Sample records for vapor radiometer precipitable

  1. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-122 G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

  3. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cadeddu, Maria

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  4. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  5. Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caddedu, MP

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The 90/150-GHz Vapor Radiometer provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  6. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from such as cloud mask, atmos- pheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties vapor amount, aerosol particles, and the subsequently formed clouds [9]. Barnes et al. [2] provide

  7. ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 24, NO. 3, 2007, 509526 Variational Assimilation of GPS Precipitable Water Vapor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precipitable Water Vapor and Hourly Rainfall Observations for a Meso- Scale Heavy Precipitation Event During Atmospheric water vapor plays a significant role in numerical weather predictions (NWP) of heavy rain- fall of the precipitable water vapor (PWV) from delayed signals transmitted by GPS satellites, which can be assimilated

  8. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  9. Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  11. Orographic Precipitation and Water Vapor Fractionation over the Southern Andes RONALD B. SMITH AND JASON P. EVANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Orographic Precipitation and Water Vapor Fractionation over the Southern Andes RONALD B. SMITH (Smith and Barstad 2004) to predict the patterns of orographic pre- Corresponding author address: Ronald B. Smith, Depa

  12. Broadband radiometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cannon, T.W.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband radiometer is disclosed including (a) an optical integrating sphere having generally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample. 8 figs.

  13. Water vapor variability in the tropics and its links to dynamics and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    dioxide doubling [e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2001]. This uncertainty stems P. P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia Richard P. Allan to understanding feedbacks and processes operating within the climate system. Column-integrated water vapor (CWV

  14. Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, X.; Diak, G.R.; Hayden, C.M.; Young, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation.

  15. Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGrado, Timothy R. [Mayo Clinic] [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started.

  16. Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Correlation between water-vapor transport from the Gulf of Mexico and precipitation in the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John Vinson

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation inland, are very much appreciated. There is little doubt that the Gulf has a great influence on the amount and character of precipit. tion that does occur in the eastern United States, i. e. , the area generally east of the Rocky Mountains... moisture flux. Cobb found that precipitation which is signif icantly greater than normal did not occur when the flux of moisture was unusually small, and that a large moisture flux does not result in abnormally high precipitation if it is associated...

  18. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of this contract, we participated in another ARM-sponsored experiment at the NSA during February-March 2007. This experiment is called the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) and the GSR was operated successfully for the duration of the campaign. One of the principal goals of the experiment was to provide retrievals of water vapor during PWV amounts less than 2 mm and to compare GSR data with ARM radiometers and radiosondes. A secondary goal was to compare the radiometric response of the microwave and millimeter wavelength radiometers to water and ice clouds. In this final report, we will include the separate progress reports for each of the three years of the project and follow with a section on major accomplishments of the project.

  19. Radiometer Characterization System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Spectroscopy with Multichannel Correlation Radiometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Harris

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation radiometers make true differential measurements in power with high accuracy and small systematic errors. This receiver architecture has been used in radio astronomy for measurements of continuum radiation for over 50 years; this article examines spectroscopy over broad bandwidths using correlation techniques. After general discussions of correlation and the choice of hybrid phase, experimental results from tests with a simple laboratory multi-channel correlation radiometer are shown. Analysis of the effect of the input hybrid's phase shows that a 90 degree hybrid is likely to be the best general choice for radio astronomy, depending on its amplitude match and phase flatness with frequency. The laboratory results verify that the combination of the correlation architecture and an analog lag correlator is an excellent method for spectroscopy over very wide bandwidths.

  1. Simultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    to simultaneously retrieve the vertical profile of precipitation and the near-surface wind speed. ResultsSimultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements simultaneously estimates the over ocean near-surface wind speed and rain rate profile using data from a 10.7 GHz

  2. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, GB; Michalsky, JJ

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using the diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  3. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - agua precipitable pwv Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South China. The ground-based GPS Precipitable Wa- ter Vapor (PWV) measurements... for water vapor dur- ing the heavy precipitation processes over South China. 3 GPS PWV data......

  5. Impact of GPS Zenith Tropospheric Delay data on precipitation forecasts in Mediterranean France and Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Jennifer

    implies that the GPS data has good potential for influencing numerical models in rapidly developing, high for the forecasting of rainfall. Water vapor plays an important role in energy transfer and in the formation of clouds. 1992]. Rocken et al. (1993)] demonstrated agreement between water vapor radiometers and GPS derived

  6. Polar Precipitation Measurement Mission A Mission Concept for Earth Explorer 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regional and global energy-water cycle budgets. Measurement of precipitation at the high latitudes the middle to high latitudes. To improve global precipitation estimates through the synergistic use of space borne radar and radiometer measurements. Orbital characteristics To achieve full sensitivity an orbit

  7. Regional summer precipitation events in Asia and their changes in the past decades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Weihong

    with the enhanced water vapor supply related to the strengthened monsoon flow over southeastern China and the anomalous easterlies over northwestern China. It is also associated with the decreased water vapor supply in precipitation amount and precipitation days for total, extreme, heavy, and light-moderate precipitations

  8. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  9. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 â�� 300 �¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  10. Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: radiometer standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estey, R.S.; Seaman, C.H.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

  11. The physical basis for increases in precipitation extremes in simulations of 21st-century climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul Ambrose

    Global warming is expected to lead to a large increase in atmospheric water vapor content and to changes in the hydrological cycle, which include an intensification of precipitation extremes. The intensity of precipitation ...

  12. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, Tom; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Anderberg, Mary; Kutchenreiter, Mark

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  13. Vertical structure of tropical oceanic convective clouds and its relation to precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    data are collocated with precipitation rates from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR high tops that are nearly two km deeper than moderately raining or non- raining high clouds. Rain rate.1029/2007GL032811. 1. Introduction [2] Tropical convection plays an important role in the energy and moisture

  14. Observational Analysis of Cloud and Precipitation in Midlatitude Cyclones: Northern versus Southern Hemisphere Warm Fronts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System Extratropical cyclones produce the bulk of the cold- season precipitation in middle and high latitudes and are key contributors to the meridional transport of energy between the equator and the poles. Though

  15. PROGRESS REPORT OF FY 2004 ACTIVITIES: IMPROVED WATER VAPOR AND CLOUD RETRIEVALS AT THE NSA/AAO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. R. Westwater; V. V. Leuskiy; M. Klein; A. J. Gasiewski; and J. A. Shaw

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic goals of the research are to develop and test algorithms and deploy instruments that improve measurements of water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud coverage, with a focus on the Arctic conditions of cold temperatures and low concentrations of water vapor. The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Although several technologies have been investigated to measure these column amounts, microwave radiometers (MWR) have been used operationally by the ARM program for passive retrievals of these quantities: precipitable water vapor (PWV) and integrated water liquid (IWL). The technology of PWV and IWL retrievals has advanced steadily since the basic 2-channel MWR was first deployed at ARM CART sites Important advances are the development and refinement of the tipcal calibration method [1,2], and improvement of forward model radiative transfer algorithms [3,4]. However, the concern still remains that current instruments deployed by ARM may be inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and IWL. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important because of the possibility of scaling and/or quality control of radiosondes by the water amount. Extremely dry conditions, with PWV less than 3 mm, commonly occur in Polar Regions during the winter months. Accurate measurements of the PWV during such dry conditions are needed to improve our understanding of the regional radiation energy budgets. The results of a 1999 experiment conducted at the ARM North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site during March of 1999 [5] have shown that the strength associated with the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line makes radiometry in this frequency regime suitable for measuring low amounts of PWV. As a portion of our research, we conducted another millimeter wave radiometric experiment at the NSA/AAO in March-April 2004. This experiment relied heavily on our experiences of the 1999 experiment. Particular attention was paid to issues of radiometric calibration and radiosonde intercomparisons. Our theoretical and experimental work also supplements efforts by industry (F. Solheim, Private Communication) to develop sub-millimeter radiometers for ARM deployment. In addition to quantitative improvement of water vapor measurements at cold temperature, the impact of adding millimeter-wave window channels to improve the sensitivity to arctic clouds was studied. We also deployed an Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) during this experiment, both for measuring continuous day-night statistics of the study of cloud coverage and identifying conditions suitable for tipcal analysis. This system provided the first capability of determining spatial cloud statistics continuously in both day and night at the NSA site and has been used to demonstrate that biases exist in inferring cloud statistics from either zenith-pointing active sensors (lidars or radars) or sky imagers that rely on scattered sunlight in daytime and star maps at night [6].

  16. Correlation of globe thermometer response and a YSI radiometer response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franknecht, Robert Howard

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOWARD FRANKNECHT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subjects Industrial Hygiene CORRELATION OF GLOBE THERMOMETER RESPONSE AND A YSI RADIOMETER RESPONSE A Thesis by ROBERT HOMARD FRANKNECHT Approved as to sty1e and content by: C'6~& . ~ Chairman of Committee ead...

  17. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  18. Ocean Water Vapor and Cloud Burden Trends Derived from the Topex Microwave Radiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    algorithm is a log-linear regression algorithm with coefficients that are stratified by wind speed and water. TMR OBSERVATIONS The TMR flew in a 10-day non-sun-synchronous exact repeat orbit with an inclination

  19. Improved Retrievals of Temperature and Water Vapor Profiles Using a Twelve-Channel Microwave Radiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300 219 255Retrievals of Temperature and Water

  20. MEASUREMENTS AND RETRIEVALS FROM A NEW 183-GHz WATER VAPOR RADIOMETER IN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Wittle, J. Kenneth (Chester Springs, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement.

  2. The effect of energetic electron precipitation on middle mesospheric night-time ozone during and after a moderate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    mainly by large fluxes of high-energy protons with energies >100 MeV, has been observed and modeled 14 November 2012. [1] Using a ground-based microwave radiometer at Troll Station, Antarctica (72 S, 2 satellite data were used to identify the precipitating particles and to characterize their energy, spatial

  3. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  4. Vapor phase elemental sulfur amendment for sequestering mercury in contaminated soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Jackson, Dennis G.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of treating elemental mercury within the soil is provided by introducing into the soil a heated vapor phase of elemental sulfur. As the vapor phase of elemental sulfur cools, sulfur is precipitated within the soil and then reacts with any elemental mercury thereby producing a reaction product that is less hazardous than elemental mercury.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  7. Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

  8. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA); McRae, Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  9. The Response of Orographic Precipitation over Idealized Midlatitude Mountains Due to Global Increases in CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    precipitation replenishes a large fraction of the world's freshwater supply. About 26% of the world's population regions (Beniston 2005). Heavy orographic precipitation on the other hand, can have less benign impacts constant, im- plying through the Clausius­Clapeyron (CC) equation an increase in atmospheric water vapor

  10. Impact of Convective Organization on the Response of Tropical Precipitation Extremes to Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact of Convective Organization on the Response of Tropical Precipitation Extremes to Warming extremes to warming in organized convection is ex- amined using a cloud-resolving model. Vertical shear, the fractional increase of precipitation extremes is similar to that of surface water vapor, which

  11. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  12. Growth of Large-Area Single- and Bi-Layer Graphene by Controlled Carbon Precipitation on Polycrystalline Ni Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reina, Alfonso

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report graphene films composed mostly of one or two layers of graphene grown by controlled carbon precipitation on the surface of polycrystalline Ni thin films during atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Controlling ...

  13. Skin temperature of the sea as determined by radiometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudreau, Robert Donald

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Differences Temperature Vapor Press Skin Skin Bkt Skin Bkt -Bkt -Air -Air -Air -Air 120100 120200 120400 120500 1 20600 1 20700 1 20800 1 20900 1 21000 130100 130200 130300 130400 130500 130600 130700 130800 131000 131100 . 6235 . 6732.... FORTRAN program. 57 6. Stepwise analysis of error in radiation temperature of the sea. 65 LIST OF FIGURES Number Page 1. Tracks of Cruise 62 -H-10 along which radiation data were obtained, 2. Comparison of i. nfrared emissivities of water vapor. 14...

  14. Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

  15. ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AUSTIN, ME; LOHR, J

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 ECE RADIOMETER UPGRADE ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) heterodyne radiometer diagnostic on DIII-D has been upgraded with the addition of eight channels for a total of 40. The new, higher frequency channels allow measurements of electron temperature into the magnetic axis in discharges at maximum field, 2.15 T. The complete set now extends over the full usable range of second harmonic emission frequencies at 2.0 T covering radii from the outer edge inward to the location of third harmonic overlap on the high field side. Full coverage permits the measurement of heat pulses and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations on both sides of the magnetic axis. In addition, the symmetric measurements are used to fix the location of the magnetic axis in tokamak magnetic equilibrium reconstructions. Also, the new higher frequency channels have been used to determine central T{sub e} with good time resolution in low field, high density discharges using third harmonic ECE in the optically gray and optically thick regimes.

  16. Ten channel background alpha radiometer for nondestructive analysis of low activity samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugatch, V.M.; Pavlenko, Y.N.; Vasiliev, Y.O.; Nenakhov, A.N.; Tkatch, N.M.; Barabash, L.I.; Berdnichenko, S.V.; Litovchenko, P.G.; Rosenfeld, A.B.; Zinets, O.S. (Inst. for Nuclear Research, Kiev (USSR))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The description of a ten-channel alpha-radiometer based on large-area semiconductor detectors is presented in this paper. The radiometer is intended for determination of soil pollution by alpha-active radionuclides using thick samples. The analysis of isotopes is also provided. The concentrations of Pu and Am isotopes in soil samples are determined.

  17. Calibration of a Solar Absolute Cavity Radiometer with Traceability to the World Radiometric Reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the present method of establishing traceability of absolute cavity radiometers to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) through the process employed in the International Pyrheliometer Comparisons (IPC). This method derives the WRR reduction factor for each of the participating cavity radiometers. An alternative method is proposed, described, and evaluated as a way to reduce the uncertainty in the comparison process. The two methods are compared using a sample of data from the recent IPC-VIII conducted from September 25th to October 13th, 1995 at the World Radiation Center in Davos, Switzerland. A description of absolute cavity radiometers is also included, using a PMO-6 as an example of active cavity radiometers, and a HF as an example of passive cavity radiometers.

  18. Effect of atmospheric water vapor on modification of stable isotopes in near-surface snow on ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    temperature and the abundance of heavy isotopes of water found in water vapor and precipitation as functionsEffect of atmospheric water vapor on modification of stable isotopes in near-surface snow on ice fractionation model is developed to investigate postdepositional modification of stable isotopes of water

  19. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Nadine; Schroeder, Marc; Stengel, Martin [Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD), KU22, Frankfurter Str. 135, 63067 Offenbach a. M (Germany); Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene [Freie Universitaet Berlin (FUB), Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6-10, 12165 Berlin (Germany); Collaboration: ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m{sup 2} for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m{sup 2} for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  20. Gasoline vapor recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lievens, G.; Tiberi, T.P.

    1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a gasoline distribution network wherein gasoline is drawn from a gasoline storage tank and pumped into individual vehicles and wherein the gasoline storage tank is refilled periodically from a gasoline tanker truck, a method of recovering liquid gasoline from gasoline vapor that collects in the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom, said method comprising the steps of: (a) providing a source of inert gas; (b) introducing inert gas into the gasoline storage tank as liquid gasoline is drawn therefrom so that liquid gasoline drawn from the tank is displaced by inert gas and gasoline vapor mixes with the inert gas in the headspace of the tank; (c) collecting the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture from the headspace of the gasoline storage tank as the tank is refilled from a gasoline tanker truck; (d) cooling the inert gas/gasoline vapor mixture to a temperature sufficient to condense the gasoline vapor in the mixture to liquid gasoline but not sufficient to liquify the inert gas in the mixture; (e) separating the condensed liquid gasoline from the inert gas; and delivering the condensed liquid gasoline to a remote location for subsequent use.

  1. The Planck/LFI Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herreros, J M; Rebolo, R; Chulani, H; Rubino-Martin, J A; Hildebrandt, S R; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Miccolis, M; Pena, A; Pereira, M; Torrero, F; Franceschet, C; Lopez, M; Alcala, C; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12008

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiometer Electronics Box Assembly (REBA) is the control and data processing on board computer of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission (ESA). The REBA was designed and built incorporating state of the art processors, communication interfaces and real time operating system software in order to meet the scientific performance of the LFI. We present a technical summary of the REBA, including a physical, functional, electrical, mechanical and thermal description. Aspects of the design and development, the assembly, the integration and the verification of the equipment are provided. A brief description of the LFI on board software is given including the Low-Level Software and the main functionalities and architecture of the Application Software. The compressor module, which has been developed as an independent product, later integrated in the application, is also described in this paper. Two identical engineering models EM and AVM, the engineering qualification model EQM, the flight model ...

  2. Evaluation of Global Monsoon Precipitation Changes based on Five Reanalysis Datasets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Renping; Zhou, Tianjun; Qian, Yun

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the motivation to identify whether or not a reasonably simulated atmospheric circulation would necessarily lead to a successful reproduction of monsoon precipitation, the performances of five sets of reanalysis data (NCEP2, ERA40, JRA25, ERA-Interim and MERRA) in reproducing the climatology, interannual variation and long-term trend of global monsoon (GM) precipitation are comprehensively evaluated. In order to better understand the variability and long-term trend of GM precipitation, we also examined the major components of water budget, including evaporation, water vapor convergence and the change in local water vapor storage, based on five reanalysis datasets. The results show that all five reanalysis data reasonably reproduce the climatology of GM precipitation. The ERA-Interim (NCEP2) shows the highest (lowest) skill among the five datasets. The observed GM precipitation shows an increasing tendency during 1979-2001 along with a strong interannual variability, which is reasonably reproduced by the five sets of reanalysis data. The observed increasing trend of GM precipitation is dominated by the contribution from the North African, North American and Australian monsoons. All five data fail in reproducing the increasing tendency of North African monsoon precipitation. The wind convergence term in water budget equation dominate the GM precipitation variation, indicating a consistency between the GM precipitation and the seasonal change of prevailing wind.

  3. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  4. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sederquist, Richard A. (Newington, CT); Szydlowski, Donald F. (East Hartford, CT); Sawyer, Richard D. (Canton, CT)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well.

  5. Characterization and calibration of 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system for SST-1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siju, Varsha; Kumar, Dharmendra; Shukla, Praveena; Pathak, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system (74–86 GHz) is designed, characterized, and calibrated to measure the radial electron temperature profile by measuring Electron Cyclotron Emission spectrum at SST-1 Tokamak. The developed radiometer has a noise equivalent temperature of 1 eV and sensitivity of 5 × 10{sup 9} V/W. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperature, a calibration measurement of the radiometer system is performed using hot-cold Dicke switch method, which confirms the system linearity.

  6. Total Precipitable Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

  7. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  8. Enthalpies of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures of Some Deuterated Hydrocarbons. Liquid-Vapor Pressure Isotope Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    * Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of MissourisSt. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63121 Liquid vapor pressure isotope effects have generally been observed, pD > pH.12 Vapor pressure and sublimation

  9. Sea surface temperature for climate from the along-track scanning radiometers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embury, Owen

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the construction of a sea surface temperature (SST) dataset from Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) observations suitable for climate applications. The algorithms presented here are now used at ...

  10. Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

  11. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  12. Stratified vapor generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Hassani, Vahab (Golden, CO)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  13. ARM - Water Vapor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmr DocumentationProductsaodsasheniraodAlaskaVisiting theWater Vapor

  14. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  15. GVR (G-Band Vapor Radiometer) M.P. Cadeddu and J.C. Liljegren Argonne Natl. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-DRMR LSU/CAMD ALTDAdvancedÂŁcMWR

  16. GVR (G-Band Vapor Radiometer) M.P. Cadeddu and J.C. Liljegren Argonne Natl. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-DRMR LSU/CAMD

  17. ARM - Word Seek: Precipitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects of Global Warming? Outreach HomeWillPrecipitation

  18. Altitudinal Gradients of Stable Isotopes in Lee-Slope Precipitation in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , this isotopic fractionation and distillation can be driven by vapor transport to higher altitudes, higher of the Canadian Rockies at the Continental Divide and receives precipitation from both westerly (Pacific) air altitudes. Surface and upper-air meteorological data were analyzed to classify the type of weather systems

  19. ARM Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARM Participation in SuomiNet The ARM62ARM Water Vapor IOP

  20. Water Vapor Experiment Concludes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition3 Water Vapor Experiment Concludes The

  1. To estimate vapor pressure easily

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Yang, H.C. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor pressures as functions of temperature for approximately 700 major organic chemical compounds are given. The tabulation also gives the temperature range for which the data are applicable. Minimum and maximum temperatures are denoted by TMIN and TMAX. The Antoine equation that correlates vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. A representative comparison of calculated and actual data values for vapor pressure is shown for ethyl alcohol. The coefficient tabulation is based on both literature (experimental data) and estimated values.

  2. Vaporization of zinc from scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of zinc vaporization from galvanized scrap was measured using a thermogravimetric apparatus along with chemical analysis. It is found that the rate of zinc vaporization is very fast in nitrogen and carbon monoxide atmospheres at temperatures higher than 950 C. At lower temperature rate decreases with decreasing temperature and is controlled by the gas phase mass transport. The simultaneous oxidation and vaporization of zinc occurs when the samples were heated in carbon dioxide and air. The current experimental results indicate that almost all of the zinc from scrap vaporizes during the heating process in a very short period of time after the temperature reaches above 850 C.

  3. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  4. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  5. Precipitation extremes under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of precipitation extremes to climate change is considered using results from theory, modeling, and observations, with a focus on the physical factors that control the response. Observations and simulations with climate models show that precipitation extremes intensify in response to a warming climate. However, the sensitivity of precipitation extremes to warming remains uncertain when convection is important, and it may be higher in the tropics than the extratropics. Several physical contributions govern the response of precipitation extremes. The thermodynamic contribution is robust and well understood, but theoretical understanding of the microphysical and dynamical contributions is still being developed. Orographic precipitation extremes and snowfall extremes respond differently from other precipitation extremes and require particular attention. Outstanding research challenges include the influence of mesoscale convective organization, the dependence on the duration considered, and the need to...

  6. Fuel vapor control device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ota, I.; Nishimura, Y.; Nishio, S.; Yogo, K.

    1987-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel vapor control device is described having a valve opening and closing a passage connecting a carburetor and a charcoal canister according to a predetermined temperature. A first coil spring formed by a ''shape memory effect'' alloy is provided to urge the valve to open the passage when the temperature is high. A second coil spring urges the valve to close the passage. A solenoid is provided to urge an armature against the valve to close the passage against the force of the first coil spring when the engine is running. The solenoid heats the first coil spring to generate a spring force therein when the engine is running. When the engine is turned off, the solenoid is deactivated, and the force of the first spring overcomes the force of the second spring to open the passage until such time as the temperature of the first spring drops below the predetermined temperature.

  7. A 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission radiometer on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.; Xiao, J. S.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Fusion and Advanced Electromagnetic Technology Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Phillips, P. E.; Huang, H.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To study equilibrium temporal dynamics and the mechanisms of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, a 16-channel heterodyne electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer has been developed to view the J-TEXT tokamak from the low field side. The ECE radiometer detects second-harmonic extraordinary mode in the frequency band of 94-125 GHz which corresponds to resonances from 1.8 T to 2.2 T. This ECE system consists of an ECE transmission line, a radio frequency unit, and two 8-channel intermediate frequency units. An in situ blackbody calibration source is applied for system calibration by comparison of hot and cold sources in order to provide an absolute temperature measurement.

  8. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

  9. Outgassing, Temperature Gradients and the Radiometer Effect in LISA: A Torsion Pendulum Investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott E Pollack; Stephan Schlamminger; Jens H Gundlach

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal modeling of the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) includes such effects as outgassing from the proof mass and its housing and the radiometer effect. Experimental data in conditions emulating the LISA GRS are required to confidently predict the GRS performance. Outgassing and the radiometer effect are similar in characteristics and are difficult to decouple experimentally. The design of our torsion balance allows us to investigate differential radiation pressure, the radiometer effect, and outgassing on closely separated conducting surfaces with high sensitivity. A thermally controlled split copper plate is brought near a freely hanging plate-torsion pendulum.We have varied the temperature on each half of the copper plate and have measured the resulting forces on the pendulum. We have determined that to first order the current GRS model for the radiometer effect, outgassing, and radiation pressure are mostly consistent with our torsion balance measurements and therefore these thermal effects do not appear to be a large hindrance to the LISA noise budget. However, there remain discrepancies between the predicted dependence of these effects on the temperature of our apparatus.

  10. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  11. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

    1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  12. Potential Soil Moisture Products from the Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yan [I.M. Systems Group at NOAA/NCEP/EMC; Feng, Xia [George Mason University; Houser, Paul [George Mason University; Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Fan, Xingang [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; De Lannoy, Gabrielle [Ghent University, Belgium; Zhan, Xiwu [NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research; Dabbiru, Lalitha [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE), we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz) and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz). We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i) a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii) a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii) a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv) an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs) of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  13. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Research Institute is developing a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) to control acid mist missions from high-sulfur coal combustion. The WESP is being developed as a retrofit technology for existing coal-fired power plants, particularly those equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers. Acid mist emissions can be a significant problem at these facilities because the sulfuric acid vapor in the flue gas is converted to a very fine mist that is not collected in the scrubber system. Conventional mist eliminators are not adequate in this application due to the very fine size of the mist droplets. The potential for corrosion also makes it difficult to use a fabric filter or a conventional, dry ESP in this application. Therefore, this research project has been structured around the development of a compact WESP that could be retrofit on top of an existing scrubber or within an existing flue gas duct. This paper describes the development and testing of a prototype WESP for the utility acid mist application. Testing was conducted with combustion of sulfur-doped gas to simulate the acid mist alone, and with a combination of coal and sulfur-doped gas to simulate the mixture of acid mist and fly ash downstream from a scrubber. The performance of the WESP test unit was modeled using two different cylindrical-geometry computer models: a current-seeking'' model and a current-specific'' model. 8 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addresses the acid mist that is formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. An acid mist can be formed whenever the flue gas temperature approaches the prevailing acid dew point. This commonly occurs when the gas is subjected to rapid adiabatic cooling in a wet scrubber system for flue gas desulfurization. Acid mists can also sometimes result from unexpected temperature excursions caused by air inleakage, load cycling, and start-up operations. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attach glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. Therefore, this program has been structured around the use of a compact, wet ESP to control acid mist emissions. Progress to date is discussed. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addresses the acid mist that is formed by condensation of sulfuric acid vapor in flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers. An acid mist can be formed whenever the flue gas temperature approaches the prevailing acid dew point. This commonly occurs when the gas is subjected to rapid adiabatic cooling in a wet scrubber system for flue gas desulfurization. Acid mists can also sometimes result from unexpected temperature excursions caused by air inleakage, load cycling, and start-up operations. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is the best control option for acid mist. The mist would blind a fabric filter and attack glass fiber fabrics. A wet ESP is required because the acid would quickly corrode the plates in a conventional dry ESP. The wet ESP also offers the advantages of no rapping reentrainment and no sensitivity to fly ash resistivity. Therefore, this program has been structured around the use of a compact, wet ESP to control acid mist emissions. 7 refs.

  16. A 6-year AMSU-based climatology of upper-level troughs and associated precipitation distribution in the Mediterranean region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    orography surrounding the Mediterranean sea, and the large supply of water vapor at low levels, are all conditions such as heavy precipitation and floods, strong winds and droughts. In our study we focus on heavy that intrude into and affect the Medi- terranean region as well as on the occurrence of moderate to heavy

  17. The Vaporization Enthalpies and Vapor Pressures of Some Primary Amines of Pharmaceutical Importance by Correlation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    by Correlation Gas Chromatography Chase Gobble, Nigam Rath, and James Chickos* Department of Chemistry Information ABSTRACT: Vapor pressures, vaporization, and sublimation enthalpies of several pharmaceuticals and boiling temperatures when available. Sublimation enthalpies and vapor pressures are also evaluated for 1

  18. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Laia, Jr., Joseph R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  19. Development of a new radiometer for the thermodynamic measurement of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dury, M. R.; Goodman, T. M.; Lowe, D. H.; Machin, G.; Woolliams, E. R. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)] [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a new radiometer to measure the thermodynamic melting point temperatures of high temperature fixed points with ultra-low uncertainties. In comparison with the NPL's Absolute Radiation Thermometer (ART), the 'THermodynamic Optical Radiometer' (THOR) is more portable and compact, with a much lower size-of-source effect and improved performance in other parameters such as temperature sensitivity. It has been designed for calibration as a whole instrument via the radiance method, removing the need to calibrate the individual subcomponents, as required by ART, and thereby reducing uncertainties. In addition, the calibration approach has been improved through a new integrating sphere that has been designed to have greater uniformity.

  20. Electron cyclotron emission radiometer upgrade on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luna, E. de la; Sanchez, J.; Tribaldos, V.; Conway, G.; Suttrop, W.; Fessey, J.; Prentice, R.; Gowers, C.; Chareau, J. M. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); IPP-EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Associations, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The capabilities of the Joint European Torus (JET) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics have recently been extended with an upgrading of the heterodyne radiometer. The number of channels has been doubled to 96 channels, with a frequency separation corresponding to <1 cm for JET magnetic field gradient, and with a frequency response of 1 MHz. This enhancement has increased the radial coverage of the ECE electron temperature measurements in JET to approximately the full plasma column (limited at R>2.6 m for the X-mode due to harmonic overlap) at almost all magnetic field values used at JET (1.7 Tradiometer is presented along with some results showing its performance.

  1. VAPORIZATION THERMODYNAMICS OF KCl. COMBINING VAPOR PRESSURE AND GRAVIMETRIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

    .B. Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899, Russia Bonnell D.W., Hastie J.W. National temperature chemistry situations, vapor pressures are typically less than 100 kPa. The molar volume is p = 101325 Pa). The subscript trs denotes that the changeisfor a transition, typically sublimation

  2. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

  3. Preliminary separation of galactic and cosmic microwave emission for the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, C.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Hinshaw, G.; Wright, E.L.; Kogut, A.; De Amici, G.; Meyer, S.S.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D.T.; Gulkis, S. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States) California, University, Berkeley (United States) Universities Space Research Association, Boulder, CO (United States) California, University, Los Angeles (United States) MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States) Princeton University, NJ (United States) JPL, Pasadena, Ca (United States))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary models of microwave emission from the Milky Way Galaxy based on COBE and other data are constructed for the purpose of distinguishing cosmic and Galactic signals. Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) maps, with the modeled Galactic emission removed, are fitted for a quadrupole distribution. Autocorrelation functions for individual Galactic components are presented. When Galactic emission is removed from the DMR data, the residual fluctuations are virtually unaffected, and therefore they are not dominated by any known Galactic emission component. 42 refs.

  4. Calibration of a 32 channel electron cyclotron emission radiometer on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Z. B., E-mail: shizb@swip.ac.cn; Jiang, M.; Huang, X. L.; Zhong, W. L.; Chen, W.; Che, Y. L.; Liu, Z. T.; Ding, X. T.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)] [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel 32-channel electron cyclotron emission radiometer has been designed and tested for the measurement of electron temperature profiles on the HL-2A tokamak. This system is based on the intermediate frequency filter detection technique, and has the features of wide working frequency range and high spatial resolution. Two relative calibration methods have been investigated: sweeping the toroidal magnetic field and hopping the output frequency of the local oscillator. Preliminary results show that both methods can ensure reasonable profiles.

  5. Using a cold radiometer to measure heat loads and survey heat leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Hait, T.; Shirron, P. [Cryogenics and Fluids Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an inexpensive cold radiometer for use in thermal/vacuum chambers to measure heat loads, characterize emissivity and specularity of surfaces and to survey areas to evaluate stray heat loads. We report here the results of two such tests for the James Webb Space Telescope to measure heat loads and effective emissivities of 2 major pieces of optical ground support equipment that will be used in upcoming thermal vacuum testing of the Telescope.

  6. Development of multichannel intermediate frequency system for electron cyclotron emission radiometer on KSTAR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogi, Yuichiro; Sakoda, Takuya; Mase, Atsushi; Ito, Naoki; Yokota, Yuya [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Nagayama, Yoshio; Kawahata, Kazuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Jeong, Seung H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Myeun [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma experiments on KSTAR are scheduled to start up this year (2008). We have developed an electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer to measure the radial electron temperature profiles in KSTAR experiments. The radiometer system consists, briefly, of two downconversion stages, amplifiers, bandpass filter banks, and video detectors. These components are made commercially or developed in house. The system detects ECE power in the frequency range from 110 to 196 GHz, the detected signal being resolved by means of 48 frequency windows. Before installation of this system on KSTAR, we installed a part of this system on large helical device (LHD) to study the system under similar plasma conditions. In this experiment, the signal amplitude, considered to be proportional to the electron temperature, is measured. The time-dependent traces of the electron temperature measured by this radiometer are in good agreement with those provided by the LHD Michelson spectrometer. The system noise level which limits the minimum measurable temperature (converted to the electron temperature) is about 30 eV.

  7. Hydrogen Cars and Water Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    misidentified as "zero-emissions vehicles." Fuel cell vehicles emit water vapor. A global fleet could have, with discernible effects on people and ecosystems. The broad environmental effects of fuel cell vehicles. This cycle is currently under way with hydrogen fuel cells. As fuel cell cars are suggested as a solution

  8. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  9. Development and application of new methods to retrieve vertical structure of precipitation above the ARM CART sites from MMCR measurementsĂ?Âť

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sergey Matrosov

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project was to develop, validate and apply remote sensing methods to retrieve vertical profiles of precipitation over the DOE ARM CART sites using currently available remote sensors. While the ARM Program invested very heavily into developments of remote sensing methods and instruments for water vapor and non-precipitating cloud parameter retrievals, precipitation retrievals and studies lagged behind. Precipitation, however, is a crucial part of the water cycle, and without detailed information on rainfall and snowfall, significant improvements in the atmospheric models of different scales (i.e., one of the ARM Program's main goals) is difficult to achieve. Characterization of the vertical atmospheric column above the CART sites is also incomplete without detailed precipitation information, so developments of remote sensing methods for retrievals of parameters in precipitating cloud condition was essential. Providing modelers with retrieval results was also one of the key objectives of this research project.

  10. Effects of Aerosols on Autumn Precipitation over Mid-Eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Qian, Yun; Ge, Jinming; Su, Jing

    2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term observational data indicated a decreasing trend for the amount of autumn precipitation (i.e. 54.3 mm per decade) over Mid-Eastern China, especially after 1980s (~ 5.6% per decade). To examine the cause of the decreasing trend, the mechanisms associated with the change of autumn precipitation were investigated from the perspective of water vapor transportation, atmospheric stability and cloud microphysics. Results show that the decrease of convective available potential energy (i.e. 12.81 J kg-1/ decade) and change of cloud microphysics, which were closely related to the increase of aerosol loading during the past twenty years, were the two primary factors responsible for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Ours results showed that increased aerosol could enhance the atmospheric stability thus weaken the convection. Meanwhile, more aerosols also led to a significant decline of raindrop concentration and to a delay of raindrop formation because of smaller size of cloud droplets. Thus, increased aerosols produced by air pollution could be one of the major reasons for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Furthermore, we found that the aerosol effects on precipitation in autumn was more significant than in other seasons, partly due to the relatively more stable synoptic system in autumn. The impact of large-scale circulation dominated in autumn and the dynamic influence on precipitation was more important than the thermodynamic activity.

  11. Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer.

  12. Vapor canister heater for evaporative emissions systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, R.P.; Berg, P.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automotive evaporative emissions systems use a charcoal canister to store evaporative hydrocarobn emissions. These stored vapors are later purged and burned during engine operation. Under certain conditions the engine cannot completely purge the canister of the stored fuel vapors, which results in a decreased vapor storage capacity in the canister. A self-regulating PTC (Positive Temperature Coefficient) heater has been developed to warm the purge air as it enters the canister, in order to provide thermal energy for increased release of the vapors from charcoal sites. This paper describes the construction and operation of the vapor canister heater as it relates to improved evaporative emission system performance.

  13. OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M.R. Platt; R.T. Austin; S.A. Young; and G.L. Stephens

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK 270 - The use of Lidar/Radiometer (LIRAD) in the ARM program to obtain optical properties and microphysics of high and midlevel clouds

  14. Changes in precipitation characteristics and extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    changes in two different climate scenarios. In the Mediterranean region, precipitation amount, frequencyChanges in precipitation characteristics and extremes Comparing Mediterranean to change Swiss with climate change, with potentially severe impacts on human society and ecosystems. This study analyses

  15. Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans #12 diffusion into austenite Carbon diffusion into austenite and carbide precipitation in ferrite Carbide precipitation from austenite CASE 2: elimination of carbides #12;#12;#12;0.110.090.070.050.03 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

  16. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, D. D., E-mail: dtruong@wisc.edu [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ?1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ?2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  17. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  18. Macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates for stable radiometal antibody conjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  19. Water Vapor Transport and the Production of Precipitation in the Eastern Fertile Crescent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    sensitivity to changes in the condition of the Persian Gulf relative to the Mediterranean Sea. This may have the longest ar- cheological record of human civilization. As such, Ho- locene climate changes and what a Regional Climate Model [fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5)­Noah land

  20. Control of flow through a vapor generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Rankine cycle system wherein a vapor generator receives heat from exhaust gases, provision is made to avoid overheating of the refrigerant during ORC system shut down while at the same time preventing condensation of those gases within the vapor generator when its temperature drops below a threshold temperature by diverting the flow of hot gases to ambient and to thereby draw ambient air through the vapor generator in the process. In one embodiment, a bistable ejector is adjustable between one position, in which the hot gases flow through the vapor generator, to another position wherein the gases are diverted away from the vapor generator. Another embodiment provides for a fixed valve ejector with a bias towards discharging to ambient, but with a fan on the downstream side of said vapor generator for overcoming this bias.

  1. Multi-Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) for remote sensing studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, GS; Grotbeck, CL

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Multi-spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) has been developed as a well-calibrated, imaging radiometer for studies of cloud properties from an unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. The instrument is designed to fly at altitudes up to 20 km and produce data from nine spectral detector modules. Each module has its own telescope optics, linear detector array, spectral filter, and necessary electronics. Cryogenic cooling for the long-wavelength infrared modules, as well as temperature regulation of the short- wavelength modules, is provided by a liquid nitrogen system designed to operate for multi-day missions. Pre- and post-flight calibration, combined with an on-board calibration chopper, provide an instrument with state-of-the-art radiometric measurement accuracies. Each module has a {+-}40{degree} across-track field-of-view and images a curved footprint onto its linear detector array. The long-wavelength array types have 256 detector elements while the short-wavelength arrays can have 512 elements. A modular design allows individual spectral bands to be changed to match the requirements for a particular mission.

  2. Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) for remote sensing cloud studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phipps, G.S.; Grotbeck, C.L.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Multi Spectral Pushbroom Imaging Radiometer (MPIR) has been developed as are relatively inexpensive ({approximately}$IM/copy), well-calibrated,imaging radiometer for aircraft studies of cloud properties. The instrument is designed to fly on an Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) platform at altitudes from the surface up to 20 km. MPIR is being developed to support the Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle portion of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurements program (ARM/UAV). Radiation-cloud interactions are the dominant uncertainty in the current General Circulation Models used for atmospheric climate studies. Reduction of this uncertainty is a top scientific priority of the US Global Change Research Program and the ARM program. While the DOE`s ARM program measures a num-ber of parameters from the ground-based Clouds and Radiation Testbed sites, it was recognized from the outset that other key parameters are best measured by sustained airborne data taking. These measurements are critical in our understanding of global change issues as well as for improved atmospheric and near space weather forecasting applications.

  3. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  4. Overview of chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is developing into a commercially important method for the fabrication of continuous filament ceramic composites. Current efforts are focused on the development of an improved understanding of the various processes in CVI and its modeling. New approaches to CVI are being explored, including pressure pulse infiltration and microwave heating. Material development is also proceeding with emphasis on improving the oxidation resistance of the interfacial layer between the fiber and matrix. This paper briefly reviews these subjects, indicating the current state of the science and technology.

  5. Retrieval of Optical And Size Parameters of Aerosols Utilizing a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiometer and Inter-Comparison with CIMEL Sun Photometer and MICROTOPS Sun Photometer Antonio Aguirre Radiometer (MFRSR) and comparing with data from a CIMEL Sun Photometer and a MICROTOPS Sun Photometer. Using the inverse cosine of the angle between the sun and the vertical. A Langley plot provides a linear regression

  6. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  7. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  8. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  9. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  10. Tropospheric water vapor and climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)] [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates are made of the effect of changes in tropospheric water vapor on the climate sensitivity to doubled carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a coarse resolution atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The sensitivity of the model to doubled CO{sub 2} is found as the difference between the equilibrium responses for control and doubled CO{sub 2} cases. Clouds are specified to isolate the water vapor feedback. Experiments in which the water vapor distribution is specified rather than internally calculated are used to find the contribution of water vapor in various layers and latitude belts to the sensitivity. The contribution of water vapor in layers of equal mass to the climate sensitivity varies by about a factor of 2 with height, with the largest contribution coming from layers between 450 and 750 mb, and the smallest from layers above 230 mb. The positive feedback on the global mean surface temperature response to doubled CO{sub 2} from water vapor above 750 mb is about 2.6 times as large as that from water vapor below 750 mb. The feedback on global mean surface temperature due to water vapor in the extratropical free troposphere is about 50% larger than the feedback due to the lower-latitude free troposphere water vapor. Several important sources of nonlinearity of the radiative heating rates were identified in the process of constructing the specified cloud and water vapor fields. These are (1) the interaction of clouds and solar radiation, which produces much more reflection of solar radiation for time mean clouds than for the instantaneous clouds; (2) the correlation of clouds and water vapor, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground for correlated clouds and water vapor than when these fields are independent; and (3) the interaction of water vapor with long wave radiation, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground of the average over instantaneous water vapor distributions than of the time mean water vapor distribution.

  11. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara (Berkeley, CA); Daisey, Joan M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Stevens, Robert K. (Cary, NC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  12. Thermophilic Biotrickling Filtration of Ethanol Vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermophilic Biotrickling Filtration of Ethanol Vapors H U U B H . J . C O X , T H O M A S S E X of ethanol vapors in biotrickling filters for air pollution control was investigated. Two reactors were adaptation phase, the removal of ethanol was similar in both reactors. At a bed contact time of 57 s

  13. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  14. 3742 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 47, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2009 Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference Detection Algorithms: A Comparative Study Sidharth Misra, Priscilla N is with Halliburton Energy Services, Houston, TX 77032 USA. J. R. Piepmeier is with the Microwave Instrument growth recently in satellite telecommunica- tion, in high-bandwidth point-to-point terrestrial wireless

  15. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  16. Modification of the collective Thomson scattering radiometer in the search for parametric decay on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P.; Stejner, M. [Association EURATOM - DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Risoe Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bongers, W.; Moseev, D.; Westerhof, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM - FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oosterbeek, J. W. [Department of Applied Physics, Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong scattering of high-power millimeter waves at 140 GHz has been shown to take place in heating and current-drive experiments at TEXTOR when a tearing mode is present in the plasma. The scattering signal is at present supposed to be generated by the parametric decay instability. Here we describe the heterodyne detection system used to characterize the newly discovered signal measured at TEXTOR, and we present spectral shapes in which the signal can appear under different conditions. The radiation is collected by the receiver through a quasi-optical transmission line that is independent of the electron cyclotron resonance heating transmission line, and so the scattering geometry is variable. The signal is detected with 42 frequency channels ranging from 136 to 142 GHz. We demonstrate that the large signal does not originate from gyrotron spurious radiation. The measured signal agrees well with independent backscattering radiometer data.

  17. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  18. Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

  19. Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-PhaseGlyoxal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal,...

  20. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (H202) in the mid-infrared at atmospheric pressure. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen...

  1. The importance of snow scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wania, F. [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mackay, D. [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies] [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies; Hoff, J.T. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science] [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, experimental data on the scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the atmosphere by snow were interpreted assuming that the distribution of chemical between particles and dissolved phase measured in the meltwater reflects the state of the chemical during the scavenging process. A consequence of this assumption is that vapor scavenging is found to be unimportant relative to particle scavenging. An alternative interpretation is presented that during melting repartitioning occurs from the dissolved phase to the particle-sorbed phase. Further, it is argued that a constant particle scavenging ratio may apply to all chemicals of the same class in the same precipitation event, and its value can be estimated from the scavenging characteristics of predominantly particle-sorbed, high molecular mass chemicals. This analysis suggests that for more volatile PCBs and PAHs vapor scavenging is an important, if not the dominating, snow scavenging process. Gas scavenging ratios obtained with this method are, as expected, negatively correlated with the vapor pressure of a substance, indicating that adsorption to the air-ice interface is the process responsible for vapor scavenging.

  2. Copper precipitation in cobalt-alloyed precipitation-hardened stainless steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    Copper precipitation in cobalt-alloyed precipitation-hardened stainless steel Arpana S. Murthy online 1 March 2012 The influence of cobalt addition on precipitation of copper in a high-strength stainless steel was investigated using three-dimen- sional atom probe tomography. A decrease in copper

  3. Dissolution of ordered precipitates under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camus, E.; Bourdeau, F.; Abromeit, C.; Wanderka, N.; Wollenberger, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of the ordered {gamma}{prime} precipitates under 300-keV Ni{sup +} irradiation was investigated between room temperature and 623 K. The two competing mechanisms of destabilization by cascade producing irradiation, i.e. disordering and dissolution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitates in Nimonic PE16 alloy, has been studied separately by electron microscopy and field-ion microscopy with atom probe. At high temperatures, the precipitates are stable. At intermediate temperatures, the precipitates dissolve by ballistic mixing into the matrix, but the interface is restored by the radiation-enhanced atomic jumps. The order in the precipitates remains stable. At low temperatures, the precipitates are dissolved by atomic mixing. The dissolution proceeds in a diffusional manner with a diffusion coefficient normalized by the displacement rate D/K = 0.75 nm{sup 2}dpa{sup {minus}1}. The precipitates become disordered by a fluence of 0.1 dpa, whereas precipitate dissolution needs much higher fluences.

  4. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress of the ratio of hill/coast precipitation during the 20th century in polluted areas in line with the increasing

  5. Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum only recently have attempts been made to develop a thermodynamic description. Published methods

  6. Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or sonication, has been shown to successfully remove or prevent the formation of 50–90% of the precipitates in biofuels. Precipitates can plug filters as biodiesel is transported from one location to another, and often cannot be detected by visual inspection....

  7. Flow preconditioner for electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honacker, H.; Drlik, R.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow preconditioner for an electrostatic precipitator removes particulate matter from a stream of polluted gas immediately after it passes through a tangential inlet at the lower end of a vertical cylindrical housing and straightens and divides the stream into laminations parallel to the axis of the housing. It comprises an annular ledge or choke ring extending inwardly from said housing above the inlet and an assembly of vanes above said ledge extending radially from the axis of the housing and angularly spaced apart. Each of said vanes has a flow receiving edge directed toward said inlet, a curved portion extending upwardly and away from said inlet, and a flat portion extending upwardly from said curved portion in a plane parallel to the housing axis. The curved portion of each vane defines a trough having a camber which gradually decreases along its span from the outer end of the vane towards the axis of the housng, together with means to vary the centrifugal flow distribution relative to the housing to render the preconditioner adjustable for various flow capacities.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Ylva Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a platform for deposition of polymer thin films that can be further tailored by chemical surface modification. First, we explore chemical vapor deposition of functionalized isobenzofuran films using ...

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of antimicrobial polymer coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Tyler Philip, 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is large and growing interest in making a wide variety of materials and surfaces antimicrobial. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD), a solventless low-temperature process, is used to form thin films of polymers ...

  10. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma.

  11. Retrieval of Hydrometeor Profiles in Tropical Cyclones and Convection from Combined Radar and Radiometer Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Haiyan

    of understanding the global energy and water cycles by providing four-dimensional distributions of latent heat- ing related to latent heating, ice water content (IWC) and liquid water content (LWC) have implications A retrieval algorithm is described to estimate vertical profiles of precipitation ice water content and liquid

  12. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  13. Processing NPP Bottoms by Ferrocyanide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savkin, A. E.; Slastennikov Y. T.; Sinyakin O. G.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of work is a laboratory test of a technological scheme for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides by use of ozonization, ferrocyanide precipitation, filtration and selective sorption. At carrying out the ferrocyanide precipitation after ozonization, the specific activity of bottoms by Cs{sup 137} is reduced in 100-500 times. It has been demonstrated that the efficiency of ferrocyanide precipitation depends on the quality of consequent filtration. Pore sizes of a filter has been determined to be less than 0.2 {micro}m for complete separation of ferrocyanide residue. The comparison of two technological schemes for cleaning bottoms from radionuclides, characterized by presence of the ferrocyanide precipitation stage has been performed. Application of the proposed schemes allows reducing volumes of radioactive waste in many times.

  14. Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

    1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

  15. A reactionless, bearingless linear shutter mechanism for the multispectral pushbroom imaging radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumel, L.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program is a multi-laboratory, interagency program as part of DOE`s principal entry into the US Global Change Research Program. Two issues addressed are the radiation budget and its spectral dependence, and radiative and other properties of clouds. Measures of solar flux divergence and energy exchanges between clouds, the earth, its oceans, and the atmosphere through various altitudes are sought. Additionally, the program seeks to provide measurements to calibrate satellite radiance products and validate their associated flux retrieval algorithms. Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles fly long, extended missions. MPIR is one of the primary instruments on the ARM-UAV campaigns. A shutter mechanism has been developed and flown as part of an airborne imaging radiometer having application to spacecraft or other applications requiring low vibration, high reliability, and long life. The device could be employed in other cases where a reciprocating platform is needed. Typical shutters and choppers utilize a spinning disc, or in very small instruments, a vibrating vane to continually interrupt incident light or radiation that enters the system. A spinning disk requires some sort of bearings that usually have limited life, and at a minimum introduce issues of reliability. Friction, lubrication and contamination always remain critical areas of concern, as well as the need for power to operate. Dual vibrating vanes may be dynamically well balanced as a set and are frictionless. However, these are limited by size in a practical sense. In addition, multiples of these devices are difficult to synchronize.

  16. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  17. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization, Sublimation, and Fusion Enthalpies of Some Fatty Acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Vapor Pressures and Vaporization, Sublimation, and Fusion Enthalpies of Some Fatty Acids Joe A. Wilson and James S. Chickos* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of MissouriSt. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63121, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Sublimation enthalpies

  18. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of a Series of Dialkyl Phthalates by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Chromatography Chase Gobble and James Chickos* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis Missouri 63121, United States Sergey P. Verevkin Department of Physical Chemistry: Experimental vapor pressures, vaporization, fusion and sublimation enthalpies of a number of dialkyl

  19. Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

  20. Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bora Mavis

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of kinetic components of a reaction which was set to stoichiometric constant with which the species appear in the reaction in KINSIM by default. For instance, in the case of LDH precipitation, the new program allows to change the order of species in the reactions associated with Al{sup 3+} and let the Ni{sup 2+} reactions take over. This could be carried on iteratively until a good fit between the experimental data and the predictions were observed. However for such studies availability of accurate equilibrium constants (especially for the solubility products for the solid phase) is a prerequisite.

  1. Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Story, M.S. [Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc. Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program.

  2. Method and Apparatus for Concentrating Vapors for Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for pre-concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the apparatus can be thermally desorbed achieving at least partial separation of vapor mixtures. The apparatus is suitable, e.g., for preconcentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than for direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications.

  3. Direct effects: Quantity related to precipitation Direct effects: Quantity related to precipitation and temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    ) Adequate and sufficient water supply: (storage, snow pack reservoir and groundwater levels)snow pack temperature extremes, heat waves and heavy precipitation. Precipitation increases in high latitudes and decreases in most sub-tropical land regions. Increases in annual river runoff and water availability

  4. The R/V Discoverer cruise to Manus Island. The BNL Portable Radiometer Package (PRP) evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory installed and operated a Portable Radiation Package (PRP) on the NOAA ship R/V DISCOVERER as part of the Combined Sensor Program cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean. The DISCOVERER transported a collection of radiation and atmospheric instrumentation to positions offshore of manus Island to compare cloud and radiation fields to like instruments measured from a station on the island. The ship sailed NW from Pago Pago, American Samoa, on 14 March 1996 to a latitude of 1{degree}S then due West until it approached manus Island (2{degree}S and 148{degree}E) on approximately 7 April. The ship then turned SW and approached Manus Island in three steps. This route was reversed during the ship`s return to Hawaii. The PRP package is a compact low-power integration of simple sensors that measure long- and short-wave irradiance from moving platforms. A rapid rotating shadowband radiometer that is designed to provide good estimates of diffuse (sky) radiation even from moving buoys or ships was being evaluated. The PRP provided the only means of making diffuse (sky) radiation measurements from the ship. The CSP cruise provided an excellent opportunity to intercompare the PRP with other like instruments in the TWP locale. The unit was located on the starboard flying bridge which was fully exposed to direct sunlight during the ship`s westward transit. When the ship was at its closest approach to manus, the PRP was moved to the island where careful intercomparison with the Manus instrumentation was conducted.

  5. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.

    1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

  6. High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C. (N. Augusta, SC)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

  7. Vapor intrusion modeling : limitations, improvements, and value of information analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friscia, Jessica M. (Jessica Marie)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor intrusion is the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subsurface source into the indoor air of an overlying building. Vapor intrusion models, including the Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) model, can be ...

  8. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  9. Desalination Using Vapor-Compression Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubis, Mirna R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and MSF, this research investigates a high-efficiency mechanical vapor-compression distillation system that employs an improved water flow arrangement. The incoming salt concentration was 0.15% salt for brackish water and 3.5% salt for seawater, whereas...

  10. Reductive Dehalogenation of Trichloroethene Vapors in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to treat trichloroethene (TCE) from waste gases generated by soil vapor extraction or dual-phase extraction through the recirculating liquid as a source of hydrogen, the electron donor for Dehalococcoides strains (DPE) (4). However, these techniques result in a waste gas stream that needs further treatment. Several

  11. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  12. Vaporization of synthetic fuels. Final report. [Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirignano, W.A.; Yao, S.C.; Tong, A.Y.; Talley, D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of transient droplet vaporization in a hot convective environment is examined. The main objective of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the droplet vaporization which is simple enough to be feasibly incorporated into a complete spray combustion analysis and yet will also account for the important physics such as liquid-phase internal circulation, unsteady droplet heating and axisymmetric gas-phase convection. A simplified liquid-phase model has been obtained based on the assumption of the existence of a Hill's spherical vortex inside the droplet together with some approximations made in the governing diffusion equation. The use of the simplified model in a spray situation has also been examined. It has been found that droplet heating and vaporization are essentially unsteady and droplet temperature is nonuniform for a significant portion of its lifetime. It has also been found that the droplet vaporization characteristic can be quite sensitive to the particular liquid-phase and gas-phase models. The results of the various models are compared with the existing experimental data. Due to large scattering in the experimental measurements, particularly the droplet diameter, no definite conclusion can be drawn based on the experimental data. Finally, certain research problems which are related to the present study are suggested for future studies.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  14. Industrial Heat Pumps Using Solid/Vapor Working Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockenfeller, U.

    INDUSTRIAL HEAT PUMPS USING SOLID/VAPOR WORKING FLUIDS Uwe Rockenfeller, Desert Research Institute, Boulder City, Nevada ABSTRACT Industrial heat pumps have the potential to reduce the operating costs of chemical and heat treating processes... with vapor re-compression recovery systems. The state-of-the-art heat pump equipment employing liquid/vapor working fluids fulfills the requirements only in some applications. The employment of solid/vapor complex compounds leads to 'nore cost effective...

  15. Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

  16. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, spect and pet imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N'N",N'"-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy.

  17. Synthesis of macrocyclic polyaminocarboxylates and their use for preparing stable radiometal antibody immunoconjugates for therapy, SPECT and PET imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mease, R.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for the synthesis of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane N,N{prime}N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid and 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid involves cyanomethylating 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane to form a tetranitrile and hydrolyzing the tetranitrile. These macrocyclic compounds are functionalized through one of the carboxylates and then conjugated to various biological molecules including monoclonal antibodies. The resulting conjugated molecules are labeled with radiometals for SPECT and PET imaging and for radiotherapy. 4 figs.

  18. Cloud Properties and Precipitation Formation Processes Observed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    of spring time precipitation that develops in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. · What are the cloud properties for developing cloud in the Riyadh, Saudi Arabia region. Research Objective #12;#12;Quality is based on calibration conducted by Kelly bosch and Dennis Afseth at Weather Modification Inc. (WMI) on 22

  19. -Assessment of current water conditions -Precipitation Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;-Assessment of current water conditions - Precipitation Forecast - Recommendations for Drought of the mountains, so early demand for irrigation water should be minimal as we officially move into spring. Western, it is forecast to bring wet snow to the eastern slope of the Rockies, with less accumulations west of the divide

  20. Modeling engine oil vaporization and transport of the oil vapor in the piston ring pack on internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Yeunwoo, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was developed to study engine oil vaporization and oil vapor transport in the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. With the assumption that the multi-grade oil can be modeled as a compound of several ...

  1. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  2. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  3. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  4. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  5. Apparatus and method for photochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott C. (Wilmington, DE); Rocheleau, Richard E. (Wilmington, DE)

    1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A photochemical vapor deposition apparatus includes a reactor housing having a window in one wall above a reaction chamber in the housing. A transparent curtain divides the reaction chamber into a reaction zone and a flush zone. At least one substrate is mounted in the reaction zone in light communication with the window so that ultraviolet radiation may penetrate through the window into the reaction zone. The window is kept clear by a gas flowing through the flush zone.

  6. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH&Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations.

  7. Copper vapor laser modular packaging assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA); Moses, Edward I. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modularized packaging arrangement for one or more copper vapor lasers and associated equipment is disclosed herein. This arrangement includes a single housing which contains the laser or lasers and all their associated equipment except power, water and neon, and means for bringing power, water, and neon which are necessary to the operation of the lasers into the container for use by the laser or lasers and their associated equipment.

  8. Modeling of LNG Pool Spreading and Vaporization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basha, Omar 1988-

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    ..................................................................................... 15 Figure 5: 90 mol% Methane 10mol% Ethane mixture VLE phase envelope .................. 18 Figure 6: Boiling temperature and vapor composition of 90 mol% methane 10mol% ethane mixture... process of natural gas allows a 600 fold reduction in the volume of the gas being transported at ambient pressure. The resulting liquid which is mainly composed of methane presents some hazardous properties linked to its flammable nature and its...

  9. Vapor-phase heat-transport system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedstrom, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor-phase heat-transport system is being tested in one of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The system consists of one selective-surface collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by gravity or with a pump. Results from several operating configurations are presented, together with a comparison with other passive systems. A new self-pumping concept is presented.

  10. Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in a model Ti-Mo-Al alloy studied by direct coupling of transmission Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta...

  11. The precipitation sequence in Al-Mg-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, G.A.; Dunlop, G.L. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)] [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Stiller, K. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Couper, M.J. [Comalco Research Centre, Thomastown, Victoria (Australia)] [Comalco Research Centre, Thomastown, Victoria (Australia)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine-scale precipitation that occurs during age hardening of Al alloy 6061 has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the precipitation sequence is: independent clusters of Mg and Si atoms {yields} co-clusters that contain Mg and Si atoms {yields} small precipitates of unknown structure {yields} {beta}{double_prime} needle-shaped precipitates {yields} B{prime} lath-shaped precipitates and {beta}{prime} rod-shaped precipitates. A new structure is proposed for the {beta}{double_prime} precipitate. It was found that the Mg:Si ratio in the intermediate precipitates and co-clusters was close to 1:1.

  12. A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

  13. Diurnal Precipitation Variations in South-Central New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orographic forcing of diurnal precipitation variations in south-central New Mexico is examined. Harmonic analysis reveals a strong diurnal cycle in precipitation frequency at all stations studied. In addition, relatively ...

  14. Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung-Eun

    Tropical rainforests are known to exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability compared with oceanic areas with similar mean precipitation in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of ...

  15. Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

  16. Sensitivity of tropical precipitation extremes to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul Ambrose

    Precipitation extremes increase in intensity over many regions of the globe in simulations of a warming climate1, 2, 3. The rate of increase of precipitation extremes in the extratropics is consistent across global climate ...

  17. Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at nano-crystalline ZrO2SiO2Si Interfaces . Defect- and Strain-enhanced Cavity Formation and Au Precipitation at...

  18. ammonium polyuranate precipitation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and CoAgMet stations. From top to bottom, and left to right: most recent 7-days of accumulated precipitation in inches; current month-to-date accumulated precipitation in...

  19. Augmenting Satellite Precipitation Estimation with Lightning Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Petersen, Walter A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; Hsu, Kuo-Lin [University of California, Irvine; Behrangi, Ali [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used lightning information to augment the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). Co-located lightning data are used to segregate cloud patches, segmented from GOES-12 infrared data, into either electrified (EL) or non-electrified (NEL) patches. A set of features is extracted separately for the EL and NEL cloud patches. The features for the EL cloud patches include new features based on the lightning information. The cloud patches are classified and clustered using self-organizing maps (SOM). Then brightness temperature and rain rate (T-R) relationships are derived for the different clusters. Rain rates are estimated for the cloud patches based on their representative T-R relationship. The Equitable Threat Score (ETS) for daily precipitation estimates is improved by almost 12% for the winter season. In the summer, no significant improvements in ETS are noted.

  20. Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

  1. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Don L. (Moscow, ID); Pometto, III, Anthony L. (Moscow, ID)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  2. Estimating Continental and Terrestrial Precipitation Averages from Raingauge Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willmott, Cort J.; Robeson, Scott M.; Feddema, Johannes J.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation, and in areas with s trong precipitation gradients and stat ion-densi ty gradients . 414 C. J. WILLMOTT, S. M. ROBESON AND J. J. FEDDEMA Sampling the LW climatology at the NCAR station locations suggests that many yearly NCAR station densities.... Higher resolution deployments should coincide with high-frequency (in the spatial domain) precipitation variability. Spatial shifts in the precipitation field with time (on seasonal and interannual time-scales, for example) also should be considered...

  3. Inhibition of nickel precipitation by organic ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewaters from electroplating are very complex due to the composition of the plating baths. A nickel plating bath typically consists of a nickel source (nickel chloride or nickel sulfate), complexing agents to solubilize nickel ions controlling their concentration in the solution, buffering agents to maintain pH, brighteners to improve brightness of the plated metal, stabilizers (inhibitors) to prevent undesired reactions, accelerators to enhance speed of reactions, wetting agents to reduce surface tension at the metal surface, and reducing agents (only for electroless nickel plating) to supply electrons for reduction of the nickel. Alkaline precipitation is the most common method of recovering nickel from wastewaters. However, organic constituents found in the wastewaters can mask or completely inhibit the precipitation of nickel. The objective of this study was to conduct an equilibrium study to explore the inhibition behavior of various organic ligands on nickel precipitation. This will lay the groundwork for development of technologies efficacious in the treatment of complexed nickel. The organic ligands used in this study are EDTA, triethanolamine (TEA), gluconate, and tartrate.

  4. THE DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF NETWORK OF GROUND-BASED GPS WATER VAPOR MONITORING STATIONS TO IMPROVE PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it is the means by which moisture and latent heat are transported to produce mesoscale weather events. And remote a a Institute of Urban Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, No.55 Bei Wa Xi Li, Haidian District. Dr. Chao-Lin Zhang, IUM, CMA, Beijing, clzhang@ium.cn, c_lzhang@yahoo.com. 1. INTRODUCTION Remote

  5. Method and apparatus for concentrating vapors for analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Baldwin, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Anheier, Jr., Norman C. (Richland, WA)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pre-concentration device and a method are disclosed for concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the pre-concentration device are thermally desorbed, achieving at least partial separation of the vapor mixtures. The pre-concentration device is suitable, e.g., for pre-concentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable.

  6. Neptunium_Oxide_Precipitation_Kinetics_AJohnsen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, A M; Roberts, K E; Prussin, S G

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation system at elevated temperatures to obtain primary information on the effects of temperature, ionic strength, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Experiments conducted on unfiltered solutions at 10{sup -4} M NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq), neutral pH, and 200 C indicated that solution colloids strongly affect precipitation kinetics. Subsequent experiments on filtered solutions at 200, 212, and 225 C showed consistent and distinctive temperature-dependent behavior at reaction times {le} 800 hours. At longer times, the 200 C experiments showed unexpected dissolution of neptunium solids, but experiments at 212 C and 225 C demonstrated quasi steady-state neptunium concentrations of 3 x 10{sup -6} M and 6 x 10{sup -6} M, respectively. Solids from a representative experiment analyzed by X-ray diffraction were consistent with NpO{sub 2}(cr). A 200 C experiment with a NaCl concentration of 0.05 M showed a dramatic increase in the rate of neptunium loss. A 200 C experiment in an argon atmosphere resulted in nearly complete loss of aqueous neptunium. Previously proposed NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq)-NpO{sub 2}(cr) reduction-precipitation mechanisms in the literature specified a 1:1 ratio of neptunium loss and H{sup +} production in solution over time. However, all experiments demonstrated ratios of approximately 0.4 to 0.5. Carbonate equilibria can account for only about 40% of this discrepancy, leaving an unexpected deficit in H+ production that suggests that additional chemical processes are occurring.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berkman, Samuel (Florham Park, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  8. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  9. Storing images in warm atomic vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Shuker; O. Firstenberg; R. Pugatch; A. Ron; N. Davidson

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Reversible and coherent storage of light in atomic medium is a key-stone of future quantum information applications. In this work, arbitrary two-dimensional images are slowed and stored in warm atomic vapor for up to 30 $\\mu$s, utilizing electromagnetically induced transparency. Both the intensity and the phase patterns of the optical field are maintained. The main limitation on the storage resolution and duration is found to be the diffusion of atoms. A techniqueanalogous to phase-shift lithography is employed to diminish the effect of diffusion on the visibility of the reconstructed image.

  10. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  11. Mercury Vapor (Kooten, 1987) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellisMcDonald isMelletteEnclosed andEnergySolar SystemsVapor

  12. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  13. Recovery of benzene in an organic vapor monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krenek, Gregory Joel

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid adsorbents available (silica gel, activated alumina, etc. ), activated charcoal is most frequently utilized. Activated charcoal has retentivity for sorbed vapors several times that of silica gel and it displays a selectivity for organic vapors... (diffusion rate) of the vapor molecules to the sur- face of the adsorbent. The adsorption process determine how effective the adsorbent collects and holds the contam- inant on the surface of the activated charcoal. Recovery of the contaminant from...

  14. Vaporizer design criteria for ethanol fueled internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariyaratne, Arachchi Rallage

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . Stout (Member) L r x ge Edwa d A. Hiler (Head of Department) May 1985 ABSTRACT Vaporizer Design Criteria For Ethanol Fueled Internal Combustion Engines. (May 1985) Arachchi Rallage Ariyaratne, B. S. , University of Sri Lanka Chairman... VAPORIZATION LENGTH WITH UNIFORM HEAT FLUX 8 POLYNOMIAL FUNCTIONS FOR EVALUATING PARAMETERS C VARIATION OF HEAT FLUX AND AVERAGE SURFACE TEMPARATURE D PROGRAM FOR PREDICTING VAPORIZATION LENGTH 73 75 78 80 VITA 87 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1...

  15. Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sperry, John S. (Houston, TX); Krajicek, Richard W. (Houston, TX)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

  16. Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Exploration...

  17. Electrostatic precipitator having high strength discharge electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakke, E.; Willett, H.P.

    1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    There is disclosed an electrostatic precipitator with a discharge electrode having dimensional and configuration characteristics which provide high field strength and high current density particularly in a wet electrostatic precipitator. The round cylindrical collector tube of length (L) and with an inner diameter (D) has a coaxially positioned discharge electrode having an electrode supporting mast of a diameter from 0.25 to 40 D with an electrically conducting closed screw fli secured to the mast. The screw flight has an overall diameter (D) of from 0.33 to 0.67 D with a pitch of from d-d/2 to d-d and an overall length of from one screw revolution to l-(D-d), preferably one-half L or less and most preferably one to two revolutions. The short screw flight is economical and readily adjusted. The screw flight has a thickness of from about 0.05 to 15 inch and has a symmetrically curved outer edge. Collector tube is flared at its lower end to direct water away from the electrode mast as the water is discharged from the tube. The discharge electrode is supported from above and centered by means of adjustable tie rods at its lower end.

  18. The control of confined vapor phase explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scilly, N.F. [Laporte plc, Widnes (United Kingdom); Owen, O.J.R. [Fine Organics, Ltd., Middlesborough (United Kingdom); Wilberforce, J.K. [Solvay SA, Brussels (Belgium)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The probability of, for example, a fire or explosion occurring during a process operation is related both to the fire-related properties of the materials used, such as flash point, flammable limits etc., i.e. the material or intrinsic factors, and the nature of the operation and the equipment used, i.e. the extrinsic factors. The risk, or frequency of occurrence, of other hazards such as reaction runaway, major toxic release etc. can be determined in a similar manner. For a vapor phase explosion (and a fire) the probability of the event is the product of the probability of generating a flammable atmosphere and the probability of ignition. Firstly, materials may be coded using properties that are relevant to the hazard in question. Secondly, different operations have different degrees of risk and these risks are assigned as Low, Medium, High etc. according to criteria outlined here. Combination of these two factors will then be a measure of the overall risk of the operation with the specified material and may be used to define operating standards. Currently, the hazard/risk of a vapor phase explosions is examined by this method but in due course dust explosions, fires, condensed phase explosions, reaction runaways, physical explosions, major toxic releases and incompatibility will be included.

  19. Comparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor in Observational and Model Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global water vapor distribution for five observational based data sets and three GCM integrations are compared. The variables considered are the mean and standard deviation values of the precipitable water for the entire atmospheric column and the 500 to 300 hPa layer for January and July. The observationally based sets are the radiosonde data of Ross and Elliott, the ERA and NCEP reanalyses, and the NVAP blend of sonde and satellite data. The three GCM simulations all use the NCAR CCM3 as the atmospheric model. They include: a AMIP type simulation using observed SSTs for the period 1979 to 1993, the NCAR CSM 300 year coupled ocean--atmosphere integration, and a CSM integration with a 1% CO2 increase per year. The observational data exhibit some serious inconsistencies. There are geographical patterns of differences related to interannual variations and national instrument biases. It is clear that the proper characterization of water vapor is somewhat uncertain. Some conclusions about these data appear to be robust even given the discrepancies. The ERA data are too dry especially in the upper levels. The observational data evince much better agreement in the data rich Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern. Distinct biases are quite pronounced over the Southern Ocean. The mean values and particularly the standard deviations of the three reanalyses are very dependent upon the GCM used as the assimilation vehicle for the analyses. This is made clear by the much enhanced tropical variability in the NCEP/DOE/ AMIP reanalyses compared the initial NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis. The NCAR CCM3 shows consistent evidence of a dry bias. The 1% CO2 experiment shows a very similar pattern of disagreement with the sonde data as the other integrations, once account is taken of the warming trend. No new modes of difference are evident in the 1% CO2 experiment. All the CCM3 runs indicated too much Tropical variability especially in the western Tropical Pacific and Southeast Asia. A EOF analysis of the interannual variations of the zonally averaged precipitable water and the 500 to 300 hPa layer reveals fundamental differences in the structure of the variations. The impact of ENSO and variations of the ITCZ have only a low level of correspondence between the observed data, much less the simulations. It is apparent that an adequate characterization of the climatology of the global water vapor distribution is not yet at hand.

  20. Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-T-111 using the vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprio, G.S.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents sampling data resulting from the January 20, 1995, sampling of SST 241-T-111 using the vapor sampling system.

  1. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-BY-112 using the vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprio, G.S.

    1995-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents sampling data from the November 18, 1994, sampling of SST 241-BY-112 using the vapor sampling system.

  2. Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caprio, G.S.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents sampling data resulting from the June 8, 1995, sampling of SST 241-A-101 using the Vapor Sampling System.

  3. RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Alex D.

    RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR By SCOTT RUSSELL WAITUKAITIS A Thesis Submitted: #12;Abstract I describe a study of Faraday rotation in a hot lithium vapor. I begin by dis- cussing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 The Lithium Oven and Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Theoretical Framework

  4. Isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapor: Measurements and photochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of magnitude between the surface and the tropopause, and isotopically heavy water is pref- erentially removedIsotopic composition of stratospheric water vapor: Measurements and photochemistry David G. Johnson composition of stratospheric water vapor that result from methane oxidation and reactions with O( ¢¡ ). We

  5. Chemical vapor detection with a multispectral thermal imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chein-I

    Chemical vapor detection with a multispectral thermal imager Mark 1. G. Aithouse, MEMBER SPIE U.S. Army Chemical Research Development and Engineering Center SMCCR-DDT Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland algorithm 7. Conclusions 8. Acknowledgments 9. References 1. INTRODUCTION Detection of chemical vapor clouds

  6. Informal Report . VAPOR DETECTION OF TRAFFICKING OF CONTRABAND MONEY-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I BNL- 62834 Informal Report . VAPOR DETECTION OF TRAFFICKING OF CONTRABAND MONEY-· [D VAPOR DETECTION OF TRAFFICKING OF CONTRABAND MONEY- A DISCUSSION OF TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY Concept MONEY --A DISCUSSION OF TECHNICAL FEASffiILITY Russell N. Dietz, Head Tracer Technology Center

  7. Heavy precipitation events in the southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soptei, Robert Julius

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oriented east. to west during the occurrence of light precipitation. . . . . . . . . . 60 15h 16b 16c 16d 16e 16f Composite 1000-500 mb thickness pattern (60 m increments) accompanying fronts oriented north to south during the occurrence of light... oriented north to south 12 h prior to the occurrence of heavy precipitation. . . . . . . . -. . . . ~ 22 b Composite 300 mb height field (120 m increments) accompanying fronts oriented east to west 12 h prior to the occurrence of heavy precipitation...

  8. Precipitation chemistry: its behavior and its calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, J.M.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purposes of this paper are twofold. The first of these is to present a rational basis for examining the aggregate set of scavenging-calculation techniques, and for guiding the reader in his course toward choosing the most appropriate technique for his particular application. The second purpose of this paper is to present a somewhat brief survey of our current understanding of scavenging and precipitation chemistry. Both objectives will be implemented by a flowchart approach, which attempts to draw the various facets of scavenging calculations together and present a generalized approach to the problem in total. The mathematical level of this paper is restricted to the presentation of the equations necessary to provide the reader with a basic appreciation of the fundamental concepts involved. References to more detailed mathematical treatments are cited at appropriate juncture points, for the reader interested in more detailed pursuit.

  9. Electrode supporting base for electrostatic precipitators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honacker, H.

    1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a base for supporting hollow cylindrical and circular in cross section collector electrodes for an electrostatic precipitator. The base comprises a central portion and is generally circular; a plurality of arcuate venturi and collector trough assemblies which are generally circular and which intersect radially disposed drain troughs; said venturi and collector trough assemblies being concentric with said center portion of said base and drain troughs extending radially outward from said center portion; a circular wall structure secured to outer ends of said drain troughs; fixture means for securing said collector electrodes on said drain troughs; uppermost portions of said drain troughs and said venturi and collector troughs being substantially flush with each other and said venturi and collector trough assemblies disposed on a common plane to provide for uniform laminar flow relative to the collector electrodes.

  10. A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified approach to evaluating asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach used an organic deposition cell for measuring asphaltene drop out onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure, temperature and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully-compositional V-L-S mathematical model completed the analysis by matching the experimental results. The model was then used to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios including response to gas-lift operations, and to evaluate the possible location of a tar-mat.

  11. Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions . Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and...

  12. Research on the Morphology of Precipitation and Runoff in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R.A.

    TR-15 1969 Research on the Morphology of Precipitation and Runoff in Texas R.A. Clark Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  13. Changes in concurrent monthly precipitation and temperature extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Phillips, Thomas J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    changes in daily climate extremes of temperature J. Geophys.Bayesian spatial modeling of extreme precipitation returnand Mearns L 2000 Climate extremes: observations, modeling,

  14. Joint probability analysis of precipitation and streamflow extremes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chia-hung.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis focuses on evaluation of joint occurrence of extreme precipitation and streamflow events at several hydrologic structures in South Florida. An analysis of twelve… (more)

  15. Temperature dependent vapor pressures of chlorinated catechols, syringols, and syringaldehydes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Y.D.; Shiu, W.Y.; Boocock, D.G.B. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry; Wania, F. [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vapor pressures of nine chlorinated catechols, syringols, and syringaldehydes were determined as a function of temperature with a gas chromatographic retention time technique. The vapor pressures at 298.15 K were in the range of 0.02--1 Pa, and the enthalpies of vaporization, between 68 and 82 kJ/mol. The validity of the technique was established by a calibration involving four chlorinated phenols with well-known vapor pressures. Using these data and previously reported solubility data, Henry`s law constants for these substances and some chlorinated guaiacols and veratrols were estimated. The vapor pressure of these substances tends to decrease with increasing polarity and an increasing number of chlorine atoms. Henry`s law constants decrease sharply with increasing polarity, suggesting that methylation can result in a significant increase in a chemical`s potential for volatilization from water.

  16. Analysis of electron-beam vaporization of refractory metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheshgi, H.S.; Gresho, P.M.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam is focussed onto a small area on the surface of a refractory metal to locally raise the temperature and vaporize metal. At high vaporization rates the hot area is on the surface of a churning liquid-metal pool contained in a solid-metal skull which sits in a cooled crucible. Inner workings of the process are revealed by analysis of momentum, energy, and mass transfer. At the surface high temperature causes high vaporization rate and high vapor thrust, depressing the vapor/liquid surface. In the liquid pool surface-tension gradients and thermal buoyancy drive a (typically) chaotic flow. In the solid skull thermal conductivity and contact resistance regulate the rate of heat transfer from pool to crucible. Analyses of these phenomena together reveal process performance sensitivities - e.g., to depression size or to magnitude of surface-tension gradients. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  18. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  19. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  20. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  1. Gas Separation Using Organic-Vapor-Resistent Membranes In Conjunctin With Organic-Vapor-Selective Membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Da Costa, Andre R. (Menlo Park, CA); Daniels, Ramin (San Jose, CA); Amo, Karl D. (Mountain View, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating a gas mixture containing at least an organic compound gas or vapor and a second gas, such as natural gas, refinery off-gas or air. The process uses two sequential membrane separation steps, one using membrane selective for the organic compound over the second gas, the other selective for the second gas over the organic vapor. The second-gas-selective membranes use a selective layer made from a polymer having repeating units of a fluorinated polymer, and demonstrate good resistance to plasticization by the organic components in the gas mixture under treatment, and good recovery after exposure to liquid aromatic hydrocarbons. The membrane steps can be combined in either order.

  2. M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Vapor Power Cycles 1 Vapor Power Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    is not a suitable model for steam power cycle since: The turbine has to handle steam with low quality which steam is condensed in the condenser 4 3 1 2 s T 1 2 34 s #12;M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Vapor Power = 0 qin = h3 ­ h2 Turbine q = 0 wturbine,out = h3 ­ h4 Condenser w = 0 qout = h4 ­ h1 The thermal

  3. An analysis of winter precipitation in the northeast and a winter weather precipitation type forecasting tool for New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Christopher James

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    center, (ii) a pool of high humidity spreading to the coast, and (iii) temperatures between 0 and -5 C at the coastal area. Goree and Younkin (1966) described favored locations for the occurrence of heavy snow with respect to certain atmospheric.... Precipitation Type Precipitation type is dependent on the thermal structure of the lower atmosphere. Temperatures below freezing (0 C) from the level where precipitation forms to the surface result in snow. A layer of significant depth above the surface...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol-assisted chemical vapor Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work to Prevent Chemical Warfare Agent Vapor Infiltration? John H. Sorensen Barbara M. Vogt Date... protection strategies to reduce exposure to vapors from chemical warfare...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - arc vapor deposition Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been produced... al Vaporization and melting of materials in fusion devices 325 ENERGY DEPOSITED (Jcm21 Figure 3... VAPORIZATION AND MELTING OF MATERIALS IN FUSION...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic vapor laser Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE 1 Summary: vapor, atomic physics and vapor ionization, absorption reflection in a heated plasma layer, and...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - atom vapor cells Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rotation in the vapor cell due to inten- sity-induced birefringence in the rubidium atomic vapor. While... Super efficient absorption filter for quantum memory using atomic...

  8. Nano-precipitation in hot-pressed silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Sixta, Mark E.; Chen, Da; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat treatments at 1300 degrees C, 1400 degrees C, 1500 degrees C, and 1600 degrees C in Ar were found to produce nanoscale precipitates in hot-pressed silicon carbide containing aluminum, boron, and carbon sintering additives (ABC-SiC). The precipitates were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nano-probe energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (nEDS). The precipitates were plate-like in shape, with a thickness, length and separation of only a few nanometers, and their size coarsened with increasing annealing temperature, accompanied by reduced number density. The distribution of the precipitates was uniform inside the SiC grains, but depleted zones were observed in the vicinity of the SiC grain boundaries. A coherent orientation relationship between the precipitates and the SiC matrix was found. Combined high-resolution electron microscopy, computer simulation, and nEDS identified an Al4C3-based structure and composition for the nano-precipitates. Most Al ions in SiC lattice exsolved as precipitates during the annealing at 1400 to 1500 degrees C. Formation mechanism and possible influences of the nanoscale precipitates on mechanical properties are discussed.

  9. Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Modelling precipitation of niobium carbide in austenite: multicomponent diffusion, capillarity, and coarsening N. Fujita and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia The growth of niobium carbide in austenite involves for the overall transformation kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in austenite that takes into account

  10. Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media approximation by a finite volume. Quelques tests numériques sont ensuite montrés. KEYWORDS: diffusion, dissolution­precipitation, porous­ ficiency of such disposals relies on material barriers. For such a use, cement concrete offers

  11. Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphaèle

    Diffusion with dissolution and precipitation in a porous media approximation by a finite volume numériques sont ensuite montrés. KEYWORDS: diffusion, dissolution-precipitation, porous media, finite volumes barriers. For such a use, cement concrete offers the advantage of having a weak porosity. However, disposal

  12. An analysis of radar estimated precipitation to rain gauge measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleason, Byron Edward

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the surface. These levels included 1.0 1.5@ 2.0 @ 2.5 km, and 3.0 km. Radar precipitation estimates were calculated at each 1.4 2 level using Z = 30ORand Z = 25OR" . The precipitation amounts, as measured by both the gauges and the radar,were used...

  13. Molecular Thermodynamics of Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianzhong

    Molecular Thermodynamics of Asphaltene Precipitation in Reservoir Fluids Jianzhong Wu and John M the- ory, is used to correlate experimental asphaltene-precipitation data at high-temperature and pressure conditions. In this framework, asphaltenes and resins are represented by pseudopure components

  14. Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Seasonal Forecasting of Extreme Wind and Precipitation Frequencies in Europe Matthew J. Swann;Abstract Flood and wind damage to property and livelihoods resulting from extreme precipitation events variability of these extreme events can be closely related to the large-scale atmospheric circulation

  15. Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

  16. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

  17. An investigation of precipitation attenuation and its application in a dual-frequency radar morphology of subtropical precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene, Douglas Richard

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the gases, Ap represents the attenuation by precipitation, and rp is the one-way path length through the precipitation. Attenuation b Atmos heric Gases The principal investigator of attenuation by atmospheric gases has been Van Vleck [16, 34, 35], who...

  18. Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Helfritch, Dennis J. (Baltimore, MD)

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

  19. Low Level Heat Recovery Through Heat Pumps and Vapor Recompression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this paper is to examine the methods and economics of recovering low level heat through heat pumps and vapor recompression. Actual commercially available equipment is considered to determine the near-term and future economic viability...

  20. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of functional polyacrylic thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Yu, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was explored as a novel method for synthesis of functional polyacrylic thin films. The process introduces a peroxide initiator, which can be decomposed at low temperatures (<200?C) ...

  1. All graphene electromechanical switch fabricated by chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milaninia, Kaveh M.

    We demonstrate an electromechanical switch comprising two polycrystalline graphene films; each deposited using ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition. The top film is pulled into electrical contact with the bottom film ...

  2. Applications of Mechanical Vapor Recompression to Evaporation and Crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outland, J. S.

    there is no boiler plant available or when electrical power is priced competitively in comparison to steam. Vapor recompression is accomplished using centrifugal, axial-flow, or positive displacement compressors and these compressors can be powered by electricity...

  3. Melt and vapor characteristics in an electron beam evaporator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenfeld, L.; Fleche, J.L.; Gonella, C. [DCC/DPE/SPEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the free surface temperatures T{sub s}, calculated by two methods, in cerium or copper evaporation experiments. The first method considers properties of the melt: by an empirical law we take into account turbulent thermal convection, instabilities and craterization of the free surface. The second method considers the vapor flow expansion and connects T{sub s} to the measured terminal parallel temperature and the terminal mean parallel velocity of the vapor jet, by Direct Simulation Monte Carlo calculations including an atom-atom inelastic collision algorithm. The agreement between the two approaches is better for cerium than for copper in the high craterization case. The analysis, from the point of view of the properties of the melt, of the terminal parameters of the vapor jet for the high beam powers shows that T{sub s} and the Knudsen number at the vapor source reach a threshold when the beam power increases.

  4. Enabling integration of vapor-deposited polymer thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petruczok, Christy D. (Christy Danielle)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) is a versatile, one-step process for synthesizing conformal and functional polymer thin films on a variety of substrates. This thesis emphasizes the development of tools to further ...

  5. Hyperfine Studies of Lithium Vapor using Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Alex D.

    the frequency of a laser with respect to an atomic spectral feature.[20] As such, saturated absorptionHyperfine Studies of Lithium Vapor using Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.3 Broadening Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.4 Saturated Absorption

  6. Heat transfer during film condensation of a liquid metal vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhatme, S. P.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this investigation is to resolve the discrepancy between theory and experiment for the case of heat transfer durirnfilm condensation of liquid metal vapors. Experiments by previous investigators have yielded ...

  7. Photoinitiated chemical vapor depostion [sic] : mechanism and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxamusa, Salmaan Husain

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition (piCVD) is developed as a simple, solventless, and rapid method for the deposition of swellable hydrogels and functional hydrogel copolymers. Mechanistic experiments show that piCVD ...

  8. Optical Precursors in Rubidium Vapor and Their Relation to Superradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wenlong

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical precursor is the sharp optical pulse front that does not show delay in absorptive media. In this thesis, optical precursor behavior in rubidium (Rb) vapor was investigated in the picoseconds regime. An amplified femtosecond laser was shaped...

  9. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  10. Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2005, in TA-48, Building RC-1 Room 402 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Acid Vapor Inhalation on June 7, 2005, in TA-48, Building RC-1...

  11. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Mariner

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, HSiO{sub 3}{sup -}, and MgOH{sup +}); (2) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, mineral precipitation resulting from the evaporation of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (specifically, minerals of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O); (3) To provide a means for abstracting these effects into a set of lookup tables that provide input to downstream models used for performance assessment. The presence and composition of liquid water in the drift depend upon relative humidity, temperature, incoming water composition, in-drift gas composition, and relative rates of evaporation and seepage. In downstream applications of this model, intended input values for these parameters are abstracted results from thermal-hydrological-chemical models, water sample measurements, dust leachate samples, and values used in sensitivity and uncertainty analyses that encompass the expected ranges of these parameters.

  12. Electrostatic precipitation of condensed acid mist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report deals with the second part (Phase 2) of a two-phased study of the control of acid mist emissions using a compact, wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). The goal of the study was to determine the degree of acid mist control that could be achieved when a compact WESP was used to replace or augment the mist eliminators in a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Phase 1 of the study examined the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase 2, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the computer model to project the performance of retrofitted WESPs at both of the utility test sites. Phase 1 results showed that excellent electrical operating conditions could be achieved, but very high loadings of acid mist or the fine fly ash tended to degrade electrical operation because of space charge suppression of the corona current. Measurements made at the utility sites under Phase 2 showed that acid mist accounted for 40 to 57% of the total particulate mass, while fly ash and scrubber solids accounted for 40 to 55% and 1.0 to 3.4%. Impactor samples from both test sites showed an increase in acid content with decreasing particle size. 9 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Advanced Chemical Heat Pumps Using Liquid-Vapor Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirol, L.

    ically feasible systems have significant potential advantage over conventional tech nology. An electric drive reactive heat pump can use smaller heat exchangers and compressor than a vapor-compression machine, and have more flexible operating... are discussed, and performance is bounded. A discussion on liquid-vapor equilibria is included as introduction to the systems I- considered. The electric drive heat pump and TA are promising systems; the TA has potential for higher COP than absorption...

  14. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  15. The development of a passive dosimeter for airborne benzene vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hager, David William

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    entirely different from that usually employed in gas or vapor collection devices, as there is no need for pumps and airflow control s to provi de fi xed airflows or volumes. This principle, Ficks First Law of Diffusion, states tha t the rate of transfer...+ Ilay 1978 ABSTRACT The Development of a Passive Dosimeter for Airborne Benzene Vapor. ", . (Nay 1978) David Hilliam Hager, B. S. , University of Rochester; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. David F. Ciapo Passive diffusion dosimeters offer...

  16. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Annual status report for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvers, K.L.; Fruchter, J.S.; Huckaby, J.L.; Almeida, T.L.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Pool, K.H.; Simonen, C.A.; Thornton, B.M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Fiscal Year 1996, staff at the Vapor Analytical Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed work in support of characterizing the vapor composition of the headspaces of radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Work performed included support for technical issues and sampling methodologies, upgrades for analytical equipment, analytical method development, preparation of unexposed samples, analyses of tank headspaces samples, preparation of data reports, and operation of the tank vapor database. Progress made in FY 1996 included completion and issuance of 50 analytical data reports. A sampling system comparison study was initiated and completed during the fiscal year. The comparison study involved the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based system, and the in situ vapor sampling system (ISVS), a cart-based system. Samples collected during the study were characterized for inorganic, permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds and organic speciation by SUMMA{trademark} and TST methods. The study showed comparable sampling results between the systems resulting in the program switching from the VSS to the less expensive ISVS methodology in late May 1996. A temporal study was initiated in January 1996 in order to understand the influences seasonal temperatures changes have on the vapors in the headspace of Hanford waste tanks. A holding time study was initiated in the fourth quarter of FY 1996. Samples were collected from tank S-102 and rushed to the laboratory for time zero analysis. Additional samples will be analyzed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 weeks.

  17. A stochastic technique for synthesis of hourly precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huddle, John Paul

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1. Classes of amounts of hourly precipitation 2. Possible sequences of wet and dry states during six periods when the last period is dry 3. Scheme of the sixth-order model Page 21 Observed frequencies of hourly precipitation by cl. ass 5...-5) were equal to 1 hr. Time (t-6) ends with the hour immediately preceding the hour represented by time (t-5). The time (t-6) was defined as wet or dry depending on whether precipitation was recorded during any hour of this period. The complete...

  18. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bongers, W. A.; Beveren, V. van; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; Berg, M. A. van den; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Thoen, D. J. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Nuij, P. J. W. M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baar, M. R. de; Donne, A. J. H.; Hennen, B. A. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Control Systems Technology Group, and Applied Physics Department, PO Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kantor, M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Forschungszentrum Juelich GMBH, Institute of Energy and Climate research, Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ioffe Institute, RAS, Saint-Petersburg, 195256 (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the full wave information of the mm-wave signals under investigation. The system is based on directly digitizing the IF band after down conversion. The enabling technology consists of a fast multi-giga sample analog to digital converter that has recently become available. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) are implemented to accomplish versatile real-time data analysis. A prototype system has been developed and tested and its performance has been compared with conventional electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrometer systems. On the TEXTOR Tokamak a proof of principle shows that ECE, together with high power injected and scattered radiation, becomes amenable to measurement by this device. In particular, its capability to measure the phase of coherent signals in the spectrum offers important advantages in diagnostics and control. One case developed in detail employs the FPGA in real-time fast Fourier transform (FFT) and additional signal processing. The major benefit of such a FFT-based system is the real-time trade-off that can be made between frequency and time resolution. For ECE diagnostics this corresponds to a flexible spatial resolution in the plasma, with potential application in smart sensing of plasma instabilities such as the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) and sawtooth instabilities. The flexible resolution would allow for the measurement of the full mode content of plasma instabilities contained within the system bandwidth.

  19. Interannual variability of summer precipitation in Texas and its implication to summer drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since Texas normally receives most of its precipitation in the warm season, precipitation deficits in summertime may bring serious agricultural and hydrological disasters. While the underlying physical processes of summer precipitation deficit...

  20. In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Mariner

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of the temperature range. Although such treatment contributes to uncertainty in model outputs, the model validation test cases indicate that the model, with its associated uncertainty, is valid for its intended use. The intended use of this model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period.

  1. A Micro-Alloyed Ferritic Steel Strengthened by Nanoscale Precipitates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microscope (TEM), fine carbides with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at...

  2. A micro-alloyed ferritic steel strengthened by nanoscale precipitates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (TEM), fine carbides TiC with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at...

  3. Copper gettering by aluminum precipitates in aluminum-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSEN,GARY A.; MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.

    2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper in Si is shown to be strongly gettered by Al-rich precipitates formed by implanting Al to supersaturation and followed by annealing. At temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C a layer containing Al precipitates is found to getter Cu from Cu silicide located on the opposite side of a 0.25-mm Si wafer, indicating a substantially lower chemical potential for the Cu in the molten-A1 phase. Cu gettering proceeds rapidly until an atomic ratio of approximately 2 Cu atoms to 1 Al atom is reached in the precipitated Al region, after which the gettering process slows. Redistribution of Cu from one Al-rich layer to another at low Cu concentrations demonstrates that a segregation-type gettering mechanism is operating. Cu gettering occurs primarily in the region containing the precipitated Al rather than the region where the Al is entirely substitutional.

  4. Stochastic Simulation Methods for Precipitation and Streamflow Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chao

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One major acknowledged challenge in daily precipitation is the inability to model extreme events in the spectrum of events. These extreme events are rare but may cause large losses. How to realistically simulate extreme behavior of daily...

  5. Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Merging Cloud and Precipitation Radar Data Provides a Better View of Tropical Rain Clouds For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

  6. Aerosol-Cloud interactions : a new perspective in precipitation enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased industrialization and human activity modified the atmospheric aerosol composition and size-distribution during the last several decades. This has affected the structure and evolution of clouds, and precipitation ...

  7. Mesoscale predictability of an extreme warm-season precipitation event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odins, Andrew Michael

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of June 29 through July 6, 2002, an extreme precipitation event occurred over Texas, resulting in catastrophic flooding. Operational forecasts performed poorly, neither predicting the copious amounts of rain nor its longevity...

  8. Observed Global Precipitation Variability During the 20th Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anisimov, Mikhail

    of warming and other regional-scale features, including changes in wind patterns, precipitation and some aspects of extremes and of ice. n The models used in AR4 were judged to have improved representation

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced precipitation radar Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clutter Summary: of precipitation for every pixel in a Meteosat-8 scene. Via pixel-level image fusion of the radar data... and the Precipitating Clouds product, supervised...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - affects regional precipitation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of precipitation trends over the two regions, as they are also directly affected by the South Asian monsoon... Regional summer precipitation events in Asia and their...

  11. Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

  12. Assessment of operating parameter variation on electrostatic precipitator performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunn, Roam Anthony

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lignite coal were collected and resistivity analysis performed for varying conditions of temperature and humidity. As a result of the laboratory analysis, it was determined that moisture and temperature conditioning of Texas lignite coal fly ash... results. I 5. Sample 8 moisturi ed test results. 57 64 66 69 77 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Lignite coal deposit formations in East Texas. Z. The electrostatic precipitator system 3. Electrostatic precipitator in operation. 4. Electrostatic...

  13. Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, S.B.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the findings of the Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration carried out at TNX during December 1995. This demonstration consisted of two steps: oxalate precipitation and precipitate washing. The first step reacted Am/Cm stimulant solution with oxalic acid resulting in the formation of insoluble lanthanide oxalates and soluble metal oxalates. The second step consisted of washing the precipitate with equal volumes of a nitric acid/oxalic acid solution to remove unwanted cations (miscellaneous metals) from the slurry. Quantitative results consist of: the solubility of the metallic impurities and lanthanide oxalates under process conditions, the settling rate of the oxalates, the specific volume of the oxalate precipitate, and the minimum distance the solution transfer jet can be place from the oxalate solids to prevent entrainment. Finally, discussion of how to decrease lanthanide losses is presented in terms of transfer jet location, initial nitric acid concentration, and wash nitric acid concentration. Solubilizing the precipitate and adjusting the nitric acid concentration prior to vitrification were not performed in this demonstration.

  14. Extracellular iron-sulfur precipitates from growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Witzcak, D.

    1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have examined extracellular iron-bearing precipitates resulting from the growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in a basal medium with lactate as the carbon source and ferrous sulfate. Black precipitates were obtained when D. desulfuricans was grown with an excess of FeSO{sub 4}. When D. desulfuricans was grown under conditions with low amounts of FeSO{sub 4}, brown precipitates were obtained. The precipitates were characterized by iron K-edge XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. Both were noncrystalline and nonmagnetic (at room temperature) solids containing high-spin Fe(III). The spectroscopic data for the black precipitates indicate the formation of an iron-sulfur phase with 6 nearest S neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 2.24(1) {angstrom}, whereas the brown precipitates are an iron-oxygen-sulfur phase with 6 nearest O neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 1.95(1) {angstrom}.

  15. Precipitation in 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu maraging steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stiller, K.; Haettestrand, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Danoix, F. [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique] [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique

    1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two maraging steels with the compositions 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu-4Mo (wt%) and 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu and with small additions of Al and Ti were investigated using atom probe field ion microscopy. Tomographic atom probe investigations were performed to clarify the spatial distribution of elements in and close to the precipitates. Materials heat treated at 475 C for 5, 25 min, 1, 2, 4 and 400 h were analyzed. Precipitates in the Mo-rich material were observed already after 5 min of aging, while in the material without MO, precipitation started later. In both materials precipitation begins with the formation of Cu-rich particles which work as nucleation sites for a Ni-rich phase of type Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al). A Mo-rich phase was detected in the Mo-rich steel after 2 h of aging. The distribution of alloying elements in the precipitates, their role in the precipitation process, and the mechanism of hardening in the two materials are discussed.

  16. Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew M. J.; Reynolds, R. M.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Min, Q.; Edwards, R.; Smith, S.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, and liquid water path. The instrument consists of photodiode sensors positioned beneath two narrow metal bands that occult the sun by moving alternately from horizon to horizon. Measurements from the narrowband 415-nm channel were used to demonstrate a retrieval of the cloud properties of interest. With the proven operation of the relatively inexpensive TCRSR instrument, its usefulness for retrieving aerosol properties under cloud-free skies and for ship-based observations is discussed.

  17. Vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Porter, John D. (Berkeley, CA); Yoshiyama, James M. (Fremont, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process involving vapor etching of nuclear tracks in dielectric materials for creating high aspect ratio (i.e., length much greater than diameter), isolated cylindrical holes in dielectric materials that have been exposed to high-energy atomic particles. The process includes cleaning the surface of the tracked material and exposing the cleaned surface to a vapor of a suitable etchant. Independent control of the temperatures of the vapor and the tracked materials provide the means to vary separately the etch rates for the latent track region and the non-tracked material. As a rule, the tracked regions etch at a greater rate than the non-tracked regions. In addition, the vapor-etched holes can be enlarged and smoothed by subsequent dipping in a liquid etchant. The 20-1000 nm diameter holes resulting from the vapor etching process can be useful as molds for electroplating nanometer-sized filaments, etching gate cavities for deposition of nano-cones, developing high-aspect ratio holes in trackable resists, and as filters for a variety of molecular-sized particles in virtually any liquid or gas by selecting the dielectric material that is compatible with the liquid or gas of interest.

  18. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

  19. Interactions between Liquid-Wall Vapor and Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of liquid walls for fusion reactors could help solve problems associated with material erosion from high plasma heat-loads and neutronic activation of structures. A key issue analyzed here is the influx of impurity ions to the core plasma from the vapor of liquid side-walls. Numerical 2D transport simulations are performed for a slab geometry which approximates the edge region of a reactor-size tokamak. Both lithium vapor (from Li or SnLi walls) and fluorine vapor (from Flibe walls) are considered for hydrogen edge-plasmas in the high- and low-recycling regimes. It is found that the minimum influx is from lithium with a low-recycling hydrogen plasma, and the maximum influx occurs for fluorine with a high-recycling hydrogen plasma.

  20. VAPORIZATION OF TUNGSTEN-METAL IN STEAM AT HIGH TEMPERATURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate system. The aerosol formed a fine white smoke of tungsten-oxide which was visible to the eye as it condensed in the laminar boundary layer of steam which flowed along the surface of the rod. The aerosol continued to flow as a smoke tube downstream of the rod, flowing coaxially along the centerline axis of the quartz glass tube and depositing by impaction along the outside of a bend and at sudden area contractions in the piping. The vaporization rate data from the 17 experiments which exceeded the vaporization threshold temperature are shown in Figure 5 in the form of vaporization rates (g/cm{sup 2} s) vs. inverse temperature (K{sup {minus}1}). Two correlations to the present data are presented and compared to a published correlation by Kilpatrick and Lott. The differences are discussed.

  1. Evaluation and prevention of explosions in soil vapor extraction systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.W. [Radian Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the widespread and long term use of petroleum derived fuels and solvents, many areas have subsurface soils contaminated with petroleum derivatives. This contamination can migrate to groundwater, which is frequently used to supply drinking water needs. A common method of cleaning up that contamination is soil vapor extraction (SVE). SVE is a technique where several extraction wells are installed in the contaminated area, with screens in the appropriate vertical locations. The soil vapors re extracted form the wells using a positive displacement blower. To prevent this subsurface contamination from becoming air pollution, the extracted vapors are then sent to some hydrocarbon removal device, such as a carbon adsorption system or a thermal oxidizer. The data used in this investigation were collected as part of a Radian Corporation project for a client. The site is a former petroleum refinery, and the hydrocarbons are primarily gasoline and diesel.

  2. Radiometer Calibration Trends

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323Program

  3. MWRRET (Microwave Radiometer Retrievals)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S . D e pPlus Plus Andy

  4. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W. Jr. (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA)); Cochran, H.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. A Novel Retrieval Algorithm for Cloud Optical Properties from the Atmopsheric Radiation Measurement Program's Two-Channel Narrow-Field-of-View Radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.; Marshak, A.; Chiu, J.-Y. C.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud optical depth is the most important of all cloud optical properties, and vital for any cloud-radiation parameterization. To estimate cloud optical depth, the atmospheric science community has widely used ground-based flux measurements from either broadband or narrowband radiometers in the past decade. However, this type of technique is limited to overcast conditions and, at best, gives us an "effective" cloud optical depth instead of its "local" value. Unlike flux observations, monochromatic narrow-field-of-view (NFOV) radiance measurements contain information of local cloud properties, but unfortunately, the use of radiance to interpret optical depth suffers from retrieval ambiguity. We have pioneered an algorithm to retrieve cloud optical depth in a fully three-dimensional cloud situation using new Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) NFOV measurements. The underlying principle of the algorithm is that these two channels have similar cloud properties but strong spectral contrast in surface reflectance. This algorthm offers the first opportunity to illustrate cloud evolution with high temporal resolution retrievals. A combination of two-channel NFOV radiances with multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) fluxes for the retrieval of cloud optical properties is also discussed.

  6. Balance of atmospheric water vapor over the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Ralph Morgan

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    / / / / I / o. i + B CAP C BBJ V S TPA PZA EHA Fig. 5. Vertical distribution of the average water-vapor flux normal to the perimeter of the Gulf of Nexico during Oct-Kov-Dec 1959. Plus values are inflow in kgm/sec-mb-. m. -o-I Pi C4 I / ~-o, i...BALANCE OF ATMOSPHERIC HATER VAPOR OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis By RALPH MORGAN HUGHES Captain, USAF Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulf-'llment of the rec;uirements for the degree of MASTER...

  7. Phase effects for electrons in liquid water and water vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.E.; Paretzke, H.G.; Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Ritchie, R.H.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of these studies is to compare transport, energy loss, and other phenomena for electrons in water in the liquid and vapor phases. Understanding the differences and similarities is an interesting physics problem in its own right. It is also important for applying the relatively large body of experimental data available for the vapor to the liquid, which is of greater relevance in radiobiology. This paper presents a summary of results from a series of collaborative studies carried out by the authors at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung (GSF). 14 figs.

  8. The development of a passive dosimeter for airborne aniline vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, James Evan

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    passive sampl1ng dosimeter was designed to measure concen- trat1ons of aniline vapor in air. Diffus1on tubes of 1. 5, 3. 0 and 4. 5 cm lengths were tested under controlled conditions of relative humid1ty, air temperature and vapor concentrations. A... of Measured vs Calculated Concentrations APPENDIX D-Student-t Test on Slopes of Measured vs Calculated Data . APPENDIX E-Statistical Analysis of Four Hour Time- Weighted Average Study on 3. 0 cm Dosimeter VITA ~pa e 42 45 48 59 62 63 65 70 73...

  9. Continuous Precipitation of Ceria Nanoparticles from a Continuous Flow Micromixer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tseng, Chih Heng; Paul, Brian; Chang, Chih-hung; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles were continuously precipitated from a solution of cerium(III) nitrate and ammonium hydroxide using a micro-scale T-mixer. Findings show that the method of mixing is important in the ceria precipitation process. In batch mixing and deposition, disintegration and agglomeration dominates the deposited film. In T-mixing and deposition, more uniform nanorod particles are attainable. In addition, it was found that the micromixing approach reduced the exposure of the Ce(OH)3 precipates to oxygen, yielding hydroxide precipates in place of CeO2 precipitates. Advantages of the micro-scale T-mixing approach include shorter mixing times, better control of nanoparticle shape and less agglomeration.

  10. Wet electrostatic precipitator eliminates over 90% of previous emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After ten years of searching for an effective air pollution control device, engineers at Teledyne Wah Chang Albany (TWCA) found that zirconium was the best metal in withstanding the gases generated in the manufacturing process of zirconium and hafnium. The best equipment was a two-stage, modular wet electrostatic precipitator to collect the submicron-size particulates in the form of metal oxides, ammonium sulfate, ammonium sulfite and ammonium bisulfite. All nonmetal components of the precipitator were fabricated entirely from industrial grade reinforced thermoset plastics. All metal components, including process water spray components, pipe fittings, and emitting electrodes - to be charged at 45,000 V - were fabricated from zirconium. Stack emission tests indicate the precipitator has eliminated over 90% of previous particulate emissions. Operation has been virtually maintenance free. The zirconium components show no signs of corrosion to date. (DP)

  11. Electrostatic precipitator for metal and particulate emission control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, C.L.; Beltran, M.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving air pollution control systems is crucial for incinerators to be an option for sewage sludge disposal. Combinations of venturi and tray tower scrubbers are the most popular air pollution control system for sewage sludge incinerators. Recently wet electrostatic precipitators have been installed downstream of the scrubbing system to ensure the compliance of new regulations. Performance and stack tests were conducted on sludge incinerators at Somerset Raritan Valley Sewage Authority and New England Treatment Company. Efficiencies in terms of heavy metal and particulate removals are presented. This paper also describes sewage sludge incinerators, existing air pollution control systems, design considerations of the wet electrostatic precipitator, as well as sampling and analysis methods.

  12. The Tropical Atmospheric El Nio Signal in Satellite Precipitation Data and a Global Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT Aspects of the tropical atmospheric response to El Niño related to the global energy and water and the Advanced Micro- wave Scanning Radiometer-E and simulations from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies are highly correlated, but anomalies in stratiform­convective rainfall partitioning in the two datasets

  13. Amine functionalization by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) for interfacial adhesion and film cohesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingjing, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amine functional polymer thin films provide a versatile platform for subsequent functionalization because of their diverse reactivity. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a polymer chemical vapor deposition ...

  14. Chemical vapor deposition thin films as biopassivation coatings and directly patternable dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryce Lewis, Hilton G. (Hilton Gavin), 1973-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organosilicon thin films deposited by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PPECVD) and hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) were investigated as potential biopassivation coatings for neural probes. ...

  15. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of carbon-free ZnO using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of carbon-free ZnO using the bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)zinc precursor. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of carbon-free...

  16. Heat transfer during film condensation of potassium vapor on a horizontal plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyrial, Paul M.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of the investigation is to analyze the following two features of heat transfer during condensation of potassium vapor: a. Heat transfer during film condensation of a pure saturated potassium vapor on a horizontal ...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - airs water vapor Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water vapor Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: airs water vapor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A laboratory experiment from the Little...

  18. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Biblarz, Oscar (Swampscott, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process.

  19. Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phasehydrodeoxy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol. Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of...

  20. Energy Saving in Distillation Using Structured Packing and Vapor Recompression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, J.H.

    difference across the column. VRC uses hot compressed overhead vapors, instead of steam, to heat the reboiler. Cost savings are highest when the pressure ratio for the compressor is low. The pressure ratio depends on the boiling point difference of top...

  1. DIAMOND CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION Nucleation and Early Growth Stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandy, David

    a reality. Epi- taxial diamond has been grown on diamond and cubic-BN. Polycrystalline diamond films haveDIAMOND CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION Nucleation and Early Growth Stages by Huimin Liu David S. Dandy of high-quality diamond coatings on preshaped parts and synthesis of free-standing shapes of diamond

  2. Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG07-90IDI2934,and by the Department of PetroleumSGP-TR-148 Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal Reservoir Rocks Shubo Shang Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering

  3. Fatigue Resistance of Asphalt Mixtures Affected by Water Vapor Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Yunwei

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation has two key objectives: the first objective is to develop a method of predicting and quantifying the amount of water that can enter into a pavement system by vapor transport; the second objective is to identify to which extent...

  4. A transient model for a cesium vapor thermionic converter. [Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Murray, C.S.; Chaudhuri, S. (Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA))

    1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analytical model for simulating the transient and steady-state operation of cesium vapor thermionic converters. A parametric analysis is performed to assess the transient response of the converter to changes in fission power and width of interelectrode gap. The model optimizes the converter performance for maximum electric power to the load.(AIP)

  5. CVD CNT CNT (Vapor-grown carbon fiber, VGCF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CNT CNT CVD CNT CNT (Vapor-grown carbon fiber, VGCF) 10001300 CNT CVD Smalley CO 24 CCVD 1 #12; 27 mm 3% 200 sccm 800 10 10 Torr 300 sccm Ethanol tank Hot bath boat Ar/H2 Ar or Ethanol tank Hot bath Ethanol tank Hot bath Pressure gauge Maindraintube Subdraintube

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    OPTIMIZATION OF INJECTION INTO VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS CONSIDERING ADSORPTION. Because of the costs associated with injection, optimizing an injection program involves not only of the injectate can become available for production and at the same time optimize the present worth of the project

  7. High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements David M. Slocum,* Thomas M such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow

  8. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Vaporization, fusion and sublimation enthalpies of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Vaporization, fusion and sublimation enthalpies of the 3 dicarboxylic acids from of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge, St. Louis, MO 63121, USA observed previously in the sublimation enthalpies of these compounds. The results are dis- 16 cussed

  9. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  10. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahluwalia, R. K. (6440 Hillcrest Dr., Burr Ridge, IL 60521); Im, K. H. (925 Lehigh Cir., Naperville, IL 60565)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  11. Diffusion-driven precipitate growth and ripening of oxygen precipitates in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, J., E-mail: will@krist.uni-erlangen.de; Gröschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Spiecker, E. [Center for Nanoanalysis and Electron Microscopy, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Pendellösung fringes from three silicon single crystals measured at 900?°C are analyzed with respect to density and size of oxygen precipitates within a diffusion-driven growth model and compared with TEM investigations. It appears that boron doped (p+) material shows a higher precipitate density and a higher strain than moderately (p-) boron crystals. In-situ diffraction reveals a diffusion-driven precipitate growth followed by a second growth regime in both materials. An interpretation of the second growth regime in terms of Ostwald ripening yields surface energy values (around 70?erg/cm{sup 2}) similar to published data. Further, an increased nucleation rate by a factor of ?13 is found in the p+ sample as compared to a p- sample at a nucleation temperature of 450?°C.

  12. Assessment of radionuclide vapor-phase transport in unsaturated tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.M.; Updegraff, C.D.; Bonano, E.J.; Randall, J.D.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes bounding calculations performed to investigate the possibility of radionuclide migration in a vapor phase associated with the emplacement of high-level waste canister in unsaturated tuff formations. Two potential radionuclide transport mechanisms in the vapor phase were examined: aerosol migration and convection/diffusion of volatile species. The former may have significant impact on the release of radionuclides to the accessible environment as the concentration in the aerosols will be equal to that in the ground water. A conservative analysis of air diffusion in a stagnant liquid film indicated that for all expected repository conditions, aerosol formation is not possible. The migration of volatile species was examined both in the vicinity of a waste canister and outside the thermally disturbed zone. Two-dimensional (radial) and three-dimensional (radial-vertical) coupled heat transfer-gas flow-liquid flow simulations were performed using the TOUGH computer code. The gas flow rate relative to the liquid flow rate predicted from the simulations allowed calculations of mobility ratios due to convection which led to the conclusion that, except for the immediate region near the canister, transport in the liquid phase will be dominant for radionuclides heavier than radon. Near the waste canister, iodine transport may also be important in the vapor phase. Bounding calculations for vertical mobility ratios were carried out as a function of saturation. These calculations are conservative and agree well with the two-dimensional simulations. Based on this analysis, it is clear that vapor-phase transport will not be important for radionuclides such as cesium and heavier species. Vapor transport for iodine may play a role in the overall release scenario depending on the particular repository conditions.

  13. Correlation for the Vapor Pressure of Heavy Water From the Triple Point to the Critical Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Correlation for the Vapor Pressure of Heavy Water From the Triple Point to the Critical Point Allan the vapor pressure of heavy water (D2O) from its triple point to its critical point. This work takes Institute of Physics. Key words: D2O; heavy water; ITS-90; vapor pressure. Contents 1. Introduction

  14. The control of mercury vapor using biotrickling filters Ligy Philip a,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The control of mercury vapor using biotrickling filters Ligy Philip a,b,1 , Marc A. Deshusses b August 2007 Abstract The feasibility of using biotrickling filters for the removal of mercury vapor from. In particular, the biotrickling filters with sulfur oxidizing bacteria were able to remove 100% of mercury vapor

  15. Asphaltene Precipitation in Crude Oils: Theory and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianzhong

    of the production of crude oil in deep-water environments and the operations of enhanced oil recovery by miscible asphaltenes and resins. Asphaltenes are defined as the fraction separated from crude oil or petroleum productsAsphaltene Precipitation in Crude Oils: Theory and Experiments Eduardo Buenrostro

  16. Capacitance studies of cobalt oxide films formed via electrochemical precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    prepared by electrochemically precipitating the hydroxide and heating it in air to form Co3O4 the need to identify more suitable materials. One promising route is the use of transi- tion metal oxides to batteries, are referred to as Faradaic or pseudocapacitors. However, the high cost of these materials has

  17. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid Daniel M. Dabbs, Usha as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous

  18. Late Neoproterozoic cap carbonates: Mackenzie Mountains, northwestern Canada: precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narbonne, Guy

    carbonate is thus interpreted to have formed in two steps: (1) during initial marine ice melting accompaniedLate Neoproterozoic cap carbonates: Mackenzie Mountains, northwestern Canada: precipitation and global glacial meltdown Noel P. James, Guy M. Narbonne, T. Kurtis Kyser Abstract: The 3­27 m-thick cap

  19. Joint probability of precipitation and discharge deficits in the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    Joint probability of precipitation and discharge deficits in the Netherlands Jules J. Beersma and T. Adri Buishand Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt, The Netherlands Received 14 April] The Netherlands are situated at the downstream end of the Rhine River. A large part of the country can be supplied

  20. Spatial variability of summer precipitation related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    to the observed diurnal patterns of precipitation over the central U.S. #12;Shading ­ meridional wind speed (Shading denotes meridional wind speed) P winds #12; Air temperature (shading; K) and zonal temperature #12;Convective P frequency Vertical wind in the model Moisture convergence at 850 hPa Vertical

  1. Dendroclimatic Analysis for Changes of Air Temperature and Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Forestry (Bulgaria)

    periodsClimate change viewed over different periods #12;Northern Russia:Northern Russia: Raspopov increase in the pastincrease in the past 250 years250 years #12;Climate change viewed over differentDendroclimatic Analysis for Changes of Air Temperature and Precipitation in Southwestern Bulgaria

  2. Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Precipitation Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    credits: Marty Bahamonde/FEMA, Darin Leach/USDA, Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA, Matt and Kim Rudge This graphic and condenses to form clouds, and falls again to the surface as precipitation. About 75 percent of the energy condenses into clouds latent heat is released--warming the atmosphere. Conversely, when liquid water

  4. Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone Sediments at the Hanford 300, Advanced Light Source, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, United States Geological Survey Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Uranium (U) solid-state speciation in vadose zone sediments

  5. STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    1 STATISTICS OF PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN TRENDS Rick Katz Institute of the validity of this analysis." -- Emil Gumbel #12;3 Outline (1) Introduction (2) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Classical Approach (3) Extreme Value Analysis under Stationarity: Modern Approach (4) Extreme

  6. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4). In general, higher [H4SiO4] leads to lower dissolution rates. It has often been observed that the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products can cause the dissolution of the glass to increase, even after the rate has decreased significantly. However, it has also been observed that in the concentrations of these silica-bearing solution species do not significantly decrease while other elements continue to be released. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a silica-bearing alteration product, analcime (Na(AlSi2O6)?H2O). In this initial study and to simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The ‘cross affinity’ code option allowed us to account for the fact that glass is a thermodynamically unstable solid with respect to its alteration products in contact with water. The cross-affinity option in the Geochemist’s Workbench geochemical code allowed us to substitute the amorphous silica equilibrium-constant matrix for the glass equilibrium-constant matrix. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. In all cases, our results indicate that the glass dissolution rate controls the rate of analcime precipitation in the long term. Our results, compared in general terms with experiments, show the importance of the gel layer that forms during glass alteration. The meaning of these results pertinent to long-term glass durability is discussed.

  7. Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic model. It was found that the precipitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Summary Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic to that in gas condensates. As a result of pressure decrease (at a constant tem- perature), the amount is undesirable. The flowlines may be plugged by wax deposition. For both crude oils and gas condensates, one may

  8. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunnmann, Walter (Stony Brook, NY); Larese, John Z. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  9. Evaporation monitoring and composition control of alloy systems with widely differing vapor pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Braun, D.G.; Haynam, C.; McClelland, M.A.; Meier, T.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing sensors and controls to improve and extend electron beam materials processing technology to alloy systems with constituents of widely varying vapor pressure. The approach under development involves using tunable lasers to measure the density and composition of the vapor plume. A laser based vaporizer control system for vaporization of a uranium-iron alloy has been previously demonstrated in multi-hundred hour, high rate vaporization experiments at LLNL. This paper reviews the design and performance of the uranium vaporization sensor and control system and discusses the extension of the technology to monitoring of uranium vaporization. Data is presented from an experiment in which titanium wire was fed into a molten niobium pool. Laser data is compared to deposited film composition and film cross sections. Finally, the potential for using this technique for composition control in melting applications is discussed.

  10. Evaporation monitoring and composition control of alloy systems with widely differing vapor pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Braun, D.G.; Haynam, C.; McClelland, M.A.; Meier, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing sensors and controls to improve and extend electron beam materials processing technology to alloy systems with constituents of widely varying vapor pressure. The approach under development involves using tunable lasers to measure the density and composition of the vapor plume. A laser based vaporizer control system for vaporization of a uranium-iron alloy has been previously demonstrated in multi-hundred hour, high rate vaporization experiments at LLNL. This paper reviews the design and performance of the uranium vaporization sensor and control system and discusses the extension of the technology to monitoring of titanium vaporization. Data is presented from an experiment in which titanium wire was fed into a molten niobium pool. Laser data is compared to deposited film composition and film cross sections. Finally, the potential for using this technique for composition control in melting applications is discussed.

  11. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  12. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Harvey, Michael N. (DeSoto, TX)

    2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  13. Piston pump and method of reducing vapor lock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Harvey, Michael N. (DeSoto, TX)

    2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump includes a housing defining a cavity, at least one bore, a bore inlet, and a bore outlet. The bore extends from the cavity to the outlet and the inlet communicates with the bore at a position between the cavity and the outlet. A crankshaft is mounted in supports and has an eccentric portion disposed in the cavity. The eccentric portion is coupled to a piston so that rotation of the crankshaft reciprocates the piston in the bore between a discharge position an intake position. The bore may be offset from an axis of rotation to reduce bending of the piston during crankshaft rotation. During assembly of the pump, separate parts of the housing can be connected together to facilitate installation of internal pumping components. Also disclosed is a method of reducing vapor lock by mixing vapor and liquid portions of a substance and introducing the mixture into a piston bore.

  14. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  15. Water vapor and the dynamics of climate changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Tapio; Levine, Xavier

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus climate. Here we present an overview of how latent heat release affects atmosphere dynamics in a broad range of climates, ranging from extremely cold to extremely warm. Contrary to widely held beliefs, atmospheric circulation statistics can change non-monotonically with global-mean surface temperature, in part because of dynamic effects of water vapor. For example, the strengths of the tropical Hadley circulation and of zonally asymmetric tropical circulations, as well as the kinetic energy of extratropical baroclinic eddies, can be lower than they presently are both in much warmer climates and in much colder climates. We discuss how latent heat release is implicated in such circulation changes, particularly through its effect on the atmospheric static stability, and we illustrate the circul...

  16. Vapor-liquid equilibria of hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, A.; Lamm, S.; Orbey, H.; Sandler, S.I. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) + 1-heptene, MTBE + four-component gasoline prototype, ethanol + four-component gasoline prototype, and separately MTBE and ethanol with the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Gasoline Blend A are reported. Small additions of MTBE have a very small effect on the total equilibrium pressure of this gasoline blend, and at most temperatures will decrease this pressure. In contrast, small additions of ethanol to this gasoline blend result in a significant increase in the equilibrium pressure at all temperatures. Analysis shows that the vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the MTBE-containing systems are easily correlated using a modified Peng-Robinson equation of state with conventional van der Waals one-fluid mixing rules. Data for mixtures containing ethanol cannot be accurately correlated in this way.

  17. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  18. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Downs, Wayne C. (Sugar City, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Ammon, ID); Hall, H. James (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  19. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  20. High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

  1. FRACTURE ENHANCED SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION AT THE A-014 OUTFALL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Richard Hall (NOEMAIL), R

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Data collected during this study show that the performance of hydraulically fractured wells (with respect to mass removal rates) may tend to decrease with time following precipitation events. These effects are due to temporary increases in water saturation in the formation within the vicinity of the fractures, therefore, the wells should tend to rebound during subsequent dry periods. The data available for fractured well versus conventional well performance (with respect to flow rate versus vacuum pressure) are limited in this study. However, the data that we have to draw from suggest that, with the possible exception of a few extreme examples, hydraulically fractured wells tend to perform better than conventional wells during soil vapor extraction (SVE) operation at the A-14 Outfall. The pancake like geometry associated with hydraulic fractures also leads to a significant increase in zone of influence (ZOI), as compared to conventional wells. The increase in ZOI is due to the radially extending, horizontal, high-permeability conduit nature of the hydraulic fracture, however, air-flow into the fracture is predominately vertical (occurring at right angles to the fracture plane). Flow rates from above and below the fracture will tend to be equivalent when the formation is homogeneous, however, in the case of directionally fining depositional sequences flow rates will be greater from the direction of increasing permeability. The Upland Unit is a fining upward sequence, therefore flow rates (and contaminant mass flow rates) will tend to be higher below the fracture. This suggests that emplacing the fractures slightly above the source zone is an important strategy for accelerating contaminant removal at the A-014 Outfall site and in the Upland Unit at the SRS. However, due to the multitude of previous borings at the A-014 Outfall site, the shallower fractures failed. More than 2500 lbs of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (cVOCs) were removed during approximately 6 months of fractured well SVE operation at the A-014 field site. Plotting total mass removed over this time period shows a roughly linear relationship Figure 7. This occurs because the mass removal rate remains fairly constant with time. When mass removal comes predominately from cVOCs stored in the vapor phase there is a marked decline in mass removal rate over a short period of time due to the limiting nature of diffusion. Constant mass removal rates suggest that a source zone has been directly targeted and, therefore, is providing a constant supply of cVOC that partitions into the vapor phase and is removed through the well. Directly targeting and removing source zones is the most efficient approach to remediating contaminated sites. Results of this study show that utilization of hydraulic fractures during SVE is an effective approach for increasing remediation efficiency at the A-014 Outfall field site and in the Upland Unit at the SRS. Hydraulically fractured wells tend to produce greater flow rates and create larger ZOI's than do conventional wells. These attributes allow fractured wells to effectively treat larger volumes of formation. The unique sand-emplacement geometry associated with hydraulically fractured wells also allows direct targeting of multiple zones located at similar elevations within a fairly large radius of the well. The ability to directly target source zones significantly decreases diffusion pathways, therefore, significantly decreasing the time required to reach remediation goals.

  2. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  3. Program plan for the resolution of tank vapor issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, J.W.; Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1987, workers at the Hanford Site waste tank farms in Richland, Washington, have reported strong odors emanating from the large, underground high-level radioactive waste storage tanks. Some of these workers have complained of symptoms (e.g., headaches, nausea) related to the odors. In 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy, which manages the Hanford Site, and Westinghouse Hanford Company determined that the vapor emissions coming from the tanks had not been adequately characterized and represented a potential health risk to workers in the immediate vicinity of the tanks. At that time, workers in certain areas of the tank farms were required to use full-face, supplied-breathing-air masks to reduce their exposure to the fugitive emissions. While use of supplied breathing air reduced the health risks associated with the fugitive emissions, it introduced other health and safety risks (e.g., reduced field of vision, air-line tripping hazards, and heat stress). In 1992, an aggressive program was established to assure proper worker protection while reducing the use of supplied breathing air. This program focuses on characterization of vapors inside the tanks and industrial hygiene monitoring in the tank farms. If chemical filtration systems for mitigation of fugitive emissions are deemed necessary, the program will also oversee their design and installation. This document presents the plans for and approach to resolving the Hanford Site high-level waste tank vapor concerns. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management.

  4. Vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esteve, X.; Chaudhari, S.K.; Coronas, A. [Univ. Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain). Dept. of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium (P-T-x) for the methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether binary system were obtained by the static method in the range of temperatures from 293.15 to 423.15 K at 10 K intervals. The modified vapor pressure apparatus used is described. The Kuczynsky method was used to calculate the liquid and vapor composition and the activity coefficients of methanol from the initial composition of the sample and the measured pressure and temperature. The results were correlated by the NRTL and UNIQUAC temperature dependent activity coefficient models. This system shows nearly ideal behavior at 323.15 K, but positive deviations from ideality at lower temperatures and negative deviations at higher temperatures are observed. The activity coefficients become more negative with the increase in temperature and mole fraction of methanol. The excess molar enthalpy using the Gibss-Helmholtz equation and the NRTL and UNIQUAC parameters were calculated at 303.15 K and compared with experimental data. This binary system shows promise as a working pair for high-temperature heat pump applications.

  5. Methanol vaporization and injection system for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayley, R.I.

    1980-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An engine equipped with an alcohol vaporization injection system operates as a four stroke cycle diesel engine that transfers the heat of exiting exhaust gases and cylinder head walls to the fuel. The engine runs on alcohol. The alcohol becomes vaporized and its pressure is high enough so that when a valve is opened between the high pressure fuel line and the combustion chamber (when it is at the peak of its compression ratio) enough alcohol will enter the combustion chamber to allow proper combustion. The overall advantages to this type of alcohol vaporization injection system is that it adds relatively few new mechanisms to the spark ignition four cycle internal combustion engine to enable it to operate as a diesel engine with a high thermal efficiency. This alcohol injection system exploits the engine's need for greater volumes of alcohol caused by the alcohol's relatively low heat of combustion (When compared to gasoline) by using this greater volume of fuel to return greater quantities of heat back to the engine to a much greater degree than other fuels can.

  6. Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, L.D.; Cerni, T.A.

    1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are disclosed which determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to an equation given in the patent where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4) + K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation. 11 figs.

  7. Method of and apparatus for measuring vapor density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Loren D. (Morrison, CO); Cerni, Todd A. (Littleton, CO)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method determine the concentration of an individual component, such as water vapor, of a multi-component mixture, such as a gaseous mixture for cooling a nuclear reactor. A hygrometer apparatus includes an infrared source for producing a broadband infrared energy beam that includes a strong water vapor absorption band and a weak water vapor absorption region. The beam is chopped to select infrared pulses. A temporally first pulse has a wavelength in the weakly absorbing region, a temporally second pulse has a wavelength in the strong band and a temporally third pulse has a wavlength in the weakly absorbing region. A fourth reference pulse representing background radiation is interposed in such chopped pulses. An indium arsenide infrared sensor is responsive to the pulses for generating an output signal in proportion to: ##EQU1## where N1 is proportional to the transmission through the sample of the first signal, N4 is related to the background radiation, and [K2 (N2-N4)+K3 (N3-N4)] is the time-weighted average of the transmission through the sample of the second and third pulses applicable at the time of the second pulse, with the reference pulse N4 being subtracted in each case to render the ratio independent of variations in the background radiation.

  8. Intensification of precipitation extremes with warming in a cloud resolving model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Caroline

    A cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the effect of warming on high percentiles of precipitation (precipitation extremes) in the idealized setting of radiative-convective equilibrium. While this idealized setting ...

  9. Statistical Relationships of the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Precipitation and Large-scale Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borg, Kyle

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between precipitation and large-flow is important to understand and characterize in the climate system. We examine statistical relationships between the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) 3B42 gridded precipitation...

  10. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf...

  11. Characteristics of warm season precipitating storms in the Arkansas–Red River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Li, Xingong

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Analysis of a multisensor precipitation product enables us to extract the precipitation from individual storms in the Arkansas–Red River drainage basin over a period of 11 years. We examine the year-to-year and ...

  12. Spatial predictive distribution for precipitation based on numerical weather predictions (NWP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinsland, Ingelin

    for precipitation based on NWP #12;Motivation, hydro power production How much water comes when? With uncertainty Precipitation Data Meteorological model NWP Short term optimalization Run off Hydrological model Past Future

  13. Scaling of Precipitation Extremes over a Wide Range of Climates Simulated with an Idealized GCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul Ambrose

    Extremes of precipitation are examined in a wide range of climates simulated with an idealized aquaplanet GCM. The high percentiles of daily precipitation increase as the climate warms. Their fractional rate of increase ...

  14. Future credible precipitation occurrences in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeele, W.V.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I have studied many factors thought to have influenced past climatic change. Because they might recur, they are possible suspects for future climatic alterations. Most of these factors are totally unpredictable; therefore, they cast a shadow on the validity of derived climatic predictions. Changes in atmospheric conditions and in continental surfaces, variations in solar radiation, and in the earth's orbit around the sun are among the influential mechanisms investigated. Even when models are set up that include the above parameters, their reliability will depend on unpredictable variables totally alien to the model (like volcanic eruptions). Based on climatic records, however, maximum precipitation amounts have been calculated for different probability levels. These seem to correspond well to past precipitation occurrences, derived from tree ring indices. The link between tree ring indices and local climate has been established through regression analysis.

  15. Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. D. Kolasinski; D. F. Cowgill; D. C. Donovan; M. Shimada

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

  16. The precipitation synthesis of broad-spectrum UV absorber nanoceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurhasanah, Iis; Sutanto, Heri; Puspaningrum, Nurul Wahyu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the possibility of nanoceria as broad-spectrum UV absorber was evaluated. Nanoceria were synthesized by precipitation process from cerium nitrate solution and ammonium hydroxide as precipitant agent. Isopropanol was mixed with water as solvent to prevent hard agglomeration. The structure of resulting nanoceria was characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). The transparency in the visible light and efficiency of protection in UV A region were studied using ultraviolet-visible (UV - Vis) spectrophotometer. The results show that nanoceria possess good tranparency in visible light and high UV light absorption. The critical absorption wavelenght of 368 nm was obtained which is desirable for excellent broad-spectrum protection absorbers. Moreover, analysis of photodegradation nanoceria to methylene blue solution shows poor photocatalytic activity. It indicates that nanoceria suitable for used as UV absorber in personal care products.

  17. Permeability Reduction Due to Precipitation of Quartz under Nonisothermal Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith, Laura A.; Delaney, Paul T.; Moore, Diane E.

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many problems concerning the origin and exploitation of geothermal reservoirs demonstrate the need for models of reactive-solute transport. Of particular interest to us is the coupling between dissolution/precipitation reactions and transient-flow behavior. In an effort to account for observed flow-rate reductions during experiments on samples of granite held in a temperature gradient (summarized at this meeting in 1981 by Moore and others), we examine the effect of quartz precipitation on fluid flow. Our results confirm earlier inerences that reactions responsible for porosity reduction were affected by kinetic factors. Although our results show substantial flow-rate reductions, we are unable to reproduce measured silica concentrations of the outlet fluid by considering the behavior of silica phases without regard for that of the feldspars and micas.

  18. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The second model used the crystal growth rate as an alternate measure of supersaturation. The growth rate obtained from a settling procedure correlated well with values for silica removal rates for experiments grouped by pH and recycie conditions... of precipitation processes specific applications to lime soFtening and silica removal can be addressed. Mechanisms oF silica raawal. Many of the processes studied for specific removal of silica From industrial water have relied on adsorption...

  19. Dynamics of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigel Goldenfeld; Pak Yuen Chan; John Veysey

    2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate and model the dynamics of spatial patterns arising during the precipitation of calcium carbonate from a supersaturated shallow water flow. The model describes the formation of travertine deposits at geothermal hot springs and rimstone dams of calcite in caves. We find explicit solutions for travertine domes at low flow rates, identify the linear instabilities which generate dam and pond formation on sloped substrates, and present simulations of statistical landscape evolution.

  20. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature11784 Divergent global precipitation changes induced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the spatial distribution of precipitation is complex, our approach relies on millennial simulations with ECHO-G

  1. Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico ANNE W. NOLIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Frequency Modes of Monsoon Precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico ANNE W. NOLIN Department proportion of the annual precipitation for Arizona and New Mexico arrives during the summer monsoon. Forty-one years of daily monsoon season precipitation data for Arizona and New Mexico were studied using wavelet

  2. Modulation of Caribbean Precipitation by the MaddenJulian Oscillation ELINOR R. MARTIN AND COURTNEY SCHUMACHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Elinor R.

    Modulation of Caribbean Precipitation by the Madden­Julian Oscillation ELINOR R. MARTIN satellite precipitation data and reanalysis winds, intraseasonal (30­90 days) variability in Caribbean and 6) of the MJO. The changes in Caribbean precipitation associated with the MJO are shown

  3. Metal precipitation at grain boundaries in silicon: Dependence on grain boundary character and dislocation decoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are combined to determine the dependence of metal silicide precipitate formation on grain boundary character and microstructure in multicrystalline silicon mc-Si . Metal silicide precipitate decoration is observed to increase the local metal silicide precipitate concentrations at various types of grain boundaries, identifying clear

  4. Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we need them most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we inferences of air pollution suppressing precipitation lead us to investigate historical climate records precipitation, decreases with time in the polluted regions and remains unchanged where no pollution sources were

  5. A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO Wiel M.F. Wauben precipitation sensor of Ott has been tested at KNMI in order to find out whether it is a suitable candidate for replacing the current operational KNMI precipitation gauge. Tests performed at the calibration facilities

  6. 7 Physical Model of Carbide Precipitation 2 7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Contents 7 Physical Model of Carbide Precipitation 2 7.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1 #12;Chapter 7 Physical Model of Carbide Precipitation 7.1 Introduction If the austempering process is held for prolonged periods of time precipitation of carbides from retained austenite occurs

  7. Effect of CNTs on precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/AlCu composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    Effect of CNTs on precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/Al­Cu composites Dong H. Nam a , Yun K June 2012 A B S T R A C T The precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/Al­Cu composites was investigated accelerated the precipitation hardening behavior of CNT/Al­Cu composites due to the generation of excess

  8. Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Effect of Resins and DBSA on Asphaltene Precipitation from Petroleum Fluids Lamia Goual and Abbas different petroleum fluids. Various resins are added to three different petroleum fluids to measure of precipitation. However, addition of resins to a petroleum fluid increases the amount of precipitated asphaltenes

  9. Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    ) and the global monsoon total precipitation (GMP) have increased during 1979­2008 [Hsu et al., 2011; Wang et alIncrease of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang of people around the world. The global monsoon precipitation had an increasing trend over the past three

  10. A perturbation approach for assessing trends in precipitation extremes across Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    A perturbation approach for assessing trends in precipitation extremes across Iran Hossein Tabari a of Iran using a novel quantile perturbation method during 1980­2010. Precipitation data from NASA's Modern indicate significant anomalies in precipitation extremes in the northwest and southeast regions of Iran

  11. The robust dynamical contribution to precipitation extremes in idealized warming simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    The robust dynamical contribution to precipitation extremes in idealized warming simulations across shift under climate warming on the distribution of precipitation extremes and the associated sensitivity in the frequency of the most extreme categories of the precipitation events at the poleward side of the midlatitude

  12. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-T-110: Results from samples collected on August 31, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-T-110 (Tank T-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5056. Samples were collected by WHC on August 31, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  13. Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, John

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

  14. EUROBRISA products documentation This page (http://eurobrisa.cptec.inpe.br/) presents 1-month lead South America precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South America precipitation forecasts and verification products for three month seasons. For example surface temperatures as predictor variables for precipitation over South America. For example

  15. EUROBRISA products documentation This page (http://eurobrisa.cptec.inpe.br/) presents 1-month lead South America precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South America precipitation forecasts and verification products for three month seasons. For example Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures as predictor variables for precipitation over South America

  16. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Eun Joon, E-mail: ejchun@mapse.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Baba, Hayato [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishimoto, Kazutoshi [Department of the Application of Nuclear Technology, Fukui University of Technology, Gakuen 3-6-1, Fukui-shi, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Saida, Kazuyoshi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  17. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  18. Vapor explosion in the RIA-ST-4 experiment. [BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concern in assuring the safety of commercial light water reactors (LWRs) is whether core overheating, during which molten fuel is produced, can lead to massive vaporization of the coolant and shock pressurization of the system due to an energetic molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI). The RIA-ST-4 experiment was one of four scoping tests in the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test Series which is being conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) to define an energy deposition failure threshold and to determine modes and consequences of fuel rod failure during a postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) control rod drop accident.

  19. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  20. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

  1. Optical waveguides in SBN by zinc vapor diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Jeffrey Dale

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at 600'C for a 12. 5 i1m Wide 1000'C Zinc Vapor Diffused SBN:60 Waveguide Measured at X = 0. 81 pm. IV. SBN:60 Amplitude Modulator Results . . . . . V. SBN:60 Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Results. . . . VI. Voltage-Length Product Comparison...: (a) extraordinary (TM), (b) 1. 5 x ordinary (TE). 12. Surface damage on SBN:60 diffused at 1000'C with an SiOz diffusion mask. 13. Zinc in-diffusion in SBN:60 25 . . . . . 26 . . . . . 27 . . . . . 28 29 14. Barium out-diffuison in SBN:60...

  2. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jerome P. (Livermore, CA); Sawvel, Robert M. (Modesto, CA); Draggoo, Vaughn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  3. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  4. Io - Are vapor explosions responsible for the 5-micron outbursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, W.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed that a vapor explosion of a submerged pool of liquid sulfur will remove the crust overlying an area of about 50-km diam. Thermal radiation from the exposed liquid sulfur pool with a surface temperature of 600 K is then presumed to be responsible for the 5-micron outbursts that have been observed. The explosive volcanoes are expected to leave black sulfur calderas, which are, indeed, found on the surface. The 5-micron outburst observed by Sinton (1980), on June 11, 1979 (UT), is identified with a new caldera found on Voyager 2 photographs but which had not been present on Voyager 1 pictures.

  5. In situ bioremediation enhanced with air sparging and vapor extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesko, S. [Eaton Corp., Willoughby Hills, OH (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eaton Corporation operates a corporate airport hangar facility in central Michigan. Testing showed, and soil and groundwater investigation confirmed, that two underground storage tanks leaked. This release sent an undetermined amount of Jet A kerosene into the soil and groundwater. As a result, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) listed the facility on the Act 307 list of contaminated sites (Michigan equivalent of a Superfund listing). The objective of the remediation was to clean up an aquifer and soil system contaminated with Jet A kerosene. This cleanup used pump and treat, bioremediation, soil vapor extraction, and air sparging technologies.

  6. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  7. Moisture burst structure in satellite water vapor imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulsh, David Joel

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moisture burst is a tropical synoptic-scale weather event that typically originates along the ITCZ and has been defined previously in window-channel infrared imagery. This research uses 6. 7-micrometer water vapor absorption band imagery to composite 35... moisture burst events during the North Pacific cool season of 1983-1984. Composite maps are constructed at four times, each 24 h apart, during the life cycle of the moisture burst. A comparative baseline is provided by an additional composite of 35 dates...

  8. Unusual thermopower of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Youngwoo, E-mail: youngwoo.nam@chalmers.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Woo Park, Yung [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on thermopower (TEP) and resistance measurements of inhomogeneous graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Unlike the conventional resistance of pristine graphene, the gate-dependent TEP shows a large electron-hole asymmetry. This can be accounted for by inhomogeneity of the CVD-graphene where individual graphene regions contribute with different TEPs. At the high magnetic field and low temperature, the TEP has large fluctuations near the Dirac point associated with the disorder in the CVD-graphene. TEP measurements reveal additional characteristics of CVD-graphene, which are difficult to obtain from the measurement of resistance alone.

  9. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II FieldVacancy-InducedCloudPoissonVampire Power1 - USAF1Vapor

  10. Stimulated emission of ultraviolet radiation by vapors of complex molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkova, L.A.; Gruzinskii, V.V.; Danilova, V.I.; Degtyarenko, K.M.; Kopylova, T.N.; Kuznetsov, A.L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasing was observed in vapors of new organic compounds: para-terphenyl, 2-phenylbenzoxazole, 2-(n-tolyl) benzoxazole, 2-(n-methoxyphenyl) benzoxazole, 2-(n-dimethylaminophenyl) benzoxazole, 2-biphenylbenzoxazole, 2-(..cap alpha..-naphthyl) benzoxazole, and also 1,4-di(n-phenylethynyl) benzole, and para-quaterphenyl pumped transversely by XeCl excimer laser radiation at lambda/sub p/ = 308 nm. The lasing bands without tuning covered the 330--370 nm range. The shortest-wavelength maximum (333.5 nm) was observed for 2-(n-methoxyphenyl) benzoxazole. An analysis was made of the lasing ability of the molecules.

  11. The Prospects of Alternatives to Vapor Compression Technology for Space Cooling and Food Refrigeration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Stout, Tyson E.

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Five alternatives to vapor compression technology were qualitatively evaluated to determine their prospects for being better than vapor compression for space cooling and food refrigeration applications. The results of the assessment are summarized in the report. Overall, thermoacoustic and magnetic technologies were judged to have the best prospects for competing with vapor compression technology, with thermotunneling, thermoelectric, and thermionic technologies trailing behind in that order.

  12. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

  13. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ); Harris, Ian D. (Dublin, OH); Ratka, John O. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Spiegelberg, William D. (Parma, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

  14. A radar study of the interaction between lightning and precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, D.N.; Ulbrich, C.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar study was made of the interaction between lightning and precipitation with the 430 MHz Doppler radar at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. On one occasion, the spectral power at Doppler velocities near that corresponding to the updraft increased substantially within a fraction of a second after a discharge was detected in the beam. Calculations were made to simulate the effect of an electric field change on mean Doppler velocity for a distribution of droplets in a thunderstorm. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali atom vapor Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a vapor cell magneto-optical trap. 1999 American... to the vacuum pumps or due to adsorption of the ... Source: Jin, Deborah - JILA, University of Colorado at Boulder...

  16. Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  17. LABORATORY TESTING TO SIMULATE VAPOR SPACE CORROSION IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Gray, J.

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 70 years at the Hanford nuclear facility. Vapor space corrosion of the tank walls has emerged as an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of these tanks. The interaction between corrosive and inhibitor species in condensates/supernates on the tank wall above the liquid level, and their interaction with vapor phase constituents as the liquid evaporates from the tank wall influences the formation of corrosion products and the corrosion of the carbon steel. An effort is underway to gain an understanding of the mechanism of vapor space corrosion. Localized corrosion, in the form of pitting, is of particular interest in the vapor space. CPP testing was utilized to determine the susceptibility of the steel in a simulated vapor space environment. The tests also investigated the impact of ammonia gas in the vapor space area on the corrosion of the steel. Vapor space coupon tests were also performed to investigate the evolution of the corrosion products during longer term exposures. These tests were also conducted at vapor space ammonia levels of 50 and 550 ppm NH{sub 3} (0.005, and 0.055 vol.%) in air. Ammonia was shown to mitigate vapor space corrosion.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave vapor Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (6). While previous systems have demonstrated success in chemical... striking visual identification of a range of ligating vapors (including alcohols, amines, ethers... ,...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - asssited chemical vapor Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nitride, chemical vapor ... Source: Dandy, David - Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado State University Collection: Materials Science 14 DEPOSITION OF ELECTRON BEAM...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - all-hot-wire chemical vapor Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nitride, chemical vapor ... Source: Dandy, David - Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado State University Collection: Materials Science 10 DEPOSITION OF ELECTRON BEAM...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic vapor deposited Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. S. - School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 8 Influence of substrate temperature on the stability of glasses prepared by vapor...

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Magnetic Nanowires Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Siwei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Various metal silicide and germanide magnetic nanowires were synthesized using a home-built CVD [chemical vapor deposition] system. The morphology, composition, and magnetic properties of the… (more)

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated chemical vapor Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Orgainc vapor; Adsorption capacity 1. Introduction... containing a variety of organic chemicals. In ... Source: Cal, Mark P. - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,...

  4. Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

  5. Towards improved spinnability of chemical vapor deposition generated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Gregg Sturdivant Burke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. J. F. 1999 Carbon nanotubes and related structures: newof vapor grown carbon nanotubes and single wall nanotubes, Eto Carbon Materials in Carbon Nanotubes: Preparation and

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon composite thin films for porous low-k dielectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, April Denise, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition has produced organosilicon thin films with the potential use as low dielectric constant interconnect materials in microelectronic circuits. Both diethylsilane and ...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali vapor species Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume 4, novembre 1994 Summary: 60 specines aged at elevated temperatures in alkali-metal vapors have shown that such treatmerlt... -T superconductivity in C specimens annealed...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - acetone vapor sensing Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -0150 The photophysics of vapor and liquid acetone are experimentally examined from subcritical to supercritical... injection and mixing. The fluorescence quantum yield for...

  9. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, of theTransport in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs, Geothermics,Depletion of Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, Lawrence

  10. The Patuha geothermal system: a numerical model of a vapor-dominated system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schotanus, M.R.J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The Patuha geothermal system is a vapor-dominated reservoir located about 40 kilometers southwest of Bandung on western Java, Indonesia. The geothermal system consists of a… (more)

  11. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric characterization of an oil aerosol-vapor microbial disinfectant .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadhwa, Prakash, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??"This thesis focuses on chemical characterization studies of disinfectant vapors generated from thermal oxidation of mineral oil and biogenic oil esters. The disinfection technique holds… (more)

  12. Prediction of blast damage from vapor cloud explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, H. [Phillips (H.), Buxton (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The process industries handle a wide range of different materials and use them in different types of chemical reaction. Of particular concern is the prospect of damage and injury affecting the general public outside the boundary wall of the chemical plant. It is not wise to permit the construction of homes, schools or hospitals so close to chemical plants that they, and the people within, might be damaged or injured should there be an accidental explosion in the plant. The major hazard outside the plant is over-pressure, a consequence of an accidental explosion in a cloud of flammable gas or vapor (Vapor Cloud Explosion or VCE). It is the responsibility of plant management to ensure that any such accidental explosion is not so large as to endanger the public, and of the local planning authorities to ensure that homes, schools or hospitals are not sited so close to chemical plants that they may be endangered by accidental explosion. A vital tool for such authorities is a simple method of assessing the possible consequences of an accidental VCE. In this paper those methods of assessing the consequences are examined.

  13. Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

  14. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. This report covers testing an iron catalyst. During the last quarter, a new precipitated iron catalyst was prepared and tested in the slurry autoclave reactor at various conditions. This catalyst did not noticeably deactivate during 1250 hours of testing. This quarter, the test was extended to include performance evaluations at different conversion levels ranging from 35 to 88% at 265 and 275{degree}C. The conversion levels were varied by changing the feed rate. The catalytic performance at different conversion intervals was then integrated to approximately predict performance in a bubble column reactor. The run was shut down at the end of 1996 hours because of a 24-hour-power outage. When the power was back on, the run was restarted from room temperature. Catalytic performance during the first 300 hours after the restart-up was monitored. Overall product distributions are being tabulated as analytical laboratory data are obtained. 34 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called ‘‘superparameterization’’, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

  16. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C21 to C30 at T ) 298.15 K by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    by Correlation Gas Chromatography James S. Chickos* and William Hanshaw Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Sublimation enthalpies for n-C17 to n-C30 are calculated by combining vaporization enthalpies with fusion

  17. Evaluation of the Vaporization, Fusion, and Sublimation Enthalpies of the 1-Alkanols: The Vaporization Enthalpy of 1-, 6-, 7-, and 9-Heptadecanol,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    Evaluation of the Vaporization, Fusion, and Sublimation Enthalpies of the 1-Alkanols* Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of MissourisSt. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63121 sublimation enthalpies. The sublimation enthalpies were compared to existing literature values. Agreement

  18. Synthesis of magnesium diboride by magnesium vapor infiltration process (MVIP)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Serquis, Adriana C. (Los Alamos, NM); Zhu, Yuntian T. (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Frederick M. (Los Alamos, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Liao, Xiao Zhou (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing superconducting magnesium diboride powder by heating an admixture of solid magnesium and amorphous boron powder or pellet under an inert atmosphere in a Mg:B ratio of greater than about 0.6:1 at temperatures and for time sufficient to form said superconducting magnesium diboride. The process can further include exposure to residual oxygen at high synthesis temperatures followed by slow cooling. In the cooling process oxygen atoms dissolved into MgB.sub.2 segregated to form nanometer-sized coherent Mg(B,O) precipitates in the MgB.sub.2 matrix, which can act as flux pinning centers.

  19. Polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes grown by vapor deposition techniques Pascal Brault*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrodes grown by vapor deposition techniques Pascal Brault Abstract: Polymer fuel cell electrode growth using vapor deposition techniques is reviewed. The supports process: sputtering, CVD, PECVD, MOCVD. In each case, up-to-date fuel cell performances are highlighted

  20. Lithium phosphorous oxynitride films synthesized by a plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Lithium phosphorous oxynitride films synthesized by a plasma-assisted directed vapor deposition vapor deposition approach has been explored for the synthesis of lithium phosphorous oxynitride Lipon the ionic transport properties of these films. This enabled the synthesis of electrolyte films with lithium

  1. Tank 241-U-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-U-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  2. Hybrid Optical Pumping of Optically Dense Alkali-Metal Vapor without Quenching Gas M. V. Romalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romalis, Mike

    Hybrid Optical Pumping of Optically Dense Alkali-Metal Vapor without Quenching Gas M. V. Romalis; published 7 December 2010) Optical pumping of an optically thick atomic vapor typically requires a quenching the atoms. We show that optical pumping of a trace contamination of Rb present in K metal results in a 4

  3. Chem. Mater. 1995, 7, 2269-2272 2269 Water Vapor Adsorption on Chemically Treated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Chem. Mater. 1995, 7, 2269-2272 2269 Water Vapor Adsorption on Chemically Treated Activated Carbon August 25, 1995@ Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon cloth (ACCBO)which has been oxidized% Cl), and ACCBO (4% N), exhibits sigmoidal isotherms with hysteresis loops of varying magnitudes

  4. VAPOR + LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM OF WATER, CARBON DIOXIDE, AND THE BINARY SYSTEM WATER + CARBON DIOXIDE FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (for water: the SPC-, SPC/E-, and TIP4P-potential models; for carbon dioxide: the EPM2 potential model dioxide are calculated. For water, the SPC- and TIP4P-models give superior results for the vapor pressure when compared to the SPC/E-model. The vapor liquid equilibrium of the binary mixture carbon dioxide

  5. Shock wave induced vaporization of porous solids Andy H. Shen, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    to reach high entropy, vaporized states in impact experiments. We extended calculations by Ahrens J. Appl such as Earth.1­3 During collision events, kinetic energy is converted into internal energy and such conversion spectrometry. More re- cently, the vapor products generated from a hypervelocity impact of electrostatically

  6. Low temperature chemical vapor deposition of Co thin films from Co2(CO)8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Low temperature chemical vapor deposition of Co thin films from Co2(CO)8 D.-X. Yea,*, S. Pimanpanga chemical vapor deposition with a metallorganic Co2(CO)8 precursor. After Ar sputtering of the surface, Co2(CO)8, has been extensively used in cobalt CVD and is attractive, since Co is in its elemental

  7. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene hexagonal boron nitride graphene junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene ­ hexagonal boron nitride ­ graphene junctions T. Roy1 , L. Liu2 , S. de la Barrera,3 B. Chakrabarti1,4 , Z. R. Hesabi1 , C. A. Joiner1 Abstract: Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate

  8. Computational Analysis and Optimization of a Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Analysis and Optimization of a Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactor with Large and optimization of a three- dimensional model of a horizontal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor used National Laboratories February 9, 2004 Abstract A computational analysis and optimization is presented

  9. Optimization of the chemical vapor deposition process for carbon nanotubes fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Optimization of the chemical vapor deposition process for carbon nanotubes fabrication M. Grujicica-phase chemistry and surface chemistry model is developed to analyze, at the reactor length scale, chemical vapor (carrier gas) in the presence of cobalt catalytic particles in a cylindrical reactor. The model allows

  10. OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPTIMAL DESIGN OF A HIGH PRESSURE ORGANOMETALLIC CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION REACTOR K.J. BACHMANN of computer simulations as an optimal design tool which lessens the costs in time and effort in experimental vapor deposition (HPOMCVD) reactor for use in thin film crystal growth. The advantages of such a reactor

  11. On the optimization of a dc arcjet diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandy, David

    On the optimization of a dc arcjet diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor S. W. Reevea) and W. A precursor in our dc arcjet reactor.1 Based on conclusions drawn from that work, an optimization strategy diamond film growth in a dc arcjet chemical vapor deposition reactor has been developed. Introducing

  12. Laser vaporization/ionization interface for coupling microscale separation techniques with mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, Y.C.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a laser-induced vaporization and ionization interface for directly coupling microscale separation processes to a mass spectrometer. Vaporization and ionization of the separated analytes are facilitated by the addition of a light-absorbing component to the separation buffer or solvent. 8 figs.

  13. An Examination of the Thermodynamics of Fusion, Vaporization, and Sublimation of Several Parabens by Correlation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    An Examination of the Thermodynamics of Fusion, Vaporization, and Sublimation of Several Parabens, Kasetsart University, Bangkane, Bangkok 10900, Thailand 2 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.com). DOI 10.1002/jps.22423 ABSTRACT: The vaporization, fusion, and sublimation enthalpies of methyl, ethyl

  14. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Biblarz, O.

    1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process. 2 figures.

  15. Apparatus and method for removing mercury vapor from a gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Kumar (Butte, MT)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallic filter effectively removes mercury vapor from gas streams. The filter captures the mercury which then can be released and collected as product. The metallic filter is a copper mesh sponge plated with a six micrometer thickness of gold. The filter removes up to 90% of mercury vapor from a mercury contaminated gas stream.

  16. Researchers develop electrodeposition process to deposit coatings on substrates, eliminate the expensive physical vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the expensive physical vapor deposition step, and improve device quality. CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) solar cells have composition was adjusted by physical vapor deposition method. At present, we are fabricating CIGS-based solar). 2 R. N. Bhattacharya, W. Batchelor, J. F. Hiltner, and J. R. Sites, Appl. Phys. Lett., 75, 1431

  17. Real-time growth rate metrology for a tungsten chemical vapor deposition process by acoustic sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    to a production-scale tungsten chemical vapor deposition cluster tool for in situ process sensing. Process gasesReal-time growth rate metrology for a tungsten chemical vapor deposition process by acoustic to achieve run-to-run process control of the deposited tungsten film thickness. © 2001 American Vacuum

  18. Characterization of irradiation-induced precipitates by small angle x-ray and neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, M.; Eichhorn, F.; Boehmert, J.; Brauer, G. [Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Dresden (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the irradiation-induced precipitates in the VVER-440-type steel 15Kh2MFA has been investigated by the combination of small angle neutron scattering and anomalous small angle X-ray scattering. Information about the chemical composition of the irradiation-induced precipitates was obtained by the method of contrast variation. ASAXS experiments with variation of the X-ray energy near the energy of the vanadium K-absorption edge prove the content of vanadium within the irradiation-induced precipitates. The scattering density of the precipitates is lower than the scattering density of the iron matrix. The chemical shift of the vanadium-K{sub {alpha}}-absorption-edge and the results of the variation of the contribution of the magnetic scattering in the SANS experiment show, that vanadium does not precipitate in an elementary state. These results can be explained by assuming the precipitates are vanadium carbide.

  19. Method of precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Kim, Yongman; Wan, Jiamin

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium is presented. The method includes precipitating uranium as a uranyl vanadate through mixing an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium and a solution comprising a monovalent or divalent cation to form the corresponding cation uranyl vanadate precipitate. The method also provides a pathway for extraction of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment.

  20. pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a , Y. Creff a , N. Petit b,* a IFP of controlling the pH, in a fed batch reactor where precipitation occurs, is con- sidered. Due to the batch Keywords: pH control Fed batch process Precipitation a b s t r a c t In this paper, the problem

  1. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium accompanied by esterification; ethanol-formic acid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rim, J.K.; Bae, S.Y.; Lee, H.T.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium total pressures after reaction between ethanol and formic acid were measured at 30, 40 and 50/sup 0/C, and the compositions of the vapor and liquid phases were determined gas chromatographically. Since the presence of the carboxylic acid in the mixture induces dimerization and trimerization of the acid in the vapor phase, the modified fugacity coefficients were calculated from ''chemical'' theory using the Lewis fugacity rule, from which are calculated the activity coefficients and the vapor-phase mole fractions using the nonrandom, two-liquid (NRTL) equation. The parameters in the NRTL equation were obtained from vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the binary system. The calculated results agree closely with the experimental vapor-phase mole-fraction data.

  2. Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, K.; Pramanik, A.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)] [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Bandyopadhya, N.R. [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)] [Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Bhattacharjee, S., E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Burmamines, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(III)-silicate precipitation tubes synthesized through 'silica garden' route have been characterized using a number of analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These tubes are brittle and amorphous and are hierarchically built from smaller tubes of 5-10 nm diameters. They remain amorphous at least up to 650 {sup o}C. Crystobalite and hematite are the major phases present in Fe(III)-silicate tubes heated at 850 {sup o}C. Morphology and chemical compositions at the external and internal walls of these tubes are remarkably different. These tubes are porous with high BET surface area of 291.2 m{sup 2}/g. Fe(III)-silicate tubes contain significant amount of physically and chemically bound moisture. They show promise as an adsorbent for Pb(II), Zn(II), and Cr(III) in aqueous medium.

  4. The Dynamics of Platinum Precipitation in an Ion Exchange Membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burlatsky, S F; Atrazhev, V V; Dmitriev, D V; Kuzminyh, N Y; Erikhman, N S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopy of polymer electrolyte membranes that have undergone operation under fuel cell conditions, have revealed a well defined band of platinum in the membrane. Here, we propose a physics based model that captures the mechanism of platinum precipitation in the polymer electrolyte membrane. While platinum is observed throughout the membrane, the preferential growth of platinum at the band of platinum is dependent on the electrochemical potential distribution in the membrane. In this paper, the location of the platinum band is calculated as a function of the gas concentration at the cathode and anode, gas diffusion coefficients and solubility constants of the gases in the membrane, which are functions of relative humidity. Under H2/N2 conditions the platinum band is located near the cathode-membrane interface, as the oxygen concentration in the cathode gas stream increases and/or the hydrogen concentration in the anode gas stream decreases, the band moves towards the anode. The model developed in this paper...

  5. Method and apparatus for detection of chemical vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark (Knoxville, TN); Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Caja, Josip (Knoxville, TN)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a gas detector and method for using the gas detector for detecting and identifying volatile organic and/or volatile inorganic substances present in unknown vapors in an environment. The gas detector comprises a sensing means and a detecting means for detecting electrical capacitance variance of the sensing means and for further identifying the volatile organic and volatile inorganic substances. The sensing means comprises at least one sensing unit and a sensing material allocated therein the sensing unit. The sensing material is an ionic liquid which is exposed to the environment and is capable of dissolving a quantity of said volatile substance upon exposure thereto. The sensing means constitutes an electrochemical capacitor and the detecting means is in electrical communication with the sensing means.

  6. Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troppenz, Gerald V., E-mail: gerald.troppenz@helmholtz-berlin.de; Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jörg; Nickel, Norbert H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut für Silizium Photovoltaik, Kekuléstr. 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27?cm{sup ?1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

  7. Discrete Boltzmann modeling of liquid-vapor system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiguo Xu; Guangcai Zhang; Yanbiao Gan

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We further probe the Discrete Boltzmann Modeling(DBM) of the single-component two phase flows or the liquid-vapor system. There are two kinds of nonequilibrium effects in the system. The first is the Mechanical NonEquilibrium(MNE). The second is the Thermodynamic NonEquilibrium(TNE). The MNE is well described in the traditional fluid dynamic theory. The description of TNE resorts to the gas kinetic theory. Since based on the Boltzmann equation, the DBM makes possible to analyze both the MNE and TNE. The TNE is the main discussion of this work. A major purpose of this work is to show that the DBM results can be used to confirm and/or improve the macroscopic modeling of complex system.

  8. Field emission properties of chemical vapor deposited individual graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamri Yusop, Mohd [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Department of Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kalita, Golap, E-mail: kalita.golap@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Center for Fostering Young and Innovative Researchers, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we report field emission (FE) properties of a chemical vapor deposited individual graphene investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. Free-standing bilayer graphene is mounted on a cathode microprobe and FE processes are investigated varying the vacuum gap of cathode and anode. The threshold field for 10?nA current were found to be 515, 610, and 870?V/?m for vacuum gap of 400, 300, and 200?nm, respectively. It is observed that the structural stability of a high quality bilayer graphene is considerably stable during emission process. By contacting the nanoprobe with graphene and applying a bias voltage, structural deformation and buckling are observed with significant rise in temperature owing to Joule heating effect. The finding can be significant for practical application of graphene related materials in emitter based devices as well as understanding the contact resistance influence and heating effect.

  9. Feasibility of UV lasing without inversion in mercury vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin R. Sturm; Benjamin Rein; Thomas Walther; Reinhold Walser

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the feasibility of UV lasing without inversion at a wavelength of $253.7$ nm utilizing interacting dark resonances in mercury vapor. Our theoretical analysis starts with radiation damped optical Bloch equations for all relevant 13 atomic levels. These master equations are generalized by considering technical phase noise of the driving lasers. From the Doppler broadened complex susceptibility we obtain the stationary output power from semiclassical laser theory. The finite overlap of the driving Gaussian laser beams defines an ellipsoidal inhomogeneous gain distribution. Therefore, we evaluate the intra-cavity field inside a ring laser self-consistently with Fourier optics. This analysis confirms the feasibility of UV lasing and reveals its dependence on experimental parameters.

  10. Technology alternatives to CFC/HCFC vapor compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phaseouts of CFCs and HCFCs to protect the stratospheric ozone layer have caused many developments in replacement or alternative technologies for heat pumping. Some of this effort has been of an ``evolutionary`` nature where the designs of conventional vapor compression systems were adapted to use chlorine-free refrigerants. Other alternatives are more radical departures from conventional practice such as operating above the critical point of an alternative refrigerant. Revolutionary changes in technology based on cycles sor principles not commonly associated with refrigeration have also attracted interest. Many of these technologies are being touted because they are ``ozone-safe`` or because they do not use greenhouse gases as refrigerants. Basic principles and some advantages and disadvantages of each technology are discussed in this paper.

  11. The precipitation response to the desiccation of Lake Chad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauwaet D.; VanWeverberg K.; vanLipzig, N. P. M., Weverberg, K. V., Ridderb, K. D., and Goyens, C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the semi-arid African Sahel, Lake Chad has shrunk from a surface area of 25000 km2 in 1960 to about 1350 km2 due to a series of droughts and anthropogenic influences. The disappearance of such a large open-water body can be expected to have a noticeable effect on the meteorology in the surroundings of the lake. The impact could extend even further to the west as westward propagating convective systems pass Lake Chad in the rainfall season. This study examines the sensitivity of the regional hydrology and convective processes to the desiccation of the lake using a regional atmospheric model. Three Lake Chad scenarios are applied reflecting the situation in 1960, the current situation and a potential future scenario in which the lake and the surrounding wetlands have disappeared. The model simulations span the months July-September in 2006, which includes the rainfall season in the Lake Chad area. Total precipitation amounts and the components of the hydrological cycle are found to be hardly affected by the existence of the lake. A filled Lake Chad does, however, increase the precipitation at the east side of the lake. The model results indicate that the boundary layer moisture and temperature are significantly altered downwind of the lake. By investigating a mesoscale convective system (MCS) case, this is found to affect the development and progress of the system. At first, the MCS is intensified by the more unstable boundary layer air but the persistence of the system is altered as the cold pool propagation becomes less effective. The proposed mechanism is able to explain the differences in the rainfall patterns nearby Lake Chad between the scenarios. This highlights the local sensitivity to the desiccation of Lake Chad whereas the large-scale atmospheric processes are not affected.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted precipitation method Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , Yang Zhanga,, Robert Gilliamb , Jonathan Pleimb a MEAS, North... and horizontal grid resolutions in 3-D models can directly affect simulated clouds, precipitation, and...

  13. Method and means for continuous precipitation of easy-dry, granular uranium peroxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahill, Allen E. (Roland, IA); Burkhart, deceased, Lawrence E. (late of Ames, IA)

    1992-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and means for continuous precipitation of granular uranium peroxide. The reaction vessel and agitation method practiced in it avoid filter plugging and caking problems.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid precipitation assessment Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are located, the pH value is much lower... of the environmental importance of rainwater acidity. 3 Field observations indicate that acid precipitation often... Wang...

  15. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Trade Wind Boundary Layer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Eunsil

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX,… (more)

  16. Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - altered precipitation preliminary Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meteorologisch Instituut Collection: Geosciences 5 Non-thermal Process for Recovering Reverse Osmosis Concentrate: Process Chemistry and Kinetics Summary: precipitation. 4....

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid precipitation provisions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of acidity in precipitation and in watersheds, showed... and nitrogen emissions from industrial sources as a means of reducing the ... Source: Crone, Elizabeth - Department of...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution precipitation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution precipitation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Air Pollution Physics and...

  20. Precipitation in a Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy during aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.Y., E-mail: bigchengjianyi@163.com; Shen, B.; Yu, F.X.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The precipitation processes in a Cu-0.69Cr-0.10Zr-0.02Mg alloy aged at 450 °C and 550 °C have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 450 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? Guinier–Preston zone (fcc Cr-rich phase) ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 550 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. In the evolution of decomposition, the orientation relationship between the precipitates and the Cu matrix changes from cube-on-cube to Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. The ordering of Cr-rich precipitates facilitates the formation of the bcc precipitates and promotes the development of Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. - Highlights: • Two different precipitation sequences in the Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy are proposed. • The changes in orientation relationship of the precipitates are presented. • The roles of ordering and coherent interface of the precipitates are discussed.

  1. Influences of climate variability and change on precipitation characteristics and extremes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goly, Aneesh.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This study focuses on two main broad areas of active research on climate: climate variability and climate change and their implications on regional precipitation characteristics.… (more)

  2. Future projections of daily precipitation and its extremes in simulations of 21st century climate change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Lei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The current generation of climate models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) is used to assess the future changes in daily precipitation… (more)

  3. Arctic daily temperature and precipitation extremes: Observed and simulated physical behavior.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glisan, Justin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??ARCTIC DAILY TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION EXTREMES: OBSERVED AND SIMULATED PHYSICAL BEHAVIOR Justin M. Glisan Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa… (more)

  4. Analysis of crude oil vapor pressures at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudeen, David Keith (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Lord, David L.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil storage caverns at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) are solution-mined from subsurface salt domes along the U.S. Gulf Coast. While these salt domes exhibit many attractive characteristics for large-volume, long-term storage of oil such as low cost for construction, low permeability for effective fluids containment, and secure location deep underground, they also present unique technical challenges for maintaining oil quality within delivery standards. The vapor pressures of the crude oils stored at SPR tend to increase with storage time due to the combined effects of geothermal heating and gas intrusion from the surrounding salt. This presents a problem for oil delivery offsite because high vapor-pressure oil may lead to excessive atmospheric emissions of hydrocarbon gases that present explosion hazards, health hazards, and handling problems at atmospheric pressure. Recognizing this potential hazard, the U.S. Department of Energy, owner and operator of the SPR, implemented a crude oil vapor pressure monitoring program that collects vapor pressure data for all the storage caverns. From these data, DOE evaluates the rate of change in vapor pressures of its oils in the SPR. Moreover, DOE implemented a vapor pressure mitigation program in which the oils are degassed periodically and will be cooled immediately prior to delivery in order to reduce the vapor pressure to safe handling levels. The work described in this report evaluates the entire database since its origin in 1993, and determines the current levels of vapor pressure around the SPR, as well as the rate of change for purposes of optimizing both the mitigation program and meeting safe delivery standards. Generally, the rate of vapor pressure increase appears to be lower in this analysis than reported in the past and, problematic gas intrusion seems to be limited to just a few caverns. This being said, much of the current SPR inventory exceeds vapor pressure delivery guidelines and must be degassed and cooled in order to meet current delivery standards.

  5. Vaporization modeling of petroleum-biofuel drops using a hybrid multi-component approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei; Kong, Song-Charng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering Building, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of the vaporization characteristics of multi-component fuel mixtures is performed in this study. The fuel mixtures studied include those of binary components, biodiesel, diesel-biodiesel, and gasoline-ethanol. The use of biofuels has become increasingly important for reasons of environmental sustainability. Biofuels are often blended with petroleum fuels, and the detailed understanding of the vaporization process is essential to designing a clean and efficient combustion system. In this study, a hybrid vaporization model is developed that uses continuous thermodynamics to describe petroleum fuels and discrete components to represent biofuels. The model is validated using the experimental data of n-heptane, n-heptane-n-decane mixture, and biodiesel. Since biodiesel properties are not universal due to the variation in feedstock, methods for predicting biodiesel properties based on the five dominant fatty acid components are introduced. Good levels of agreement in the predicted and measured drop size histories are obtained. Furthermore, in modeling the diesel-biodiesel drop, results show that the drop lifetime increases with the biodiesel concentration in the blend. During vaporization, only the lighter components of diesel fuel vaporize at the beginning. Biodiesel components do not vaporize until some time during the vaporization process. On the other hand, results of gasoline-ethanol drops indicate that both fuels start to vaporize once the process begins. At the beginning, the lighter components of gasoline have a slightly higher vaporization rate than ethanol. After a certain time, ethanol vaporizes faster than the remaining gasoline components. At the end, the drop reduces to a regular gasoline drop with heavier components. Overall, the drop lifetime increases as the concentration of ethanol increases in the drop due to the higher latent heat. (author)

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 39, NO. 1, JANUARY 2001 173 Impact of Variable Atmospheric Water Vapor Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    of the electromagnetic spectrum. Second, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) measurements obtained over radiation distorts the information embedded in the signal after its energy interacted with the target

  7. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  8. Regional sensitivity of Greenland precipitation to NAO variability E. Mosley-Thompson,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Regional sensitivity of Greenland precipitation to NAO variability E. Mosley-Thompson,1,2 C. R, particularly under a warming Earth scenario. As Greenland precipitation is modulated by the NAO, ice core-derived accumulation histories are incorporated into multi-proxy reconstructions. New ice core records from Greenland

  9. U.S.DOE Global Monthly Station Temperature and Precipitation, 1738-1980

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The global monthly station temperature and precipitation data from the U.S. Department of Energy, a dataset hosted at, covers the time period from January, 1738 to December, 1980. The air temperature and precipitation levels are platform observations from ground and water surfaces. The data are maintained in the Research Data Archive at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  10. Transition metal co-precipitation mechanisms in silicon T. Buonassisi a,*, M. Heuer a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -temperature annealing, co-localized single-metal silicide phases are observed, consistent with classical models, upon supersaturation, precipitate into their solid equilibrium metal silicide phase (e.g., FeSi2 [6Transition metal co-precipitation mechanisms in silicon T. Buonassisi a,*, M. Heuer a,1 , A

  11. A comparison between raw EPS output, (modied) BMA and extended LR using ECMWF EPS precipitation reforecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeits, Maurice

    A comparison between raw EPS output, (modied) BMA and extended LR using ECMWF EPS precipitation (EPS). 2. Data sets, statistical methods and predictand denitions The data sets used in this study [1 and precipitation data from a reforecasting exper- iment with the ECMWF EPS system. Figure 1: BMA-tted pdf of 24-h

  12. Statistical Characteristics of Daily Precipitation: Comparisons of Gridded and Point Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy Chowdhury, Rinku

    Statistical Characteristics of Daily Precipitation: Comparisons of Gridded and Point Datasets Gauge Dataset (URD) and those of its nearest (rain gauge) station. To further examine differences between the two datasets, return periods of daily precipitation were calculated over a region encompassing

  13. Response of a modern cave system to large seasonal precipitation variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montañez, Isabel Patricia

    , and responds within hours to storm events during the height of the rainy season. Rainwater and drip water d18 O source influences rainwater isotopes through individual storm events, it has less influence on drip water of calcite precipitation upflow from the drip water collection site (prior calcite precipitation) occurs

  14. Formation Damage due to Iron Precipitation in Acidizing Operations and Evaluating GLDA as a Chelating Agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rohit

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron control during acidizing plays a key role in the success of matrix treatment. Ferric ion precipitates in the formation once the acid is spent and the pH exceeds 1-2. Precipitation of iron (III) within the formation can cause formation damage...

  15. Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium and Uranium with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VISSER, ANN E.; BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAEL G.; RUDISILL, TRACY S.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) from Pu and U-containing waste solutions has been investigated to determine whether gadolinium (Gd) could be used as a neutron poison for precipitation with greater than a fissile mass containing both Pu and enriched U. Precipitation experiments were performed using both process solution samples and simulant solutions with a range of 2.6-5.16 g/L U and 0-4.3:1 U:Pu. Analyses were performed on solutions at intermediate pH to determine the partitioning of elements for accident scenarios. When both Pu and U were present in the solution, precipitation began at pH 4.5 and by pH 7, 99% of Pu and U had precipitated. When complete neutralization was achieved at pH > 14 with 1.2 M excess OH{sup -}, greater than 99% of Pu, U, and Gd had precipitated. At pH > 14, the particles sizes were larger and the distribution was a single mode. The ratio of hydrogen:fissile atoms in the precipitate was determined after both settling and centrifuging and indicates that sufficient water was associated with the precipitates to provide the needed neutron moderation for Gd to prevent a criticality in solutions containing up to 4.3:1 U:Pu and up to 5.16 g/L U.

  16. The relative importance of deforestation, precipitation change, and temperature sensitivity in determining the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    The relative importance of deforestation, precipitation change, and temperature sensitivity human disturbances ­ two of the most important of which are deforestation and climate change of deforestation as well as the response of species to changes in temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric

  17. Decadal cyclicity of regional mid-Holocene precipitation: Evidence from Dominican coral proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Lisa

    Decadal cyclicity of regional mid-Holocene precipitation: Evidence from Dominican coral proxies of four Holocene specimens of Montastraea sp. and Siderastrea sp. coral skeletons from the Dominican Republic were analyzed to examine decadal-scale fluctuations in regional precipitation. The specimens range

  18. Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum K. G precipitation; sorption; isotherms; X-ray diffraction; hydrous iron oxide; hydrous aluminum oxide; copper. INTRODUCTION Hydrous oxides of iron (HFO) and aluminum (HAO) are important mineral components of natural

  19. Modeling precipitation from concentrated solutions with the EQ3/6 chemical speciation codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.F.; Ebinger, M.H.

    1995-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the more important uncertainties of using chemical speciation codes to study dissolution and precipitation of compounds is the results of modeling which depends on the particular thermodynamic database being used. The authors goal is to investigate the effects of different thermodynamic databases on modeling precipitation from concentrated solutions. They used the EQ3/6 codes and the supplied databases to model precipitation in this paper. One aspect of this goal is to compare predictions of precipitation from ideal solutions to similar predictions from nonideal solutions. The largest thermodynamic databases available for use by EQ3/6 assume that solutions behave ideally. However, two databases exist that allow modeling nonideal solutions. The two databases are much less extensive than the ideal solution data, and they investigated the comparability of modeling ideal solutions and nonideal solutions. They defined four fundamental problems to test the EQ3/6 codes in concentrated solutions. Two problems precipitate Ca(OH){sub 2} from solutions concentrated in Ca{sup ++}. One problem tests the precipitation of Ca(OH){sub 2} from high ionic strength (high concentration) solutions that are low in the concentrations of precipitating species (Ca{sup ++} in this case). The fourth problem evaporates the supernatant of the problem with low concentrations of precipitating species. The specific problems are discussed.

  20. Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Vertical Structure of Tropical Cyclone Rainbands as Seen by the TRMM Precipitation Radar DEANNA A Measurement Mission satellite's Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR) show the vertical structure of tropical cyclone separated by the melting layer. The ice layer is a combination of particles imported from the eyewall