Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Presenters Name: Veasey Wilson, VP Page # 1 The Savannah River Site Small Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Presenters Name: Veasey Wilson, VP Page # 2 The Savannah River Site * 198,334 acres, or about 310 square miles - Fourth largest DOE site in the United States (behind Nevada Test Site, Idaho National Laboratory and Hanford Site) - About the size of the District of Columbia * SRS workforce: Approximately 11,000 - Prime contractor (about 55 percent) - DOE-SR and DOE-NNSA - Other contractors Small Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Presenters Name: Veasey Wilson, VP Page # 3 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Partner companies:

2

Charlie Wilson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charlie Wilson Charlie Wilson University of British Columbia This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Charlie Wilson is completing his PhD at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) on energy-related behavior and decision making. His research tests different behavioral models from across the social sciences in specific empirical contexts: home renovations and district energy systems. His background is in renewable energy finance and climate change policy. This Speaker's Seminars Homeowners' Decisions on Energy Efficient Renovations: Influences and Policy Misconceptions

3

Kenneth Wilson and Renormalization  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Kenneth Wilson and Renormalization Kenneth Wilson and Renormalization Resources with Additional Information Kenneth Wilson Courtesy A&M-Commerce 'Kenneth G. Wilson ... was part of the generation of scientists who revolutionized physics in the 1970s and confirmed the quantum theories of physicists from the early 20th century ... . Wilson won the 1982 Nobel Prize in physics for his development of the Renormalization Group (RG) into a central tool in physics. ... He received a doctorate from the California Institute of Technology in 1961, and joined the physics faculty at Cornell University in 1963. ... Before Wilson's discoveries, many physicists thought quantum field theory had to be discarded, because so many of its calculations generated infinite values-which are physically impossible. Wilson's RG theory not only explained these infinite values, it showed that they contained information which allowed for a fuller understanding of the relevant physics. ...

4

Wilson Chiu | HeteroFoaM Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wilson Chiu Home People Leadership Wilson Chiu Wilson Chiu University of Connecticut Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering Dr. Chiu joined the University of...

5

vp_leakage1.eps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0. 20. 40. 60. 80. 1. Frequency (Hz). 2.3. 2.35. 2.4. 2.45. 2.5. 2.55. 2.6. Vp (km/s). 10% fluid mix. 20% fluid mix. 30% fluid mix. 40% fluid mix. 50% fluid mix.

santos

6

Effect of Ebola virus proteins GP, NP and VP35 on VP40 VLP morphology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently we described a role for Ebola virus proteins, NP, GP, and VP35 in enhancement of VP40 VLP budding. To explore the possibility that VLP structure was altered by co-expression of EBOV proteins leading t...

Reed F Johnson; Peter Bell; Ronald N Harty

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Surface-Exposed Adeno-Associated Virus Vp1-NLS Capsid Fusion Protein Rescues Infectivity of Noninfectious Wild-Type Vp2/Vp3 and Vp3-Only Capsids but Not That of Fivefold Pore Mutant Virions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Virus Vp1-NLS Capsid Fusion Protein Rescues Infectivity...Noninfectious Wild-Type Vp2/Vp3 and Vp3-Only...Incorporation of the fusions into AAV type 2 capsids lacking a...Incorporation of the fusions into AAV type 2 capsids lacking a...

Joshua C. Grieger; Jarrod S. Johnson; Brittney Gurda-Whitaker; Mavis Agbandje-McKenna; R. Jude Samulski

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

NATIONALSCIENCE FOUNDATION 4201 WILSON BOULEVARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATIONALSCIENCE FOUNDATION 4201 WILSON BOULEVARD ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22230 January 29,2007 OFFICE Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have agreed upon the following Deputy Director National Institutes of Health National ScienceFoundation #12;

Baker, Chris I.

9

Fuzzy Bags and Wilson Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I start with an elementary observation about the pressure in the deconfined phase of a SU(3) gauge theory without quarks. This suggests a ``fuzzy'' bag model for the analogous pressure in QCD, with dynamical quarks. I then sketch how the deconfined phase might be described using an effective theory of Wilson lines. To leading order in weak coupling, the effective electric field appears in a form familiar from the lattice theory of Banks and Ukawa.

Robert D. Pisarski

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Wilson and Dalton | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration Partnership Year 1996 Link to project description http:www.nrel.govnewspress199617wall.html Wilson and Dalton is a company located in Dalton, GA. References...

11

Wilson loop dependence on the contour shape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By computing exactly the Wilson loop expectation value for two-dimensional quantum electrodynamics, we show that the nonleading terms depend drastically on the shape of the contour.

H. A. Falomir, R. E. Gamboa Saraví, and F. A. Schaposnik

1982-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Particles as Wilson lines of gravitational field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the work of Mac-Dowell-Mansouri it is well known that gravity can be written as a gauge theory for the de Sitter group. In this paper we consider the coupling of this theory to the simplest gauge invariant observables that is, Wilson lines. The dynamics of these Wilson lines is shown to reproduce exactly the dynamics of relativistic particles coupled to gravity, the gauge charges carried by Wilson lines being the mass and spin of the particles. Insertion of Wilson lines breaks in a controlled manner the diffeomorphism symmetry of the theory and the gauge degree of freedom are transmuted to particles degree of freedom.

L. Freidel; J. Kowalski--Glikman; A. Starodubtsev

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Wilson loop and contour shapes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By computing the Wilson loop expectation value W[C] in the two-dimensional Schwinger model on R1×S1, we show that nonleading terms depend on the shape of the contours both on R1×R1 and R1×S1. We also find that the rhombic contour and triangular contour lead to the same static potentials both on R1×R1 and R1×S1. The binding energy is also affected by the choice of contour shapes on the R1×S1 model. This indicates that the model on R1×S1 deserves more study.

W. F. Kao

1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich Rosati | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sonsini Goodrich Rosati Sonsini Goodrich Rosati Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94304-1050 Product California-based, legal advisor to technology and growth business enterprises worldwide, as well as the investment banks and venture capital firms that finance them. WSGR has been the lead advisor in several clean energy related projects/financings. References Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati is a company located in Palo Alto, California . References ↑ "Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wilson_Sonsini_Goodrich_Rosati&oldid=353053

15

Kenneth Wilson and lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward b...

Ukawa, Akira

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

B : Bayesian Circuit Analysis by Michel Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://ftp.arl.army.mil/~mike/comphist. #12;B : Bayesian Circuit Analysis by Topology Author: Michel Wilson Student id: Email: michel obtained. esis Committee: Chair: Prof. Dr. Ir. A.J.C. van Gemund, Faculty EEMCS, TU Del University

Kuzmanov, Georgi

17

Computing Wilson lines with dielectric branes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson lines in N=4SYM can be computed in terms of branes carrying electric flux, i.e. F-strings dissolved in their worldvolumes. It is then natural to think that those configurations are the effective description of strings expanding due to dielectric effect to D-branes. In this note we explicitly show this for a class of such configurations, namely those dual to Wilson lines either in the symmetric or in the antisymmetric tensor product of fundamentals.

Diego Rodriguez-Gomez

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Wilson_APS2007.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiments with Lower Hybrid Experiments with Lower Hybrid Current Drive on Alcator C-Mod J.R. Wilson 1 , R. Parker 2 , G. Wallace 2 , A Schmidt 2 , P.T. Bonoli 2 , A.E Hubbard 2 , C. Kessel 1 , J. Ko 2 , C.K. Phillips 1 , M. Porkolab 2 , S. Scott 1 , E. Valeo 1 , J Wright 2 1 PPPL, 2 MIT 49th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics Orlando, Florida November 14, 2007 Experiments in 2007 extended the LH plasma parameters toward AT Plasmas * Current drive performance consistent with Fisch-Karney Theory over wider range of parameters - Densities 0.4x10 20 < n e < 2x10 20 m -3 - Temperatures 1< T e < 4 keV - Additional n || ' s between 1.6 - 3.1 * L and H-mode plasmas investigated w/wo ICRF - Good coupling achieved under some conditions * Extensive modeling under way in collaboration with RF SciDac project - Full wave codes applied

19

Kenneth Wilson and lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward better understanding of physics, better algorithms, and more powerful supercomputers have produced major breakthroughs in our understanding of the strong interactions. We review the salient results of this effort in understanding the hadron spectrum, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements and CP violation, and quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures. We conclude with a brief summary and a future perspective.

Akira Ukawa

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

Memorandum from VP Technical Services, Association of Home Appliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from VP Technical Services, Association of Home from VP Technical Services, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers to the Department of Energy Memorandum from VP Technical Services, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers to the Department of Energy This memo memorializes the phone call between AHAM and the Department of Energy on November 4, 2009 for inclusion in the public docket. The issues discussed during the call included (1) an update on ice maker energy into the refrigerator (2) freezer test procedure and (3) questions on the status regarding AHAM's clarification request on clothes washer drum volume determination. Memorandum from VP Technical Services, Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers to the Department of Energy More Documents & Publications Ex parte Communication Proceedings of the Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Virus-like particle-induced fusion from without in tissue culture cells: role of outer-layer proteins VP4 and VP7.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proteins VP4 and VP7 JM Gilbert HB Greenberg Department of Microbiology and Immunology...Falconer, J. M. Gilbert, A. M. Roper...Falconer, J. M. Gilbert, A. M. Roper...Department of Microbiology and Immunology...

J M Gilbert; H B Greenberg

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Torus knot polynomials and susy Wilson loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give, using an explicit expression obtained in [V. Jones, Ann. of Math. 126, 335 (1987)], a basic hypergeometric representation of the HOMFLY polynomial of $(n,m)$ torus knots, and present a number of equivalent expressions, all related by Heine's transformations. Using this result the $(m,n)\\leftrightarrow (n,m)$ symmetry and the leading polynomial at large $N$ are explicit. We show the latter to be the Wilson loop of 2d Yang-Mills theory on the plane. In addition, after taking one winding to infinity, it becomes the Wilson loop in the zero instanton sector of the 2d Yang-Mills theory, which is known to give averages of Wilson loops in $\\mathcal{N}$=4 SYM theory. We also give, using matrix models, an interpretation of the HOMFLY polynomial and the corresponding Jones-Rosso representation in terms of $q$-harmonic oscillators.

Georgios Giasemidis; Miguel Tierz

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Torus knot polynomials and susy Wilson loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give, using an explicit expression obtained in [V. Jones, Ann. of Math. 126, 335 (1987)], a basic hypergeometric representation of the HOMFLY polynomial of $(n,m)$ torus knots, and present a number of equivalent expressions, all related by Heine's transformations. Using this result the $(m,n)\\leftrightarrow (n,m)$ symmetry and the leading polynomial at large $N$ are explicit. We show the latter to be the Wilson loop of 2d Yang-Mills theory on the plane. In addition, after taking one winding to infinity, it becomes the Wilson loop in the zero instanton sector of the 2d Yang-Mills theory, which is known to give averages of Wilson loops in $\\mathcal{N}$=4 SYM theory. We also give, using matrix models, an interpretation of the HOMFLY polynomial and the corresponding Jones-Rosso representation in terms of $q$-harmonic oscillators.

Giasemidis, Georgios

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Open Wilson lines and group theory of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The correlation functions of open Wilson line operators in two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory on the noncommutative torus are computed exactly. The correlators are expressed in two equivalent forms. An instanton expansion involves only topological numbers of Heisenberg modules and enables extraction of the weak-coupling limit of the gauge theory. A dual algebraic expansion involves only group theoretic quantities, winding numbers and translational zero modes, and enables analysis of the strong-coupling limit of the gauge theory and the high-momentum behaviour of open Wilson lines. The dual expressions can be interpreted physically as exact sums over contributions from virtual electric dipole quanta.

Lori D. Paniak; Richard J. Szabo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Economics Advisor: Jill Wilson | 801-581-7481  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics Advisor: Jill Wilson | 801-581-7481 jill.wilson@economics.utah.edu All courses must. Consult the advisor or the general catalog for the list of qualifying elective courses. ECON 4010

Tipple, Brett

26

Roberta S. Matthews for the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roberta S. Matthews for the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation College Readiness: The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Street address: 5 Vaughn Drive, Suite 300 | Princeton, NJ: The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, 2010. Inquiries: Email: earlycollege@woodrow.org Telephone

Delaware, Richard - Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Missouri

27

Maxwell's Equations in a Uniformly Rotating Dielectric Medium and the Wilson-Wilson Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note offers a conceptually straightforward and efficient way to formulate and solve problems in the electromagnetics of moving media based on a representation of Maxwell's equations in terms of differential forms on spacetime together with junction conditions at moving interfaces. This framework is used to address a number of issues that have been discussed recently in this journal about the theoretical description underlying the interpretation of the Wilson-Wilson experiment.

C E S Canovan; Robin W Tucker

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts VP 100: Retooling Michigan -- Yachts and Watts June 18, 2010 - 4:13pm Addthis Energetx Composites was able to purchase equipment such as this mold for utility-scale wind turbine blades thanks to a Recovery Act grant that matched the company’s $3.5 million investment. | Photo Courtesy of Energetx | Energetx Composites was able to purchase equipment such as this mold for utility-scale wind turbine blades thanks to a Recovery Act grant that matched the company's $3.5 million investment. | Photo Courtesy of Energetx | Joshua DeLung Near the eastern shore of Lake Michigan, there's a shift taking place. Tiara Yachts makes fiber composite structures for boats. Now the Holland, Mich.-based company is transforming part of its factory and using its 30

29

The Ebola Virus VP35 Protein Inhibits Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology ARTICLE VIRUS-CELL INTERACTIONS The Ebola Virus VP35 Protein Inhibits Activation...Marburg, D-35037 Marburg, Germany The Ebola virus VP35 protein was previously found...virus IFN antagonist protein, NS1. The Ebola virus VP35 could also prevent the virus...

Christopher F. Basler; Andrea Mikulasova; Luis Martinez-Sobrido; Jason Paragas; Elke Mühlberger; Mike Bray; Hans-Dieter Klenk; Peter Palese; Adolfo García-Sastre

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Wilson TurboPower | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TurboPower TurboPower Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Wilson TurboPower Name Wilson TurboPower Address 55 Sixth Street Place Woburn, Massachusetts Zip 01801 Sector Efficiency Product Developer of microturbines and high efficiency heat exchangers Website http://www.wilsonturbopower.co Coordinates 42.5099836°, -71.150081° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5099836,"lon":-71.150081,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Wilson Engineering Services, PC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Services, PC Services, PC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Wilson Engineering Services, PC Name Wilson Engineering Services, PC Address 9006 Mercer Pike Place Meadville, Pennsylvania Zip 16335 Sector Biomass Product Engineering Consulting Services Year founded 2008 Number of employees 1-10 Website [www.wilsonengineeringservices.com www.wilsonengineeringservices. ] Coordinates 41.5885016°, -80.1569891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5885016,"lon":-80.1569891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

ADHM Revisited: Instantons and Wilson Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the well-studied D0-D4 system of D-branes and its relationship to the ADHM construction. It is well known that the D0-branes appear as instantons in the D4-brane worldvolume. We add a Wilson line to the D4-brane in the guise of an extended fundamental string and determine how this affects the D0-brane dynamics. As the D0-brane moves in the presence of the Wilson line, it experiences a Lorentz force, proportional to its Yang-Mills gauge connection. From the perspective of the D0-brane quantum mechanics, this force emerges through the ADHM construction of the self-dual gauge connection.

David Tong; Kenny Wong

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Economics of planting improved Sitka spruce -Seed Orchard and VP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of planting improved Sitka spruce - Seed Orchard and VP Steve Lee and Guy Watt Forest Research, and John Clegg and associates. #12;6th November 20082 Economics of Sitka spruce www 20083 Economics of Sitka spruce www.forestresearch.gov.uk Background · Different sources of improved SS

34

Bluetongue virus coat protein VP2 contains sialic acid-binding domains, and VP5 resembles enveloped virus fusion proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the rotavirus VP4 spike (PDB ID code 1KQR) (14). When the ribbon model...expression of nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) at 16 h after BTV infection of HeLa...fusion proteins gp41 of HIV (PDB ID code 1SZT) (24) and HA2 of influenza...

Xing Zhang; Mark Boyce; Bishnupriya Bhattacharya; Xiaokang Zhang; Stan Schein; Polly Roy; Z. Hong Zhou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

NLO evolution of 3-quark Wilson loop operator  

It is well known that high-energy scattering of a meson from some hadronic target can be described by the interaction of that target with a color dipole formed by two Wilson lines corresponding to fast quark-antiquark pair. Moreover, the energy dependence of the scattering amplitude is governed by the evolution equation of this color dipole with respect to rapidity. Similarly, the energy dependence of scattering of a baryon can be described in terms of evolution of a three-Wilson-lines operator with respect to the rapidity of the Wilson lines. We calculate the evolution of the 3-quark Wilson loop operator in the next-to-leading order (NLO) and present a quasi-conformal evolution equation for a composite 3-Wilson-lines operator. We also obtain the linearized version of that evolution equation describing the amplitude of the odderon exchange at high energies.

Balitsky, Ian [ODU, JLAB; Grabovsky, A V [Novosibirsk

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Scott Wilson Oceans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceans Oceans Jump to: navigation, search Name Scott Wilson Oceans Place Chesterfield, United Kingdom Zip S30 1JF Sector Wind energy Product Specialist in the engineering of onshore and offshore wind farm technology. Coordinates 37.376844°, -77.508252° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.376844,"lon":-77.508252,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Phenomenology with Wilson fermions using smeared sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the use of two types of non-local (``smeared'') sources for quark propagators in quenched lattice QCD at $\\beta=6.0$ using Wilson fermions at $\\kappa=0.154$ and $0.155$. We present results for the hadron mass spectrum, meson decay constants, quark masses, the chiral condensate and the quark distribution amplitude of the pion. The use of smeared sources leads to a considerable improvement over previous results. We find a disturbing discrepancy between the baryon spectra obtained using Wuppertal and wall sources. We find good signals in the ratio of correlators used to calculate the quark mass and the chiral condensate and show that the extrapolation to the chiral limit is smooth.

D. Daniel; R. Gupta; G. Kilcup; A. Patel; S. Sharpe

1992-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Bob Wilson and The Birth of Fermilab  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In the 1960?s the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (then The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory) submitted two proposals to build the next high energy physics research laboratory. The first included a 200 GeV accelerator and associated experimental facilities. The cost was $350 million. The Bureau of the Budget rejected that proposal as a ?budget buster?. It ruled that $250 million was the maximum that could be accepted. The second proposal was for a reduced scope laboratory that met the Bureau of the Budget?s cost limitation, but it was for a lower energy accelerator and somewhat smaller and fewer experimental facilities. The powerful Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy rejected the reduced scope proposal as inadequate to provide physics results of sufficient interest to justify the cost. It was then that Bob Wilson came forth with a third proposal, coping with that ?Catch 22? and leading to the creation of Fermilab. How he did it will be the subject of this colloquium.

Edwin L. Goldwasser

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

39

Local gauge-invariant generators for Wilson loops  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A complete and irreducible set of gauge-invariant local generators for Wilson loops in a pure Yang-Mills theory is constructed. A few comments are made about their relevance in quantum theory in the 1N approximation scheme.

M. Azam

1989-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Trivializing maps, the Wilson flow and the HMC algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In lattice gauge theory, there exist field transformations that map the theory to the trivial one, where the basic field variables are completely decoupled from one another. Such maps can be constructed systematically by integrating certain flow equations in field space. The construction is worked out in some detail and it is proposed to combine the Wilson flow (which generates approximately trivializing maps for the Wilson gauge action) with the HMC simulation algorithm in order to improve the efficiency of lattice QCD simulations.

Martin Lüscher

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wilson loops to 20th order numerical stochastic perturbation theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We calculate perturbative contributions of Wilson loops of various sizes up to order 20 in SU(3) pure lattice gauge theory at different lattice sizes for the Wilson gauge action using the technique of numerical stochastic perturbation theory. This allows us to investigate the perturbative series for various Wilson loops at high orders of the perturbation theory. We observe differences in the behavior of the series as a function of the loop order n. Up to n=20 we do not find evidence for the factorial growth of the expansion coefficients often assumed to characterize an asymptotic series. Based on the actually observed behavior we sum the series in a model parametrized by hypergeometric functions. For Wilson loops of moderate sizes the summed series in boosted perturbation theory reach stable plateaus for moderate perturbative order already. The coefficients in the boosted series become much more stable in the result of smoothing the coefficients of the original series effected by the hypergeometric model. We introduce generalized ratios of Wilson loops of different sizes. Together with the corresponding Wilson loops from standard Monte Carlo measurements they enable us to assess their nonperturbative parts.

R. Horsley; G. Hotzel; E.-M. Ilgenfritz; R. Millo; H. Perlt; P. E. L. Rakow; Y. Nakamura; G. Schierholz; A. Schiller

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Structural and Functional Characterization of Reston Ebola Virus VP35 Interferon Inhibitory Domain  

SciTech Connect

Ebolaviruses are causative agents of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the filoviruses characterized thus far, Reston Ebola virus (REBOV) is the only Ebola virus that is nonpathogenic to humans despite the fact that REBOV can cause lethal disease in nonhuman primates. Previous studies also suggest that REBOV is less effective at inhibiting host innate immune responses than Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV) or Marburg virus. Virally encoded VP35 protein is critical for immune suppression, but an understanding of the relative contributions of VP35 proteins from REBOV and other filoviruses is currently lacking. In order to address this question, we characterized the REBOV VP35 interferon inhibitory domain (IID) using structural, biochemical, and virological studies. These studies reveal differences in double-stranded RNA binding and interferon inhibition between the two species. These observed differences are likely due to increased stability and loss of flexibility in REBOV VP35 IID, as demonstrated by thermal shift stability assays. Consistent with this finding, the 1.71-{angstrom} crystal structure of REBOV VP35 IID reveals that it is highly similar to that of ZEBOV VP35 IID, with an overall backbone r.m.s.d. of 0.64 {angstrom}, but contains an additional helical element at the linker between the two subdomains of VP35 IID. Mutations near the linker, including swapping sequences between REBOV and ZEBOV, reveal that the linker sequence has limited tolerance for variability. Together with the previously solved ligand-free and double-stranded-RNA-bound forms of ZEBOV VP35 IID structures, our current studies on REBOV VP35 IID reinforce the importance of VP35 in immune suppression. Functional differences observed between REBOV and ZEBOV VP35 proteins may contribute to observed differences in pathogenicity, but these are unlikely to be the major determinant. However, the high level of similarity in structure and the low tolerance for sequence variability, coupled with the multiple critical roles played by Ebola virus VP35 proteins, highlight the viability of VP35 as a potential target for therapeutic development.

Leung, Daisy W.; Shabman, Reed S.; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Prins, Kathleen C.; Borek, Dominika M.; Wang, Tianjiao; Mühlberger, Elke; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. (Sinai); (BU-M); (Iowa State); (UTSMC)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Charmless $B \\to VP$ Decays Using Flavor SU(3) Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays of $B$ mesons to a charmless vector ($V$) and pseudoscalar ($P$) meson are analyzed within a framework of flavor SU(3) in which symmetry breaking is taken into account through ratios of decay constants in tree ($T$) amplitudes. The magnitudes and relative phases of tree and penguin amplitudes are extracted from data; the symmetry assumption is tested; and predictions are made for rates and CP asymmetries in as-yet-unseen decay modes. A key assumption for which we perform some tests and suggest others is a relation between penguin amplitudes in which the spectator quark is incorporated into either a pseudoscalar meson or a vector meson. Values of $\\gamma$ slightly restricting the range currently allowed by fits to other data are favored, but outside this range there remain acceptable solutions which cannot be excluded solely on the basis of present $B \\to VP$ experiments.

Cheng-Wei Chiang; Michael Gronau; Zumin Luo; Jonathan L. Rosner; Denis A. Suprun

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wilson Warehouse - NY 64  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wilson Warehouse - NY 64 Wilson Warehouse - NY 64 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wilson Warehouse (NY.64) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation of the period do not provide sufficient information to warrant further search of historical records for information on these sites. These site files remain "open" to

45

City of Wilson, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilson, North Carolina (Utility Company) Wilson, North Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Wilson Place North Carolina Utility Id 20785 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service CP Rate for Loads Between 500 and 1,000 kW (CP-1-89), with Renew Rider-02 Industrial General Service CP Rate for Loads Between 500 and 1,000 kW (CP-1-89) Industrial General Service CP Rate for Loads Over 1,000 kW (CP-2-89) Industrial

46

Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center | discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at ... Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center Posted By Office of Public Affairs Cook at WW

47

VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra August 6, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis VP 100: Producing Electric Truck Vehicles with a Little Something Extra Kevin Craft What does this mean for me? Smith Electric Vehicles included in Vice President's report on 100 Recovery Act Projects That Are Changing America. Smith plans to hire at least 50 employees by the end of the year. Through a Recovery Act grant, that company - Smith Electric Vehicles (SEV) - is taking a different tact that could lay the foundation for the industry's future. Not only is the company manufacturing all-electric, zero-emission commercial trucks, it's collecting data on how these commercial EVs are used. In Kansas City, Mo., an 80-year old company is on

48

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins  

SciTech Connect

VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6{sub 1}22, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and P2{sub 1}, respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source.

Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. (Texas-HSC); (Sinai); (Iowa State); (LBNL)

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

49

Characterization of Ebola virus VP35 first basic patch as a therapeutic target.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Viral protein 35 (VP35), encoded by filoviruses, are multifunctional dsRNA binding proteins that play important roles in viral replication, innate immune evasion and pathogenesis. The… (more)

Binning, Jennifer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Mount Wilson Ca ii K Plage Index Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

obtained at the 60-foot solar tower, between 1915 and 1985,obtained at the 60-foot solar tower in Mount Wilson betweenfoot so- lar tower at Mount Wilson has provided to the solar

Bertello, L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Boyden, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Mutations Abrogating VP35 Interaction with Double-Stranded RNA Render Ebola Virus Avirulent in Guinea Pigs  

SciTech Connect

Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding inhibitor of host interferon (IFN)-{alpha}/{beta} responses that also functions as a viral polymerase cofactor. Recent structural studies identified key features, including a central basic patch, required for VP35 dsRNA binding activity. To address the functional significance of these VP35 structural features for EBOV replication and pathogenesis, two point mutations, K319A/R322A, that abrogate VP35 dsRNA binding activity and severely impair its suppression of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} production were identified. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography reveal minimal structural perturbations in the K319A/R322A VP35 double mutant and suggest that loss of basic charge leads to altered function. Recombinant EBOVs encoding the mutant VP35 exhibit, relative to wild-type VP35 viruses, minimal growth attenuation in IFN-defective Vero cells but severe impairment in IFN-competent cells. In guinea pigs, the VP35 mutant virus revealed a complete loss of virulence. Strikingly, the VP35 mutant virus effectively immunized animals against subsequent wild-type EBOV challenge. These in vivo studies, using recombinant EBOV viruses, combined with the accompanying biochemical and structural analyses directly correlate VP35 dsRNA binding and IFN inhibition functions with viral pathogenesis. Moreover, these studies provide a framework for the development of antivirals targeting this critical EBOV virulence factor.

Prins, Kathleen C.; Delpeut, Sebastien; Leung, Daisy W.; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkova, Valentina A.; Reid, St. Patrick; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Cárdenas, Washington B.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Basler, Christopher F. (CNRS-INSERM); (Mount Sinai Hospital); (LB-Ecuador); (Iowa State)

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Rapidity evolution of Wilson lines at the next-to-leading order  

SciTech Connect

At high energies particles move very fast so the proper degrees of freedom for the fast gluons moving along the straight lines are Wilson-line operators - infinite gauge factors ordered along the line. In the framework of operator expansion in Wilson lines the energy dependence of the amplitudes is determined by the rapidity evolution of Wilson lines. We present the next-to-leading order hierarchy of the evolution equations for Wilson-line operators.

Balitsky, Ian [JLAB, Old Dominion U.; Chirilli, Giovanni [LBL

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Structural basis for dsRNA recognition and interferon antagonism by Ebola VP35  

SciTech Connect

Ebola viral protein 35 (VP35), encoded by the highly pathogenic Ebola virus, facilitates host immune evasion by antagonizing antiviral signaling pathways, including those initiated by RIG-I-like receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain (IID) bound to short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which together with in vivo results reveals how VP35-dsRNA interactions contribute to immune evasion. Conserved basic residues in VP35 IID recognize the dsRNA backbone, whereas the dsRNA blunt ends are 'end-capped' by a pocket of hydrophobic residues that mimic RIG-I-like receptor recognition of blunt-end dsRNA. Residues critical for RNA binding are also important for interferon inhibition in vivo but not for viral polymerase cofactor function of VP35. These results suggest that simultaneous recognition of dsRNA backbone and blunt ends provides a mechanism by which Ebola VP35 antagonizes host dsRNA sensors and immune responses.

Leung, Daisy W.; Prins, Kathleen C.; Borek, Dominika M.; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. (Sinai); (Iowa State); (LBNL); (UTSMC)

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sum Rules and Cutoff Effects in Wilson Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the transfer matrix formalism to derive non-perturbative sum rules in Wilson's lattice QCD with N_f flavours of quarks. The discretization errors on these identities are treated in detail. As an application, it is shown how the sum rules can be exploited to give improved estimates of the continuum spectrum and static potential.

Harvey B. Meyer

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Preface to the Memorial Edition for Grant M. Wilson  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Wilson family moved to Rainier, Oregon, in 1944 where Grant attended high school. ... Grant also harnessed the power of the early computers to aid in converting temperature–pressure–feed composition (TPz) data to temperature–pressure–liquid and vapor composition (TPxy) data. ... In conjunction with this work, Grant produced a correlation and computer program for the Gas Processors Association called GPSWAT. ...

Loren Wilson; Howard Wilson

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

Truth and Reconciliation for Group Selection David Sloan Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Truth and Reconciliation for Group Selection David Sloan Wilson SUNY Distinguished Professor on both sides of the controversy, it will require very few changes. I. Why It Is Needed The phrase "truth to resolve bitter political conflicts and achieve national unity, starting with South Africa's Truth

Wilson, David. S.

57

P700-96-006 Pete Wilson, Governor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GUIDEPLANNING S TATE OF CALIFORNI A ENERGY COMMISSION #12;Charles R. Imbrecht, Chairman Sally Rakow, Vice ChairCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION P700-96-006 Pete Wilson, Governor ENERGY AWARE ENERGY FACILITIES COMMISSIONERS Michal Moore David A. Rohy Jananne Sharpless Stephen Rhoads, Executive Director ENERGY FACILITIES

58

Wilson lines and gauge invariant off-shell amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study matrix elements of Fourier-transformed straight infinite Wilson lines as a way to calculate gauge invariant tree-level amplitudes with off-shell gluons. The off-shell gluons are assigned "polarization vectors" which (in the Feynman gauge) are transverse to their off-shell momenta and define the direction of the corresponding Wilson line operators. The infinite Wilson lines are first regularized to prove the correctness of the method. We have implemented the method in a computer FORM program that can calculate gluonic matrix elements of Wilson line operators automatically. In addition we formulate the Feynman rules that are convenient in certain applications, e.g. proving the Ward identities. Using both the program and the Feynman rules we calculate a few examples, in particular the matrix elements corresponding to gauge invariant $g^{*}g^{*}g^{*}g$ and $g^{*}g^{*}g^{*}g^{*}g$ processes. An immediate application of the approach is in the high energy scattering, as in a special kinematic setup our results reduce to the form directly related to Lipatov's vertices. Thus the results we present can be directly transformed into Lipatov's vertices, in particular into $RRRP$ and $RRRRP$ vertices with arbitrary "orientation" of reggeized gluons. Since the formulation itself is not restricted to high-energy scattering, we also apply the method to a decomposition of an ordinary on-shell amplitude into a set of gauge invariant objects.

Piotr Kotko

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

59

Extended Response to Weir and Smith Sven E. Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended Response to Weir and Smith Sven E. Wilson Brigham Young University Benjamin L. Howell University Phone: (801) 422-9018 Email: sven@byu.edu #12;2 Abstract Evidence provided by Weir and Smith and a variety of regression models (including that of Weir and Smith). In particular, our pooled regression

Martinez, Tony R.

60

Ebolavirus VP35 uses a bimodal strategy to bind dsRNA for innate immune suppression  

SciTech Connect

Ebolavirus causes a severe hemorrhagic fever and is divided into five distinct species, of which Reston ebolavirus is uniquely nonpathogenic to humans. Disease caused by ebolavirus is marked by early immunosuppression of innate immune signaling events, involving silencing and sequestration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the viral protein VP35. Here we present unbound and dsRNA-bound crystal structures of the dsRNA-binding domain of Reston ebolavirus VP35. The structures show that VP35 forms an unusual, asymmetric dimer on dsRNA binding, with each of the monomers binding dsRNA in a different way: one binds the backbone whereas the other caps the terminus. Additional SAXS, DXMS, and dsRNA-binding experiments presented here support a model of cooperative dsRNA recognition in which binding of the first monomer assists binding of the next monomer of the oligomeric VP35 protein. This work illustrates how ebolavirus VP35 could mask key recognition sites of molecules such as RIG-I, MDA-5, and Dicer to silence viral dsRNA in infection.

Kimberlin, Christopher R.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Li, Sheng; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; MacRae, Ian J.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps); (UCSD)

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wilson TurboPower Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TurboPower Inc TurboPower Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilson TurboPower Inc Place Woburn, Massachusetts Zip MA 01801 Product Massachusetts-based developer of heat exchanger technology that was founded to commercialise the research of Prof. David Gordon Wilson from MIT. Coordinates 42.479195°, -71.150604° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.479195,"lon":-71.150604,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Wilson lines for AdS_5 black strings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a simple method of extending AdS_5 black string solutions of 5d gauged supergravity in a supersymmetric way by adding Wilson lines along the string direction. Due to the specific form of 5d supergravity that features Chern-Simons terms, the existence of magnetic charges automatically generates conserved electric charges upon the addition of such Wilson lines in a 5d analogue of the Witten effect. Therefore we find a rather generic, model-independent way of adding electric charges to already existing solutions with no backreaction from the geometry or breaking of any symmetry. We use this method to explicitly write down a more general version of the Benini-Bobev black strings and comment on the implications for the dual field theory and the similarities with generalizations of the Cacciatori-Klemm black holes in AdS_4.

Kiril Hristov; Stefanos Katmadas

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Higher rank Wilson loops from a matrix model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the circular Wilson loop of N=4 SYM theory at large N in the rank k symmetric and antisymmetric tensor representations. Using a quadratic Hermitian matrix model we obtain expressions for all values of the 't Hooft coupling. At large and small couplings we give explicit formulae and reproduce supergravity results from both D3 and D5 branes within a systematic framework.

Sean A. Hartnoll; S. Prem Kumar

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wilson Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilson Hot Spring Geothermal Area Wilson Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wilson Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7672,"lon":-119.1732,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion March 12, 2010 - 2:47pm Addthis Charlotte sees next-gen vehicle supply expansion: U.S. Energy Secretary Steve Chu speaks at Celgard LLC in Charlotte, N.C. as Mitch Pulwer, Celgard’s vice president and general manager, looks on. | Photo courtesy of Celgard | Charlotte sees next-gen vehicle supply expansion: U.S. Energy Secretary Steve Chu speaks at Celgard LLC in Charlotte, N.C. as Mitch Pulwer, Celgard's vice president and general manager, looks on. | Photo courtesy of Celgard | Joshua DeLung Right now, manufacturers of electric cars too often have to rely on foreign suppliers for the high-performance batteries needed in those vehicles. But

66

VP 100: President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant VP 100: President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant VP 100: President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant July 15, 2010 - 5:05pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this project do? Puts the U.S. in position to produce 40 percent of the world's supply of advanced batteries by 2015 - up from it's current level of 2 percent Makes us less dependent on foreign oil Creates jobs in an emerging sector of manufacturing The electric-vehicle industry received more support Thursday when President Obama delivered remarks in Holland, Michigan, at the groundbreaking ceremony for an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-funded battery cell plant. "This is about more than just building a new factory," President Obama told

67

VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion VP 100: Charlotte Sees Next-Gen Vehicle Supply Expansion March 12, 2010 - 2:47pm Addthis Charlotte sees next-gen vehicle supply expansion: U.S. Energy Secretary Steve Chu speaks at Celgard LLC in Charlotte, N.C. as Mitch Pulwer, Celgard’s vice president and general manager, looks on. | Photo courtesy of Celgard | Charlotte sees next-gen vehicle supply expansion: U.S. Energy Secretary Steve Chu speaks at Celgard LLC in Charlotte, N.C. as Mitch Pulwer, Celgard's vice president and general manager, looks on. | Photo courtesy of Celgard | Joshua DeLung Right now, manufacturers of electric cars too often have to rely on foreign suppliers for the high-performance batteries needed in those vehicles. But

68

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades July 23, 2010 - 1:19pm Addthis Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE America's first-of-its-kind wind blade testing facility - capable of testing a blade as long as a football field - almost never was. Because of funding woes, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC),

69

V.P. Biden Hosts the Middle Class Task Force | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V.P. Biden Hosts the Middle Class Task Force V.P. Biden Hosts the Middle Class Task Force V.P. Biden Hosts the Middle Class Task Force November 9, 2010 - 10:38am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Editor's Note: This event has concluded. Today at 11:45 AM EST, Secretary Chu will join Vice President Biden at the White House as he hosts a Middle Class Task Force event to announce a series of federal actions designed to lay the groundwork for a strong, self-sustaining home energy efficiency retrofit industry. The Vice President and Secretary Chu will be joined by CEQ Chair Nancy Sutley, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Shaun Donovan to announce a series of initiatives that seek to address recommendations from the October 2009 Middle Class Task Force

70

VP 100: Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills VP 100: Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills VP 100: Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills October 4, 2010 - 3:00pm Addthis An employee installs a smart meter as part of a smart grid initiative by EPB. The project is supporting 390 jobs in the Chattanooga area. | Photo courtesy of EPB An employee installs a smart meter as part of a smart grid initiative by EPB. The project is supporting 390 jobs in the Chattanooga area. | Photo courtesy of EPB Kevin Craft What are the key facts? EPB will install approximately 170,000 smart meters and 1,500 automated switches. They have the potential to provide a $300 million value to EPB and customers over a ten-year period. "Last winter I received a call from my son saying he had a $400 electric

71

VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy October 5, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Brevini Wind is building a 127,000-square foot state-of-the-art factory in Muncie, Ind.| Photo courtesy of Brevini Wind Brevini Wind is building a 127,000-square foot state-of-the-art factory in Muncie, Ind.| Photo courtesy of Brevini Wind Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Brevini Wind awarded $12.8 million tax credit to build wind gear box plant Company will tap into manufacturing workforce, creating 450 jobs in next two years Faced with a recession and an auto industry that ran out gas, many manufacturing towns in the Rust Belt have reinvented themselves. Some found

72

Dr Lane Wilson | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Lane Wilson Lane Wilson Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Staff Listings/Contact Information What's New Research Areas Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Staff Listings/Contact Information Dr. Lane Wilson Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Wilson Program Manager X-ray Scatttering Materials Sciences and Engineering Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences SC-22.2/Germantown Building, Rm F-411 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 E-Mail:Lane.Wilson@science.doe.gov Phone: (301) 903-5877 Fax: (301) 903-9513 In 2001, Dr. Wilson started working for the Department of Energy as the lead project manager for the materials work funded by the Solid Oxide Fuel

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp7b wilson disease Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2009, a 5- Summary: implementing How honey bees could have helped control swine flu. By Philip T. Starks and Noah Wilson... it spreads, an opportunity arises for...

74

Ebola Virus VP40 Late Domains Are Not Essential for Viral Replication in Cell Culture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...AND REGULATION OF VIRAL GENE EXPRESSION Ebola Virus VP40 Late Domains Are Not Essential...Corporation, Saitama 332-0012, Japan Ebola virus particle formation and budding are...the budding of these viruses, including Ebola virus, it remains unclear as to whether...

Gabriele Neumann; Hideki Ebihara; Ayato Takada; Takeshi Noda; Darwyn Kobasa; Luke D. Jasenosky; Shinji Watanabe; Jin H. Kim; Heinz Feldmann; Yoshihiro Kawaoka

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

INVESTS IN SFU August 2011 | Communications, SFU VP-Research Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will significantly improve energy efficiency, minimize greenhouse gas emissions, and meet modern health and safetyFEDERAL GOVERNMENT INVESTS IN SFU RESEARCH August 2011 | Communications, SFU VP-Research Office www.sfu.ca/vpresearch BUILDING CAPACITY SUPPORTING FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH The rehabilitation of SFU's 1960s-era Chemistry building

76

Gemstone Detector: Dual Energy Imaging via Fast kVp Switching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter provides an overview of the GE Discovery CT750HD dual energy imaging capability known as gemstone spectral imaging (GSI). The CT750HD is a single X-ray source system that employs fast kVp switching f...

Naveen Chandra; David A. Langan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Double-winding Wilson loops and monopole confinement mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider "double-winding" Wilson loops in SU(2) gauge theory. These are contours which wind once around a loop $C_1$ and once around a loop $C_2$, where the two co-planar loops share one point in common, and where $C_1$ lies entirely in (or is displaced slightly from) the minimal area of $C_2$. We discuss the expectation value of such double-winding loops in abelian confinement pictures, where the spatial distribution of confining abelian fields is controlled by either a monopole Coulomb gas, a caloron ensemble, or a dual abelian Higgs model, and argue that in such models an exponential falloff in the sum of areas $A_1+A_2$ is expected. In contrast, in a center vortex model of confinement, the behavior is an exponential falloff in the difference of areas $A_2-A_1$. We compute such double-winding loops by lattice Monte Carlo simulation, and find that the area law falloff follows a difference-in-areas law. The conclusion is that even if confining gluonic field fluctuations are, in some gauge, mainly abelian in character, the spatial distribution of those abelian fields cannot be the distribution predicted by the simple monopole gas, caloron ensemble, or dual abelian Higgs actions, which have been used in the past to explain the area law falloff of Wilson loops.

Jeff Greensite; Roman Höllwieser

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

Writing Home: The Post Colonial Dialogue of Athol Fugard and August Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Paul Prece, Ph.D Department of Theatre and Film, April, 2008 University of Kansas Athol Fugard and August Wilson are two of the most prolific, respected, and artistically and commercially successful playwrights ...

Prece, Paul Michael

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Wilson lines and Chern-Simons flux in explicit heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study to what extent Wilson lines in heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications lead to non-trivial H-flux via Chern-Simons terms. Wilson lines are basic ingredients for Standard Model constructions but their induced H-flux may affect the consistency of the leading order background geometry and of the two-dimensional worldsheet theory. Moreover H-flux in heterotic compactifications would play an important role for moduli stabilization and could strongly constrain the supersymmetry breaking scale. We show how to compute H-flux and the corresponding superpotential, given an explicit complete intersection Calabi-Yau compactification and choice of Wilson lines. We do so by classifying special Lagrangian submanifolds in the Calabi-Yau, understanding how the Wilson lines project onto these submanifolds, and computing their Chern-Simons invariants. We illustrate our procedure with the quintic hypersurface as well as the split-bicubic, which can provide a potentially realistic three generation model.

Fabio Apruzzi; Fridrik Freyr Gautason; Susha Parameswaran; Marco Zagermann

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cutoff effects of Wilson fermions on the QCD equation of state to O(g^2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the O(g^2) contribution to the thermodynamic pressure for Wilson fermions in the standard, the twisted mass, and clover improved formulation in lattice perturbation theory, including finite mass effects. We compare the continuum approaches of these discretizations for the massive ideal and interacting gas. In all cases, for N_t \\geq 8 cutoff effects of Wilson type fermions are comparable to those of staggered fermions, but asymptotic scaling requires $N_\\tau>10$.

Owe Philipsen; Lars Zeidlewicz

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Double-winding Wilson loops and monopole confinement mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider "double-winding" Wilson loops in SU(2) gauge theory. These are contours which wind once around a loop $C_1$ and once around a loop $C_2$, where the two co-planar loops share one point in common, and where $C_1$ lies entirely in (or is displaced slightly from) the minimal area of $C_2$. We discuss the expectation value of such double-winding loops in abelian confinement pictures, where the spatial distribution of confining abelian fields is controlled by either a monopole Coulomb gas, a caloron ensemble, or a dual abelian Higgs model, and argue that in such models an exponential falloff in the sum of areas $A_1+A_2$ is expected. In contrast, in a center vortex model of confinement, the behavior is an exponential falloff in the difference of areas $A_2-A_1$. We compute such double-winding loops by lattice Monte Carlo simulation, and find that the area law falloff follows a difference-in-areas law. The conclusion is that even if confining gluonic field fluctuations are, in some gauge, mainly abelian ...

Greensite, Jeff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

An isoteniscope was used to measure the V.P. of different fuel blends. This apparatus allows us to take measurements over a wide range of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.B. *** Biofuels are increasingly being used in the aviation industry. Vapor pressure (V.P.) is the main parameter understand the combustion process in jet engines. An experimental apparatus was set up and data was collected for a 50/50* surrogate mixture of Biojet and Jet-A fuel to find the relation of their V.P. with temperature

Barthelat, Francois

83

A review of "Ritual and Conflict: The Social Relations of Childbirth in Early Modern England" Adrian Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-century drama, legal history, and the intellectual history of England’s evolution toward royalist and parliamentary polarization. Adrian Wilson. Ritual and Conflict: The Social Relations of Childbirth in Early Modern England. Farnham: Ashgate, 2013. vii + 261... pp. $124.95. Review by karol kovalovich weaver, susquehanna university. Adrian Wilson’s Ritual and Conflict: The Social Relations of Child- birth in Early Modern England considers the social networks that shaped childbirth in seventeenth...

Weaver, Karol Kovalovich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Robert R. Wilson, 1984 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Robert R. Wilson, 1984 Robert R. Wilson, 1984 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: fermi.award@science.doe.gov 1980's Robert R. Wilson, 1984 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Citation For his outstanding contributions to physics and particle accelerator designs and construction. He was the creator and principal designer of the Fermi National Laboratory and what is, at present, the highest energy accelerator in the world. His contributions have always been characterized by the greatest ingenuity and innovation and accomplished with grace and

85

VP 100: A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town VP 100: A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town October 6, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Technicians implement smart meters as part of the Naperville Smart Grid Initiative, which is projected to save the city $3 million a year over a 15 year period. | Photo courtesy of Naperville Technicians implement smart meters as part of the Naperville Smart Grid Initiative, which is projected to save the city $3 million a year over a 15 year period. | Photo courtesy of Naperville Kevin Craft What does this project do? Naperville Smart Grid Initiative will save the city $3 million a year over a 15-year period. 57,000 smart meters will be installed in Naperville, IL by April 2013. Naperville, Ill. is home to some very environmentally conscious people.

86

VP 100: Growth in solar means growth in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Growth in solar means growth in Ohio Growth in solar means growth in Ohio VP 100: Growth in solar means growth in Ohio October 6, 2010 - 10:57am Addthis DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar panels. | Photo Courtesy of DuPont DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar panels. | Photo Courtesy of DuPont Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Market research company Solarbuzz reports that global demand for solar power soared by 54 percent in the second quarter of 2010. The research firm reports that in the United States, the annual number of total watts installed moved from 485 MW in all of 2009 to 2.3 GW as of June -- and

87

VP 100: UQM revving up electric motor production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UQM revving up electric motor production UQM revving up electric motor production VP 100: UQM revving up electric motor production July 15, 2010 - 9:06am Addthis UQM will manufacture electric vehicle propulsion systems like this at its new facility in Longmont, Colo. | Photo courtesy of UQ UQM will manufacture electric vehicle propulsion systems like this at its new facility in Longmont, Colo. | Photo courtesy of UQ Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Business is booming at UQM Technologies, a Frederick, Colo.-based manufacturer and developer of electric vehicle propulsion systems. Last summer, UQM signed a 10-year contract to build motor and control systems for all electric cars to be manufactured by CODA Automotive of California. UQM aims to produce 20,000 of the propulsion systems over a

88

VP 100: A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town VP 100: A Smart Grid Initiative in an Eco-Conscious Town October 6, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Technicians implement smart meters as part of the Naperville Smart Grid Initiative, which is projected to save the city $3 million a year over a 15 year period. | Photo courtesy of Naperville Technicians implement smart meters as part of the Naperville Smart Grid Initiative, which is projected to save the city $3 million a year over a 15 year period. | Photo courtesy of Naperville Kevin Craft What does this project do? Naperville Smart Grid Initiative will save the city $3 million a year over a 15-year period. 57,000 smart meters will be installed in Naperville, IL by April 2013. Naperville, Ill. is home to some very environmentally conscious people.

89

VP 100: President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant VP 100: President Obama Hails Electric-Vehicle Battery Plant July 15, 2010 - 5:05pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this project do? Puts the U.S. in position to produce 40 percent of the world's supply of advanced batteries by 2015 - up from it's current level of 2 percent Makes us less dependent on foreign oil Creates jobs in an emerging sector of manufacturing The electric-vehicle industry received more support Thursday when President Obama delivered remarks in Holland, Michigan, at the groundbreaking ceremony for an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-funded battery cell plant. "This is about more than just building a new factory," President Obama told

90

VP 100: Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills VP 100: Smart Meters Will Help Customers Avoid High Electric Bills October 4, 2010 - 3:00pm Addthis An employee installs a smart meter as part of a smart grid initiative by EPB. The project is supporting 390 jobs in the Chattanooga area. | Photo courtesy of EPB An employee installs a smart meter as part of a smart grid initiative by EPB. The project is supporting 390 jobs in the Chattanooga area. | Photo courtesy of EPB Kevin Craft What are the key facts? EPB will install approximately 170,000 smart meters and 1,500 automated switches. They have the potential to provide a $300 million value to EPB and customers over a ten-year period. "Last winter I received a call from my son saying he had a $400 electric

91

Uncatalyzed assembly of spherical particles from SV40 VP1 pentamers and linear dsDNA incorporates both low and high cooperativity elements  

SciTech Connect

The capsid of SV40 virion is comprised of 72 pentamers of the major capsid protein, VP1. We examined the synergism between pentamer-pentamer interaction and pentamer-DNA interaction using a minimal system of purified VP1 and a linear dsDNA 600-mer, comparing electrophoresis with electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. At low VP1/DNA ratios, large tubes were observed that apparently did not survive native agarose gel electrophoresis. As the VP1 concentration increased, electrophoretic migration was slower and tubes were replaced by 200 A diameter particles and excess free pentamer. At high VP1/DNA ratios, a progressively larger fraction of particles was similar to 450 A diameter virions. VP1 association with DNA is very strong compared to the concentrations in these experiments yet, paradoxically, stable complexes appear only at high ratios of VP1 to DNA. These data suggest a DNA saturation-dependent nucleation event based on non-specific pentamer-DNA interaction that controls assembly and the ultimate capsid geometry.

Mukherjee, Santanu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States); Kler, Stanislav; Oppenheim, Ariella [Department of Hematology, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, 91120 Jerusalem (Israel); Zlotnick, Adam, E-mail: azlotnic@indiana.ed [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47401 (United States)

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ebola Virus VP24 Targets a Unique NLS Binding Site on Karyopherin Alpha 5 to Selectively Compete with Nuclear Import of Phosphorylated STAT1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary During antiviral defense, interferon (IFN) signaling triggers nuclear transport of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 (PY-STAT1), which occurs via a subset of karyopherin alpha (KPNA) nuclear transporters. Many viruses, including Ebola virus, actively antagonize STAT1 signaling to counteract the antiviral effects of IFN. Ebola virus VP24 protein (eVP24) binds KPNA to inhibit PY-STAT1 nuclear transport and render cells refractory to IFNs. We describe the structure of human KPNA5 C terminus in complex with eVP24. In the complex, eVP24 recognizes a unique nonclassical nuclear localization signal (NLS) binding site on KPNA5 that is necessary for efficient PY-STAT1 nuclear transport. eVP24 binds KPNA5 with very high affinity to effectively compete with and inhibit PY-STAT1 nuclear transport. In contrast, eVP24 binding does not affect the transport of classical NLS cargo. Thus, eVP24 counters cell-intrinsic innate immunity by selectively targeting PY-STAT1 nuclear import while leaving the transport of other cargo that may be required for viral replication unaffected.

Wei Xu; Megan R. Edwards; Dominika M. Borek; Alicia R. Feagins; Anuradha Mittal; Joshua B. Alinger; Kayla N. Berry; Benjamin Yen; Jennifer Hamilton; Tom J. Brett; Rohit V. Pappu; Daisy W. Leung; Christopher F. Basler; Gaya K. Amarasinghe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

4.8 IMPACT OF AGRICULTURAL PESTICIDES ON BIRDS OF PREY IN THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY by Laurie Wilson, Megan Harris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contaminants, such as dioxins and furans, in food chains; see Wilson et al. [1999]). Raptors are good

94

D-branes, Wilson Bags, and Coherent Topological Charge Structure in QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo studies of pure glue SU(3) gauge theory using the overlap-based topological charge operator have revealed a laminar structure in the QCD vacuum consisting of extended, thin, coherent, locally 3-dimensional sheets of topological charge embedded in 4D space, with opposite sign sheets interleaved. Studies of localization properties of Dirac eigenmodes have also shown evidence for the delocalization of low-lying modes on effectively 3-dimensional surfaces. In this talk, I review some theoretical ideas which suggest the possibility of 3-dimensionally coherent topological charge structure in 4-dimensional gauge theory and provide a possible interpretation of the observed structure. I begin with Luscher's ``Wilson bag'' integral over the 3-index Chern-Simons tensor. The analogy with a Wilson loop as a charged world line in 2-dimensional $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models suggests that the Wilson bag surface represents the world volume of a physical membrane. The large-N chiral Lagrangian arguments of Witten also indicate the existence of multiple ``k-vacuum'' states with discontinuous transitions between k-vacua at $\\theta=$ odd multiples of $\\pi$. The domain walls between these vacua have the properties of a Wilson bag surface. Finally, I review the AdS/CFT duality view of $\\theta$ dependence in QCD. The dual realtionship between topological charge in gauge theory and Ramond-Ramond charge in type IIA string theory suggests that the coherent topological charge sheets observed on the lattice are the holographic image of wrapped D6 branes.

H. B. Thacker

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

95

Price Trackers Inspired by Immune Memory William O. Wilson*, Phil Birkin* and Uwe Aickelin*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price Trackers Inspired by Immune Memory William O. Wilson*, Phil Birkin* and Uwe Aickelin* wow. In this paper we outline initial concepts for an immune in- spired algorithm to evaluate price time series data and mutation, with each member attempting to map to trends in price movements. Successful trackers feed

Aickelin, Uwe

96

Strings at Finite Temperature: Wilson Lines, Free Energies, and the Thermal Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the standard prescriptions, zero-temperature string theories can be extended to finite temperature by compactifying their time directions on a so-called "thermal circle" and implementing certain orbifold twists. However, the existence of a topologically non-trivial thermal circle leaves open the possibility that a gauge flux can pierce this circle --- i.e., that a non-trivial Wilson line (or equivalently a non-zero chemical potential) might be involved in the finite-temperature extension. In this paper, we concentrate on the zero-temperature heterotic and Type I strings in ten dimensions, and survey the possible Wilson lines which might be introduced in their finite-temperature extensions. We find a rich structure of possible thermal string theories, some of which even have non-traditional Hagedorn temperatures, and we demonstrate that these new thermal string theories can be interpreted as extrema of a continuous thermal free-energy "landscape". Our analysis also uncovers a unique finite-temperature extension of the heterotic SO(32) and $E_8\\times E_8$ strings which involves a non-trivial Wilson line, but which --- like the traditional finite-temperature extension without Wilson lines --- is metastable in this thermal landscape.

Keith R. Dienes; Michael Lennek; Menika Sharma

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

97

213SHORT COMMUNICATIONS The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 121(1):213215, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

213SHORT COMMUNICATIONS The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 121(1):213­215, 2009 First Observation. Martin,1,2,4 Frances Bonier,1,3 and Ignacio T. Moore3 ABSTRACT.--We report observations of a Glossy) and Drepanididae (Akiapolaau, Hemignathus munroi) (Pratt et al. 2001, Pejchar and Jeffrey 2004). Crimson Ro- sella

Bonier, Fran

98

The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 121(1):8288, 2009 DETECTION PROBABILITIES OF WOODPECKER NESTS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

82 The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 121(1):82­88, 2009 DETECTION PROBABILITIES OF WOODPECKER NESTS. villosus) nests and nest survival rates in post-fire landscapes provide land managers with information on the relative importance of burned forests to nesting woodpeckers. We conducted multiple-observer surveys

99

On the Vp/VsMg# correlation in mantle peridotites: Implications for the identification of thermal and compositional anomalies in the upper mantle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Vp/Vs­Mg# correlation in mantle peridotites: Implications for the identification of thermal to analyze the correlation of important physical parameters (e.g. bulk density, elastic moduli) with bulk Mg

100

Elucidation of the Ebola Virus VP24 Cellular Interactome and Disruption of Virus Biology through Targeted Inhibition of Host-Cell Protein Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elucidation of the Ebola Virus VP24 Cellular Interactome and Disruption of Virus Biology through Targeted Inhibition of Host-Cell Protein Function ... One such virus is Ebola, which has profound consequences for human health and causes viral hemorrhagic fever where case fatality rates can approach 90%. ... The Ebola virus VP24 protein plays a critical role in the evasion of the host immune response and is likely to interact with multiple cellular proteins. ...

Isabel García-Dorival; Weining Wu; Stuart Dowall; Stuart Armstrong; Olivier Touzelet; Jonathan Wastling; John N. Barr; David Matthews; Miles Carroll; Roger Hewson; Julian A. Hiscox

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Variations in film exposure, effective kVp, and HVL among thirty-five dental x-ray units  

SciTech Connect

Speed group ''E'' dental films were exposed in thirty-five dental x-ray units and processed under rigidly controlled conditions. The exposure, in milliroentgens required to produce an overall film density between 0.85 and 1.05 density units at the 9 mm. step of an aluminum step-wedge, ranged from 94 to 186 mR. The wide range in normalized exposure required to produce a standard density of 1.0 was associated with half-value layer and effective operating kilovoltage in only a general way. The half-value layer of thirty-five dental x-ray units ranged from 1.9 to 2.9 mm. Al, and their effective operating kilovoltages ranged from 62 to 77 kVp when units were set at 70 kVp. The exposure required to produce a specific radiographic density depended largely on the individual characteristics of the x-ray unit used.

Preece, J.W.; Jensen, C.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Gaze-eccentricity effects on automobile driving performance -or -Going where you look Wilson O Readinger1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gaze-eccentricity effects on automobile driving performance - or - Going where you look Wilson O to ride horses1 , ride a motorcycle2 , and race automobiles3 , provides anecdotal evidence that navigation

103

A review of "Theaters of Intention: Drama and the Law in Early Modern England." by Luke Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson. Theaters of Intention: Drama and the Law in Early Modern England. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000. x + REVIEWS 103 362 pp. + 13 illus. $55.00. Review by DOUGLAS BRUSTER, THE UNI- VERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. Most Shakespeareans...

Douglas Bruster

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Sequence Stratigraphy and Detrital Zircon Geochronology of Middle-Late Ordovician Mt. Wilson Quartzite, British Columbia, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................... viii LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................... ix 1. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 1 1.1... ............................................................................................................ 9 3.1 Mt. Wilson Measured Sections ............................................................ 9 3.1.1 Wilcox Pass Measured Section ................................................... 9 3.1.2 Morberley Mountain Measured Section...

Hutto, Andrew Paul

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Beyond the Scope of Free-Wilson Analysis: Building Interpretable QSAR Models with Machine Learning Algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Each data set was randomly split into training and test sets with a ratio of 4:1 by a Perl script(33) for model validation purposes. ... The latter is in line with the Q2 (0.7) from the 10-fold cross-validation, which may indicate that the structural information of the Free-Wilson subset is better covered in the training set and results in a deceptively high correlation. ... For the MAPK14 set the R-group SVM model performs rather poorly, and the increase of prediction R2 from 0.2 to 0.38 merely reflects the incomplete statistics of the Free-Wilson subset which only covers 17 out of the 122 compounds in the full test set. ...

Hongming Chen; Lars Carlsson; Mats Eriksson; Peter Varkonyi; Ulf Norinder; Ingemar Nilsson

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Wilson line correlators in two-dimensional noncommutative Yang-Mills theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the correlator of two parallel Wilson lines in two-dimensional non-commutative Yang-Mills theory, following two different approaches. We first consider a perturbative expansion in the large-N limit and resum all planar diagrams. The second approach is non perturbative: we exploit the Morita equivalence, mapping the two open lines on the non-commutative torus (which eventually gets decompacted) in two closed Wilson loops winding around the dual commutative torus. Planarity allows us to single out a suitable region of the variables involved, where a saddle-point approximation of the general Morita expression for the correlator can be performed. In this region the correlator nicely compares with the perturbative result, exhibiting an exponential increase with respect to the momentum p.

Antonio Bassetto; Federica Vian

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Exponentiation for products of Wilson lines within the generating function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the generating function approach to the perturbative exponentiation of correlators of a product of Wilson lines and loops. The exponentiated expression is presented in the closed form as an algebraic function of correlators of known operators, which can be seen as a generating function for web diagrams. The expression is naturally split onto two parts: the exponentiation kernel, which accumulates all non-trivial information about web diagrams, and the defect of exponentiation, which reconstructs the matrix exponent and is a function of the exponentiation kernel. The detailed comparison of the presented approach with existing approaches to exponentiation is presented as well. We also give examples of calculations within the generating function exponentiation, namely, we consider different configurations of light-like Wilson lines in the multi-gluon-exchange-webs (MGEW) approximation. Within this approximation the corresponding correlators can be calculated exactly at any order of perturbative expans...

Vladimirov, Alexey A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Large rank Wilson loops in N=2 superconformal QCD at strong coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the expectation values of circular Wilson loops in large representations at strong coupling, in the large-N limit of the N=2 superconformal theory with SU(N) gauge group and 2N hypermultiplets. Employing Pestun's matrix integral, we focus attention on symmetric and antisymmetric representations with ranks of order N. We find that large rank antisymmetric loops are independent of the coupling at strong 't Hooft coupling while symmetric Wilson loops grow exponentially with it. Symmetric loops display a non-analyticity as a function of the rank, characterized by the splitting of a single matrix model eigenvalue from the continuum, bearing close resemblance to Bose-Einstein condensation in an ideal gas. We discuss implications of these for a putative large-N string dual. The method of calculation we adopt makes explicit the connection to Fermi and Bose gas descriptions and also suggests a tantalizing connection of the above system to a multichannel Kondo model.

Benedict Fraser; S. Prem Kumar

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wilson Loops in 3d QFT from D-branes in AdS(4) x CP**3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Wilson loops and defects in the three dimensional QFT from the D-branes in the AdS(4) x CP**3 geometry. We find out explicit D-brane configurations in the bulk which correspond to both straight and circular Wilson lines extended to the boundary of AdS(4). We analyze critically the role of boundary contributions to the D2-branes with various topology and to the fundamental string actions.

J. Kluson; Kamal L. Panigrahi

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

110

The role of Ambassador Roland S. Morris in President Wilson's decision to send troops to Siberia in 1918  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies involving Woodrow Wilson's decision to send troops to Siberia, there has been a distinct lack of attention given to the role of Morris and the impact of his dispatches. As Ambassador to Japan during this turbulent era, Morris was the highest... in the Far East. The relationship that existed between the President and Morris will also be studied in light of how it could have affected the value Wilson placed upon the Ambassador's dispatches. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This thesis would not have been possible...

Whittlesey, Frederick Albert

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hybrid Monte Carlo with Wilson Dirac operator on the Fermi GPU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we present our implementation of a Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm for Lattice Gauge Theory using two degenerate flavours of Wilson-Dirac fermions on a Fermi GPU. We find that using registers instead of global memory speeds up the code by almost an order of magnitude. To map the array variables to scalars, so that the compiler puts them in the registers, we use code generators. Our final program is more than 10 times faster than a generic single CPU.

Abhijit Chakrabarty; Pushan Majumdar

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nano-criticality in small CoO particles To Kenneth Wilson, Cornell, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-criticality in small CoO particles To Kenneth Wilson, Cornell, USA "for his theory a neutron scattering study of CoO bulk and nano-powders, we have measured the critical magnetic scattering), and theC -n magnetic coherence length xµ(-e) . We have found a bof 0.31 and 0.35 for bulk and nano

113

Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Wilson Center on the “2015 U.S. Energy Policy Outlook: Opportunities and Challenges”-- As Delivered  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Secretary Moniz's remarks, as delivered, on the “2015 U.S. Energy Policy Outlook: Opportunities and Challenges” at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC on January 7, 2015.

114

Use of polar decomposition for the diagnosis of oral Jungrae Chung, Woonggyu Jung, Marie J. Hammer-Wilson, Petra Wilder-Smith,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Hammer-Wilson, Petra Wilder-Smith, and Zhongping Chen The Mueller matrix describes all are optically inhomogeneous, birefringent, and absorbing media.3 Precancerous lesions are characterized

Chen, Zhongping

115

Silver vanadium diphosphate Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Electrochemistry and characterization of reduced material providing mechanistic insights  

SciTech Connect

Silver vanadium phosphorous oxides (Ag{sub w}V{sub x}P{sub y}O{sub z}) are notable battery cathode materials due to their high energy density and demonstrated ability to form in-situ Ag metal nanostructured electrically conductive networks within the cathode. While analogous silver vanadium diphosphate materials have been prepared, electrochemical evaluations of these diphosphate based materials have been limited. We report here the first electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}, where the structural differences associated with phosphorous oxides versus diphosphates profoundly affect the associated electrochemistry. Reminiscent of Ag{sub 2}VO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} reduction, in-situ formation of silver metal nanoparticles was observed with reduction of Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. However, counter to Ag{sub 2}VO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} reduction, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} demonstrates a significant decrease in conductivity upon continued electrochemical reduction. Structural analysis contrasting the crystallography of the parent Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} with that of the proposed Li{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} reduction product is employed to gain insight into the observed electrochemical reduction behavior, where the structural rigidity associated with the diphosphate anion may be associated with the observed particle fracturing upon deep electrochemical reduction. Further, the diphosphate anion structure may be associated with the high thermal stability of the partially reduced Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} materials, which bodes well for enhanced safety of batteries incorporating this material. - Graphical abstract: Structure and galvanostatic intermittent titration-type test data for silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. Highlights: ? First electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. ? In-situ formation of Ag{sup 0} nanoparticles was observed upon electrochemical reduction. ? Structural analysis used to provide insight of the electrochemical behavior.

Takeuchi, Esther S., E-mail: esther.takeuchi@stonybrook.edu [Department Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Global and Regional Solutions Directorate, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Lee, Chia-Ying; Cheng, Po-Jen [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Menard, Melissa C. [Department Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marschilok, Amy C., E-mail: amy.marschilok@stonybrook.edu [Department Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Takeuchi, Kenneth J., E-mail: kenneth.takeuchi.1@stonybrook.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Organic Particles Kevin Wilson Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Studying the Chemical Transformations of for Studying the Chemical Transformations of Organic Particles Kevin Wilson Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Molecular weight growth and decomposition chemistries play important roles in the transformation of particles from soot formation to atmospheric aerosol oxidation. Understanding these complex reaction pathways requires novel methods of analyzing particle phase hydrocarbons. We are developing a suite of synchrotron-based tools to provide better insights into the molecular composition, isomer distribution, and elemental composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures, aimed at developing simple yet realistic descriptions of molecular weight growth and decomposition that occur during a heterogeneous reaction.

117

On the Ginsparg-Wilson Dirac operator in the monopole backgrounds on the fuzzy 2-sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the previous papers, we studied the 't Hooft-Polyakov (TP) monopole configurations in the U(2) gauge theory on the fuzzy 2-sphere,and showed they have nonzero topological charge in the formalism based on the Ginsparg-Wilson (GW) relation. In this paper, we will show an index theorem in the TP monopole background, which is defined in the projected space, and provide a meaning of the projection operator. We further calculate the spectrum of the GW Dirac operator in the TP monopole backgrounds, and confirm the index theorem in these cases.

Aoki, H; Maeda, T; Aoki, Hajime; Iso, Satoshi; Maeda, Toshiharu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Exponentiation for products of Wilson lines within the generating function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the generating function approach to the perturbative exponentiation of correlators of a product of Wilson lines and loops. The exponentiated expression is presented in the closed form as an algebraic function of correlators of known operators, which can be seen as a generating function for web diagrams. The expression is naturally split onto two parts: the exponentiation kernel, which accumulates all non-trivial information about web diagrams, and the defect of exponentiation, which reconstructs the matrix exponent and is a function of the exponentiation kernel. The detailed comparison of the presented approach with existing approaches to exponentiation is presented as well. We also give examples of calculations within the generating function exponentiation, namely, we consider different configurations of light-like Wilson lines in the multi-gluon-exchange-webs (MGEW) approximation. Within this approximation the corresponding correlators can be calculated exactly at any order of perturbative expansion by only algebraic manipulations. The calculation shows an evident violation of the dipole formula for infrared singularities at three-loop order.

Alexey A. Vladimirov

2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

119
120

Development of a shock-induced detonation driver F.K. Lu and D.R. Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of a shock-induced detonation driver F.K. Lu and D.R. Wilson Aerodynamics Research's performance can be improved by using a detonation driver that produces a driver gas with a high pressure, are that the gaseous detonation products have high molecular weight compared to helium and the potential danger

Texas at Arlington, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cold Flow Simulations for a Pulse Detonation Rocket Ejector J. Tyler Nichols, Donald R. Wilson, Frank K. Lu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold Flow Simulations for a Pulse Detonation Rocket Ejector J. Tyler Nichols, Donald R. Wilson pulse detonation rocket (PDR) ejecting into a duct was fabricated and integrated into the supersonic detonation engines (PDE) have been researched extensively as an alternate form for high-speed propulsion

Texas at Arlington, University of

122

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields

123

Crack Propagation Fracture Toughness of Several Wood Species Elijah Wilson, Meisam Shir Mohammadi, and John A. Nairn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Crack Propagation Fracture Toughness of Several Wood Species Elijah Wilson, Meisam Shir Mohammadi, and John A. Nairn Wood Science & Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA Abstract In materials with process zones, such as fiber bridging zones in wood, it is crucial to characterize fracture

Nairn, John A.

124

Wilson Loops and Area-Preserving Diffeomorphisms in Twisted Noncommutative Gauge Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use twist deformation techniques to analyse the behaviour under area-preserving diffeomorphisms of quantum averages of Wilson loops in Yang-Mills theory on the noncommutative plane. We find that while the classical gauge theory is manifestly twist covariant, the holonomy operators break the quantum implementation of the twisted symmetry in the usual formal definition of the twisted quantum field theory. These results are deduced by analysing general criteria which guarantee twist invariance of noncommutative quantum field theories. From this a number of general results are also obtained, such as the twisted symplectic invariance of noncommutative scalar quantum field theories with polynomial interactions and the existence of a large class of holonomy operators with both twisted gauge covariance and twisted symplectic invariance.

Mauro Riccardi; Richard J. Szabo

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Wilson loops and area-preserving diffeomorphisms in twisted noncommutative gauge theory  

SciTech Connect

We use twist deformation techniques to analyze the behavior under area-preserving diffeomorphisms of quantum averages of Wilson loops in Yang-Mills theory on the noncommutative plane. We find that while the classical gauge theory is manifestly twist covariant, the holonomy operators break the quantum implementation of the twisted symmetry in the usual formal definition of the twisted quantum field theory. These results are deduced by analyzing general criteria which guarantee twist invariance of noncommutative quantum field theories. From this a number of general results are also obtained, such as the twisted symplectic invariance of noncommutative scalar quantum field theories with polynomial interactions and the existence of a large class of holonomy operators with both twisted gauge covariance and twisted symplectic invariance.

Riccardi, Mauro; Szabo, Richard J. [Department of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Colin Maclaurin Building, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

QCD Condensates and Holographic Wilson Loops for Asymptotically AdS Spaces  

SciTech Connect

The minimization of the Nambu-Goto (NG) action for a surface whose contour defines a circular Wilson loop of radius a placed at a finite value of the coordinate orthogonal to the border is considered. This is done for asymptotically AdS spaces. The condensates of dimension n = 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 are calculated in terms of the coefficients in the expansion in powers of the radius a of the on-shell subtracted NG action for small a->0. The subtraction employed is such that it presents no conflict with conformal invariance in the AdS case and need not introduce an additional infrared scale for the case of confining geometries. It is shown that the UV value of the gluon condensates is universal in the sense that it only depends on the first coefficients of the difference with the AdS case.

Quevedo, R. Carcasses [Instituto Balseiro, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goity, Jose L. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23668 (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Trinchero, Roberto C. [Instituto Balseiro, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); CONICET, Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ginsparg-Wilson Dirac operator in the monopole backgrounds on the fuzzy 2-sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the previous papers, we studied the 't Hooft-Polyakov (TP) monopole configurations in the U(2) gauge theory on the fuzzy 2-sphere,and showed that they have nonzero topological charge in the formalism based on the Ginsparg-Wilson (GW) relation. In this paper, we will show an index theorem in the TP monopole background, which is defined in the projected space, and provide a meaning of the projection operator. We also extend the index theorem to general configurations which do not satisfy the equation of motion, and show that the configuration space can be classified into the topological sectors. We further calculate the spectrum of the GW Dirac operator in the TP monopole backgrounds, and consider the index theorem in these cases.

Hajime Aoki; Satoshi Iso; Toshiharu Maeda

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ginsparg-Wilson Dirac operator in monopole backgrounds on the fuzzy 2-sphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In previous papers, we studied ’t Hooft-Polyakov (TP) monopole configurations in U(2) gauge theory on the fuzzy 2-sphere, and showed that they have nonzero topological charges in the formalism based on the Ginsparg-Wilson (GW) relation. In this paper, we will show an index theorem in the TP monopole background, which is defined in the projected space, and provides meaning of the projection operator. We also extend the index theorem to general configurations which do not satisfy the equation of motion, and show that configuration space can be classified into topological sectors. We further calculate the spectrum of the GW Dirac operator in TP monopole backgrounds, and consider the index theorem in these cases.

Hajime Aoki; Satoshi Iso; Toshiharu Maeda

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

QCD thermodynamics with two flavours of Wilson fermions on large lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the phase diagram of two flavour QCD at vanishing chemical potential using dynamical O(a)-improved Wilson quarks. In the approach to the chiral limit we use lattices with a temporal extent of N_t=16 and spatial extent L=32,48 and 64 to enable the extrapolation to the thermodynamic limit with small discretisation effects. In addition to an update on the scans at constant \\kappa, reported earlier, we present first results from scans along lines of constant physics at a pion mass of 290 MeV. We probe the transition using the Polyakov loop and the chiral condensate, as well as spectroscopic observables such as screening masses.

Bastian B. Brandt; Anthony Francis; Harvey B. Meyer; Owe Philipsen; Hartmut Wittig

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thermodynamics of two-flavor lattice QCD with an improved Wilson quark action at non-zero temperature and density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the current status of our systematic studies of the QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks. We evaluate the critical temperature of two flavor QCD in the chiral limit at zero chemical potential and show the preliminary result. Also we discuss fluctuations at none-zero temperature and density by calculating the quark number and isospin susceptibilities and their derivatives with respect to chemical potential.

Y. Maezawa; S. Aoki; S. Ejiri; T. Hatsuda; N. Ishii; K. Kanaya; N. Ukita

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

Wilson polynomials/functions and intertwining operators for the generic quantum superintegrable system on the 2-sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been known since 2007 that the Wilson and Racah polynomials can be characterized as basis functions for irreducible representations of the quadratic symmetry algebra of the quantum superintegrable system on the 2-sphere, $H\\Psi=E\\Psi$, with generic 3-parameter potential. Clearly, the polynomials are expansion coefficients for one eigenbasis of a symmetry operator $L_1$ of $H$ in terms of an eigenbasis of another symmetry operator $L_2$, but the exact relationship appears not to have been made explicit. We work out the details of the expansion to show, explicitly, how the polynomials arise and how the principal properties of these functions: the measure, 3-term recurrence relation, 2nd order difference equation, duality of these relations, permutation symmetry, intertwining operators and an alternate derivation of Wilson functions -- follow from the symmetry of this quantum system. There is active interest in the relation between multivariable Wilson polynomials and the quantum superintegrable system on the $n$-sphere with generic potential, and these results should aid in the generalization. Contracting function space realizations of irreducible representations of this quadratic algebra to the other superintegrable systems one can obtain the full Askey scheme of orthogonal hypergeometric polynomials. All of these contractions of superintegrable systems with potential are uniquely induced by Wigner Lie algebra contractions of $so(3, C )$ and $e(2, C)$. All of the polynomials produced are interpretable as quantum expansion coefficients. It is important to extend this process to higher dimensions.

Willard Miller Jr; Qiushi Li

2014-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

Phase structure of thermal lattice QCD with N{sub f}=2 twisted mass Wilson fermions  

SciTech Connect

We present numerical results for the phase diagram of lattice QCD at finite temperature in the formulation with twisted mass Wilson fermions and a tree-level Symanzik-improved gauge action. Our simulations are performed on lattices with temporal extent N{sub {tau}}=8, and lattice coupling {beta} ranging from strong coupling to the scaling domain. Covering a wide range in the space spanned by the lattice coupling {beta} and the hopping and twisted mass parameters {kappa} and {mu}, respectively, we obtain a comprehensive picture of the rich phase structure of the lattice theory. In particular, we verify the existence of an Aoki phase in the strong coupling region and the realization of the Sharpe-Singleton scenario at intermediate couplings. In the weak coupling region we identify the phase boundary for the physical finite temperature phase transition/crossover. Its shape in the three-dimensional parameter space is consistent with Creutz's conjecture of a cone-shaped thermal transition surface.

Ilgenfritz, E.-M. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jansen, K. [DESY, Zeuthen, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lombardo, M. P. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, I-100044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Mueller-Preussker, M.; Petschlies, M. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Philipsen, O.; Zeidlewicz, L. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Resumming planar diagrams for the N=6 ABJM cusped Wilson loop in light-cone gauge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse a light-like cusped Wilson loop in N=6 superconformal Chern-Simons theory at both weak and strong coupling in light-cone gauge. At the second order in the 't Hooft coupling $\\lambda$ the correct cusp anomalous dimension $\\Gamma_{\\rm cusp}=-\\phi / 2 \\lambda^2$ is recovered through a deformation of the contour that takes both rays of the cusp slightly off of the light-cone. The strong coupling behaviour is addressed by means of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for ladders of tree-level gauge propagators and ladders of one-loop corrected gauge propagators. It turns out that, as might be expected, the contribution of Chern-Simons tree-level propagators is insensitive of the cusp angle $\\phi$. On the other hand, corrected propagators lead to an exponential large $\\lambda$ behaviour $\\Gamma_{\\rm cusp} \\sim \\exp\\sqrt{\\lambda\\phi}$ which, though, disagrees with the AdS/CFT predictions in the power of $\\phi$.

Daniele Marmiroli

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Phase structure of a generalized Nambu Jona-Lasinio model with Wilson fermions in the mean field or large $N$-expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the vacuum structure of a generalized lattice Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with two flavors of Wilson fermions, such that its continuum action is the most general four-fermion action with 'trivial' color interactions, and having a $SU(2)_V x SU(2)_A$ symmetry in the chiral limit. The phase structure of this model in the space of the two four-fermion couplings shows, in addition to the standard Aoki phases, new phases with $ != 0$, in close analogy to similar results recently suggested by some of us for lattice QCD with two degenerate Wilson fermions. This result shows how the phase structure of an effective model for low energy QCD cannot be entirely understood from Wilson Chiral Perturbation Theory, based on the standard QCD chiral effective Lagrangian approach.

V. Azcoiti; G. Di Carlo; E. Follana; M. Giordano; A. Vaquero

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010  

SciTech Connect

A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 16. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1 Percent Sulfur Greater Than 1 Percent Average Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale 1985 ....................................... 0.644 0.610 0.582 0.560 0.610 0.577 1986 ....................................... 0.372 0.328 0.317 0.289 0.343 0.305 1987 ....................................... 0.447 0.412 0.396 0.362 0.423 0.385 1988 ....................................... 0.372 0.333 0.300 0.271 0.334 0.300 1989 ....................................... 0.436 0.407 0.344 0.331 0.385 0.360 1990 .......................................

137

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Table 46. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, No. 4 Fuel Oil, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel No. 4 Fuel Oil a Propane (Consumer Grade) Residual Fuel Oil Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1 Percent Sulfur Greater Than 1 Percent Total Residual Fuel Oil United States September 2013 ........................ 528.1 55,062.2 147.0 31,019.9 1,941.7 8,519.6 10,461.3 August 2013 .............................. 624.3 59,252.0 122.6 28,245.1 2,259.8 11,371.3 13,631.1 September 2012 ........................ 707.7 52,548.7 119.7 28,336.2 1,866.8 9,714.0 11,580.8 PAD District I September 2013 ........................

138

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 22. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Selected Countries Persian Gulf a Total OPEC b Non OPEC Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1985 .............................. 27.39 25.71 - 25.63 28.96 24.72 28.36 24.43 25.50 26.86 26.53 1986 .............................. 14.09 13.43 12.85 12.17 15.29 12.84 14.63 11.52 12.92 13.46 13.52 1987 .............................. 18.20 17.04 18.43 16.69 19.32 16.81 18.78 15.76 17.47 17.64 17.66 1988 .............................. 14.48 13.50 14.47 12.58 15.88 13.37 15.82 13.66 13.51 14.18 13.96 1989 .............................. 18.36 16.81 18.10 16.35 19.19 17.34 18.74 16.78 17.37 17.78 17.54 1990 ..............................

139

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 1A. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil by PAD Districts (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month U.S. PAD District 1 PAD District 2 Domestic Imported Composite Domestic Imported Composite Domestic Imported Composite 2004 .......................... 38.97 35.90 36.98 40.75 38.29 38.34 40.80 35.63 38.38 2005 .......................... 52.94 48.86 50.24 56.89 53.29 53.35 54.57 46.11 50.75 2006 .......................... 62.62 59.02 60.24 66.92 63.53 63.60 63.66 55.19 59.70 2007 .......................... 69.65 67.04 67.94 70.62 72.48 72.44 71.10 62.17 66.90 2008 .......................... 98.47 92.77 94.74 100.30 96.90 96.97 100.98 88.45 94.93 2009 .......................... 59.49 59.17 59.29 59.64 61.68 61.63 60.00 57.00 58.64 2010

140

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Explanatory Explanatory Notes The Explanatory Notes contain descriptions of the survey forms, sampling frames, sample design, sampling variability, imputation and estimation, and other technical information concerning the surveys. You may obtain a complete set of the Explanatory Notes for the Petroleum Marketing Monthly through the following sources: 1) Visit the EIA Website, Petroleum Marketing Annual, Explanatory Notes 2 ) T h e E I A E n e r g y I n f o r m a t i o n Ce n t e r a t infoctr@eia.gov . U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 152 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table EN1. Federal and State Motor Fuels Taxes 1 (Cents per Gallon) Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Gasohol Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Gasohol Federal 2 . . . . . . . . . . . 18.40 24.40 18.40 Mississippi 4 . . . . . . . . . . 18.40 18.40

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Statistics 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 1. Crude Oil Prices (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Domestic First Purchase Prices Average F.O.B. a Cost of Crude Oil Imports b Average Landed Cost of Crude Oil Imports b Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil Domestic Imported Composite 1990 .................................. 20.03 20.37 21.13 22.59 21.76 22.22 1991 .................................. 16.54 16.89 18.02 19.33 18.70 19.06 1992 .................................. 15.99 16.77 17.75 18.63 18.20 18.43 1993 .................................. 14.25 14.71 15.72 16.67 16.14 16.41 1994 .................................. 13.19 14.18 15.18 15.67 15.51 15.59 1995 .................................. 14.62 15.69 16.78 17.33 17.14 17.23 1996 ..................................

142

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10 10 Table 40. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Conventional Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk United States September 2013 ............................................ 12,154.8 13,516.9 7,833.1 167,726.6 20,265.8 August 2013 .................................................. 12,701.5 14,053.9 8,420.4 177,645.4 17,967.5 September 2012 ............................................ 16,638.8 18,066.5 5,988.6 166,114.8 19,652.8 PAD District I September 2013 ............................................ W 3,676.1 W 48,072.4 W August 2013

143

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table 42. Refiner No. 2 Diesel Fuel Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month No. 2 Diesel Fuel Ultra Low-Sulfur Low-Sulfur High-Sulfur Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States September 2013 ............ 10,170.6 139,922.9 473.2 2,205.9 429.4 1,261.9 August 2013 .................. 10,581.0 142,352.7 505.6 2,944.3 189.4 2,428.4 September 2012 ............ 11,013.7 129,215.9 657.0 2,684.4 733.8 1,031.2 PAD District I September 2013 ............ 1,571.7 29,234.1 40.5 W W W August 2013 .................. 1,632.1 28,720.8 54.9 W W W

144

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Table 43. Refiner No. 2 Distillate and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month No. 2 Fuel Oil No. 2 Distillate Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States September 2013 .......................................... 117.3 5,907.4 11,190.5 149,298.1 August 2013 ................................................ 99.1 5,232.6 11,375.1 152,957.9 September 2012 .......................................... 207.4 8,693.8 12,611.9 141,625.3 PAD District I September 2013 .......................................... W 3,834.8 1,704.0 33,741.5 August 2013 ................................................ W

145

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prime Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 136 Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Conventional Reformulated Total Conventional Reformulated Total United States September 2013 .................... 201,282.1 98,460.8 299,742.8 8,017.2 2,616.4 10,633.6 August 2013 .......................... 208,707.3 102,892.1 311,599.3 10,270.0 2,819.0 13,089.0 September 2012 .................... 196,290.3 100,372.7 296,663.0 10,079.6 2,892.5 12,972.1 PAD District I September 2013 ....................

146

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Prices of Petroleum Products U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 76 Table 31. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a United States September 2013 .......... 3.032 2.796 2.757 3.231 3.092 2.861 3.346 3.078 3.064 3.076 2.818 2.792

147

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total 1985 ............................... 26.2 29.9 - - - 119.7 - - - - - - 1986 ............................... 30.9 34.7 - - - 127.0 - - - - - - 1987 ............................... 32.7 36.1 - - - 141.9 - - - - - - 1988 ............................... 34.2 37.3 - - - 153.6 - - - - - - 1989 ............................... 34.3 36.8 - - - 155.7 4.9 5.1 - - - 16.4 1990 ............................... 36.7 38.8 - - - 174.5

148

niagaraVP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties, New York. Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties, New York. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties, New York (formerly the Niagara Falls Storage Site) is located in Lewiston, New York, approximately 10 miles north of the city of Niagara Falls, New York. The site is a remnant of the U.S. Army's 7,500-acre Lake Ontario

149

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F5: Aviation Gasoline Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 F5: Aviation Gasoline Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Consumption Prices a Expenditures Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 73 0.4 33.04 12.1 Alaska 74 0.4 33.04 12.3 Arizona 218 1.1 33.04 36.3 Arkansas 39 0.2 33.04 6.5 California 433 2.2 33.04 72.1 Colorado 133 0.7 33.04 22.2 Connecticut 31 0.2 33.04 5.2 Delaware 196 1.0 33.04 32.7 Dist. of Col. 7 (s) 33.04 1.2 Florida 481 2.4 33.04 80.2 Georgia 129 0.7 33.04 21.5 Hawaii 11 0.1 33.04 1.8 Idaho 47 0.2 33.04 7.9 Illinois 109 0.6 33.04 18.2 Indiana 76 0.4 33.04 12.6 Iowa 44 0.2 33.04 7.3 Kansas 163 0.8 33.04 27.1 Kentucky 41 0.2 33.04 6.9 Louisiana 69 0.3 33.04 11.5 Maine 56 0.3 33.04 9.4 Maryland 51 0.3 33.04 8.5 Massachusetts 42 0.2 33.04 7.0 Michigan 55 0.3 33.04 9.1 Minnesota 87 0.4 33.04 14.5 Mississippi 45 0.2 33.04 7.5 Missouri 72 0.4 33.04 12.1 Montana

150

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F4: Fuel Ethanol Consumption Estimates, 2012 F4: Fuel Ethanol Consumption Estimates, 2012 State Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Commercial a Industrial a Transportation a Total a Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Alabama 3 43 4,317 4,363 (s) 0.1 15.0 15.1 Alaska 11 19 728 758 (s) 0.1 2.5 2.6 Arizona 15 107 8,058 8,179 0.1 0.4 27.9 28.4 Arkansas 7 68 2,942 3,017 (s) 0.2 10.2 10.5 California 22 434 28,459 28,914 0.1 1.5 98.7 100.3 Colorado 3 65 3,608 3,677 (s) 0.2 12.5 12.8 Connecticut 4 48 3,757 3,808 (s) 0.2 13.0 13.2 Delaware 1 16 965 981 (s) 0.1 3.3 3.4 Dist. of Col. 1 2 182 185 (s) (s) 0.6 0.6 Florida 37 184 18,593 18,815 0.1 0.6 64.5 65.3 Georgia 7 120 11,164 11,291 (s) 0.4 38.7 39.2 Hawaii 1 16 1,233 1,250 (s) 0.1 4.3 4.3 Idaho 3 47 1,203 1,253 (s) 0.2 4.2 4.3 Illinois 27 215 11,509 11,750 0.1 0.7 39.9 40.8 Indiana 63 115 6,974 7,151 0.2 0.4 24.2 24.8 Iowa 135 85 2,205 2,425 0.5 0.3 7.6 8.4 Kansas 9 57 2,714 2,780 (s) 0.2 9.4 9.6 Kentucky

151

pma.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Survey Background The EIA-782 surveys were implemented in 1983 to fulfill the data requirements necessary to meet En- ergy Information Administration (EIA) legislative mandates and user community data needs. The re- quirements include petroleum product price, market distribution, demand (or sales), and product supply data, which are needed for a complete evaluation of petroleum market performance. The EIA-782 series includes the Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Re- port"; Form EIA-782B, "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report"; and Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption." The Form EIA-782A collects refiner and gas plant op- erator monthly price and volume data at a

152

pmm.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

38 38 Table 17. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Volumes (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1 Percent Sulfur Greater Than 1 Percent Total Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale 1985 ....................................... 11.4 7.0 13.8 12.9 25.2 19.9 1986 ....................................... 15.2 7.9 16.4 10.7 31.6 18.6 1987 ....................................... 15.1 7.8 13.9 9.1 29.0 16.9 1988 ....................................... 14.2 8.7 15.9 10.3 30.2 18.9 1989 ....................................... 13.4 7.9 17.0 13.1 30.4 21.0 1990 ....................................... 11.1 7.4 14.9 10.5 25.9 17.9 1991 ....................................... 8.6 5.6 15.5 12.2 24.0 17.8 1992 .......................................

153

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 10. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Average a DTW Rack Bulk Average Through Retail Outlets Average a DTW Rack Bulk Average 1994 ............................... 0.764 0.758 0.720 0.569 0.543 0.638 0.879 0.873 0.770 0.628 W 0.728 1995 ............................... 0.749 0.744 0.707 0.605 0.573 0.650 0.836 0.833 0.753 0.651 - 0.723 1996 ............................... 0.834 0.830 0.788 0.698 0.677 0.738 0.924 0.921 0.837 0.741 W 0.809 1997 ............................... 0.830 0.828 0.787 0.682 0.668 0.731 0.928 0.925

154

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

80(2013/12) 80(2013/12) Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 With Data for September 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. This report is available on the WEB at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/petroleum_marketing_monthly/pmm.html ii U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Preface

155

Annual2.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 October 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. DOE/EIA-E-0110(99) Distribution Category/UC-960 ii Energy Information Administration / Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 1999 Contacts The Historical Natural Gas Annual is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, Natural Gas Division, under the direction of Joan E. Heinkel. General questions and comments concerning the contents of the Historical Natural Gas Annual may be obtained from the National Energy Information

156

introduction.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10) 10) Release date:April 2010 Next release date: April 2011 Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 [PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY] 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3. International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 4. Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 5. Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 6. Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 7. Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 8. Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 9. Oil and Gas Supply Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 10. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module

157

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

54 54 Product Guide Volumes Category Prices Table Crude Oil Refiner Acquisition Cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 1A - Domestic First Purchases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - from selected States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 - by API gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 - for selected crude streams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 - Imports F.O.B. Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - from selected countries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 - by API gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 - for selected crude streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 - Landed Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - from selected countries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 - by API gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 - for selected crude streams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 - Percentage

158

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Table 44. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Volumes by PAD District (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Residual Fuel Oil No. 4 Fuel a Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1 Percent Sulfur Greater Than 1 Percent Total Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States September 2013 .. 1,055.3 1,804.5 3,391.6 6,245.0 4,446.9 8,049.5 W 75.2 August 2013 ........ 1,316.5 2,397.4 3,803.3 7,032.9 5,119.8 9,430.3 W 73.3 September 2012 .. 1,153.1 1,105.4 4,121.4 6,185.6 5,274.6 7,291.1 W W PAD District I September 2013 .. W W W W

159

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

13 13 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 4. U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month Motor Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Propane (Consumer Grade) Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate No. 4 Fuel a Residual Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Fuel Oil Average 1985 ................................. 0.835 1.130 0.794 0.398 0.874 0.863 0.772 0.776 0.774 0.672 0.577 1986 ................................. 0.531 0.912 0.495 0.290 0.606 0.579 0.452 0.486 0.470 0.409 0.305 1987 ................................. 0.589 0.859 0.538 0.252 0.592 0.599 0.534 0.527 0.531 0.462 0.385 1988 ................................. 0.577 0.850 0.495 0.240 0.549 0.549 0.473 0.473 0.473 0.425 0.300 1989 .................................

160

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 4. U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month Motor Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Propane (Consumer Grade) Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate No. 4 Fuel a Residual Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Fuel Oil Average 1985 ................................. 0.835 1.130 0.794 0.398 0.874 0.863 0.772 0.776 0.774 0.672 0.577 1986 ................................. 0.531 0.912 0.495 0.290 0.606 0.579 0.452 0.486 0.470 0.409 0.305 1987 ................................. 0.589 0.859 0.538 0.252 0.592 0.599 0.534 0.527 0.531 0.462 0.385 1988 ................................. 0.577 0.850 0.495 0.240 0.549 0.549 0.473 0.473 0.473 0.425 0.300 1989 .................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Table 41. Refiner Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, No. 1 Distillate, and Propane (Consumer Grade) by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene No. 1 Distillate Propane (Consumer Grade) Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States September 2013 ...... 14.8 431.5 30,000.3 25,645.0 3.6 1,224.4 44.6 336.0 6,892.8 31,307.5 August 2013 ............ 12.0 547.1 32,532.8 27,226.7 2.2 1,199.7 32.5 228.9 6,377.7 30,382.5 September 2012 ...... 97.8 370.8 32,368.2 22,892.5 4.3 966.6 W 337.4 4,838.6 26,404.4

162

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Average a DTW Rack Bulk Average Through Retail Outlets Average a DTW Rack Bulk Average 1994 ........................... 0.687 0.681 0.636 0.545 0.500 0.558 0.784 0.778 0.694 NA NA 0.627 1995 ........................... 0.710 0.704 0.651 0.570 0.525 0.573 0.800 0.794 0.711 0.610 NA 0.637 1996 ........................... 0.797 0.791 0.743 0.665 0.607 0.664 0.884 0.878 0.801 0.700 NA 0.726 1997 ........................... 0.781 0.775 0.719 0.649 0.600 0.648 0.874 0.869 0.783 0.685 W 0.708 1998 ...........................

163

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 26. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Canadian Lloydminster Iraqi Basrah Light Mexican Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1985 Average .................................. 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986 Average .................................. 12.77 - 10.93 - - 1987 Average .................................. 15.12 - 15.72 - - 1988 Average .................................. 11.28 - 11.26 - - 1989 Average .................................. W - 14.71 - - 1990 Average .................................. 18.50 - 17.29 - - 1991 Average .................................. 13.51 - 13.02 - - 1992 Average .................................. W -

164

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Table 33. Refiner Prices of Distillate Fuels by PAD District and State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States September 2013 .......... 3.591 3.342 3.182 3.090 W 2.715 August 2013 ................ 3.345 3.307 3.170 3.079 W 2.746 September 2012 .......... W 3.528 3.367 3.269 W W PAD District I September 2013 .......... W 3.465 3.212 3.067 W W August 2013 ................ W 3.489 3.197 3.080 W W September 2012 .......... W W 3.366 3.234 W W Subdistrict IA September 2013 .......... - W 3.240 3.105 W -

165

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Quarter Month Algerian Saharan Blend Brazilian Marlim Canadian Bow River Heavy Canadian Light Sour Blend Canadian Lloydminster 1985 Average .................................. - - 25.42 - 24.38 1986 Average .................................. - - 12.71 - 13.52 1987 Average .................................. - - 16.49 - 15.98 1988 Average .................................. - - 12.68 - 12.21 1989 Average .................................. - - 15.99 - 15.36 1990 Average .................................. - - 19.32 - 19.55 1991 Average .................................. - - 14.31 - 14.63 1992 Average .................................. - - 15.01 - W 1993 Average .................................. - -

166

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 11. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total 1994 ............................... 0.6 0.6 2.1 1.6 0.6 4.3 0.2 0.2 0.7 0.3 W 1.0 1995 ............................... 7.8 8.1 20.7 W W 43.3 3.0 3.1 7.4 3.1 - 10.5 1996 ............................... 10.7 11.1 26.1 20.5 8.0 54.6 3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 1997 ............................... 13.4 13.8 28.0 21.7 7.6 57.3 3.6 3.7 7.9 3.1 W 11.0 1998 ............................... 14.3 14.5 28.6 23.0 8.3 59.9 3.7 3.8 7.4 3.1 W 10.5 1999 ...............................

167

c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb. '99 to Mar. '99: +4.2% Feb. '99 to Mar. '99: +4.2% Mar. '98 to Mar. '99: +10.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.2% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb. '99 to Mar. '99: +2.6% Mar. '98 to Mar. '99: +3.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb. '99 to Mar. '99: +0.4% Mar. '98 to Mar.'99: +2.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.1% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Feb. '99 to Mar. '99: -1.7% Mar. '98 to Mar. '99: +6.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.7%

168

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F2: Jet Fuel Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 F2: Jet Fuel Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Jet Fuel a Consumption Prices Expenditures Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 2,193 12.4 23.24 289.1 Alaska 19,966 113.2 23.28 2,635.6 Arizona 3,812 21.6 23.28 503.2 Arkansas 988 5.6 22.84 128.0 California 94,474 535.7 22.88 12,256.9 Colorado 10,601 60.1 23.04 1,384.7 Connecticut 1,699 9.6 23.55 226.9 Delaware 132 0.7 23.08 17.3 Dist. of Col. 0 0.0 - - Florida 33,167 188.1 23.23 4,368.5 Georgia 11,252 63.8 22.84 1,457.5 Hawaii 11,311 64.1 22.94 1,471.3 Idaho 726 4.1 24.50 100.9 Illinois 24,668 139.9 22.85 3,196.2 Indiana 8,519 48.3 22.80 1,101.3 Iowa 1,101 6.2 23.44 146.3 Kansas 2,759 15.6 22.97 359.3 Kentucky 9,000 51.0 23.07 1,177.5 Louisiana 19,080 108.2 22.79 2,464.9 Maine 1,175 6.7 23.55 156.9 Maryland 2,100 11.9 23.08 274.8 Massachusetts

169

Annual2.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 November 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. DOE/EIA-E-0110(98) Distribution Category/UC-960 ii Energy Information Administration / Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 1998 Contacts The Historical Natural Gas Annual is prepared by the En- ergy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, Natural Gas Division, under the direction of Joan E. Heinkel. General questions and comments concerning the contents of the Historical Natural Gas Annual may be obtained from the National Energy Information

170

nemsoverview_928.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) The Na tional En ergy Mod el ing Sys tem: An Over view 2009 October 2009 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min is tra tion Of fice of In te grated Anal y sis and Fore cast ing U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min is tra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and an a lyt i cal agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min is tra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or any other or ga ni za tion. This pub li ca tion is on the WEB at: www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/over view/ The Na tional En ergy Mod el ing Sys tem: An Over view 2009 pro vides a sum mary de scrip tion of the Na tional En ergy

171

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2: Electricity Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 2: Electricity Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 33.40 31.17 18.24 - 27.31 3,491.4 2,318.1 1,856.6 - 7,666.2 Alaska 52.41 43.75 49.30 - 47.84 386.3 429.2 219.6 - 1,035.0 Arizona 33.10 27.93 19.14 - 28.74 3,718.4 2,829.5 813.1 - 7,361.0 Arkansas 27.24 22.61 16.90 32.92 22.56 1,664.7 933.6 858.3 0.1 3,456.6 California 44.95 39.29 30.74 21.01 39.75 13,821.6 16,334.5 4,655.6 49.1 34,860.7 Colorado 33.58 27.53 20.36 28.39 27.63 2,087.9 1,878.6 1,016.2 5.1 4,987.9 Connecticut 50.83 43.03 37.01 28.41 45.57 2,212.6 1,908.6 452.5 18.7 4,592.4 Delaware 39.80 29.67 24.49 - 32.47 614.0 430.6 222.5 - 1,267.1 Dist. of Col. 35.99 35.24 16.00 26.40 34.74 245.9 1,047.6 11.9 29.2 1,334.7

172

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Volumes Volumes of Petroleum Products U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 102 Table 39. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk United States September 2013 ................ 18,086.6 19,586.1 23,807.2 207,919.4 20,155.0 1,474.6 1,484.7 579.9 6,419.0 - August 2013 ...................... 18,728.0 20,240.9 24,759.1 216,172.2 18,136.4 1,549.5 1,561.5 602.5 8,305.4 - September 2012 ................ 24,254.3 25,831.3 22,767.1 207,437.9 22,013.3 2,011.0

173

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F6: Lubricants Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 F6: Lubricants Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Consumption Prices a Expenditures Industrial Transportation Total Industrial Transportation Total Industrial Transportation Total Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 363 348 711 2.2 2.1 4.3 72.11 158.8 152.4 311.2 Alaska 15 67 82 0.1 0.4 0.5 72.11 6.5 29.5 36.0 Arizona 190 249 438 1.1 1.5 2.7 72.11 82.9 108.8 191.7 Arkansas 192 310 502 1.2 1.9 3.0 72.11 84.0 135.5 219.5 California 1,508 2,010 3,518 9.1 12.2 21.3 72.11 659.5 879.3 1,538.7 Colorado 171 289 460 1.0 1.8 2.8 72.11 74.8 126.2 201.0 Connecticut 149 177 326 0.9 1.1 2.0 72.11 65.2 77.6 142.8 Delaware 54 46 100 0.3 0.3 0.6 72.11 23.6 20.0 43.6 Dist. of Col. 5 39 44 (s) 0.2 0.3 72.11 2.2 16.9 19.1 Florida 433 577 1,010 2.6 3.5 6.1 72.11 189.5 252.4 441.9 Georgia 453 443 896 2.7 2.7 5.4 72.11 198.2 193.7 391.8

174

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F3: Motor Gasoline Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 F3: Motor Gasoline Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Consumption Prices a Expenditures Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 44 596 60,191 60,831 0.2 3.1 314.1 317.5 27.57 6.4 85.7 8,659.3 8,751.4 Alaska 95 166 6,499 6,759 0.5 0.9 33.9 35.3 35.56 17.6 30.8 1,205.9 1,254.3 Arizona 110 807 60,764 61,680 0.6 4.2 317.1 321.9 28.27 16.2 119.0 8,966.3 9,101.6 Arkansas 76 754 32,706 33,536 0.4 3.9 170.7 175.0 27.69 11.0 109.0 4,727.2 4,847.2 California 256 5,149 337,666 343,071 1.3 26.9 1,762.3 1,790.5 31.59 42.2 848.9 55,668.5 56,559.6 Colorado 43 888 48,980 49,911 0.2 4.6 255.6 260.5 28.41 6.4 131.7 7,263.6 7,401.7 Connecticut 35 430 33,782 34,247 0.2 2.2 176.3 178.7 29.95

175

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

API API Gravity: An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it may be calculated in terms of the following formula: Degrees API sp gr F o = - 1415 60 1315 . . . @ . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data

176

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ii ii U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Preface The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in

177

pmm.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

50 50 Table 25. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity (Percent by Interval) Year Month 20.0 or Less 20.1 to 25.0 25.1 to 30.0 30.1 to 35.0 35.1 to 40.0 40.1 to 45.0 45.1 or Greater 1985 .......................... 7.62 20.46 11.19 27.14 24.93 4.02 4.65 1986 .......................... 5.54 19.36 14.12 27.49 25.74 3.65 4.11 1987 .......................... 4.04 19.68 16.88 26.91 24.79 3.87 3.85 1988 .......................... 3.52 18.27 15.99 30.72 24.45 4.04 3.02 1989 .......................... 2.55 14.39 16.80 36.27 23.79 3.55 2.64 1990 .......................... 3.64 14.96 18.13 34.44 23.21 2.94 2.67 1991 .......................... 3.76 16.02 20.79 34.84 20.94 2.11 1.55 1992 .......................... 4.05 17.64 22.41 31.38 20.49 3.00 1.04 1993 .......................... 4.52 18.79 19.24 32.49 20.99 2.59 1.39 1994

178

pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. These nonsampling errors also occur in complete censuses. Although no direct measurement of the biases due to nonsampling errors can be obtained, precautionary steps were...

179

diesel.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

differences, whereas stationary series can be estimated in level form. The unit root test could not reject the hypothesis that the retail and spot diesel fuel price series have...

180

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6: Total Petroleum Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Residential Commercial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: Kerosene Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Consumption Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Total Residential Commercial Industrial...

182

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0: Residual Fuel Oil Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Transportation...

183

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8: Coal Price and Expenditure Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2012 State Coal Coal Coke Prices Expenditures Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial...

184

Fuel.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

F20: Natural Gas Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Transpor- tation Electric Power Total Residential Commercial...

185

Fuel.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3: Liquefied Petroleum Gases Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial...

186

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F8: Distillate Fuel Oil Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Residential Commercial...

187

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5: Wood and Biomass Waste Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Total b Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Total b Residential...

188

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Table 19. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month Alaska North Slope California Kern River California Midway- Sunset Heavy Louisiana Sweet Louisiana Light Sweet Mars Blend West Texas Intermediate West Texas Sour Wyoming Sweet 1994 ................................... 9.77 11.65 11.79 - - - 15.65 14.16 - 1995 ................................... 11.12 13.59 13.37 - - - 17.03 15.52 - 1996 ................................... 15.32 15.97 15.70 - - - 20.96 19.49 - 1997 ................................... 14.84 15.02 14.88 - - - 19.27 17.77 - 1998 ................................... 8.47 8.59 8.48 - - - 12.89 11.50 - 1999 ................................... 12.46 14.02 12.22 - - - 17.78 16.66 - 2000 ...................................

189

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

02 02 Table 39. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk United States September 2013 ................ 18,086.6 19,586.1 23,807.2 207,919.4 20,155.0 1,474.6 1,484.7 579.9 6,419.0 - August 2013 ...................... 18,728.0 20,240.9 24,759.1 216,172.2 18,136.4 1,549.5 1,561.5 602.5 8,305.4 - September 2012 ................ 24,254.3 25,831.3 22,767.1 207,437.9 22,013.3 2,011.0 2,023.2 558.0 7,885.1 - PAD District I September 2013 ................ 5,611.2 5,750.6

190

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 3. U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products to End Users (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Motor Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Propane (Consumer Grade) Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate No. 4 Fuel a Residual Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Fuel Oil Total 1985 ................................. 57.5 0.3 34.6 3.7 0.3 0.5 25.0 5.0 29.9 0.5 25.2 1986 ................................. 61.2 0.3 35.1 3.4 0.3 0.4 24.4 4.4 28.8 0.7 31.6 1987 ................................. 61.0 0.2 36.8 3.8 0.3 0.4 24.1 4.5 28.5 0.8 29.0 1988 ................................. 61.0 0.2 38.2 4.3 0.3 0.4 24.5 4.6 29.1 1.1 30.2 1989 ................................. 61.2 0.2 40.1 2.8 0.3 0.5 24.3 4.5 28.8 0.9 30.4 1990 .................................

191

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Table 23. F.O.B. a Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month 20.0 or Less 20.1 to 25.0 25.1 to 30.0 30.1 to 35.0 35.1 to 40.0 40.1 to 45.0 45.1 or Greater 1985 .......................... 23.45 24.27 24.86 26.46 27.43 27.79 26.90 1986 .......................... 10.51 10.96 12.25 12.83 13.83 14.19 13.76 1987 .......................... 15.21 15.37 15.76 17.24 17.99 18.03 17.37 1988 .......................... 11.92 11.65 12.48 13.82 14.38 14.89 15.25 1989 .......................... 14.00 14.89 16.95 17.50 18.09 18.23 18.05 1990 .......................... 15.98 18.00 20.54 20.77 22.19 22.78 22.28 1991 .......................... 11.91 13.72 16.33 17.67 20.15 19.69 20.85 1992 .......................... 11.83 13.96 16.74 18.02 19.50 19.58 20.05 1993 .......................... 11.33 12.22 15.14 15.44

192

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 2. U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month Motor Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Propane (Consumer Grade) Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate No. 4 Fuel a Residual Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Fuel Oil Average 1985 ................................. 0.912 1.201 0.796 0.717 1.030 0.880 0.789 0.849 0.799 0.773 0.610 1986 ................................. 0.624 1.011 0.529 0.745 0.790 0.620 0.478 0.560 0.491 0.489 0.343 1987 ................................. 0.669 0.907 0.543 0.701 0.770 0.604 0.551 0.581 0.556 0.513 0.423 1988 ................................. 0.673 0.891 0.513 0.714 0.738 0.564 0.500 0.544 0.507 0.461 0.334 1989 .................................

193

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Table 47. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate Total Distillate and Kerosene No. 2 Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Distillate Ultra Low-Sulfur Low-Sulfur High-Sulfur United States September 2013 .......... 1,015.7 425.1 4,615.7 142,955.5 1,552.8 443.8 149,567.9 151,155.6 August 2013 ................ 808.9 292.3 3,336.7 147,654.9 1,731.8 204.7 152,928.1 154,151.9 September 2012 .......... 968.1 425.7 3,783.2 138,334.3 3,577.7 813.4 146,508.6 148,022.2 PAD District I September 2013 .......... 253.2 W 4,474.1 34,936.4 327.1 4.6 39,742.2 40,198.6 August 2013

194

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 5. U.S. Refiner Volumes of Petroleum Products for Resale (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Motor Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Propane (Consumer Grade) Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate No. 4 Fuel a Residual Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Fuel Oil Total 1985 ................................. 256.9 0.7 7.6 29.2 2.4 2.7 43.3 53.9 97.3 1.2 19.9 1986 ................................. 257.2 0.7 9.2 26.3 2.4 2.5 46.4 53.8 100.3 1.2 18.6 1987 ................................. 257.2 0.8 10.1 27.0 2.3 2.0 44.3 49.3 93.6 1.5 16.9 1988 ................................. 263.7 0.7 10.0 27.7 2.7 2.6 47.8 50.1 97.9 1.2 18.9 1989 ................................. 260.7 0.7 8.6 25.9 2.7 2.7 50.7 46.7 97.5 1.2 21.0 1990 .................................

195

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 18. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I PAD District II U.S. Average Less AK North Slope Average NY PA WV Average IL IN KS KY MI NE 1985 .............. 24.09 25.74 25.88 25.19 25.05 24.35 25.94 26.90 26.82 25.33 26.20 26.16 25.42 1986 .............. 12.51 14.13 14.76 16.03 15.77 14.68 14.30 14.70 14.55 14.02 14.20 14.61 13.70 1987 .............. 15.40 16.83 16.52 17.40 17.43 16.56 17.42 17.53 17.49 17.37 17.19 17.63 17.08 1988 .............. 12.58 13.97 14.21 W 15.26 14.35 14.65 14.79 14.78 14.55 14.58 14.92 14.08 1989 .............. 15.86 17.13 17.16 W 18.15 17.18 18.04 18.36 18.37 18.18 18.36 18.06 17.36 1990 .............. 20.03 21.57 22.06 23.32 23.00 22.16 22.88 23.36 23.46 23.21 23.20

196

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49 49 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 24. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month 20.0 or Less 20.1 to 25.0 25.1 to 30.0 30.1 to 35.0 35.1 to 40.0 40.1 to 45.0 45.1 or Greater 1985 .......................... 24.33 24.65 26.17 27.10 28.29 28.39 27.73 1986 .......................... 11.30 11.49 13.28 13.59 14.99 14.80 15.37 1987 .......................... 16.14 15.87 17.21 18.16 18.72 18.89 18.57 1988 .......................... 12.75 12.11 13.54 14.35 15.21 15.74 16.24 1989 .......................... 14.90 15.42 17.59 17.87 18.74 19.05 19.13 1990 .......................... 16.82 18.54 21.59 21.18 22.47 23.47 23.41 1991 .......................... 13.06 14.41 17.17 18.65 20.86 20.88 22.15 1992 .......................... 12.89 14.58

197

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 20. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity (Dollars per Barrel) Year Month 20.0 or Less 20.1 to 25.0 25.1 to 30.0 30.1 to 35.0 35.1 to 40.0 40.1 or Greater 1996 ................................. 16.01 18.61 15.35 19.97 20.23 20.91 1997 ................................. 15.44 16.27 14.87 18.38 18.62 19.26 1998 ................................. 9.22 9.62 8.50 12.03 12.17 12.80 1999 ................................. 14.00 15.30 12.50 16.92 17.18 17.64 2000 ................................. 24.42 25.64 23.64 28.10 28.36 29.09 2001 ................................. 19.53 19.59 18.18 23.31 23.99 24.43 2002 ................................. 21.08 20.80 19.39 23.62 23.94 24.26 2003 .................................

198

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table 45. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Regular Midgrade Conventional Reformulated Total Conventional Reformulated Total United States September 2013 .................... 201,282.1 98,460.8 299,742.8 8,017.2 2,616.4 10,633.6 August 2013 .......................... 208,707.3 102,892.1 311,599.3 10,270.0 2,819.0 13,089.0 September 2012 .................... 196,290.3 100,372.7 296,663.0 10,079.6 2,892.5 12,972.1 PAD District I September 2013 .................... 62,419.6 39,376.2 101,795.8 1,414.4 1,060.7 2,475.2 August 2013 .......................... 63,913.6 40,573.4 104,487.0 1,512.6 1,127.4

199

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly December 2013 Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total 1994 ............................... 29.7 31.2 36.1 113.5 22.8 172.4 7.6 7.8 10.1 14.6 0.1 24.8 1995 ............................... 24.0 25.3 19.4 105.1 26.0 150.5 6.0 6.3 5.1 13.6 0.1 18.7 1996 ............................... 24.1 25.4 17.8 108.5 27.1 153.4 5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 1997 ............................... 25.0 26.4 16.4 110.9 26.4 153.7 5.7 5.9 3.9 12.7 W 16.6 1998 ............................... 25.4 26.6 13.7 112.0

200

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Table 32. Refiner Prices of Aviation Fuels and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States September 2013 .......... 3.993 3.854 3.040 3.017 3.849 3.057 August 2013 ................ 4.298 4.025 3.002 2.995 3.707 3.055 September 2012 .......... 4.262 4.269 3.283 3.245 3.771 3.236 PAD District I September 2013 .......... W 3.827 3.055 3.060 3.867 3.172 August 2013 ................ W 4.087 3.028 3.036 3.847 3.132 September 2012 .......... W 4.347 3.265 3.249 3.754 3.366 Subdistrict IA September 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

c007.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Jul '01 to Aug '01: +2.3% Aug '00 to Aug '01: +1.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +1.7% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 4,000 4,300 4,600 4,900 5,200 5,500 5,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '01 to Aug '01: +6.1% Aug '00 to Aug '01: -2.5% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +4.8% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 2,100 2,200 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '01 to Aug '01: +2.2% Aug '00 to Aug '01: +4.0% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +3.2% U.S. Propane Sales 600 900 1,200 1,500 1,800 2,100 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1999 2000 2001 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '01 to Aug '01: +11.9% Aug '00 to Aug '01: -1.4% YTD '00 to YTD '01: +6.4% * Calculated on a per day basis. Prime Supplier Report August 2001 U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 600 700 800 900 1,000

202

Thermodynamics and heavy-quark free energies at finite temperature and density with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamics of two-flavor QCD at finite temperature and density is studied on a $16^3 \\times 4$ lattice, using a renormalization group improved gauge action and the clover improved Wilson quark action. In the simulations along lines of constant $m_{\\rm PS}/m_{\\rm V}$, we calculate the Taylor expansion coefficients of the heavy-quark free energy with respect to the quark chemical potential ($\\mu_q$) up to the second order. By comparing the expansion coefficients of the free energies between quark($Q$)and antiquark($\\bar{Q}$), and between $Q$ and $Q$, we find a characteristic difference at finite $\\mu_q$ due to the first order coefficient of the Taylor expansion. We also calculate the quark number and isospin susceptibilities, and find that the second order coefficient of the quark number susceptibility shows enhancement around the pseudo-critical temperature.

Y. Maezawa; S. Aoki; S. Ejiri; T. Hatsuda; N. Ishii; K. Kanaya; N. Ukita; T. Umeda

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch coronary angiography with third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp tube voltage: Feasibility, image quality, radiation dose, and effect of iterative reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Low tube voltage reduces radiation exposure in coronary CT angiography (CTA). Using 70 kVp tube potential has so far not been possible because CT systems were unable to provide sufficiently high tube current with low voltage. Objective We evaluated feasibility, image quality (IQ), and radiation dose of coronary CTA using a third-generation dual-source CT system capable of producing 450 mAs tube current at 70 kVp tube voltage. Methods Coronary CTA was performed in 26 consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease, selected for body weight pitch spiral acquisition was used. Filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms were applied. IQ was assessed using a 4-point rating scale (1 = excellent, 4 = nondiagnostic) and objective parameters. Results Mean age was 62 ± 9 years (46% males; mean body mass index, 27.7 ± 3.8 kg/m2; mean heart rate, 54 ± 5 beats/min). Mean dose-length product was 20.6 ± 1.9 mGy × cm; mean estimated effective radiation dose was 0.3 ± 0.03 mSv. Diagnostic IQ was found in 365 of 367 (FBP) and 366 of 367 (IR) segments (P nonsignificant). IQ was rated “excellent” in 53% (FBP) and 86% (IR) segments (P = .001) and “nondiagnostic” in 2 (FBP) and 1 segment (IR) (P nonsignificant). Mean IQ score was lesser in FBP vs IR (1.5 ± 0.4 vs 1.1 ± 0.2; P pitch spiral acquisition and 70 kVp tube voltage is feasible and provides both robust IQ and very low radiation exposure.

Michaela M. Hell; Daniel Bittner; Annika Schuhbaeck; Gerd Muschiol; Michael Brand; Michael Lell; Michael Uder; Stephan Achenbach; Mohamed Marwan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Wilson function transform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......find for u (1 + u) -- 2F1 + + , + - 2 ; -u C1u---- + C2u---+ , (6.16) where C1 and C2 are independent of u. So...that the left-hand side behaves for large t as C1u--+1 +C2u-++1 , where C1 and C2 are independent of t. So for......

Wolter Groenevelt

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 1 Overview During 1998, the natural gas industry showed modest declines in both production and end-use consumption. Pro- duction decreased slightly, by 1 percent, to 18.7 trillion cubic feet. Consumption fell in nearly every end use sector, contributing to an overall drop of 3 percent. Declines in consumption were seen in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. These decreases were somewhat offset by an increase in deliveries to electric utilities, attributed in part to the warmer-than-normal summer weather seen during 1998. Natural gas prices also fell in 1998 from the wellhead to every end use sector except vehicle fuel. Imports took on a greater role in meeting supply during 1998, contributing a 15-percent share of U.S. gas con- sumption, compared with a 5-percent share in the early 1980's. Underground

206

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Commercial Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 1. Commercial Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste e Alabama - 310.9 164.6 0.3 63.1 6.3 - 234.3 4.0 549.2 2,331.4 2,880.6 Alaska 36.0 146.0 268.7 3.1 14.9 21.0 - 307.8 1.8 491.7 430.9 922.6 Arizona - 326.0 168.7 0.1 36.7 17.7 - 223.1 2.6 551.7 2,802.8 3,354.5 Arkansas - 355.9 86.2 (s) 28.7 10.2 - 125.1 5.8 486.7 911.1 1,397.8 California - 2,038.0 1,205.8 4.6 216.1 40.6 - 1,467.2 49.6 3,554.8 16,018.1 19,572.9 Colorado 8.2 437.8 138.1 0.5 62.7 6.1 - 207.4 8.0 661.4 1,878.0 2,539.4 Connecticut - 380.2 325.3 1.5 92.5 6.2 0.8 426.2 4.3 810.7 2,037.9 2,848.6 Delaware - 142.3 23.7 0.3 26.6 1.0 - 51.6 0.8 194.7 453.2 647.8 Dist. of Col. 0.2

207

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 13. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1995-1999 Figure 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters O n s y s t e m C o m m e r c i a l R e s i d e n t i a l O n s y s t e m I n d u s t r i a l O n s y s t e m V e h i c l e F u e l E l e c t r i c U t i l i t i e s Note: Onsystem sales deliveries represent 66.1 percent of commercial deliveries, 17.4 percent of industrial deliveries, and 85.6 percent of vehicle fuel deliveries in 1999. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC- 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants." Cautionary Note: Number of Residential Consumers The Energy Information Administration

208

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 217,377 102,770 1.18 1,067 0.01 38 0.75 34,417 0.76 28,883 0.89 25,986 0.87 192,094 0.99 O r e g o n Oregon - Table 84 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oregon, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 19 17 18 17 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 4,200 2,520 1,743 1,382 1,263 From Oil Wells...........................................

209

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 269,739,909 7.31 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 224,402,286 6.32 Northern Illinois Gas Co ........................... IL 196,608,329 4.63 Consumers Pwr Co .................................. MI 153,128,350 4.92 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. OH,KY,PA,MD 138,064,908 7.21 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 126,142,540 6.61 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 125,456,377 5.35 East Ohio Gas Co .................................... OH 117,574,196 6.21 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co................... IL 89,685,006 6.81 Atlanta Gas Lt Co ..................................... GA 89,103,601 6.69 Lone Star Gas Co..................................... TX 84,559,915 5.95 Brooklyn Union Gas Co............................ NY

210

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,000,412 436,075 4.85 609,243 3.11 31 0.55 433,483 9.18 74,241 2.38 282,912 9.28 1,226,742 6.17 West North Central West North Central - Table 32 32. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 22,277 21,669 21,755 21,253 17,820 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 655,917 648,822 638,038 552,800 505,882 From Oil Wells........................................... 134,776 133,390 118,776 120,981

211

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E3. Residential Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 E3. Residential Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy e Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Total e Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama - 14.85 24.64 25.42 29.36 29.27 11.31 16.62 32.52 27.93 Alaska - 8.66 26.33 30.13 38.46 27.10 15.22 14.20 51.63 21.50 Arizona - 14.85 28.06 32.11 35.22 35.20 15.22 17.30 32.48 28.11 Arkansas - 11.29 25.11 25.91 29.94 29.87 11.31 13.58 26.42 21.28 California - 9.74 28.37 32.46 34.00 33.86 15.22 11.24 43.30 22.35 Colorado - 8.00 24.88 26.09 26.46 26.45 15.22 9.69 33.02 16.54 Connecticut - 13.46 25.47 29.35 35.42 26.44 9.07 20.79 53.06 29.71 Delaware - 14.94 24.45 26.41 32.22 28.65 11.31 19.80 40.15 29.64 Dist. of Col. - 12.86 25.92 - 34.15 25.93 11.31 13.07 39.26 22.36 Florida - 17.89 27.10 27.64 40.75 40.36 11.31

212

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 A1. Comparison of Electric Utility Natural Gas Consumption Data by State, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Form EIA-176 Form EIA-759 Difference MDP a Alabama ............................................ 17,039 20,918 3,879 22.8 Alaska ............................................... 29,720 30,529 810 2.7 Arizona .............................................. 51,577 50,875 -702 1.4 Arkansas ........................................... 38,197 40,088 1,891 5.0 California ........................................... 141,730 144,655 2,924 2.1 Colorado............................................ 20,048 19,155 -893 4.7 Connecticut ....................................... 13,704 13,095 -609 4.7 Delaware ........................................... 19,587 19,878 292 1.5

213

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 472,632 126,891 1.46 5,796 0.03 84 1.65 14,102 0.31 281,346 8.64 37,659 1.26 460,082 2.36 F l o r i d a Florida - Table 56 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 98 92 96 96 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

214

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama .................................... 3,526 4,105 4,156 4,171 4,204 Alaska ....................................... 100 102 141 148 99 Arizona ...................................... 7 7 8 8 8 Arkansas ................................... 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 3,650 California ................................... 997 978 930 847 1,152 Colorado.................................... 7,017 8,251 12,433 13,838 9,678 Illinois ........................................ 372 370 372 185 300 Indiana ...................................... 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 Kansas ...................................... 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 Kentucky ................................... 13,311 13,501 13,825 R 14,381 14,750 Louisiana ................................... 14,169 15,295 14,958 18,399 16,717 Maryland ...................................

215

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 55 13. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1995-1999 Figure 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters O n s y s t e m C o m m e r c i a l R e s i d e n t i a l O n s y s t e m I n d u s t r i a l O n s y s t e m V e h i c l e F u e l E l e c t r i c U t i l i t i e s Note: Onsystem sales deliveries represent 66.1 percent of commercial deliveries, 17.4 percent of industrial deliveries, and 85.6 percent of vehicle fuel deliveries in 1999. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC- 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants." Cautionary Note: Number

216

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama ............. 586.1 349.4 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.1 411.8 86.3 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,439.3 Alaska ................. 6.0 42.3 3.3 0.0 1.5 4.8 0.0 13.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (s) 66.3 Arizona ............... 449.9 183.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 327.3 89.1 2.4 0.0 0.8 2.5 1.5 1,057.9 Arkansas ............. 300.5 109.2 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.6 148.5 28.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 588.9 California ............ 19.7 630.1 0.4 11.1 (s) 11.5 383.6 413.4 69.0 122.0 8.4 75.3 20.1 1,753.1 Colorado ............. 362.4 88.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 20.2 0.9

217

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Consumption - Table 18 State 1998 1999 Sales Transported Total Sales Transported Total 18. Number of Natural Gas Residential Consumers by State, 1998-1999 Table Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Please see the cautionary note regarding the number of residential customers located in the Consumption and Consumer Prices sections of this report. Alabama ...................... 788,464 0 788,464 775,311 0 775,311 Alaska.......................... 86,243 0 86,243 88,924 0 88,924 Arizona ........................ 764,167 0 764,167 802,469 0 802,469 Arkansas ..................... 550,017 0 550,017 554,121 0 554,121 California ..................... 9,177,195 4,733 9,181,928 9,318,830

218

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 12. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 4 0 0 0 4 Colorado...................... 0 10 0 0 a 4,517 4,526 Connecticut ................. 0 31 0 0 0 31 Georgia........................ 0 12 0 0 0 12 Hawaii.......................... 2,752 0 0 0 0 2,752 Illinois .......................... 0 14 2,513 0 0 2,527 Indiana......................... 0 0 0 0 b 5,442 5,442 Iowa............................. 0 12 0 0 0 12 Kentucky ..................... 0 3 0 0 0 3 Maine........................... 0 43 0 0 0 43 Maryland ..................... 0 498 0 0 0 498 Massachusetts ............ 0 134 0 0 0 134 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 20,896 20,896 Minnesota.................... 0 64 0 0 0 64

219

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

220

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 Alabama ...................... 46,544 23,084 97,052 2 12,423 179,106 Alaska.......................... 15,617 27,079 75,474 0 28,961 147,130 Arizona ........................ 36,100 31,577 27,688 152 39,077 134,593 Arkansas ..................... 38,190 24,208 128,768 1 40,128 231,296 California ..................... 549,931 239,363 533,172 2,732 4,472 1,329,670 Colorado...................... 110,839 61,339 50,714 9 8,417 231,318 Connecticut ................. 35,120 23,888 15,721 36 10,606 85,371 D.C. ............................. 13,249 5,629 0 0 0 18,878 Delaware ..................... 7,755 5,590 15,149 2 10,769 39,265 Florida ......................... 14,102 36,827 52,694 84 273,858 377,565 Georgia........................ 107,398 43,554 23,578 12 26,058 200,601 Hawaii.......................... 535 1,747 62 0 0 2,343 Idaho ...........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 82,678 28,157 0.32 457 0.00 152 2.99 36,100 0.80 38,674 1.19 31,788 1.06 134,871 0.69 A r i z o n a Arizona - Table 49 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 6 7 7 8 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 711 470 417 398 429 From Oil Wells...........................................

222

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 2,382,220 1,344,142 14.95 384,006 1.96 3,489 61.37 678,764 14.37 174,639 5.61 323,946 10.63 2,524,982 12.70 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous - Table 37 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,014 996 947 862 1,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 96,329 88,173 80,182 82,360 91,397 From Oil Wells........................................... 289,430 313,581 318,852 316,472

223

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 31,164 0 0.00 0 0.00 4 0.08 13,249 0.29 0 0.00 16,862 0.56 30,115 0.15 District of Columbia District of Columbia - Table 55 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

224

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 Alabama Florida ...................................................................... 0 455,199 -455,199 Georgia .................................................................... 0 1,511,671 -1,511,671 Louisiana.................................................................. 0 b 1 -1 Mississippi................................................................ 2,868,594 b * 2,868,594 Oklahoma................................................................. 0 b * * South Carolina ......................................................... 0 b 7 -7 Tennessee ............................................................... 395 1,103,063 -1,102,668 Texas ....................................................................... 0 b 1 -1 Total ........................................................................

225

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 330,620 104,610 1.20 0 0.00 32 0.63 110,449 2.44 7,738 0.24 82,345 2.75 305,174 1.57 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota - Table 70 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

226

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E2. Total End-Use Energy Price Estimates, 2011 E2. Total End-Use Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy g Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 5.05 8.14 26.40 22.77 25.54 27.12 13.18 19.42 25.91 3.03 17.63 27.08 19.85 Alaska 3.81 8.66 29.58 23.12 29.76 31.60 17.33 34.62 26.69 14.42 23.53 47.13 25.17 Arizona 2.75 11.12 27.75 22.84 31.95 26.97 17.00 17.23 26.72 11.92 23.93 28.46 25.23 Arkansas 3.25 8.63 26.39 22.45 26.66 27.35 15.63 33.22 27.03 3.33 18.97 22.02 19.63 California 3.64 8.19 27.34 22.51 31.21 30.02 20.92 23.47 27.60 6.72 21.50 38.35 24.14 Colorado 2.31 7.47 26.87 22.41 26.35 27.21 - 19.97 26.25 14.80 19.48 27.61 21.07 Connecticut - 10.42 26.69 22.95 32.04 28.99 15.83 28.58 28.10 8.15 23.26

227

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Year Supply Disposition Dry Production Withdrawals from Storage Imports Balancing Item Total Additions to Storage Exports Consumption Total 1930 ....................... 1,903,771 NA 21 -35,490 1,868,302 NA 1,798 1,866,504 1,868,302 1931 ....................... 1,659,614 NA 44 -35,466 1,624,192 NA 2,231 1,621,961 1,624,192 1932 ....................... 1,541,982 NA 38 -37,808 1,504,212 NA 1,693 1,502,519 1,504,212 1933 ....................... 1,548,393 NA 83 -41,199 1,507,277 NA 2,158 1,505,119 1,507,277 1934 ....................... 1,763,606 NA 68 -45,075 1,718,599 NA 5,801 1,712,798 1,718,599 1935 ....................... 1,913,475 NA 106 -41,074 1,872,507 11,294 6,800 1,854,413 1,872,507 1936 ....................... 2,164,413 NA 152 -46,677 2,117,888 10,998 7,436 2,099,454 2,117,888 1937 ....................... 2,403,273 NA 289 -52,157 2,351,405

228

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

229

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: N e w J e r s e y 524,707 204,791 2.36 0 0.00 0 0.00 196,658 4.35 30,996 0.95 146,653 4.89 579,099 2.97 New Jersey - Table 77 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

230

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 240,980 106,497 1.23 0 0.00 0 0.00 50,786 1.12 12,418 0.38 36,427 1.21 206,129 1.06 North Carolina North Carolina - Table 80 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

231

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 218,232 101,368 1.13 72,189 0.37 42 0.74 69,189 1.46 23,457 0.75 61,500 2.02 255,556 1.29 V i r g i n i a Virginia - Table 87 87. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Virginia, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,671 1,671 2,046 2,388 2,752 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 49,818 54,290 58,249 57,263 72,189 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

232

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Alabama.............. 6.86 100.0 7.22 100.0 8.35 100.0 8.21 100.0 8.34 100.0 Alaska ................. 3.63 100.0 3.42 100.0 3.77 100.0 3.67 100.0 3.64 100.0 Arizona................ 7.82 100.0 7.52 100.0 7.83 100.0 8.50 100.0 9.13 100.0 Arkansas ............. 5.48 100.0 5.92 100.0 6.67 100.0 6.85 100.0 7.22 100.0 California............. 6.42 99.4 6.44 99.3 6.81 99.2 6.92 99.3 6.62 99.3 Colorado ............. 4.80 100.0 4.39 100.0 4.81 100.0 5.22 100.0 5.38 100.0 Connecticut ......... 10.00 100.0 10.08 100.0 10.33 100.0 10.60 100.0 10.54 100.0 D.C...................... 8.03 100.0 9.19 100.0 9.39 100.0 8.91 99.6 8.70 93.2 Delaware............. 6.60 100.0 7.12 100.0 8.36 100.0 8.90 100.0 8.63 100.0 Florida ................. 9.85 99.4 10.74 99.3 11.90 99.2 11.29 99.3 11.59 99.2 Georgia ............... 6.18 100.0 6.69 100.0 7.41 100.0 6.78 99.9 4.37 60.2 Hawaii .................

233

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 A1. Form EIA-176 Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 213 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 PART IV: SUPPLY OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS RECEIVED WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED INTO REPORT STATE RESPONDENT COPY Page 2 PART III: TYPE OF COMPANY AND GAS ACTIVITIES OPERATED IN THE REPORT STATE 1.0 Type of Company (check one) 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date: a b c d e Investor owned distributor Municipally owned distributor Interstate pipeline Intrastate pipeline Storage operator f g h i j SNG plant operator Integrated oil and gas Producer Gatherer Processor k Other (specify) 2.0 Gas Activities Operated On-system Within the Report State (check all that apply) a b c d e Produced Natural Gas

234

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,791,454 1,109,359 12.34 382,715 1.95 3,327 58.52 568,496 12.03 144,655 4.65 244,701 8.03 2,070,537 10.41 C a l i f o r n i a California - Table 45 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas California, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 997 978 930 847 1,152 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 93,808 86,431 78,800 81,097 89,842 From Oil Wells........................................... 289,430 313,581 318,852 316,472 342,372 Total.............................................................

235

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 10 nearly 59 percent of U.S. marketed production. In all, 32 States reported measureable production in 1998. · U.S. offshore production decreased slightly during 1998, declining 88 billion cubic feet (1 percent) from the 1997 level, to 5.8 trillion cubic feet. Offshore gross withdrawals accounted for 24 percent of the total U.S. gross withdrawals in 1998. Of the five States with off- shore gross withdrawals of natural gas, two showed declines: Texas had a decrease of 104 billion cubic feet (8 percent), and Alabama had a decrease of 16 bil- lion cubic feet (4 percent). These two States also had declines in onshore production during the same period. Alaska, California, and Louisiana, the remain- ing three States with offshore gross withdrawals of natural gas, showed increases in offshore production ranging from 1 percent

236

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,577,567 697,640 8.03 241,145 1.23 204 4.02 379,628 8.40 366,270 11.24 312,424 10.42 1,756,166 9.02 South Atlantic South Atlantic - Table 39 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 4,496 4,427 4,729 5,388 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 41,307 37,822 36,827 33,054 41,468 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

237

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Alabama.............. 5,043 19.8 5,213 19.9 5,470 18.9 11,432 35.3 5,009 19.5 Alaska ................. 0 - 5,019 20.1 9,990 36.6 12,241 45.5 13,649 50.4 Arizona................ 2,709 9.3 3,282 11.6 4,309 14.9 4,662 15.5 4,777 15.0 Arkansas ............. 1,351 4.9 1,104 4.0 1,550 5.0 1,699 5.8 2,576 9.2 California............. 134,346 51.3 133,483 47.9 106,531 45.3 125,836 49.6 144,864 51.3 Colorado ............. 3,403 5.2 3,863 5.8 4,702 6.8 4,998 7.2 3,573 5.7 Connecticut ......... 7,455 19.1 6,836 18.0 5,193 13.1 7,709 18.1 13,270 31.3 D.C...................... 1,343 9.1 3,954 23.2 4,823 29.5 8,122 45.1 8,045 47.7 Florida ................. 861 2.2 988 2.4 1,204 2.9 932 2.5 1,281 3.4 Georgia ............... 4,304 8.0 3,663 6.5 3,646 5.9 6,211 10.9 9,078 16.4 Idaho ................... 1,427 14.1 1,450 14.0 1,543

238

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 267,998 105,950 1.22 0 0.00 1 0.02 68,901 1.52 5,947 0.18 43,027 1.43 223,826 1.15 I o w a Iowa - Table 62 62. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

239

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 6,597 2,550 0.03 0 0.00 0 0.00 957 0.02 0 0.00 2,547 0.08 6,054 0.03 M a i n e Maine - Table 60 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maine, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0

240

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

243 243 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Selected Natural Gas and Related Reports Recurring Natural Gas Reports · Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0130. Published monthly. Other Reports Covering Natural Gas, Natural Gas Liquids, and Other Energy Sources · Monthly Energy Review, DOE/EIA-0035. Published monthly. Provides national aggregate data for natural gas, natural gas liquids, and other energy sources. · Short-Term Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0202. Published quarterly. Provides forecasts for next six quarters for nat- ural gas and other energy sources. · U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves -1997 Annual Report, DOE/EIA-0216(97)/Ad- vance Summary, September 1998. · Annual Energy Review 1998, DOE/ EIA-0384(98), July 1999. Published annually. · Annual Report to Congress 1998, DOE/ EIA-0173(98), April 1999. Published

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 35,391 5,607 0.06 1,620 0.01 1 0.02 11,646 0.26 2,865 0.09 9,264 0.31 29,383 0.15 South Dakota South Dakota - Table 88 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Dakota, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 55 56 61 60 59 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,000 848 905 687 772 From Oil Wells...........................................

242

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 A1. Comparison of Electric Utility Natural Gas Consumption Data by State, 1998 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Form EIA-176 Form EIA-759 Difference MDP a Alabama ............................................ 26,165 25,546 -618 2.4 Alaska ............................................... 28,961 28,784 -177 0.6 Arizona .............................................. 39,137 38,674 -463 1.2 Arkansas ........................................... 40,150 40,576 426 1.1 California ........................................... 323,664 271,154 -52,510 19.4 Colorado............................................ 8,894 10,627 1,733 19.5 Connecticut ....................................... 10,655 10,719 64 0.6 Delaware ........................................... 10,828 11,135 307 2.8

243

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Residential Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 0. Residential Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy e Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Total e Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama - 551.6 1.5 1.8 177.5 180.8 26.3 758.7 3,661.5 4,420.2 Alaska - 177.7 213.1 4.3 19.8 237.2 12.3 427.1 376.0 803.1 Arizona - 580.4 0.5 (s) 192.2 192.7 16.4 789.5 3,666.2 4,455.7 Arkansas - 386.6 1.5 0.3 155.8 157.6 37.8 582.0 1,693.8 2,275.9 California - 5,089.8 17.8 20.2 1,050.7 1,088.8 213.3 6,391.9 13,060.9 19,452.8 Colorado - 1,073.5 2.1 0.3 325.8 328.2 53.3 1,454.9 2,059.2 3,514.1 Connecticut - 618.5 1,518.1 5.2 226.9 1,750.1 28.9 2,397.5 2,339.0 4,736.5 Delaware - 154.3 65.9 3.7 105.0 174.6 5.1 334.0 634.6 968.6 Dist. of Col. - 161.8 5.4 - (s) 5.4 0.1 167.2 276.2 443.4 Florida - 297.6 4.3 1.7 297.7 303.7 57.6

244

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Minerals Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Figure 5. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States, 1995-1999 Figure T e x a s L o u i s i a n a O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g C o l o r a d o K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l a s k a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 95 96 97 98 99 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value

245

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Annual 1999 11. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1999 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Salt Caverns Aquifers Depleted Fields Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama ................. 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 0 0 2 24 2 24 0.29 California................ 1 2 0 0 8 386 9 388 4.72 Colorado ................ 0 0 0 0 9 100 9 100 1.21 Illinois ..................... 0 0 17 745 13 153 30 899 10.92 Indiana ................... 0 0 17 95 11 19 28 113 1.38 Iowa ....................... 0 0 4 273 0 0 4 273 3.32 Kansas ................... 1 4 0 0 17 298 18 301 3.66 Kentucky ................ 0 0 3 10 22 210 25 220 2.67 Louisiana................ 6 34 0 0 8 530 14 564 6.85 Maryland ................ 0 0 0 0 1 62 1 62 0.75

246

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Petroleum and Natural Gas Prices and Expenditures, Ranked by State, 2011 7. Petroleum and Natural Gas Prices and Expenditures, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Petroleum a Natural Gas b Prices Expenditures Prices Expenditures State Dollars per Million Btu State Million Dollars State Dollars per Million Btu State Million Dollars 1 District of Columbia 28.93 Texas 127,656 Hawaii 43.43 Texas 14,692 2 West Virginia 28.25 California 90,315 District of Columbia 11.89 California 14,356 3 Connecticut 28.05 Florida 42,476 Vermont 11.46 New York 11,161 4 Pennsylvania 27.95 Louisiana 36,579 Maryland 9.98 Florida 7,707 5 Vermont 27.91 New York 34,155 Washington 9.77 Illinois 7,455 6 Oregon

247

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18 18 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 977,570 306,110 3.40 195 0.00 47 0.83 445,217 9.42 40,716 1.31 188,520 6.18 980,610 4.93 I l l i n o i s Illinois - Table 54 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 372 370 372 185 300 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 325 289 224 203 189 From Oil Wells........................................... 10 9 7 6 6 Total............................................................. 335 298 231 209 195 Repressuring

248

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -881,315 198,110 2.28 1,644,531 8.37 109 2.15 66,521 1.47 174,577 5.36 43,800 1.46 483,117 2.48 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma - Table 83 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,487 13,438 13,074 13,439 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 29,121 29,733 29,733 R 29,734 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,626,858

249

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -132,916 49,807 0.57 178,023 0.91 5 0.10 29,664 0.66 417 0.01 24,986 0.83 104,879 0.54 West Virginia West Virginia - Table 95 95. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,565 2,499 2,703 2,846 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 39,830 36,144 35,148 31,000 39,072 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 183,773 186,231

250

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 18 movements to and from every State in the two regions reflect a significant drop in throughput volumes. · Over the past several years, coalbed gas production has been increasing in Wyoming and areas adjacent to the Rocky Mountains, and several pipelines have ex- panded to accommodate the growth in productive capacity. Interstate natural gas flows in 1998 in the several States in the region not only reflect the greater production but also the expanded pipeline capacity on such systems as the KN Interstate Pipeline (with its new Pony Express line) and the Trailblazer System, both completed during the latter months of 1997. These two pipelines bring gas from the Rocky Moun- tain area to markets from Denver to Chicago. Imports and Exports Highlights of the developments in natural gas import and export crossborder trade during

251

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 766,728 332,955 3.83 108,542 0.55 432 8.51 296,576 6.56 7,663 0.24 156,630 5.22 794,255 4.08 O h i o Ohio - Table 82 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,094 1,054 1,113 985 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 34,731 34,520 34,380 34,238 34,098 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 132,151 126,336 119,251 116,246

252

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 1 9 7 2 1 9 7 4 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Percent 7. Net Imports as a Percentage of Total Consumption of Natural Gas, 1972-1999 Figure Sources: 1972-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production 1979. 1980-1989: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report"; and Form FPC-14, "Annual Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas"; 1990: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, and Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; 1991-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, Form EIA-64A,

253

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -6,165,908 3,151,091 35.05 13,172,300 67.22 184 3.24 318,867 6.75 1,737,554 55.81 263,862 8.65 5,471,557 27.52 West South Central West South Central - Table 35 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 102,525 102,864 105,139 111,136 110,057 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 11,824,788 12,182,369 12,102,607 R 12,034,615 11,738,276 From Oil Wells...........................................

254

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E7. Electric Power Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 E7. Electric Power Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Electricity Imports c,d Total Energy e Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste b Alabama 2.87 4.28 22.05 - - 22.05 0.61 2.43 - 2.56 Alaska 3.35 4.97 23.21 - 20.89 22.50 - - 12.44 6.36 Arizona 1.98 4.94 23.18 - - 23.18 0.75 2.43 12.44 2.16 Arkansas 1.91 4.64 21.73 - 20.44 21.55 0.64 2.43 - 2.13 California 2.21 4.61 23.74 2.88 25.21 3.56 0.71 3.60 12.44 3.32 Colorado 1.72 4.80 23.63 - - 23.63 - 2.43 12.44 2.33 Connecticut 3.68 4.97 22.15 - 17.75 18.40 0.65 2.43 12.44 2.76 Delaware 3.41 4.94 21.93 - 17.24 20.99 - 2.43 - 4.51 Dist. of Col. - 4.98 21.93 - - 21.93 - - - 15.33 Florida 3.53 5.77 21.99 3.82 17.27 9.99 0.77 2.43 - 4.53 Georgia 3.75 4.64 22.85 - 19.14 22.56 0.75 2.43 - 3.03 Hawaii 1.66 -

255

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 98. Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1998 (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production Average Wellhead Price of Marketed Production 1930 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,978,911 75,140 1,903,771 0.08 1931 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,721,902 62,288 1,659,614 0.07 1932 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,593,798 51,816 1,541,982 0.06 1933 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,596,673 48,280 1,548,393 0.06 1934 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,815,796 52,190 1,763,606 0.06 1935 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,968,963 55,488 1,913,475 0.06 1936 ...................... 2,691,512 73,507 NA 392,528 2,225,477 61,064 2,164,413

256

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -6,144,473 3,290,856 37.89 13,439,527 68.41 120 2.36 351,740 7.78 1,776,122 54.51 265,515 8.85 5,684,353 29.20 West South Central West South Central - Table 41 41. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 88,034 88,734 62,357 62,348 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 94,233 102,525 102,864 R 105,139 111,136 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

257

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 66 New England .................................... 170,809 2,010,577 136,563 210,094 256,496 12,372 Middle Atlantic .................................. 821,578 8,883,339 667,203 808,589 743,879 23,366 East North Central ............................ 1,393,303 12,651,969 690,776 1,049,640 1,404,685 79,100 West North Central ........................... 433,483 4,826,886 282,912 513,380 436,075 24,472 South Atlantic ................................... 389,544 6,027,575 309,295 640,635 721,597 17,540 East South Central ........................... 185,413 2,852,538 135,022 302,161 557,539 8,276 West South Central .......................... 318,867 5,997,832 263,862 529,890 3,151,091 11,533 Mountain........................................... 314,177 4,218,179 209,836 373,944 300,024 11,414 Pacific Contiguous............................

258

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

An An overhead view of a natural gas processing plant. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 66 New England .................................... 163,483 1,980,506 156,146 202,286 210,342 15,556 Middle Atlantic .................................. 754,098 8,863,194 612,992 799,672 687,745 29,303 East North Central ............................ 1,282,157 12,433,376 649,117 1,030,125 1,351,611 63,863 West North Central ........................... 422,855 4,859,806 277,411 523,570 465,837 29,837 South Atlantic ................................... 379,628 5,794,996 312,424 526,487 697,640 16,213 East South Central ........................... 186,321 2,836,854 131,922 311,731 517,935 10,713 West South Central .......................... 351,740 5,990,194 265,515 543,636 3,290,856 14,326 Mountain...........................................

259

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Workmen perform maintenance on this offshore natural gas drilling platform. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 209 Summary of Data Collection Operations and Report Methodology The 1998 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supple- mental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report ." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Form EIA-176 Survey Design The original version of Form EIA-176 was approved in 1980 with a mandatory response requirement. Prior to 1980, pub- lished data were based on voluntary responses to Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior predecessor Forms BOM-6-1340-A and BOM-6-1341-A of the same title. In 1982, the

260

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 0 463 0.01 0 0.00 0 0.00 524 0.01 0 0.00 1,749 0.06 2,735 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii - Table 52 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -65,951 75,947 0.87 466,648 2.38 0 0.00 15,617 0.35 28,784 0.88 27,079 0.90 147,426 0.76 A l a s k a Alaska - Table 48 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,733 9,497 9,294 10,562 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 104 100 102 141 148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 180,639 179,470 183,747 179,534 182,993 From

262

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Consumer Prices Following the trend in wellhead prices, end-use consumers paid lower prices for natural gas in 1998 than in 1997. Price declines ranged from 2 percent in the residential sector to 14 percent in the electric utility sector. Consumers in the New England Census Division, which comprises six States (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont), paid the highest prices in all end-use sectors. Residential customers in New England paid $9.59 per thousand cubic feet in 1998, virtually the same as the $9.57 price paid the previous year, with prices in the individual States ranging from $6.54 to $10.60 per thousand cubic feet. New England also paid the highest prices for natural gas deliveries to commercial, industrial, and electric utility consumers where prices averaged $7.18, $4.79, and $2.90 per thousand cubic feet, respectively. Industrial

263

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) June 2013 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2011 2011 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 3.09 5.66 26.37 22.77 25.54 27.12 13.18 19.42 25.90 0.61 3.01 8.75 2.56 27.08 19.85 Alaska 3.64 6.70 29.33 23.12 29.76 31.60 20.07 34.62 26.61 - 14.42 20.85 6.36 47.13 25.17 Arizona 1.99 7.07 27.73 22.84 31.95 26.97 17.00 17.23 26.71 0.75 6.31 10.79 2.16 28.46 25.23 Arkansas 1.93 6.94 26.37 22.45 26.66 27.35 17.35 33.22

264

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -80,882 111,143 1.28 603,586 3.07 0 0.00 70,217 1.55 36,896 1.13 41,788 1.39 260,044 1.34 K a n s a s Kansas - Table 63 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,156 8,571 7,694 6,989 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 19,365 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 628,900 636,582 629,755 618,016

265

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Southern California Gas Co......................... 277,719,484 114,941,064 269,458,175 2,169,770 82,219,615 746,508,108 Pacific Gas and Elec Co.............................. 236,015,345 109,165,123 173,522,808 743,788 40,977,372 560,424,436 Lone Star Gas Co ........................................ 69,066,379 47,818,632 278,167,278 0 127,909,424 522,961,713 Nicor Gas..................................................... 222,803,478 91,585,840 137,592,440 5,656 37,794,659 489,782,073 Midcon Texas P L Operator Inc................... 0 0 365,563,289 0 114,011,139 479,574,428 Columbia Gas Dist Co ................................. 167,055,264 94,607,073 180,274,855 11,992 445,223 442,394,407 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co ........................... 133,426,119 124,790,684

266

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 238,205 64,868 0.75 0 0.00 6 0.12 110,779 2.45 16,035 0.49 61,995 2.07 253,682 1.30 M i s s o u r i Missouri - Table 72 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 12 15 24 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 8 16 25 5 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

267

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 13. Consumption of Natural Gas by State, 1995-1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table 1995 Total................................. 19,660,161 792,315 427,853 700,335 21,580,665 1996 Total................................. 20,005,508 799,629 450,033 711,446 21,966,616 1997 Total................................. 20,004,012 776,306 426,873 751,470 21,958,660 1998 Total................................. 19,469,047 R 773,049 401,314 635,477 R 21,278,888 1999 Total................................. 19,882,247 677,655 399,509 735,078 21,694,489 Alabama .................................... 295,414 9,954 5,336 22,109 332,813 Alaska ....................................... 150,054 224,355 41,149 4,475 420,033 Arizona ...................................... 142,216 35 0 18,570 160,821 Arkansas ................................... 249,371

268

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Glossary Aquifer Storage Field: A sub-surface facility for storing natural gas consisting of water-bearing sands topped by an impermeable cap rock. Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differ- ences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-reporting problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of variations in company accounting and billing practices; differences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data-reporting systems that vary in scope, format,

269

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

270

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 · Regulated utilities began to sell their electric generation operations to nonregulated power producers in 1998. Fifty were sold during the year, with a relatively large number fueled by natural gas. It is anticipated that this is the beginning of a trend that will continue as the restruc- turing of the electric utility industry proceeds. Natural gas consumption at these facilities was previously included in electric utility consumption but is now included in industrial consumption. The inclusion of nonutility gas consumption in the industrial sector somewhat offset the decline in consumption by man- ufacturing groups that are intensive natural gas users. · Natural gas deliveries to electric utilities rose by 290 billion cubic feet to 3.3 trillion cubic feet, 10 percent above the 1997 level. Sustained periods of very high summer temperatures in the Southwest region,

271

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 153,537 53,053 0.61 1,695 0.01 0 0.00 40,771 0.90 5,044 0.15 28,911 0.96 127,779 0.66 N e b r a s k a Nebraska - Table 74 74. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Nebraska, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 87 87 88 91 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 2,093 1,557 1,328 1,144 1,214 From Oil Wells...........................................

272

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,566,960 721,597 8.03 254,154 1.30 209 3.68 389,544 8.25 415,634 13.35 309,295 10.14 1,836,280 9.24 South Atlantic South Atlantic - Table 33 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 37,822 36,827 33,054 41,468 39,335 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 236,072 224,264 230,634 R 237,327 248,222 From Oil Wells........................................... 7,133 6,706 6,907 6,547 6,702 Total.............................................................

273

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,908,113 324,585 3.74 3,294,184 16.77 577 11.36 317,559 7.03 156,010 4.79 211,438 7.05 1,010,169 5.19 Mountain Mountain - Table 42 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 37,366 39,275 38,944 38,505 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 38,539 38,775 41,236 49,573 52,282 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

274

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 134,395 102,324 1.18 0 0.00 1 0.02 25,430 0.56 5,893 0.18 19,828 0.66 153,476 0.79 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina - Table 87 87. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

275

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E4. Commercial Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 E4. Commercial Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste e Alabama - 12.17 23.42 25.42 23.23 27.12 - 23.46 11.31 15.30 30.70 25.76 Alaska 3.82 8.66 26.53 30.13 23.15 31.60 - 26.67 15.22 12.95 44.25 19.34 Arizona - 9.86 24.91 32.11 24.68 26.97 - 25.02 11.48 13.07 27.83 23.48 Arkansas - 8.77 23.87 25.91 23.68 27.35 - 24.08 10.40 10.50 21.98 15.92 California - 8.12 25.18 32.46 24.94 30.02 - 25.27 3.91 11.05 38.24 26.43 Colorado 2.58 7.60 23.44 26.09 21.42 27.21 - 22.89 15.22 9.40 27.67 18.37 Connecticut - 8.25 26.27 29.35 26.34 28.99 17.52 26.31 9.07 12.92 45.64 26.52 Delaware - 13.20 22.31 26.41 25.04 28.08 - 23.76 11.31 14.95 31.18 23.51

276

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 186,793 93,217 1.07 81,868 0.42 4 0.08 55,545 1.23 5,760 0.18 32,464 1.08 186,990 0.96 K e n t u c k y Kentucky - Table 64 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 969 1,044 983 1,364 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 13,036 13,311 13,501 13,825 13,825 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 73,081 74,754 81,435 79,547

277

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 0 373 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 535 0.01 0 0.00 1,747 0.06 2,654 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii - Table 58 58. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

278

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 3,436,498 1,404,685 15.62 387,923 1.98 564 9.92 1,393,303 29.49 124,675 4.00 690,776 22.66 3,614,003 18.18 East North Central East North Central - Table 31 31. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East North Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 41,497 41,943 42,893 42,762 42,530 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 273,230 321,023 366,288 336,352 331,007 From Oil Wells........................................... 97,557 50,290 62,330

279

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,874,900 1,952,355 21.72 6,117,653 31.22 2 0.04 175,907 3.72 1,207,293 38.78 171,758 5.63 3,507,315 17.64 T e x a s Texas - Table 84 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Texas, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 54,635 53,816 56,747 58,736 58,712 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 5,660,153 5,843,635 5,865,930 R 5,913,517 5,645,379 From Oil Wells........................................... 1,212,503 1,184,565 1,150,211 R 1,055,912

280

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 508,613 140,740 1.57 5,933 0.03 82 1.44 13,797 0.29 319,274 10.25 36,269 1.19 510,162 2.57 F l o r i d a Florida - Table 50 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 7,133 6,706 6,907 6,547 6,702 Total............................................................. 7,133 6,706 6,907 6,547 6,702

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: Massachusetts Massachusetts - Table 62 62. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............

282

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 43,788 45,501 0.52 277,340 1.41 136 2.68 56,843 1.26 5,945 0.18 30,955 1.03 139,380 0.72 U t a h Utah - Table 91 91. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Utah, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,789 1,580 1,633 1,839 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,303 1,127 1,339 1,475 1,643 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 304,347 262,400 233,594 231,368 253,761

283

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

284

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -229,385 96,739 1.08 553,419 2.82 1 0.02 68,146 1.44 35,889 1.15 39,683 1.30 240,458 1.21 K a n s a s Kansas - Table 57 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 636,582 629,755 618,016 532,594 488,328 From Oil Wells........................................... 86,807 85,876 71,037 72,626 66,590 Total.............................................................

285

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

40 40 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -18,588 120,201 1.34 111,021 0.57 1 0.02 24,562 0.52 101,623 3.26 20,265 0.66 266,652 1.34 M i s s i s s i p p i Mississippi - Table 65 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mississippi, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 535 568 560 527 560 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 113,401 117,412 119,347 120,588 121,004 From Oil Wells........................................... 6,051 6,210 7,276 8,628 5,750 Total.............................................................

286

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 612,249 231,362 2.66 68,343 0.35 40 0.79 217,929 4.82 6,890 0.21 130,996 4.37 587,218 3.02 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania - Table 85 85. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pennsylvania, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,800 1,482 1,696 1,852 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 20,296 31,025 31,792 32,692 21,576 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 120,506

287

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama ........... 65.0 265.4 155.4 13.4 12.8 319.8 13.4 49.1 563.8 0.0 154.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 303.7 1,352.2 579.1 1,931.3 Alaska ............... 9.5 294.7 81.8 118.2 1.3 34.6 0.4 28.6 265.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.2 (s) 21.6 593.2 44.7 637.9 Arizona ............. 10.0 109.8 151.3 21.5 9.1 323.4 (s) 21.1 526.5 0.0 4.4 3.1 0.3 7.9 255.7 917.8 513.7 1,431.5 Arkansas ........... 5.6 179.4 134.5 5.9 9.4 175.6 0.1 19.8 345.4 0.0 82.6 0.0 0.7 0.2 163.5 777.4 339.8 1,117.1 California ..........

288

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: W y o m i n g -920,258 38,475 0.43 823,132 4.20 14 0.25 12,106 0.26 167 0.01 9,834 0.32 60,596 0.30 Wyoming - Table 91 91. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 4,196 4,510 5,160 5,166 4,950 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 988,671 981,115 1,043,797 1,029,403 1,091,320 From Oil Wells........................................... 111,442 109,434 109,318 132,044 108,918 Total.............................................................

289

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -2,004,469 300,024 3.34 3,398,146 17.34 470 8.27 314,177 6.65 177,649 5.71 209,836 6.88 1,002,157 5.04 Mountain Mountain - Table 36 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 38,775 41,236 49,573 52,282 46,259 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 3,131,205 3,166,689 3,333,043 3,346,183 3,480,946 From Oil Wells........................................... 503,986 505,903 513,267 525,236 478,387

290

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,021,660 251,591 2.90 16,699 0.09 457 9.00 339,512 7.51 208,348 6.39 335,343 11.18 1,135,250 5.83 N e w Y o r k New York - Table 79 79. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 242 197 232 224 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 5,884 6,134 6,208 5,731 5,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 19,937 17,677 17,494 15,525

291

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 11,621 78,640 0.91 108,068 0.55 1 0.02 24,847 0.55 76,362 2.34 21,358 0.71 201,209 1.03 M i s s i s s i p p i Mississippi - Table 71 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mississippi, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 650 663 631 582 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 583 535 568 560 527 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 112,205 113,401 117,412 119,347 120,588

292

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 New England .................................... 170,809 2,010,577 136,563 210,094 256,496 12,372 Middle Atlantic .................................. 821,578 8,883,339 667,203 808,589 743,879 23,366 East North Central ............................ 1,393,303 12,651,969 690,776 1,049,640 1,404,685 79,100 West North Central ........................... 433,483 4,826,886 282,912 513,380 436,075 24,472 South Atlantic ................................... 389,544 6,027,575 309,295 640,635 721,597 17,540 East South Central ........................... 185,413 2,852,538 135,022 302,161 557,539 8,276 West South Central .......................... 318,867 5,997,832 263,862 529,890 3,151,091 11,533 Mountain........................................... 314,177 4,218,179 209,836 373,944 300,024 11,414 Pacific Contiguous............................

293

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 121,071 28,662 0.33 9 0.00 33 0.65 30,023 0.66 60,937 1.87 23,314 0.78 142,970 0.73 N e v a d a Nevada - Table 75 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Nevada, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 5 5 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 16 13 11 9 9 Total.............................................................

294

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Con Edison Co of New York Inc............... NY 102,311,001 3.84 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 73,839,186 3.05 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 62,380,076 5.55 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 58,692,831 6.82 Keyspan Energy Del Co ........................... NY 53,162,984 6.07 Minnegasco .............................................. MN 52,910,769 4.25 Entex Div of Noram Energy Corp ............. TX,LA,MS 47,337,378 4.81 Lone Star Gas Co..................................... TX 45,843,050 4.67 Consumers Energy Co ............................. MI 45,391,308 4.50 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 41,336,416 5.38 Pub Svc Co of Colorado........................... CO 39,230,403 4.47 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. KY,PA,MD,OH 35,550,535 6.78

295

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Industrial 8,686,147 44.6% Commercial 2,999,491 15.4% Electric Utilities 3,258,054 16.7% Residential 4,520,276 23.2% Note: Vehicle fuel volume for 1998 was 5,079 million cubic feet. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s L o u i s i a n a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1998 Figure

296

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

297

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96 96 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 92. Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1999 (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production Average Wellhead Price of Marketed Production 1930 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,978,911 75,140 1,903,771 0.08 1931 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,721,902 62,288 1,659,614 0.07 1932 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,593,798 51,816 1,541,982 0.06 1933 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,596,673 48,280 1,548,393 0.06 1934 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,815,796 52,190 1,763,606 0.06 1935 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,968,963 55,488 1,913,475 0.06 1936 ......................

298

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 12. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1998 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 2 0 0 0 2 Colorado...................... 0 6 0 0 a 5,285 5,292 Connecticut ................. 0 33 0 0 0 33 Georgia........................ 0 16 0 0 0 16 Hawaii.......................... 2,715 0 0 0 0 2,715 Illinois .......................... 0 50 2,686 0 0 2,736 Indiana......................... 0 716 0 0 b 2,433 3,149 Iowa............................. 0 17 0 0 0 17 Kentucky ..................... 0 2 0 0 0 2 Maine........................... 0 24 0 0 0 24 Maryland ..................... 0 80 0 0 0 80 Massachusetts ............ 0 68 0 0 0 68 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 21,967 21,967 Minnesota.................... 0 50 0 0 0 50 Missouri ....................... 0 40 0 0 0 40 Nebraska .....................

299

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 90 39. Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1999 Table State Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama.................................................................. 2.79 1.53 Alaska ..................................................................... 2.36 1.94 Arizona.................................................................... 0 0.74 Arkansas ................................................................. 0.87 1.20 California................................................................. 1.95 9.89 Colorado ................................................................. 3.77 1.46 Connecticut............................................................. 0 0.61 D.C..........................................................................

300

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -63,607 74,687 0.83 462,967 2.36 0 0.00 18,158 0.38 30,529 0.98 29,416 0.96 152,789 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous - Table 38 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 100 102 141 148 99 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 179,470 183,747 179,534 182,993 177,640 From Oil Wells........................................... 3,190,433 3,189,837 3,201,416 3,195,855

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the the Gulf of Mexico. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 90 45. Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1998 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama.................................................................. NA 2.87 1.54 Alaska ..................................................................... NA 2.38 2.05 Arizona.................................................................... NA 0 0.73 Arkansas ................................................................. NA 0.96 1.28 California................................................................. NA 1.61 9.48 Colorado ................................................................. NA 3.54 1.47 Connecticut .............................................................

302

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 24,315 21,416 0.25 57,645 0.29 9 0.18 19,172 0.42 522 0.02 12,952 0.43 54,071 0.28 M o n t a n a Montana - Table 73 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Montana, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 717 782 796 762 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 2,940 2,918 2,990 3,071 3,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 44,350 44,370 45,154 46,613 51,774 From Oil Wells...........................................

303

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 33,635 0 0.00 0 0.00 9 0.16 14,147 0.30 0 0.00 17,837 0.59 31,993 0.16 District of Columbia District of Columbia - Table 49 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

304

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

305

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 9. Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,816,408 2,883,277 2,899,152 3,052,073 3,367,545 Mexico.............................. 6,722 13,862 17,243 14,532 54,530 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,823,130 2,897,138 2,916,394 3,066,605 3,422,075 LNG Algeria .............................. 17,918 35,325 65,675 68,567 75,763 Australia ........................... 0 0 9,686 11,634 11,904 Malaysia ........................... 0 0 0 0 2,576 Qatar ................................ 0 0 0 0 19,697 Trinidad ............................ 0 0 0 0 50,777 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 4,949 2,417 5,252 2,713 Total LNG Imports............. 17,918 40,274 77,778 85,453 163,430

306

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

307

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Consumption - Table 22 Alabama.................. 0 12,423 12,423 895 12,847 13,742 26,165 Alaska ..................... 20,330 8,631 28,961 0 0 0 28,961 Arizona.................... 3,978 35,098 39,077 0 60 60 39,137 Arkansas ................. 0 40,128 40,128 0 22 22 40,150 California................. 1 4,471 4,472 57,204 261,988 319,192 323,664 Colorado ................. 8,417 0 8,417 222 254 476 8,894 Connecticut ............. 0 10,606 10,606 1 47 49 10,655 Delaware................. 589 10,180 10,769 0 59 59 10,828 Florida ..................... 1,621 272,237 273,858 978 15,525 16,503 290,361 Georgia ................... 21,569 4,489 26,058 0 0 0 26,058 Illinois ...................... 6,158 53,692 59,850 7 0 7 59,857 Indiana .................... 502 3,146 3,649 0 2,435 2,435 6,084 Iowa ........................ 657 7,398 8,055 759 0 759 8,814 Kansas ....................

308

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -196,610 87,238 1.00 696,321 3.54 13 0.26 110,839 2.45 10,627 0.33 63,132 2.10 271,849 1.40 C o l o r a d o Colorado - Table 52 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Colorado, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 6,753 7,256 7,710 6,828 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 7,056 7,017 8,251 12,433 13,838 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 365,651 436,663 488,292

309

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2004 2004 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table S1a. Energy Price Estimates by Source, 2004 (Nominal Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector d,e Retail Electricity Total Energy d,f Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass c Total d,e,f Distillate Fuel Jet Fuel LPG a Motor Gasoline Residual Fuel Other b Total Alabama 1.57 7.72 11.91 8.82 15.78 13.68 4.78 8.25 12.28 0.43 1.81 5.32 1.68 18.01 11.29 Alaska 1.91 3.59 12.43 9.61 19.64 15.55 3.63 12.09 11.05 - 6.68 9.07 3.18 32.29 11.09 Arizona 1.31 6.84 13.59 9.53 18.40 15.33 5.29 7.23 13.92 0.45 5.90 6.68 2.18 21.83 15.24 Arkansas 1.25 8.09 12.01 8.30 14.80 13.97 4.67 11.02 12.77 0.49 1.79 6.59 1.43 16.76 11.89 California 1.82 7.63 13.58

310

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 298,541 301,811 310,971 R 316,929 307,449 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 17,282,032 17,737,334 17,844,046 R 17,719,241 17,540,919 From Oil Wells........................................... 6,461,596 6,376,201 6,368,631 R 6,376,965 6,214,427 Total............................................................. 23,743,628 24,113,536 24,212,677 R 24,096,206 23,755,345 Repressuring ................................................ -3,565,023 -3,510,753 -3,491,542 R -3,437,062 -3,304,594 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............... -388,392 -518,425 -598,691 R -615,941 -609,717 Wet After Lease Separation ......................... 19,790,213

311

profile99v8.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Recent publications may be purchased from: Older publications may be purchased from: Superintendent of Documents National Technical Information Service U.S. Government Printing Office U.S. Department of Commerce P.O. Box 371954 5285 Port Royal Road Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Springfield, Virginia 22161 (202) 512-1800 (703) 487-4650 (202) 512-2250 (fax) (703) 321-8547 (fax) 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as public and academic li- braries, Federal, State, local, and foreign governments, EIA survey respondents, and the media. For further information, and for answers to questions on energy

312

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

78 78 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 265,626 517,935 5.96 755,135 3.84 18 0.35 186,321 4.12 113,882 3.50 131,922 4.40 950,078 4.88 East South Central East South Central - Table 40 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East South Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 6,449 6,575 6,647 6,914 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 17,184 17,372 18,174 19,046 18,983 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

313

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Indiana - Table 61 I n d i a n a 540,755 290,973 3.35 615 0.00 67 1.32 140,122 3.10 9,096 0.28 73,117 2.44 513,375 2.64 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Indiana, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,348 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 107 249 360 526 615 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 107 249 360 526 615 Repressuring ................................................ NA NA NA NA NA Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............

314

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 94. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413

315

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England - Table 29 New England 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1995-1999 Table 624,295 256,496 2.85 0 0.00 105 1.85 170,809 3.62 22,057 0.71 136,563 4.48 586,030 2.95 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

316

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 11. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1998 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama ................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 2 24 0 0 2 24 0.30 California................ 0 0 9 388 0 0 9 388 4.75 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.22 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 899 10.99 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.38 Iowa ....................... 4 273 0 0 0 0 4 273 3.34 Kansas ................... 16 294 2 8 0 0 18 301 3.68 Kentucky ................ 6 167 19 53 0 0 25 220 2.69 Louisiana................ 8 530 5 33 0 0 13 564 6.89 Maryland ................ 1 62 0 0 0 0 1

317

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 703,875 282,036 3.25 278,076 1.42 31 0.61 319,701 7.07 48,321 1.48 163,368 5.45 813,457 4.18 M i c h i g a n Michigan - Table 69 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,323 1,294 2,061 2,195 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 6,000 5,258 5,826 6,825 7,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 136,989 146,320 201,123

318

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,166,885 25,048 0.29 1,501,098 7.64 189 3.72 35,877 0.79 39,034 1.20 27,206 0.91 127,354 0.65 N e w M e x i c o New Mexico - Table 78 78. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Mexico, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 17,228 17,491 16,485 15,514 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 23,292 23,510 24,134 27,421 28,200 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,381,756

319

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 1 9 7 2 1 9 7 4 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Percent 7. Net Imports as a Percentage of Total Consumption of Natural Gas, 1972-1998 Figure Sources: 1972-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas An- nual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production 1979. 1980-1989: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report"; and Form FPC-14, "Annual Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas"; 1990: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, and Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; 1991-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, Form EIA-64A, and

320

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -3,499,743 922,155 10.62 5,287,870 26.92 7 0.14 47,574 1.05 318,395 9.77 24,042 0.80 1,312,174 6.74 L o u i s i a n a Louisiana - Table 65 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Louisiana, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 a ..................................... 30,583 30,666 9,543 9,673 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 12,958 14,169 15,295 14,958 18,399 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 4,527,042

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transmission Transmission Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 25 6. Principal Interstate Natural Gas Flow Summary, 1999 Figure 2,000 1,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 0 Billion Cubic Feet = Less than 100 BCF Flow WASHINGTON MONTANA IDAHO WYOMING OREGON CALIFORNIA NEVADA UTAH COLORADO NORTH DAKOTA SOUTH DAKOTA NEBRASKA KANSAS ARIZONA NEW MEXICO OKLAHOMA ARKANSAS MISSOURI IOWA MINNESOTA WISCONSIN MICH PA MD DELAWARE CONNECTICUT RHODE ISLAND MASS NH NJ ILL INDIANA OHIO VIRGINIA WV MAINE NEW YORK VT KY TENN NORTH CAROLINA SOUTH CAROLINA MISS GEORGIA FLORIDA ALA TEXAS LA 26 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 1 9 7 2 1 9 7 4 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Percent 7. Net Imports as a Percentage of Total Consumption of Natural Gas, 1972-1999 Figure Sources: 1972-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas"

322

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 905,377 465,837 5.36 660,086 3.36 42 0.83 422,855 9.35 74,525 2.29 277,411 9.25 1,240,670 6.37 West North Central West North Central - Table 38 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,663 9,034 8,156 7,468 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 19,623 22,277 21,669 21,755 21,253 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

323

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 41,343 21,075 0.23 0 0.00 2 0.04 8,862 0.19 19,878 0.64 6,119 0.20 55,936 0.28 D e l a w a r e Delaware - Table 48 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

324

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 36,749 16,287 0.19 0 0.00 2 0.04 7,755 0.17 11,135 0.34 5,590 0.19 40,769 0.21 D e l a w a r e Delaware - Table 54 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

325

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,860,130 2,023,278 23.29 6,318,754 32.16 3 0.06 199,454 4.41 1,242,574 38.14 169,610 5.65 3,634,920 18.67 T e x a s Texas - Table 90 90. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Texas, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 42,357 43,067 38,270 37,761 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 48,654 54,635 53,816 56,747 58,736 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 5,643,577

326

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 940,495 303,668 3.50 209 0.00 60 1.18 409,812 9.07 56,337 1.73 174,687 5.82 944,563 4.85 I l l i n o i s Illinois - Table 60 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 390 372 370 372 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 323 325 289 224 203 From Oil Wells...........................................

327

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -65,951 76,319 0.88 466,648 2.38 0 0.00 16,151 0.36 28,784 0.88 28,825 0.96 150,080 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous - Table 44 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,733 9,497 9,294 10,562 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 104 100 102 141 148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

328

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Alabama Florida ...................................................................... 0 494,657 -494,657 Georgia .................................................................... 0 1,631,329 -1,631,329 Mississippi................................................................ 2,865,222 0 2,865,222 Tennessee ............................................................... 402 992,686 -992,284 Texas ....................................................................... 0 b 1 -1 Total ........................................................................ 2,865,624 3,118,673 -253,049 Alaska Japan ....................................................................... 0 c 63,607 -63,607 Total ........................................................................ 0 63,607 -63,607

329

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ii ii Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Contacts The Natural Gas Annual is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, Natural Gas Division, under the direction of Joan E. Heinkel. General questions and comments concerning the contents of the Natural Gas Annual may be obtained from the National Energy Information Center, (202) 586-8800. Questions about specific areas should be referred to Ann M. Ducca, (202/586-6137) or Margo Natof (202/586-6303). Technical inquiries should be referred to the following subject specialists: Supply............................Sharon Belcher (202) 586-6119 Sbelcher@eia.doe.gov Transmission..................Dolly Tolson (202) 586-6664 Dtolson@eia.doe.gov Consumption..................Sylvia Norris (202) 586-6106 Snorris@eia.doe.gov Electronic versions.........Sheila

330

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 114,838 32,498 0.37 0 0.00 77 1.52 35,329 0.78 10,719 0.33 42,333 1.41 120,955 0.62 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut - Table 53 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

331

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

An An overhead pipeline crossing on the White River near Newport, Arkansas. 237 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 1994 through 1998 in metric units of mea- sure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this ta- ble have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 1994 through 1998. A brief documentation for the ther- mal conversion factors follows: · Marketed Production. The conversion factor is calcu- lated by adding the total heat content

332

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 100. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1998 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

333

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 5,734 2,297 0.03 0 0.00 0 0.00 910 0.02 0 0.00 2,456 0.08 5,663 0.03 M a i n e Maine - Table 66 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maine, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

334

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. R 17,737,334 R 6,376,201 R 24,113,536 R 3,510,753 a 518,425 272,117 R 19,812,241 1997 Total .............. 17,844,046 6,368,631 24,212,677 3,491,542 R 598,691 R 256,351 R 19,866,093 1998 Total .............. 17,558,621 6,365,612 23,924,233 3,433,323 611,226 234,130 19,645,554 Alabama Total ....... 597,424 8,414 605,839 13,994 26,604 1,462 563,779 Onshore ................ 204,055 8,414 212,470 13,994 14,652 1,166 182,658 State Offshore....... 222,000 0 222,000 0 11,952 296 209,752 Federal Offshore... 171,369 0 171,369 0 0 0 171,369 Alaska Total........... 182,993 3,195,855 3,378,848 2,904,028 0 8,171 466,648 Onshore ................ 57,762

335

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,818,366 827,401 9.53 315,277 1.60 2,732 53.79 549,931 12.17 271,154 8.32 282,153 9.41 1,933,371 9.93 C a l i f o r n i a California - Table 51 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas California, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,572 3,508 2,082 2,273 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,261 997 978 930 847 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 113,525 93,808

336

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 A2. Form EIA-176, Short Form Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 219 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 220 5.4.4.2 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 RESPO NDENT CO PY Page 3 PART V: CONTINUATION, DISPOSITION OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED OUT OF REPORT STATE 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date Volume (Mcf at 14.73 psia) e or f Cost or Revenue (Including taxes) e or f 5.4.4 Other Nonutility Power Producer Sales 5.4.4.1 Firm Interruptible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4.5 Electric Utility Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

337

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 271,677 64,856 0.72 0 0.00 6 0.11 112,042 2.37 19,427 0.62 63,100 2.07 259,431 1.30 M i s s o u r i Missouri - Table 66 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 15 24 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 16 25 5 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 16 25 5 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

338

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 216,705 557,539 6.20 736,291 3.76 17 0.30 185,413 3.92 131,592 4.23 135,022 4.43 1,009,583 5.08 East South Central East South Central - Table 34 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East South Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 17,372 18,174 19,046 R 19,539 19,934 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 756,345 769,753 818,196 R 799,882 776,831 From Oil Wells........................................... 19,806 19,295 19,248 18,463

339

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 365,058 146,428 1.63 0 0.00 37 0.65 127,607 2.70 14,077 0.45 81,689 2.68 369,839 1.86 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin - Table 90 90. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

340

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Australia Australia Trinidad Qatar Malaysia Canada Mexico Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL TX MA NH CT RI MD DC DE MD RI MA MA CT VA DC (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 837,902 415,636 225,138 232 308,214 805,614 803,034 800,345 685 147 628,589 9,786 790,088 17,369 278,302 40,727 214,076 275,629 51,935 843,280 826,638 9,988 998,603 553,440 896,187 11,817 629,551 98,423

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -22,170 40,859 0.45 262,614 1.34 130 2.29 55,474 1.17 6,478 0.21 30,361 1.00 133,301 0.67 U t a h Utah - Table 85 85. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Utah, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,127 1,339 1,475 1,643 1,978 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 262,400 233,594 231,368 253,761 238,947 From Oil Wells........................................... 40,833 47,614 43,552 43,504 38,020 Total.............................................................

342

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 New England .................................... 163,483 1,980,506 156,146 202,286 210,342 15,556 Middle Atlantic .................................. 754,098 8,863,194 612,992 799,672 687,745 29,303 East North Central ............................ 1,282,157 12,433,376 649,117 1,030,125 1,351,611 63,863 West North Central ........................... 422,855 4,859,806 277,411 523,570 465,837 29,837 South Atlantic ................................... 379,628 5,794,996 312,424 526,487 697,640 16,213 East South Central ........................... 186,321 2,836,854 131,922 311,731 517,935 10,713 West South Central .......................... 351,740 5,990,194 265,515 543,636 3,290,856 14,326 Mountain........................................... 317,559 4,048,727 211,438 361,974 324,585 10,081 Pacific Contiguous............................

343

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 618,461 240,622 2.68 174,701 0.89 40 0.70 241,468 5.11 10,376 0.33 143,256 4.70 635,761 3.20 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania - Table 79 79. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pennsylvania, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 31,025 31,792 32,692 21,576 23,822 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 111,000 135,000 80,000 R 130,317 174,701 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

344

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 161,005 32,039 0.36 0 0.00 93 1.64 38,364 0.81 13,095 0.42 47,553 1.56 131,143 0.66 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut - Table 47 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

345

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

346

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Indiana - Table 55 I n d i a n a 587,213 319,890 3.56 855 0.00 48 0.84 151,529 3.21 7,655 0.25 73,643 2.42 552,765 2.78 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Indiana, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 249 360 526 615 855 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 249 360 526 615 855 Repressuring ................................................ NA NA NA NA NA Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............... NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation ......................... 249 360 526 615 855 Vented and Flared........................................

347

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 295,768 139,261 1.55 1,230 0.01 9 0.16 58,983 1.25 3,460 0.11 51,378 1.69 253,091 1.27 T e n n e s s e e Tennessee - Table 83 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Tennessee, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 505 460 420 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 1,820 1,690 1,510 1,420 1,230 Total............................................................. 1,820 1,690 1,510

348

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -236,588 44,857 0.50 176,015 0.90 5 0.09 31,403 0.66 385 0.01 27,301 0.90 103,951 0.52 West Virginia West Virginia - Table 89 89. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 36,144 35,148 31,000 39,072 36,575 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 186,231 169,839 172,268 R 180,000 176,015 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

349

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 7,143 2,901 0.03 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,565 0.05 250 0.01 2,309 0.08 8,024 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont - Table 86 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

350

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,238,255 296,358 3.30 16,122 0.08 575 10.11 370,711 7.85 181,823 5.84 360,188 11.81 1,209,656 6.08 N e w Y o r k New York - Table 73 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 6,134 6,208 5,731 5,903 6,422 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 17,677 17,494 15,525 16,413 16,016 From Oil Wells........................................... 723 641 669 291 111 Total.............................................................

351

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Industrial 8,990,216 45.2% Commercial 3,048,832 15.3% Electric Utilities 3,113,419 15.7% Residential 4,724,094 23.8% Note: Vehicle fuel volume for 1999 was 5,685 million cubic feet. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a L o u i s i a n a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s L o u i s i a n a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1999 Figure

352

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 79,992 145,140 1.61 170,006 0.87 1 0.02 36,245 0.77 40,088 1.29 27,898 0.92 249,371 1.25 A r k a n s a s Arkansas - Table 44 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 3,650 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 161,390 182,895 172,642 159,769 156,798 From Oil Wells........................................... 33,979 41,551 38,145 29,941 20,362 Total.............................................................

353

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -63,607 74,224 0.83 462,967 2.36 0 0.00 17,634 0.37 30,529 0.98 27,667 0.91 150,054 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska - Table 42 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 100 102 141 148 99 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 179,470 183,747 179,534 182,993 177,640 From Oil Wells........................................... 3,190,433 3,189,837 3,201,416 3,195,855 3,184,441 Total.............................................................

354

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Appendix - Table A7 State 1997 1998 Sales Transported Total Sales Transported Total A7. Number of Natural Gas Residential Consumers by State, 1997-1998 Table Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Please see the cautionary note regarding the number of residential customers located in the Consumption and Consumer Prices sections of this report. Alabama ...................... 781,711 0 781,711 788,464 0 788,464 Alaska.......................... 83,596 0 83,596 86,243 0 86,243 Arizona ........................ 724,911 0 724,911 764,167 0 764,167 Arkansas ..................... 544,460 0 544,460 550,017 0 550,017 California .....................

355

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 · Residential consumers continue to pay the highest price for natural gas. The average price of natural gas deliveries to the residential sector declined by 2 percent ($0.12 per thousand cubic feet) from $6.94 in 1997 to $6.82 per thousand cubic feet in 1998, which was the smallest decrease of any of the consuming sectors. In recent years, only modest changes in constant dollars have been seen for residential prices (Figure 14). Most of these consumers remain captive to LDC sales ser- vice in all but a few States. The LDCs are obligated to supply gas to residences at all times, including during heating seasons when demand is high. Providing this premium service usually results in higher prices. · The second-highest prices for natural gas deliveries were seen in the commercial sector. The average price paid by commercial consumers fell 5 percent ($0.31 per thousand cubic feet) from

356

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 A4. Estimated Composition of Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants and the Resulting Heat Content Extraction Loss by State, 1998 (Liquid Volumes in Thousand Barrels, Heat Content in Billion Btu) Table Alabama ...................... 22 1,141 172 826 1,036 13,496 Alaska.......................... 0 1,319 3,490 9,724 19,356 150,419 Arkansas ..................... 39 51 29 110 137 1,536 California ..................... 18 2,159 2,523 1,377 2,274 34,826 Colorado...................... 6,345 5,096 875 2,205 2,946 65,730 Florida ......................... 546 521 0 335 157 5,856 Illinois .......................... 0 22 0 0 37 255 Kansas ........................ 6,605 14,223 2,450 4,751 4,823 127,491 Kentucky ..................... 274 823 79 275 211 6,476 Louisiana ..................... 33,494 29,514 9,727 10,370 18,252 384,288 Michigan ......................

357

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: N e w J e r s e y 564,194 206,898 2.30 0 0.00 0 0.00 209,399 4.43 32,650 1.05 163,759 5.37 612,707 3.08 New Jersey - Table 71 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............

358

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 95,207 42,278 0.49 0 0.00 6 0.12 16,461 0.36 15,589 0.48 11,477 0.38 85,811 0.44 R h o d e I s l a n d Rhode Island - Table 86 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Rhode Island, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

359

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,737,334 6,376,201 24,113,536 3,510,753 a 518,425 272,117 19,812,241 1997 Total .............. 17,844,046 6,368,631 24,212,677 3,491,542 598,691 256,351 19,866,093 1998 Total .............. R 17,719,241 R 6,376,965 R 24,096,206 R 3,437,062 R 615,941 R 234,472 R 19,808,731 1999 Total .............. 17,540,919 6,214,427 23,755,345 3,304,594 609,717 245,180 19,595,854 Alabama Total ....... 579,057 7,048 586,105 13,793 23,956 1,085 547,271 Onshore ................ 200,815 7,048 207,863 13,793 14,061 782 179,227 State Offshore....... 212,673 0 212,673 0 9,895 303 202,474 Federal Offshore... 165,570 0 165,570 0 0 0 165,570 Alaska Total........... 177,640 3,184,441 3,362,082 2,892,017 0 7,098 462,967 Onshore ................ 58,738

360

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Alabama.................. 6.68 70.5 3.42 21.8 7.62 100.0 2.98 Alaska ..................... 2.18 55.4 1.25 99.1 - - 1.59 Arizona.................... 6.17 82.5 3.43 36.2 5.28 100.0 2.67 Arkansas ................. 5.38 89.3 3.45 9.6 5.03 100.0 2.59 California................. 6.17 57.1 3.34 8.5 4.43 79.0 2.76 Colorado ................. 4.43 97.6 2.82 8.1 2.09 100.0 2.65 Connecticut ............. 6.54 62.8 4.15 55.8 5.11 100.0 2.74 D.C.......................... 7.38 45.9 - - 2.80 100.0 - Delaware................. 7.00 98.8 4.07 16.6 2.91 100.0 2.98 Florida ..................... 6.51 94.5 4.03 5.4 4.56 100.0 3.10 Georgia ................... 3.87 61.0 3.41 23.0 3.98 94.2 2.57 Hawaii ..................... 14.33 100.0 8.21 100.0 - - - Idaho ....................... 4.77 85.9 3.29 2.7 3.58 100.0 - Illinois ...................... 5.20 42.8 4.06 9.1 2.94 100.0 2.41 Indiana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 686,993 301,326 3.35 277,364 1.42 32 0.56 350,735 7.42 51,122 1.64 179,351 5.88 882,566 4.44 M i c h i g a n Michigan - Table 63 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 5,258 5,826 6,825 7,000 6,750 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 146,320 201,123 249,291 226,992 226,423 From Oil Wells........................................... 97,547 50,281 62,323 56,748 56,606 Total.............................................................

362

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed ................................................... 1,105 1,106 1,109 1,107 1,110 Extraction Loss.......................................... 2,735 2,730 2,721 2,704 2,694 Total Dry Production............................... 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,031 Supply Dry Production........................................... 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,031 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports ................................................... 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,023 Intransit Receipts ................................... 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,023 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage............................. 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,031 LNG Storage .......................................... 1,028

363

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Alabama.................. 6.65 80.5 3.30 23.1 1.98 100.0 2.58 Alaska ..................... 2.41 49.6 1.34 99.4 - - 1.80 Arizona.................... 6.00 85.0 3.26 33.4 4.46 100.0 2.42 Arkansas ................. 5.16 90.8 3.48 9.1 5.35 100.0 2.29 California................. 6.37 48.7 3.77 9.5 4.23 76.5 2.79 Colorado ................. 4.34 94.3 2.61 12.1 2.09 100.0 2.98 Connecticut ............. 6.90 68.7 4.34 55.8 5.21 100.0 2.44 D.C.......................... 7.36 52.3 - - 2.60 100.0 - Delaware................. 7.05 100.0 4.13 22.4 2.60 100.0 2.89 Florida ..................... 6.41 96.6 3.98 7.0 4.72 100.0 2.27 Georgia ................... 6.00 83.6 3.92 25.3 4.10 100.0 3.21 Hawaii ..................... 14.15 100.0 8.64 100.0 - - - Idaho ....................... 4.62 86.4 3.09 2.5 3.39 100.0 - Illinois ...................... 5.07 47.4 3.96 9.3 2.76 100.0 2.25 Indiana

364

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 Total................................. 15,513,667 - 1.85 19,709,525 36,535,940 1995 Total................................. 15,557,464 - 1.55 19,506,474 30,159,545 1996 Total................................. 14,822,258 - 2.17 R 19,812,241 R 42,951,353 1997 Total................................. R 17,105,855 - 2.32 R 19,866,093 R 46,131,323 1998 Total................................. 17,653,795 - 1.94 19,645,554 38,205,887 Alabama .................................... 563,779 1,237,275 2.19 563,779 1,237,274 Alaska ....................................... 192,982 254,039 1.32 466,648 614,291 Arizona ...................................... 411 775 1.88 457 861 Arkansas c .................................. 61,012 239,053 3.92 188,372 738,061 California ................................... 264,810 521,970 1.97 315,277

365

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 11 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama ............. 0.0 23.5 0.4 124.4 13.4 0.3 2.3 316.3 6.7 463.7 0.0 487.2 0.0 487.2 Alaska ................. 0.0 3.5 0.8 44.4 118.2 (s) 0.4 32.9 0.4 197.2 0.0 200.7 0.0 200.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 15.6 1.0 111.3 21.5 0.8 1.6 318.2 0.0 454.5 0.0 470.1 0.0 470.1 Arkansas ............. 0.0 11.5 0.4 99.7 5.9 0.4 2.0 171.3 0.0 279.8 (s) 291.2 (s) 291.2 California ............ 0.0 25.7 1.9 440.9 549.7 3.8 13.3 1,770.1 186.9 2,966.5 2.8 2,995.1 5.5 3,000.5 Colorado ............. 0.0 14.7 0.6 83.2 58.3 0.3

366

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 275,767,714 6.50 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 234,195,449 6.61 Nicor Gas ................................................. IL 211,147,988 4.71 Consumers Energy Co ............................. MI 167,318,229 4.89 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 134,432,032 5.42 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 133,426,119 6.86 East Ohio Gas Co .................................... OH 127,141,913 5.81 Keyspan Energy Del Co ........................... NY 125,709,092 9.79 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. KY,PA,MD,OH 121,011,064 7.32 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co................... IL 98,758,164 6.77 Pub Svc Co of Colorado........................... CO 84,115,032 5.28

367

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 205,093 45,750 0.51 1,395 0.01 0 0.00 40,588 0.86 4,555 0.15 27,586 0.90 118,478 0.60 N e b r a s k a Nebraska - Table 68 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Nebraska, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 87 88 91 95 96 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,557 1,328 1,144 1,214 1,040 From Oil Wells........................................... 683 548 526 480 356 Total............................................................. 2,240 1,876

368

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama ............. 0.0 25.5 7.0 (s) 2.7 0.2 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 75.9 112.4 144.8 257.2 Alaska ................. 9.4 16.9 10.1 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.0 11.5 0.0 0.3 0.1 9.7 48.0 20.2 68.2 Arizona ............... 0.0 33.1 6.8 (s) 1.5 0.7 0.0 8.9 0.0 0.5 (s) 100.7 143.2 202.3 345.5 Arkansas ............. 0.0 40.6 3.6 (s) 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.2 0.0 1.3 0.0 41.4 88.6 86.1 174.7 California ............ 0.0 250.9 47.9 0.1 8.7 1.4 0.0 58.1 (s) 17.4 0.7 418.9 746.2 809.9 1,556.1 Colorado ............. 3.2 57.6 5.9 (s) 2.9 0.2 0.0 9.1 0.0 1.2 0.2

369

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) August 2009 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2007 2007 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table S1a. Energy Price Estimates by Source, 2007 (Nominal Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector e,f Retail Electricity Total Energy e,g Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total e,f,g Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel LPG b Motor Gasoline Residual Fuel Oil Other c Total Wood and Waste d Alabama 2.17 9.06 19.43 16.20 21.84 21.26 8.46 14.19 19.62 0.42 2.71 7.47 2.29 22.46 16.01 Alaska 2.34 5.76 19.43 16.35 28.63 22.14 11.51 23.69 17.97 - 10.51 14.88 4.94 38.96 17.87 Arizona 1.61 8.44 19.84 16.24 27.16 21.95 10.04 11.27 20.50 0.57 10.86 9.61 2.78 25.02 20.72 Arkansas 1.65 9.33 19.63 15.73 21.10 21.54 8.65 18.76 20.42 0.57 2.66 9.45 1.98 20.57

370

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 163,837 165,146 166,474 167,223 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 291,773 298,541 301,811 R 310,971 316,373 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 17,351,060 17,282,032 R 17,737,334 17,844,046 17,558,621 From Oil Wells........................................... 6,229,645 6,461,596 R 6,376,201 6,368,631 6,365,612 Total............................................................. 23,580,706 23,743,628 R 24,113,536 24,212,677 23,924,233 Repressuring ................................................ -3,230,667 -3,565,023 R -3,510,753 -3,491,542 -3,433,323

371

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D.C. 20585 Form Approved OMB No. 19050175 Expiration Date: 12/31/02 (Revised 1999) ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION FORM EIA-176 REPORT YEAR This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information and sanctions statements, see Sections VII and VIII of the instructions. PART I: IDENTIFICATION Complete and return by March 1, 2000 to: Energy Information Administration: EI-45 Mail Station: 2G-024 FORSTL U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Attn: Form EIA-176 OR Fax to: (202) 586-1076 (ATTN: EIA-176) Questions? Call (202) 586-6303 Affix mailing label or enter mailing address

372

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Electric Power Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 4. Electric Power Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 (Million Dollars) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Electricity Imports c Total Energy d Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste b Alabama 1,681.9 1,494.8 24.0 - - 24.0 250.1 11.2 - 3,462.0 Alaska 20.0 210.4 76.7 - 30.5 107.3 - - (s) 337.7 Arizona 889.7 908.5 13.0 - - 13.0 245.4 5.8 21.1 2,083.4 Arkansas 574.1 506.2 10.3 - 1.6 11.9 95.7 3.2 - 1,191.1 California 43.5 2,904.0 8.7 32.1 0.2 41.0 270.9 248.2 266.1 3,773.8 Colorado 622.0 422.5 5.9 - - 5.9 - 2.2 (s) 1,052.6 Connecticut 22.4 549.2 5.9 - 27.1 33.0 107.6 30.4 99.7 842.3 Delaware 61.0 196.7 6.6 - 1.3 7.9 - 4.3 - 269.9 Dist. of Col. - 5.1 35.2 - - 35.2 - - - 40.3 Florida 1,905.3 6,116.6 102.6 79.9 173.7 356.3 177.9 122.0 - 8,678.0 Georgia 2,271.3 927.4 21.5 - 1.5 23.1 252.5 7.0 - 3,481.3 Hawaii

373

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: W y o m i n g -864,676 54,259 0.62 761,313 3.88 10 0.20 12,702 0.28 271 0.01 10,414 0.35 77,656 0.40 Wyoming - Table 97 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,879 12,166 12,320 13,562 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 3,942 4,196 4,510 5,160 5,166 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 949,343 988,671 981,115 1,043,797

374

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 0 20 40 60 80 100 1968 1978 1988 1998 Wellhead Price Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1968 1978 1988 1998 Net Imports 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 0 -0.2 -0.4 -0.6 0 10 20 0 -10 -20 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1968 1978 1988 1998 Net Additions to Storage Millions 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Dry Production 1968 1978 1988 1998 Sources: 1960-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Forms EIA-191/FERC-8,

375

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

376

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 209 Summary of Data Collection Operations and Report Methodology The 1999 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supple- mental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report ." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Form EIA-176 Survey Design The original version of Form EIA-176 was approved in 1980 with a mandatory response requirement. Prior to 1980, published data were based on voluntary responses to Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior predecessor Forms BOM-6-1340-A and BOM-6-1341-A of the same title. In 1982, the scope of the revised EIA-176 survey was expanded to collect the number of electric

377

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E9. Total End-Use Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 E9. Total End-Use Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy g Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 327.8 1,585.7 4,101.1 304.0 326.5 8,674.5 175.9 741.8 14,323.8 396.0 16,633.3 7,846.1 24,479.3 Alaska 36.2 324.0 2,412.4 2,733.2 38.5 1,093.7 7.6 74.8 6,360.2 14.2 6,734.6 1,004.6 7,739.3 Arizona 27.5 1,073.0 4,197.6 491.8 291.8 8,720.8 0.7 363.3 14,066.0 19.6 15,186.1 7,278.6 22,464.7 Arkansas 18.1 1,286.3 3,545.7 133.0 251.0 4,803.7 2.2 330.9 9,066.5 229.2 10,600.1 3,446.6 14,046.7 California 129.5 11,451.7 15,459.5 12,374.8 2,059.9 54,072.7 3,910.0 2,397.4 90,274.3 321.9 102,177.3 33,919.1 136,096.4 Colorado 15.0 1,906.7 3,007.6 1,306.2 607.7

378

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 State Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama ...................... 105,708 3,137 108,845 3,756 4,783 15,572 Alaska.......................... 2,966,461 0 2,966,461 33,889 40,120 150,419 Arkansas ..................... 198,148 4 198,152 365 451 1,536 California ..................... 235,558 0 235,558 8,351 10,242 34,826 Colorado...................... 424,984 766 425,750 17,541 24,401 66,018 Florida ......................... 5,037 0 5,037 967 939 3,632 Illinois .......................... 468 0 468 59 70 255 Kansas ........................ 600,453 2,170 602,623

379

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

32 32 Table A6. Estimated Total Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves by State, 1994-1998 (Billion Cubic Feet) State 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Alabama .................................... 4,830 4,868 5,033 4,968 NA Alaska ....................................... 9,733 9,497 9,294 10,562 NA Arkansas ................................... 1,607 1,563 1,470 1,475 NA California ................................... 2,402 2,243 2,082 2,273 NA Colorado.................................... 6,753 7,256 7,710 6,828 NA Florida ....................................... 98 92 96 96 NA Kansas ...................................... 9,156 8,571 7,694 6,989 NA Kentucky ................................... 969 1,044 983 1,364 NA Louisiana ................................... 9,748 9,274 9,543 9,673 NA Michigan .................................... 1,323 1,294 2,061 2,195

380

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic - Table 36 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,042 1,679 1,928 2,076 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 26,180 37,159 38,000 38,423 27,479 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 140,444 128,677 152,494 95,525 84,756 From Oil Wells...........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 2 occurred in 1973 at 22.6 trillion cubic feet. Four States continue to account for the majority of the natural gas produced in the United States comprising 74 percent of the total in 1999: Texas (31 percent), Louisiana (27 percent), Oklahoma (8 percent), and New Mexico (8 percent). At the State level in 1999, Texas and Oklahoma had the largest declines in marketed production, 282 billion cubic feet and 74 billion cubic feet, respectively. These volumes were equivalent to a 4-percent drop in each State. Marketed production in Louisiana in 1999 was nearly the same as in 1998, while production in New Mexico increased by 1 percent. The States with the largest increases in marketed production during 1999 were Cali- fornia and Wyoming, with increases of 67 billion cubic feet (21 percent) and 62 billion cubic feet (8 percent), respectively.

382

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Southern California Gas Co......................... 271,780,410 110,726,162 278,809,422 1,818,869 138,826,184 801,961,047 Pacific Gas and Elec Co.............................. 225,881,609 152,010,740 174,660,660 530,262 125,268,956 678,352,227 Midcon Texas P L Operator Inc................... 0 0 552,267,806 0 109,741,739 662,009,545 Lone Star Gas Co ........................................ 84,559,915 39,926,208 265,224,831 0 172,286,535 561,997,489 Northern Illinois Gas Co .............................. 205,099,056 82,609,756 133,712,245 2,251 48,524,867 469,948,175 Columbia Gas Dist Co ................................. 151,708,989 89,151,761 177,068,077 18,365 833,281 418,780,473 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co ........................... 126,142,540 110,995,082 142,801,508

383

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 298,541 301,811 310,971 R 316,929 307,449 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 489,373 502,265 505,287 R 501,753 496,704 From Oil Wells........................................... 182,972 180,554 180,340 R 180,576 175,973 Total............................................................. 672,345 682,819 685,627 R 682,329 672,677 Repressuring ................................................ -100,950 -99,413 -98,869 R -97,327 -93,576 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............... -10,998 -14,680 -16,953 R -17,442 -17,265 Wet After Lease Separation .........................

384

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Alabama .................................... 2.89 3.48 3.65 3.17 3.21 Alaska ....................................... 1.67 1.58 1.81 1.72 1.32 Arizona ...................................... 2.10 2.78 3.15 2.55 2.72 Arkansas ................................... 2.32 2.76 3.23 2.94 2.81 California ................................... 2.03 2.59 2.98 2.38 2.61 Colorado.................................... 2.65 2.70 2.92 2.40 2.31 Connecticut ............................... 4.70 5.11 5.11 5.06 4.91 Delaware ................................... 2.70 3.68 3.53 3.02 3.45 Florida ....................................... 2.74 3.73 3.97 3.42 3.49 Georgia ..................................... 2.96 3.77 3.98 3.51 2.95 Hawaii ....................................... 5.20 6.05 6.42 5.33 5.62 Idaho .........................................

385

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 380,767 126,799 1.41 0 0.00 111 1.95 71,704 1.52 6,693 0.21 50,735 1.66 256,042 1.29 W a s h i n g t o n Washington - Table 88 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Washington, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

386

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama ............. 65.0 179.1 23.9 3.7 3.3 6.7 46.3 83.9 0.0 147.2 0.0 (s) 115.1 590.4 219.5 810.0 Alaska ................. 0.1 253.8 19.2 0.1 1.0 0.0 27.1 47.4 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 4.5 306.0 9.4 315.4 Arizona ............... 10.0 22.0 33.2 1.4 4.6 (s) 18.4 57.6 0.0 1.4 3.1 0.2 42.1 136.5 84.7 221.2 Arkansas ............. 5.6 93.1 31.1 2.6 4.0 0.1 17.4 55.1 0.0 72.7 0.0 (s) 58.0 284.5 120.5 405.0 California ............ 35.6 767.4 77.2 23.9 29.6 (s) 312.5

387

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 362,128 141,980 1.63 0 0.00 59 1.16 115,946 2.57 16,348 0.50 81,316 2.71 355,650 1.83 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin - Table 96 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

388

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England - Table 35 New England 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1994-1998 Table 568,143 210,342 2.42 0 0.00 89 1.75 163,483 3.62 45,073 1.38 156,146 5.21 575,132 2.95 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

389

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 308,654 133,106 1.53 0 0.00 112 2.21 61,936 1.37 13,352 0.41 45,561 1.52 254,067 1.30 W a s h i n g t o n Washington - Table 94 94. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Washington, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

390

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Year Supply Disposition Dry Production Withdrawals from Storage Imports Balancing Item Total Additions to Storage Exports Consumption Total 1930 ....................... 1,903,771 NA 21 -35,490 1,868,302 NA 1,798 1,866,504 1,868,302 1931 ....................... 1,659,614 NA 44 -35,466 1,624,192 NA 2,231 1,621,961 1,624,192 1932 ....................... 1,541,982 NA 38 -37,808 1,504,212 NA 1,693 1,502,519 1,504,212 1933 ....................... 1,548,393 NA 83 -41,199 1,507,277 NA 2,158 1,505,119 1,507,277 1934 ....................... 1,763,606 NA 68 -45,075 1,718,599 NA 5,801 1,712,798 1,718,599 1935 ....................... 1,913,475 NA 106 -41,074 1,872,507 11,294 6,800 1,854,413 1,872,507 1936 ....................... 2,164,413 NA 152 -46,677 2,117,888 10,998 7,436 2,099,454 2,117,888

391

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Energy Prices and Expenditures, Ranked by State, 2011 5. Energy Prices and Expenditures, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Prices Expenditures a Energy Expenditures per Person Energy Expenditures as Percent of Current-Dollar GDP b State Dollars per Million Btu State Million Dollars State Dollars State Percent 1 Hawaii 38.41 Texas 169,290 Alaska 10,692 Louisiana 18.9 2 Connecticut 27.81 California 136,096 Louisiana 10,237 North Dakota 15.9 3 Vermont 27.77 Florida 68,013 Wyoming 9,529 Mississippi 15.5 4 New Hampshire 27.36 New York 65,877 North Dakota 9,360 Alaska 15.1 5 District of Columbia 27.04 Pennsylvania 55,164 Texas

392

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2011 . Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f Alabama 3.09 5.66 26.37 22.77 25.54 27.12 13.18 19.42 25.90 0.61 3.01 8.75 2.56 27.08 19.85 Alaska 3.64 6.70 29.33 23.12 29.76 31.60 20.07 34.62 26.61 - 14.42 20.85 6.36 47.13 25.17 Arizona 1.99 7.07 27.73 22.84 31.95 26.97 17.00 17.23 26.71 0.75 6.31 10.79 2.16 28.46 25.23 Arkansas 1.93 6.94 26.37 22.45 26.66 27.35 17.35 33.22 27.02 0.64 3.31 10.54 2.13 22.02 19.63 California 3.13 7.08 27.34 22.51 31.21 30.02 20.92 21.45 27.51 0.71 4.88 17.99 3.32 38.35 24.14 Colorado 1.73 6.79 26.86 22.41 26.35

393

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 A2. Form EIA-895 Figure U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 Form Approval OMB No. 19050192 Expiration Date: 12/31/02 (Revised 1999) MONTHLY QUANTITY AND VALUE OF NATURAL GAS REPORT FORM EIA-895 This report is voluntary under Public Law 93-275. For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information and sanctions, see Sections VI and VII of the instructions. PART I. IDENTIFICATION DATA 1. Name of State Reporting 2. Report Period: Month Year 2 0 3. Name of Office/Agency Complete and return forms to: Energy Information Administration, EI-45 Mail Station: 2G-024 FORSTL Washington, D. C. 20585 Attn: EIA-895 OR Fax to: (202) 586-1076 Questions? Call (202) 586-6119 4. Office Address (Street, City, State, Zip Code)

394

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Glossary Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differ- ences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-reporting problems. Reporting problems include dif- ferences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of variations in company accounting and billing practices; differences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data-reporting systems that vary in scope, for- mat, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action

395

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Consumption Total natural gas consumption declined during 1998 to 21.3 trillion cubic feet, 3 percent below the 1997 and 1996 levels. Warmer-than-normal winter temperatures in 1998 reduced the demand for natural gas for space heating in the residen- tial and commercial sectors. These declines during 1998 were partially offset by the increase in natural gas consump- tion by electric utilities. Since 1992, natural gas has accounted for nearly one-quarter of total energy consump- tion in the United States. · The residential sector had the largest decline (463 bil- lion cubic feet) in natural gas demand with 4.5 trillion cubic feet consumed, down 9 percent from the 1997 level and down 14 percent from the 1996 level. Much of the decline may be attributed to warmer-than-normal temperatures during the heating season (November through March) and the effects from El Nino in the Pacific region

396

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 Alabama .................................... 3.44 2.89 3.48 3.65 3.17 Alaska ....................................... 1.62 1.67 1.58 1.81 1.72 Arizona ...................................... 2.53 2.10 2.78 3.15 2.55 Arkansas ................................... 2.54 2.32 2.76 3.23 2.94 California ................................... 2.57 2.03 2.59 2.98 2.38 Colorado.................................... 3.31 2.65 2.70 2.92 2.40 Connecticut ............................... 4.17 4.70 5.11 5.11 5.06 Delaware ................................... 2.95 2.70 3.68 3.53 3.02 Florida ....................................... 2.78 2.74 3.73 3.97 3.42 Georgia ..................................... 3.54 2.96 3.77 3.98 3.51 Hawaii ....................................... 4.94 5.20 6.05 6.42 5.33 Idaho .........................................

397

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Transportation Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 3. Transportation Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel a LPG b Lubricants Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama - 1.4 11.1 3,374.6 304.0 9.6 159.7 8,578.2 73.3 12,510.5 12,511.9 - 12,511.9 Alaska - 0.2 25.3 1,375.6 2,733.2 0.2 30.9 1,040.7 7.6 5,213.6 5,213.8 - 5,213.8 Arizona - 17.5 32.7 3,205.0 491.8 21.3 114.0 8,580.1 - 12,444.9 12,462.4 - 12,462.4 Arkansas - 0.2 12.9 2,715.9 133.0 11.9 142.0 4,684.4 - 7,700.1 7,700.3 (s) 7,700.3 California - 111.8 60.5 12,327.6 12,374.8 102.4 921.6 53,144.0 3,909.9 82,840.8 82,952.6 67.2 83,019.9 Colorado - 2.7 20.4 2,308.2 1,306.2 8.2 132.3 7,003.6 - 10,779.0 10,781.7 4.9 10,786.6 Connecticut - 0.9 13.2 1,152.7 202.3 6.4 81.3 5,165.7

398

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Total Consumption State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu 1 North Dakota 99.8 District of Columbia 193.1 Louisiana 585.8 Alaska 277.3 Wyoming 974.7 2 West Virginia 90.9 Wyoming 119.2 Wyoming 568.2 Wyoming 200.7 Louisiana 886.5 3 Missouri 89.4 North Dakota 106.9 Alaska 435.7 North Dakota 172.8 Alaska 881.3 4 Tennessee 87.8 Alaska 94.1 North Dakota 388.9 Louisiana 158.0 North Dakota 768.4 5 Kentucky 87.4 Montana 78.4 Iowa 243.4 Oklahoma 122.3 Iowa 493.6

399

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 96,715 147,313 1.70 188,372 0.96 1 0.02 38,190 0.84 40,576 1.25 28,062 0.94 254,142 1.31 A r k a n s a s Arkansas - Table 50 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,607 1,563 1,470 1,475 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 3,500 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 161,967 161,390 182,895 172,642

400

All Consumption Tables.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

VP & CIO Ed Clark..................................................6905  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ...................................................................1220 Enterprise Systems and Support Jeff Henline................................5715 Ryan Williams...............................2774 Receiving Desk...................................................6907 Cathy Haroldson........................................6906 Jeff Hundstad

Bates, Rebecca A.

402

Associate VP for Information Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Education Infrastructure IT Security Network Operations Grid Computing Community Cluster High Performance Application Consultation Application Security And Authentication Consulting Integrating Applications With TTU eCommerce Dev. & Support For Selected TTU Enterprise Applications Hosted IT Solution Security Review

Rock, Chris

403

All Price Tables.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

were made. See explanation of adjustments in Section 7 of the Technical Notes. Web Page: All data are available at http:www.eia.govstatesedsseds-data-complete.cfm....

404

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 0 20 40 60 80 100 1969 1979 1989 1999 Wellhead Price Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1969 1979 1989 1999 Net Imports 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 0 -0.2 -0.4 -0.6 0 10 20 0 -10 -20 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1969 1979 1989 1999 Net Additions to Storage Millions 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Dry Production 1969 1979 1989 1999 Sources: 1969-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Forms

405

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

406

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 Consumption - Table 17 Alabama.............. 7,441 94.7 5,101 93.0 11,194 95.6 25,270 96.6 16,228 95.2 Alaska ................. 8,990 30.3 9,116 29.6 10,972 32.5 8,631 29.8 8,811 29.6 Arizona................ 25,867 99.9 26,662 99.9 31,829 99.4 35,158 89.8 45,742 88.7 Arkansas ............. 23,132 96.2 26,442 94.8 20,213 95.9 40,150 100.0 38,196 100.0 California............. 367,940 90.3 263,937 85.8 315,728 86.6 266,459 82.3 123,196 86.9 Colorado ............. 554 27.8 3,484 72.8 428 8.7 254 2.9 18,269 91.1 Connecticut ......... 16,058 88.1 8,427 83.6 12,677 98.6 10,653 100.0 13,703 100.0 Delaware............. 21,423 79.5 19,088 86.8 13,697 89.6 10,239 94.6 18,552 94.7 Florida ................. 308,563 99.5 269,460 99.6 297,298 99.6 287,762 99.1 328,964 99.5 Georgia ............... 0 - 0 - 0 - 4,489 17.2 23,599 99.5 Illinois .................. 35,703 88.1 24,894

407

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 Total................................. 15,557,464 - 1.55 19,506,474 30,159,545 1996 Total................................. 14,822,258 - 2.17 19,812,241 42,951,353 1997 Total................................. 17,105,855 - 2.32 19,866,093 46,131,323 1998 Total................................. 17,653,795 - R 1.95 R 19,808,731 R 38,609,198 1999 Total................................. 18,595,208 - 2.17 19,595,854 42,538,288 Alabama .................................... 547,271 1,262,507 2.31 547,271 1,262,505 Alaska ....................................... 186,727 256,216 1.37 462,967 635,255 Arizona ...................................... 439 915 2.08 474 987 Arkansas c .................................. 54,382 222,852 4.10 170,006 696,670 California ................................... 382,715 904,530 2.36 382,715 904,531

408

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 2 utility sector was offset by lower use in the residen- tial and commercial sectors, due to warmer-than- normal temperatures during the winter months. · The residential sector saw the largest decrease (463 billion cubic feet) with 4.5 trillion cubic feet con- sumed, down 9 percent from the 1997 level and 14 percent from the 1996 level. Commercial consump- tion of natural gas was 3.0 trillion cubic feet, a decline of 7 percent from the historical high of 3.2 trillion cubic feet in 1997. During 1998, natural gas consumption by the industrial sector fell to 8.7 trillion cubic feet, 2 percent below the 1997 level. Natural gas delivered to electric utilities rose to 3.3 trillion cubic feet, 10 percent (290 billion cubic feet) above the 1997 level. The increase in this sector was largely driven by utility use of natural gas for

409

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Alabama ............................................ - - 2.69 6.5 Alaska ............................................... 1.69 70.2 - - Arizona .............................................. 2.45 10.2 - - Arkansas ........................................... - - 8.71 1.9 California ........................................... 17.65 - 2.07 17.9 Colorado............................................ 2.93 100.0 2.81 46.6 Connecticut ....................................... - - 7.09 3.0 Delaware ........................................... 2.14 5.5 - - Florida ............................................... 3.11 0.6 1.87 5.9 Georgia ............................................. 0.87 82.8 - - Illinois ................................................ 2.59 10.3 5.19 100.0 Indiana ..............................................

410

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply Supply 17 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Minerals Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Figure 5. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States, 1995-1999 Figure T e x a s L o u i s i a n a O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g C o l o r a d o K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l a s k a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 95 96 97 98 99 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity

411

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E5. Industrial Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 E5. Industrial Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste e Alabama 6.55 3.51 5.05 5.47 23.50 20.64 27.12 15.33 16.04 19.15 2.86 7.07 18.31 9.35 Alaska - 3.14 3.14 3.79 29.30 28.31 31.60 - 16.62 29.00 1.68 28.83 46.04 31.77 Arizona - 2.75 2.75 6.77 24.82 30.18 26.97 17.00 11.76 20.94 1.73 15.37 19.21 16.60 Arkansas - 3.25 3.25 7.33 23.96 21.04 27.35 15.63 23.43 23.98 2.85 9.64 16.51 11.09 California - 3.64 3.64 6.91 25.09 30.50 30.02 15.24 16.13 22.74 2.78 10.53 29.62 13.48 Colorado - 2.05 2.05 6.23 24.57 27.92 27.21 - 12.42 21.99 1.73 12.77 20.69 15.14 Connecticut - - - 8.91 24.08 32.13 28.99 17.52 21.70 25.08 1.68

412

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 819,664 330,931 3.68 109,509 0.56 400 7.04 318,214 6.74 11,105 0.36 167,573 5.50 828,223 4.17 O h i o Ohio - Table 76 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 34,520 34,380 34,238 34,098 33,982 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 126,336 119,251 116,246 108,542 103,541 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 R 6,541 5,968 Total.............................................................

413

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 2,344,398 1,063,277 12.24 316,344 1.61 2,881 56.72 646,284 14.30 313,388 9.62 353,701 11.79 2,379,531 12.22 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous - Table 43 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,572 3,508 2,082 2,273 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,280 1,014 996 947 862 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

414

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

415

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama ............................................ 107,334 3,199 4,263 13,496 Alaska ............................................... 2,966,461 33,889 40,120 150,419 Arkansas ........................................... 198,148 365 451 1,536 California ........................................... 235,558 8,351 10,242 34,826 Colorado............................................ 425,083 17,467 24,365 65,730 Florida ............................................... 8,174 1,559 1,523 5,856 Illinois ................................................ 468 59 70 255 Kansas .............................................. 732,828 32,853 45,801 127,491 Kentucky ........................................... 37,929 1,661 2,263 6,476 Louisiana........................................... 4,610,969 101,358 144,609 384,288 Michigan............................................

416

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 3,313,980 1,351,611 15.56 387,442 1.97 649 12.78 1,282,157 28.36 137,766 4.23 649,117 21.64 3,421,300 17.57 East North Central East North Central - Table 37 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East North Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,417 2,348 3,174 3,180 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 42,469 41,497 41,943 42,893 42,762 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

417

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 Consumption - Table 17 Alabama.............. 3,271 89.6 7,441 94.7 5,101 93.0 11,194 95.6 25,270 96.6 Alaska ................. 8,368 29.6 8,990 30.3 9,116 29.6 10,972 32.5 8,631 29.8 Arizona................ 33,188 99.9 25,867 99.9 26,662 99.9 31,829 99.4 35,158 89.8 Arkansas ............. 18,625 95.9 23,132 96.2 26,442 94.8 20,213 95.9 40,150 100.0 California............. 556,557 93.3 367,940 90.3 263,937 85.8 315,728 86.6 266,459 82.3 Colorado ............. 2,685 63.6 554 27.8 3,484 72.8 428 8.7 254 2.9 Connecticut ......... 6,941 88.4 16,058 88.1 8,427 83.6 12,677 98.6 10,653 100.0 Delaware............. 16,120 92.3 21,423 79.5 19,088 86.8 13,697 89.6 10,239 94.6 Florida ................. 182,379 98.9 308,563 99.5 269,460 99.6 297,298 99.6 287,762 99.1 Georgia ............... 0 - 0 - 0 - 0 - 4,489 17.2 Illinois .................. 32,064 95.4 35,703 88.1 24,894

418

All Price Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Industrial Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 2. Industrial Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2011 (Million Dollars) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy f Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Biomass Total f Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste e Alabama 214.7 113.1 327.8 721.8 560.3 76.3 90.0 102.6 568.9 1,398.2 365.7 2,813.5 1,853.2 4,666.7 Alaska - 0.2 0.2 - 555.0 3.6 32.0 - 11.1 601.6 0.1 602.0 197.7 799.7 Arizona - 27.5 27.5 149.0 823.4 41.7 123.1 0.7 216.4 1,205.3 0.6 1,382.4 809.7 2,192.1 Arkansas - 18.1 18.1 543.6 742.2 54.6 109.1 2.2 175.7 1,083.7 185.6 1,831.1 841.7 2,672.8 California - 129.5 129.5 4,212.1 1,908.2 690.6 888.1 (s) 1,390.5 4,877.4 58.9 9,278.0 4,772.8 14,050.8 Colorado - 6.8 6.8 392.8 559.2 210.9 133.8 - 167.7 1,071.7 0.2 1,471.4 1,021.1 2,492.6 Connecticut - - - 237.4

419

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 1997 Total................... 4,983,772 56,186,958 3,214,912 4,761,409 8,832,450 238,961 1998 Total................... 4,520,276 57,321,746 2,999,491 5,044,497 8,686,147 231,438 1999 Total................... 4,724,094 58,200,837 3,048,832 5,007,325 8,990,216 230,137 Alabama ...................... 42,647 775,311 27,581 64,185 204,263 2,626 Alaska.......................... 17,634 88,924 27,667 13,409 74,224 9 Arizona ........................ 32,940 802,469 31,333 53,023 27,000 554 Arkansas ..................... 36,245 554,121 27,898 71,389 145,140 1,395 California ..................... 568,496 9,331,206 244,701 416,791 1,109,359 37,266 Colorado......................

420

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 7,679 2,105 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,454 0.05 188 0.01 2,979 0.10 7,726 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont - Table 92 92. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2012 SG Peer Review - Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor & Faulted Circuit Indicator System for Underground Assets - Jason Wilson, On-Ramp Wireless  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor for Underground Assets Jason Wilson On-Ramp Wireless June 7, 2012 December 2008 Wide Area Wireless Distribution Grid Sensor for Underground Assets Objective Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Prior to FY 12 FY12, authorized FY13, requested Out-year(s) $1,046 $580 $39 $0 Technical Scope Develop and demonstrate a wireless network solution for distribution automation, including fault circuit indicators and transformer monitoring, capable of secure and reliable communication with below ground and hard to reach utility assets at a TCO that is commercially viable for utilities to deploy at large scale. Enable utilities throughout the US to improve critical grid reliability metrics including SAIDI. * Conceptual design and trade studies including sensor system interfaces, augmenting FCI with

422

Martix elements with Wilson fermions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the results for the spectrum, meson decay constants f{sub {pi}} and f{sub v}{sup {minus}1}, the chiral parameters m{sub q} and {anti {psi}}{psi}, and the Kaon B Parameter are presented. The calculation was done using 35 quenched 16{sup 3} {times} 40 lattices at {beta} = 6.0 using Wuppertal and Wall smeared sources. We show that smeared sources improve the signal significantly, consequently we are able to improve the quality of results for a number of the phenomenologically interesting quantities.

Gupta, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Martix elements with Wilson fermions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of the results for the spectrum, meson decay constants f{sub {pi}} and f{sub v}{sup {minus}1}, the chiral parameters m{sub q} and {anti {psi}}{psi}, and the Kaon B Parameter are presented. The calculation was done using 35 quenched 16{sup 3} {times} 40 lattices at {beta} = 6.0 using Wuppertal and Wall smeared sources. We show that smeared sources improve the signal significantly, consequently we are able to improve the quality of results for a number of the phenomenologically interesting quantities.

Gupta, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Sir Joseph Wilson Swan, FRS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Here he learnt how to manipulate laboratory apparatus and to make and store gases. The pyrotechnic side of chemistry attracted him most. He left school when he was thirteen years ...

A. R.

1929-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mr Wilson Trims his Sails  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... doubt that he is a dab hand with the scissors. For the cuts in Government expenditure which he announced to the House of Commons on January 16 are a masterpiece of ... . Secondary school children, for example, will no longer get free milk at school; capital ...

1968-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NFSS Vicinity Property S NFSS Vicinity Property S This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from Comprehensive Radiological Survey Off-Site Property S Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-2 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-3 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-4 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-5 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-6 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-7 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-8 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-9 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-10 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-11 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-12 Appendix C NFSS Vicinity Property S Page C-13

427

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Drainages Drainages This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from: Background and Resurvey Recommendations for the Atomic Energy Commission Portion of the Lake Ontario Ordnance Works and A Comprehensive Characterization and Hazard Assessment of the DOE-Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix G Drainages Page G-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix G Drainages Page G-2 Aerospace Report No. ATR-82(7963-04)-1 Background and ~I Resurvey Recommendations for the Atomic Energy Commission Portion of the I Lake Ontario Ordnance Works November 1982 ~~~~~~I ~Prepared for Public Safety Division Office of Operational Safety Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, ~~~~I ~Safety, and Energy Prepardness U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY *|I~~~ ~~Prepared by

428

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E E Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors Data presented in the State Energy Data System (SEDS) are expressed pre- dominately in units that historically have been used in the United States, such as British thermal units, barrels, cubic feet, and short tons. However, because U.S. commerce involves other nations, most of which use metric units of measure, the U.S. Government is committed to the transition to the metric system, as stated in the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 (Public Law 94-168), amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-418), and Executive Order 12770 of July 25, 1991. The metric conversion factors presented in Table E1 can be used to calcu- late the metric-unit equivalents of values expressed in U.S. customary units. For example, 500 short tons are the equivalent of 453.6 metric tons (500 short tons x 0.9071847 metric tons/short ton

429

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural gas prices are developed for the residential, commercial, indus- trial, transportation, and electric power sectors. Reported natural gas prices are retail prices for sales of natural gas to ultimate users. Natural gas prices are intended to include all federal, state, and local taxes, surcharges, and adjustments billed to consumers. Although the EIA data collection form states that taxes are to be included in the re- ported gross revenues, it is most likely that respondents would not con- sider sales taxes as part of their companies' gross revenues, and some may not be reporting them. As a result, consumer sales taxes may not be cov- ered in full. For more information see End-Use Taxes: Current EIA Prac- tices, page 23, http://www.eia.gov/FTPROOT/financial/ 0583.pdf. Estimates of the amount of natural gas consumed by the residential, com- mercial, industrial, and electric

430

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F F Data and Methodology Changes in the State Energy Data System Tables and data files in the State Energy Data System (SEDS) supply a new year of data each production cycle. The latest data may be prelimi- nary and, therefore, revised the following cycle. Changes made to consumption and price source data for historical years are also regularly incorporated into SEDS. Listed below are changes in SEDS contents beyond the standard updates. Coal Beginning in 2008, the residential sector is no longer covered in any EIA surveys on coal consumption and distribution. Consequently, residential coal consumption is assumed to be zero for 2008 forward. Petroleum Asphalt and Road Oil For 2009 forward, state-level asphalt and road oil sales are no longer avail- able from the Asphalt Usage Survey for the United States and Canada. The nor- malized median state shares based on 1996-2008 sales data are

431

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Prices and Expenditures 35 P E T R O L E U M O V E R V I E W cement (AC-20), asphalt emulsion (rapid set and slow set), and asphalt cutback. For 1986 forward, the tank car price is used. However, for 1986 and 1987, the drum price is used if a tank car price is not available. For 1970 through 1985, when both tank car and drum prices are available, a simple average of the two prices is used. When only one price is available, that price is used. Asphalt prices are developed by calculating a simple average annual price from the monthly prices for each city for the three products. City prices are assigned to states. California, Ohio (1970 through 1985, and 1992 for- ward), and Pennsylvania have prices from two cities; in these cases, sim- ple averages of the two city prices are used. No states have prices from more than two cities. Kansas City prices are assigned to Kansas and not used in the Missouri price

432

PriceTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Prices and Expenditures 119 E L E C T R I C I T Y power retailers reporting sales to a state. Revenue and sales data are from the EIA Electric Power Annual data files. The prices for the residential and industrial sectors are based on residen- tial revenues and sales, and industrial revenues and sales, respectively. Commercial sector prices are calculated as the commercial sector reve- nues plus the non-transportation portion of "Other" revenues divided by the commercial sales plus the non-transportation portion of "Other" sales. The non-transportation portions of "Other" sales and revenues are esti- mated using SEDS transportation electricity consumption and the Electric Sales and Revenue "Other" sales. The transportation sector prices are cal- culated by dividing the "Other" category revenues by "Other"

433

R:\ventura\psmarticle\art0406.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

xxvii xxvii Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Supply Monthly, October 2004 PSA API OGJ RPD Million Million Percent Million Percent Million Percent Year Barrels Barrels of PSA Barrels of PSA Barrels of PSA 2002 2,097 2,132 101.7 2,093 99.8 2,082 99.3 2001 2,117 2,135 100.8 2,089 98.7 2,130 100.6 2000 2,125 2,137 100.6 2,146 101.0 2,088 98.3 1999 2,147 2,152 100.5 2,195 102.2 2,151 100.2 1998 2,282 2,298 100.7 2,327 102.0 2,181 95.6 1997 2,355 2,326 98.8 2,330 98.9 2,312 98.2 1996 2,360 2,356 99.8 2,370 100.4 2,335 98.9 1995 2,394 2,382 99.5 2,393 100.0 2,358 98.5 1994 2,432 2,424 99.7 2,438 100.2 2,425 99.7 1993 2,499 2,504 100.2 2,520 100.8 2,492 99.7 Table FE1. A Comparison of Data Series for Crude Oil Production, 1993-2002 Sources: PSA: Petroleum Supply Annual, 1993 through 2002, Table 2. API: American Petroleum Institute, Monthly Statistical Report, 1993 through 2002. OGJ: Oil

434

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Physical Units Coal in the United States is mostly consumed by the electric power sector. Data are collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) on Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," and predecessor forms. "ZZ" in the variable name is used to represent the two-letter state code: CLEIPZZ = coal consumed by the electric power sector in each state, in thousand short tons. CLEIPUS = SCLEIPZZ Seven data series are used to estimate state coal consumption for the other sectors. They are derived from various coal consumption and distribution surveys conducted by EIA. Four are U.S.-level consumption data series, available in thousands of short tons: CLACPUS = coal consumed by the transportation sector in the United States; CLHCPUS = coal consumed by the commercial sector (residential and commercial sector prior to 2008) in

435

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports. Coking coal, used in the industrial sector only, is a high-quality bitumi- nous coal that is used to make coal coke. Steam coal, which may be used by all sectors, includes anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, and lignite. In the industrial sector, coal consumption is the sum of cok- ing coal and steam coal. The industrial coal price is the quantity- weighted average price of these two components. Imports and exports of coal coke are available only on the national level and are accounted for in the industrial sector. Coal coke imports and ex- ports are reported separately and are not averaged with other coal prices and expenditures. Coking Coal Coking coal is generally more expensive than steam coal; therefore, it is identified separately

436

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resident Resident Population The population data used in the U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data System (SEDS) to calculate per capita consumption are shown in Tables C1 through C5. The data are the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, resident population estimates by state. The reference date for the estimates is July 1 of each year. The sum of the state estimates may not match the U.S. estimates. More re- cent revisions to the U.S. estimates may have been incorporated into the U.S. tables available on the Census Bureau website that are not included in the state estimates. Data Sources TPOPPUS ¾ Resident population of the United States. · 1960 through 1989: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/index.html. · 1990 through 1999: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/index.html.

437

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Real Real Gross Domestic Product by State The real gross domestic product (GDP) data used in the U.S. Energy Infor- mation Administration State Energy Data System to calculate total energy consumed per chained (2005) dollar of output are shown in Tables D1 through D4. The data are the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), real GDP estimates by state, beginning in 1977. The estimates are released in June of each year. For 1997 forward, BEA reports real GDP by state based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). From 1977 through 1997, BEA reports real GDP by state based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). A set of quality indexes for real GDP by state (1997=100) is available for 1977 through 1997. Given the differences in NAICS and SIC, BEA has cautioned against appending the two data series in an attempt to construct a single time series.

438

PriceTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Prices and Expenditures 135 A P P E N D I X A Price and Expenditure Variables ARICD Asphalt and road oil price in the industrial Dollars per million Btu ARICDZZ is independent. sector. ARICDUS = ARICVUS / ARICBUS * 1000 ARICV Asphalt and road oil expenditures in the Million dollars ARICVZZ = ARICBZZ * ARICDZZ / 1000 industrial sector. ARICVUS = SARICVZZ ARTCD Asphalt and road oil average price, all sectors. Dollars per million Btu ARTCD = ARICD ARTCV Asphalt and road oil total expenditures. Million dollars ARTCV = ARICV ARTXD Asphalt and road oil average price, all end-use Dollars per million Btu ARTXD = ARTXV / ARTXB * 1000 sectors. ARTXV Asphalt and road oil total end-use expenditures. Million dollars ARTXV = ARICV AVACD Aviation gasoline price in the transportation Dollars per million Btu AVACDZZ is independent. sector. AVACDUS = AVACVUS / AVACBUS * 1000 AVACV Aviation gasoline expenditures

439

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sections Sections 2 through 6 provide information for each of the major energy sources: coal, natural gas, petroleum, renewable energy, and electricity. Section 7 describes adjustments for consumption of industrial process fuel and intermediate products and other uncosted energy sources. Appendix A is an alphabetical listing of the variable names and formulas used in the price and expenditure module. Appendix B presents the cur- rent-dollar gross domestic product (GDP) by state used to calculate en- ergy expenditures as percent of GDP. Appendix C provides metric and other physical conversion factors for measures used in energy analyses. Appendix D summarizes the changes in SEDS content made since the last complete release of data. There are over 600 variables in SEDS. All of the variables are identified by five-character mnemonic series names, or MSN. In the following ex- ample, MGACV

440

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Metric Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors Data presented in the State Energy Data System are expressed predomi- nately in units that historically have been used in the United States, such as British thermal units, barrels, cubic feet, and short tons. However, be- cause U.S. commerce involves other nations, most of which use metric units of measure, the U.S. Government is committed to the transition to the metric system, as stated in the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 (Public Law 94-168), amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-418), and Executive Order 12770 of July 25, 1991. The metric conversion factors presented in Table C1 can be used to calcu- late the metric-unit equivalents of values expressed in U.S. customary units. For example, 500 short tons are the equivalent of 453.6 metric tons (500 short tons x 0.9071847 metric tons/short ton = 453.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NFSS Vicinity Property W NFSS Vicinity Property W This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from Comprehensive Radiological Survey Off-Site Property W Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-2 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-3 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-4 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-5 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-6 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-7 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-8 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-9 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-10 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-11 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-12 Appendix E NFSS Vicinity Property W Page E-13

442

PriceTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Prices and Expenditures 35 P E T R O L E U M O V E R V I E W cement (AC-20), asphalt emulsion (rapid set and slow set), and asphalt cutback. For 1986 forward, the tank car price is used. However, for 1986 and 1987, the drum price is used if a tank car price is not available. For 1970 through 1985, when both tank car and drum prices are available, a simple average of the two prices is used. When only one price is available, that price is used. Asphalt prices are developed by calculating a simple average annual price from the monthly prices for each city for the three products. City prices are assigned to states. California, Ohio (1970 through 1985, and 1992 for- ward), and Pennsylvania have prices from two cities; in these cases, sim- ple averages of the two city prices are used. No states have prices from more than two cities. Kansas City prices are assigned to Kansas and not used in the Missouri price estimates.

443

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ASTM: The American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel (petroleum): A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass Waste:

444

ConsumTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Consumption 31 P E T R O L E U M O V E R V I E W U.S. Energy Information Administration 32 State Energy Data: Consumption Petroleum Products Residential Sector Estimated Consumption (RC) Commercial Sector Estimated Consumption (CC) Industrial Sector Estimated Consumption (IC) Transportation Sector Estimated Consumption (AC) Electric Power Sector Estimated Consumption (EI) Total Estimated Consumption (TC) Asphalt and Road Oil (AR) ARIC = ARTC + + Aviation Gasoline (AV) AVAC = AVTC + + Distillate Fuel Oil (DF) DFRC + DFCC + DFIC + DFAC + DFEI = DFTC + + + + + + Jet Fuel (JF) JFAC JFEU = JFTC + + Kerosene (KS) KSRC + KSCC + KSIC = KSTC + + + + Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LG) LGRC + LGCC + LGIC + LGAC = LGTC + + + Lubricants (LU) + LUIC LUAC = LUTC + + + Motor Gasoline (MG) MGCC MGIC MGAC = MGTC + + + + Residual Fuel Oil (RF) RFCC RFIC + RFAC + RFEI = RFTC + + + Other Petroleum Products (PO) PCCC 1 + POIC 2 + PCEI 1 = POTC Total

445

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Consumption 125 A P P E N D I X A ABICB Aviation gasoline blending components Billion Btu ABICBZZ = ABTCBZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICBUS = ABTCBUS ABICP Aviation gasoline blending components Thousand barrels ABICPZZ = ABTCPZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICPUS = ABTCPUS ABTCB Aviation gasoline blending components total Billion Btu ABTCBZZ = ABTCPZZ * 5.048 consumed. ABTCBUS = SABTCBZZ ABTCP Aviation gasoline blending components total Thousand barrels ABTCPZZ = (COCAPZZ / COCAPUS) * ABTCPUS consumed. ABTCPUS is independent. AICAP Aluminum ingot production capacity. Short tons AICAPZZ is independent. AICAPUS = SAICAPZZ ARICB Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Billion Btu ARICBZZ = ARICPZZ * 6.636 industrial sector. ARICBUS = SARICBZZ ARICP Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Thousand barrels ARICPZZ = ASICPZZ + RDICPZZ industrial

446

ConsumTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oxygenate. oxygenate. A small amount of fuel ethanol is used as an alternative fuel, such as E85. It is typ- ically produced chemically from ethylene, or biologically from fermenta- tion of various sugars from carbohydrates found in agricultural crops and cellulosic residues from crops or wood. For 1981 forward, fuel ethanol es- timates are maintained separately from motor gasoline in SEDS and shown in the state energy consumption data tables to illustrate renewable energy use. The U.S. total fuel ethanol consumption in SEDS is a series developed by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) from annual reports of field production of oxygenated gasoline (prior to 2005), finished motor gasoline and motor gasoline blending components adjustments (2005 for- ward), and refinery and blender net inputs of fuel ethanol (all years). The fuel ethanol series used in SEDS is denatured fuel ethanol,

447

ConsumTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Consumption 125 A P P E N D I X A ABICB Aviation gasoline blending components Billion Btu ABICBZZ = ABTCBZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICBUS = ABTCBUS ABICP Aviation gasoline blending components Thousand barrels ABICPZZ = ABTCPZZ total consumed by the industrial sector. ABICPUS = ABTCPUS ABTCB Aviation gasoline blending components total Billion Btu ABTCBZZ = ABTCPZZ * 5.048 consumed. ABTCBUS = SABTCBZZ ABTCP Aviation gasoline blending components total Thousand barrels ABTCPZZ = (COCAPZZ / COCAPUS) * ABTCPUS consumed. ABTCPUS is independent. AICAP Aluminum ingot production capacity. Short tons AICAPZZ is independent. AICAPUS = SAICAPZZ ARICB Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Billion Btu ARICBZZ = ARICPZZ * 6.636 industrial sector. ARICBUS = SARICBZZ ARICP Asphalt and road oil consumed by the Thousand barrels ARICPZZ = ASICPZZ + RDICPZZ industrial sector.

448

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Section Section 1. Documentation Guide This section describes the data identification codes in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). The following six sections, one for each energy source and total energy, provide: descriptions of all the data series that are entered into SEDS; the formulas applied in SEDS for creating additional data series; and notes on special circumstances for any series. Appendix A is an alphabetical listing of the variable names and formulas used in consumption estimation; Appendix B lists the conversion factors used to convert physical units into British thermal units and cites the sources for those factors; Appendix C provides the state-level resident pop- ulation data used in per capita calculations; Appendix D presents the real gross domestic product by state used to calculate total energy per real dol- lar of economic output; Appendix E provides metric and other

449

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Adjustments for Calculating Expenditures Expenditures developed in the EIA State Energy Data System (SEDS) are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the SEDS consumption estimates. The consumption estimates are adjusted to remove process fuel, intermediate petroleum products, electricity exports, and other con- sumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy sources, and some wood and waste. Almost all aspects of energy production, processing, and distribution con- sume energy as an inherent part of those activities. SEDS industrial and transportation sector consumption estimates include energy consumed in the process of providing energy to the end-use consumer and are called "process fuel." Familiar examples include energy sources used in drilling for oil and

450

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Consumption 109 E L E C T R I C A L E N E R G Y S O U R C E S British Thermal Units (Btu) In order to total all the energy that is used to produce electricity, the energy sources are converted to the common unit of Btu. The methods for calcu- lating the Btu content of coal, natural gas, petroleum, and renewable energy sources consumed for generating electric power are explained in their respective sections of this documentation. Nuclear electric power is described in the following section. Total energy consumed by the electric power sector is the sum of all pri- mary energy used to generate electricity, including net imports of electric- ity across U.S. borders (ELNIBZZ, see page 111). To eliminate the double counting of supplemental gaseous fuels, which are accounted for in the en- ergy sources (such as coal) from which they are derived, and in natural gas, they are removed from the total:

451

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Consumption 31 P E T R O L E U M O V E R V I E W U.S. Energy Information Administration 32 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Petroleum Products Residential Sector Estimated Consumption (RC) Commercial Sector Estimated Consumption (CC) Industrial Sector Estimated Consumption (IC) Transportation Sector Estimated Consumption (AC) Electric Power Sector Estimated Consumption (EI) Total Estimated Consumption (TC) Asphalt and Road Oil (AR) ARIC = ARTC + + Aviation Gasoline (AV) AVAC = AVTC + + Distillate Fuel Oil (DF) DFRC + DFCC + DFIC + DFAC + DFEI = DFTC + + + + + + Jet Fuel (JF) JFAC JFEU = JFTC + + Kerosene (KS) KSRC + KSCC + KSIC = KSTC + + + + Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LG) LGRC + LGCC + LGIC + LGAC = LGTC + + + Lubricants (LU) + LUIC LUAC = LUTC + + + Motor Gasoline (MG) MGCC MGIC MGAC = MGTC + + + + Residual Fuel Oil (RF) RFCC RFIC + RFAC + RFEI = RFTC + + + Other Petroleum Products (PO) PCCC 1 + POIC 2 + PCEI

452

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NFSS Vicinity Property R NFSS Vicinity Property R This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from Comprehensive Radiological Survey Off-Site Property R Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-2 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-3 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-4 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-5 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-6 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-7 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-8 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-9 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-10 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-11 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-12 Appendix B NFSS Vicinity Property R Page B-13

453

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NFSS Vicinity Property X NFSS Vicinity Property X This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from Comprehensive Radiological Survey Off-Site Property X Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-2 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-3 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-4 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-5 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-6 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-7 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-8 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-9 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-10 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-11 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-12 Appendix F NFSS Vicinity Property X Page F-13

454

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NFSS Vicinity Property Q NFSS Vicinity Property Q This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from Comprehensive Radiological Survey Off-Site Property Q Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-2 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-3 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-4 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-5 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-6 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-7 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-8 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-9 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-10 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-11 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-12 Appendix A NFSS Vicinity Property Q Page A-13

455

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Formerly Utilized Sites Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties, New York: Review of Radiological Conditions at Six Vicinity Properties and Two Drainage Ditches October 2010 LMS/NFS/S06246 This page intentionally left blank LMS/NFS/S06246 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties, New York: Review of Radiological Conditions at Six Vicinity Properties and Two Drainage Ditches October 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy NFSS Vicinity Property Report October 2010 Doc. No. S06246 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. v

456

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Prices and Expenditures 111 R E N E W A B L E E N E R G Y to estimate prices for 1970 through 1989. The 1980 Census division resi- dential wood prices are adjusted in proportion to the changes in U.S. av- erage residential distillate fuel oil prices each year compared to the 1980 distillate fuel oil price. The Census division estimated prices are assigned to the states within each Census division for 1970 through 1989. The four Census region average prices for residential wood from RECS 1993 are used to estimate prices for 1990 forward. The 1993 Census division wood prices are adjusted in proportion to the changes in U.S. average residen- tial distillate fuel oil prices each year compared to the 1990 distillate fuel oil price. The estimated Census region wood prices are assigned to the states within each Census region for 1990 forward. Btu Prices, All Years Prices in dollars per cord are

457

ConsumTechNotes2012.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data: Data: Consumption 109 E L E C T R I C A L E N E R G Y S O U R C E S British Thermal Units (Btu) In order to total all the energy that is used to produce electricity, the energy sources are converted to the common unit of Btu. The methods for calcu- lating the Btu content of coal, natural gas, petroleum, and renewable energy sources consumed for generating electric power are explained in their respective sections of this documentation. Nuclear electric power is described in the following section. Total energy consumed by the electric power sector is the sum of all pri- mary energy used to generate electricity, including net imports of electric- ity across U.S. borders (ELNIBZZ, see page 111). To eliminate the double counting of supplemental gaseous fuels, which are accounted for in the en- ergy sources (such as coal) from which they are derived, and in natural gas, they are removed from the total: TEEIBZZ

458

R:\ventura\psmarticle\Art0310.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ix Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2002 data from good, to better, to best, for initial estimates to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting time increases from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, there is more in-depth review resulting in an improvement in the accuracy of the data. For the monthly-from-weekly

459

R:\ventura\psmarticle\Art0410.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 vii Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2003 data from good, to better, to best, for initial estimates to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD products: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), This Week in Petroleum (TWIP), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and TWIP were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting and review time passes from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, the EIA is able to serve up more accurate data. For the monthly-from-weekly (MFW) data, respondents have the

460

R:\ventura\psmarticle\Art0209.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September September 2002 xi Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data by Tammy G. Heppner and Carol L. French Overview Petroleum supply data collected by the Petroleum Division (PD) in the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) showed an improvement in the accuracy of the 2001 data from good, to better, to best, for initial estimates to final values. These data were presented in a series of PD publications: the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report (WFR), the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM), and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Weekly estimates in the WPSR and WFR were the first values available. Figure FE1 illustrates that as reporting time increases from the weekly estimates to the interim monthly values to the final petroleum supply values, there is more in-depth review resulting in an improvement in the accuracy of the data. For the monthly-from-weekly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Physical Physical Units Eight natural gas data series are used to derive the natural gas consump- tion estimates in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Several of these data series are deliveries of natural gas to the end user by state and are used as consumption because actual consumption data at these levels are not available. The sources for the natural gas data are the Natural Gas Annual and Electric Power Annual published by the U.S. Energy Information Ad- ministration (EIA) and its predecessors. Data for recent years are also available on the EIA website. These series, in million cubic feet, for each state are as follows (the two-letter state code is represented by "ZZ" in the following variable names): NGCCPZZ = natural gas delivered to the commercial sector (includes gas used by nonmanufacturing organizations, such as ho- tels, restaurants, retail stores, laundries, and other

462

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Prices and Expenditures 119 E L E C T R I C I T Y power retailers reporting sales to a state. Revenue and sales data are from the EIA Electric Power Annual data files. The prices for the residential and industrial sectors are based on residen- tial revenues and sales, and industrial revenues and sales, respectively. Commercial sector prices are calculated as the commercial sector reve- nues plus the non-transportation portion of "Other" revenues divided by the commercial sales plus the non-transportation portion of "Other" sales. The non-transportation portions of "Other" sales and revenues are esti- mated using SEDS transportation electricity consumption and the Electric Sales and Revenue "Other" sales. The transportation sector prices are cal- culated by dividing the "Other" category revenues by "Other"

463

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

65 65 Appendix B Thermal Conversion Factors A P P E N D I X B Table B1. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum and Heat Rates for Electricity, Selected Years, 1960-2011 Year Petroleum Consumption Electricity Net Generation Liquefied Petroleum Gases, Industrial Sector (LGICKUS) Liquefied Petroleum Gases, All Sectors (LGTCKUS) Motor Gasoline, All Sectors (MGTCKUS) Total Petroleum Products, All Sectors a (PATCKUS) Fossil-Fueled Steam-Electric Plants b (FFETKUS) Nuclear Steam-Electric Plants (NUETKUS) Million Btu per Barrel Btu per Kilowatthour 1960 4.163 4.011 5.253 5.555 10,760 11,629 1965 4.149 4.011 5.253 5.532 10,453 11,804 1970 3.736 3.779 5.253 5.503 10,494 10,977 1975 3.645 3.715 5.253 5.494 10,406 11,013 1976 3.640 3.711 5.253 5.504 10,373 11,047 1977 3.590 3.677 5.253 5.518 10,435 10,769 1978 3.579 3.669 5.253 5.519 10,361 10,941 1979

464

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total Energy The preceding sections of this documentation describe how the Energy In- formation Administration (EIA) arrives at state end-use consumption esti- mates by individual energy source in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). This section describes how all energy sources are added in Btu to create total energy consumption and end-use consumption estimates. Total Energy Consumption Total energy consumption by state is defined in SEDS as the sum of all en- ergy sources consumed. The total includes all primary energy sources used directly by the energy-consuming sectors (residential, commercial, indus- trial, transportation, and electric power), as well as net interstate flow of electricity (ELISB) and net imports of electricity (ELNIB). Energy sources can be categorized as renewable and non-renewable sources: Non-Renewable Sources Fossil fuels: · coal (CL) · net

465

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The The following six sections, one for each energy source and total energy, provide: descriptions of all the data series that are entered into SEDS; the formulas applied in SEDS for creating additional data series; and notes on special circumstances for any series. Appendix A is an alphabetical listing of the variable names and formulas used in consumption estimation; Appendix B lists the conversion factors used to convert physical units into British thermal units and cites the sources for those factors; Appendix C provides the state-level resident pop- ulation data used in per capita calculations; Appendix D presents the real gross domestic product by state used to calculate total energy per real dol- lar of economic output; Appendix E provides metric and other physical conversion factors for measures used in energy analyses; and Appendix F summarizes changes made since the last complete

466

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes ox- ygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are re- ported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel

467

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oxygenate oxygenate (blended up to 10 percent concentration). A small amount of fuel ethanol is used as an alternative fuel, such as E85. It is typically produced chemically from ethylene, or biologically from fermentation of various sugars from carbo- hydrates found in agricultural crops and cellulosic residues from crops or wood. For 1981 forward, fuel ethanol estimates are maintained separately from motor gasoline in SEDS and shown in the state energy consumption data tables to illustrate renewable energy use. The U.S. total fuel ethanol consumption in SEDS is a series developed by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) from annual reports of field production of oxygenated gasoline (prior to 2005), finished motor gasoline and motor gasoline blending components adjustments (2005 for- ward), and refinery and blender net inputs of fuel ethanol (all years). The fuel ethanol

468

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data 2011: Prices and Expenditures 135 A P P E N D I X A Price and Expenditure Variables ARICD Asphalt and road oil price in the industrial Dollars per million Btu ARICDZZ is independent. sector. ARICDUS = ARICVUS / ARICBUS * 1000 ARICV Asphalt and road oil expenditures in the Million dollars ARICVZZ = ARICBZZ * ARICDZZ / 1000 industrial sector. ARICVUS = SARICVZZ ARTCD Asphalt and road oil average price, all sectors. Dollars per million Btu ARTCD = ARICD ARTCV Asphalt and road oil total expenditures. Million dollars ARTCV = ARICV ARTXD Asphalt and road oil average price, all end-use Dollars per million Btu ARTXD = ARTXV / ARTXB * 1000 sectors. ARTXV Asphalt and road oil total end-use expenditures. Million dollars ARTXV = ARICV AVACD Aviation gasoline price in the transportation Dollars per million Btu AVACDZZ is independent. sector. AVACDUS = AVACVUS / AVACBUS * 1000 AVACV Aviation gasoline

469

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Current-Dollar Current-Dollar Gross Domestic Product by State The current-dollar gross domestic product (GDP) data used in the U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data System (SEDS) to calculate total energy consumed per current dollar of output are shown in Tables B1 through B4. The data are the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, current-dollar GDP estimates by state. The estimates are released June of each year. For 1970 through 1996, BEA reports current-dollar GDP by state based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). For 1997 forward, the BEA reports current-dollar GDP by state based on the 1997 North Ameri- can Classification System (NAICS). Given this discontinuity in the GDP by states series at 1997, users of these data are strongly cautioned against appending the two data series in an attempt to construct a single time se- ries of GDP by state

470

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

471

Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NFSS Vicinity Property T NFSS Vicinity Property T This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from Comprehensive Radiological Survey Off-Site Property T Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-2 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-3 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-4 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-5 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-6 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-7 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-8 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-9 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-10 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-11 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-12 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-13

472

Richard Shaheen named Senior VP of Transmission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and operational accomplishments that will serve BPA well as we continue to strengthen our safety culture, sustain our core transmission assets and modernize our electric grid."...

473

Bruce Braine VP, Strategic Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

added approximately 5,000 MW of new natural gas generation and over 2,000 MW of renewable generation storms ­ "Derecho" and Hurricane Sandy · Significant direct and societal costs for storm outages ­ `10­'12 AEP Restoration spend: ~$73.5M Capital and $286M O&M ­ `10­'12 AEP Customer Societal costs: ~$34B (DOE

Howat, Ian M.

474

PriceTechNotes2012.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

esti- mates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. Reliable data for state-level prices rarely exist, especially as...

475

Wilson, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5007599°, -110.8752112° 5007599°, -110.8752112° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5007599,"lon":-110.8752112,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

476

Wilson-Loop Symmetry Breaking Reexamined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The splitting in energy of gauge field vacua on the non-simply connected space $S^3/Z_2$ is reconsidered. We show the calculation to the one-loop level for a Yang-Mills vector with a ghost field. We confirm our previous result and give a solution to the question posed by Freire, Rom\\~ao and Barroso.

Atsushi Nakamula; Kiyoshi Shiraishi

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

477

by D. D. Chambliss R. J. Wilson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in printed form for private use is pcmiitted without payment of royalty provided that (1) each reproduction on thefirstpage. The title and abstract, but no other portions, of this paper may be copied or distributed royalty

Chiang, Shirley

478

Dwayne Wilson SRNS President and CEO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commonly employed through the government for detection of nuclear forensically- relevant isotope ratios of uranium and plutonium among other elements. The goal of this work is to...

479

Michael Wilson 5400 words 16 Colchester Avenue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-framed spec- tacles, and the lenses drooped onto his broad cheekbones. At his side he carried a small, 1 #12 settled the black case into a hollow next to Alan's French horn. He did this so gently, it might have been to fall at the end, as if what he'd said were a wonder. My son Alan is seventeen. He's played the French

Wilson, J. Michael

480

ASTRONOMICAL AND PHYSICAL Mr. WILSON'S OBSERVATORY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

111 115 ILLUSTRATIONS. Daramoxa ............. frontispiece. Heliostat Facing page 88 The Sun ,, ,, 94. The experiments on the radiation of heat from sun spots were made by means of a large polar heliostat, having

Dworetsky, Mike

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "veasey wilson vp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ABJ Wilson loops and Seiberg duality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......606-8501, Japan Subject Index: B04, B06, B16, B21, B83...we provide a nonperturbative completion that renders the formal series...to be with a non-integral index in our calculations and is...generality, we can choose the index to be , since the expression......

Hirano Shinji; Nii Keita; Shigemori Masaki

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Note: Prices are calculated from onsystem sales in all States and sectors except in Georgia, Maryland, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania, where prices reflect all deliveries in the residential and commercial sectors. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition;" Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC- 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants;" and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." 0 2 4 6 8 10 Residential Commercial Onsystem Industrial Onsystem Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 13. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1998-2002

483

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 - Natural Gas 1997 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -100,347 57,380 0.65 172,268 0.87 6 0.14 35,996 0.72 219 0.01 25,913 0.81 119,512 0.60 West Virginia West Virginia - Table 95 95. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1993-1997 Table 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 2,846 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 31,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 171,024

484

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1997 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 98,869 24,472 0.28 0 0.00 3 0.07 18,162 0.36 27,162 0.91 12,303 0.38 82,102 0.41 R h o d e I s l a n d Rhode Island - Table 86 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Rhode Island, 1993-1997 Table 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

485

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 A1. Comparison of Electric Utility Natural Gas Consumption Data by State, 1997 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Form EIA-176 Form EIA-759 Difference MDP a Alabama ............................................ 11,716 9,996 -1,720 17.2 Alaska ............................................... 33,754 33,511 -243 0.7 Arizona .............................................. 32,019 23,384 -8,635 36.9 Arkansas ........................................... 21,077 24,802 3,725 17.7 California ........................................... 364,645 377,967 13,322 3.7 Colorado............................................ 4,932 5,537 605 12.3 Connecticut ....................................... 12,859 16,762 3,903 30.4 Delaware ........................................... 15,285 16,090 805 5.3 Florida ...............................................

486

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1997 10 Wellhead Prices The average wellhead price rose in 1997 for the second year in a row. It reached $2.32 per thousand cubic feet, 7 percent more than the 1996 price of $2.17 and 50 percent above the 1995 low of $1.55. Average wellhead prices during 1996 and 1997 were at their highest level since the 1982 through 1985 time period when they peaked in the range of $2.51 to $2.66 per thousand cubic feet. The 1997 price of $2.32 per thousand cubic feet still was more than 41 percent below the 1983 peak after adjustment for inflation. Drilling Exploration and development activities incrementally added to proved reserves of natural gas. In 1997, natural gas reserves reached 167,223 billion cubic feet, and reserve ad- ditions replaced production for the fourth year in a row. The number of rotary rigs running and the number of well com- pletions

487

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2002 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 T e x a s G u l f o f M e x i c o N e w M e x i c o O k l a h o m a W y o m i n g L o u i s i a n a C o l o r a d o A l a s k a K a n s a s C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 Billion Cubic Meters 2001 2002 2001 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Minerals Management Service. 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2001-2002 Figure None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001-and over WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK GOM 3. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2002 (Million Cubic Feet) Figure GOM = Gulf of Mexico Sources:

488

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

DOE DOE personnel fueling a natural gas automobile. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1997 211 Summary of Data Collection Operations and Report Methodology The 1997 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supple- mental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report ." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Form EIA-176 Survey Design The original version of Form EIA-176 was approved in 1980 with a mandatory response requirement. Prior to 1980, pub- lished data were based on voluntary responses to Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior predecessor Forms BOM-6-1340-A and BOM-6-1341-A of the same title. In 1982, the scope of the revised EIA-176

489

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 2. Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1997 (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama ................ 583,272 4,637 -70,095 -185,706 0 587 21 322,270 Alaska.................... 468,311 41,535 60,798 0 -62,187 0 0 425,387 Arizona .................. 452 0 9,469 125,217 -3,901 0 0 131,237 Arkansas ............... 208,514 554 -17,978 72,846 0 -261 0 263,089 California ............... 285,690 11,600 -14,363 1,671,128 -308 -16,398 0 1,946,945 Colorado................ 637,375 28,851 -225,105 -83,263 0 525 6,314 305,945 Connecticut ........... 0 0 197 136,910 0 94 37 137,049 D.C. ....................... 0 0 -1,074 35,144 0 0 0 34,070 Delaware ............... 0 0 2,266 44,214 0 -8 2 46,490 Florida ................... 6,114 1,563 -21,960 503,126 0 0 0 485,717 Georgia.................. 0 0 -7,724 369,230 0 -153 14 361,672 Hawaii.................... 0

490

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1997 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -51,591 44,162 0.50 257,139 1.29 128 2.89 58,108 1.17 4,079 0.14 31,129 0.97 137,605 0.69 U t a h Utah - Table 91 91. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Utah, 1993-1997 Table 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,040 1,789 1,580 1,633 1,839 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,061 1,303 1,127 1,339 1,475 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 264,481 304,347 262,400 233,594 231,368

491

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Principally, Principally, natural gas flows from the pro- ducing areas in Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico toward the northeast and mid- west. Imports, primarily from Canada, have continued to provide significant contributions, helping the United States meet increasing demand for natural gas. Imports and Exports During 1997, net imports rose for the 11th consecutive year, representing 13 percent of U.S. natural gas consumption. Canada continued its role as the major supplier of natural gas imported into the United States. However, the growth rate of U.S. imports of Canadian gas was minimal because pipeline capacity utilization remained near its maximum level and capacity expanded very little during the year. In- creases in pipeline capacity are under development and oth- ers have been proposed for the next several years. Crossborder trade with Mexico also

492

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1997 1997 - Natural Gas 1997 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: W y o m i n g -595,033 46,936 0.53 738,368 3.72 13 0.29 12,999 0.26 95 0.00 10,754 0.33 70,797 0.35 Wyoming - Table 97 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1993-1997 Table 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 13,562 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 5,160 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 880,596 949,343 988,671

493

X:\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma00.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

61.7 61.7 57.1 50.7 46.6 54.6 51.1 February ............................. 66.9 61.9 54.3 48.8 57.9 55.2 March .................................. 60.9 54.7 56.0 51.5 57.3 53.1 April .................................... 60.6 54.4 53.2 45.5 55.0 50.2 May ..................................... 61.7 58.7 55.5 51.7 57.0 54.9 June .................................... 67.1 64.9 59.1 55.3 61.6 60.0 July ..................................... 65.8 64.2 58.7 53.3 61.0 59.3 August ................................ 64.5 60.9 55.4 48.9 58.2 54.4 September .......................... 73.4 71.4 60.5 58.8 63.6 64.3 October ............................... 75.5 72.8 65.8 58.1 69.1 64.5 November ........................... 77.2 71.7 61.4 56.2 66.4 64.8 December ........................... 73.7 68.7 57.9 51.8 63.6 61.6

494

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1997 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 296,612 138,877 1.57 1,510 0.01 13 0.29 64,130 1.29 1,635 0.06 55,117 1.71 259,773 1.30 T e n n e s s e e Tennessee - Table 89 89. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Tennessee, 1993-1997 Table 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 505 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

495

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1997 2 natural gas imported into the United States. However, the growth rate of U.S. imports of Canadian gas was minimal because pipeline capacity utilization remained near its maximum level and capacity expanded very little during the year. Increases in pipeline capacity are under develop- ment or have been proposed for the next several years. Cross border trade with Mexico also increased in 1997, and that nation holds substantial promise for expansion on both the supply and demand sides of the market. Spot purchases of liquefied natural gas (LNG) rose as the United States re- sponded to LNG availability in the world marketplace. Spot purchases of LNG were received from the United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi), and, for the first time, from Australia. At the end of 1997, there were 418 active underground storage fields in operation

496

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14. 14. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, as of December 31, 2002 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Salt Caverns Aquifers Depleted Fields Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama ................. 1 7 0 0 1 2 2 9 0.10 Arkansas ................ 0 0 0 0 2 22 2 22 0.27 California................ 0 0 0 0 10 479 10 479 5.84 Colorado ................ 0 0 0 0 9 101 9 101 1.23 Illinois ..................... 0 0 17 791 13 155 30 945 11.52 Indiana ................... 0 0 8 55 16 56 24 111 1.35 Iowa ....................... 0 0 4 273 0 0 4 273 3.33 Kansas ................... 1 1 0 0 18 298 19 299 3.65 Kentucky ................ 0 0 2 9 23 212 25 221 2.69 Louisiana................ 6 57 0 0 8 530 14 587 7.15 Maryland ................ 0 0 0 0 1 62 1 62 0.76 Michigan.................

497

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 81 40. Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 Table State Dry Production Total Consumption Alabama.................................................................. 2.63 1.49 Alaska ..................................................................... 2.21 1.90 Arizona.................................................................... 0 0.91 Arkansas................................................................. 0.90 1.13 California................................................................. 1.93 10.30 Colorado ................................................................. 3.81 1.53 Connecticut............................................................. 0 0.56 D.C..........................................................................

498

X:\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma00.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Survey Background The EIA-782 surveys were implemented in 1983 to fulfill the data requirements necessary to meet En- ergy Information Administration (EIA) legislative mandates and user community data needs. The re- quirements include petroleum product price, market distribution, demand (or sales), and product supply data, which are needed for a complete evaluation of petroleum market performance. The EIA-782 series includes the Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Re- port"; Form EIA-782B, "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report"; and Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption." The Form EIA-782A collects refiner and gas plant op- erator monthly price and volume data at a

499

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1997 52 A discussion of prices by each sector follows. City Gate City gate prices represent the total cost paid by gas distribu- tion companies for gas received at the point where the gas is physically transferred from a pipeline company or trans- mission system. This price is intended to reflect all charges for the acquisition, storage, and transportation as well as other charges associated with the LDC's obtaining the gas for sale to consumers. Prices paid at the city gate by local distribution companies rose substantially in 1997, reaching $3.66 per thousand cubic feet, 12 percent above the 1996 level and 32 percent more than the low price seen in 1995. Residential Residential consumers pay the highest price for natural gas. In 1997, the residential price increased to a record $6.94 per thousand cubic feet, 8 percent above the previous

500

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 2000 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 2,461,942 1,571,106 16.52 366,731 1.93 4,673 56.43 627,207 12.57 212,121 6.97 325,490 10.12 2,740,597 13.19 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous - Table 38 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1996-2000 Table 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 996 947 862 1,171 1,186 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 88,173 80,182 82,360 91,397 95,877 From Oil Wells........................................... 313,581 318,852 316,472 342,372 324,400