National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for vapor metal halide

  1. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.

    2015-08-07

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  2. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

  3. Electrolytic systems and methods for making metal halides and refining metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Justin M.; Cecala, David M.

    2015-05-26

    Disclosed are electrochemical cells and methods for producing a halide of a non-alkali metal and for electrorefining the halide. The systems typically involve an electrochemical cell having a cathode structure configured for dissolving a hydrogen halide that forms the halide into a molten salt of the halogen and an alkali metal. Typically a direct current voltage is applied across the cathode and an anode that is fabricated with the non-alkali metal such that the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed adjacent the anode. Electrorefining cells and methods involve applying a direct current voltage across the anode where the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed and the cathode where the non-alkali metal is electro-deposited. In a representative embodiment the halogen is chlorine, the alkali metal is lithium and the non-alkali metal is uranium.

  4. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  5. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  6. Thermal battery. [solid metal halide electrolytes with enhanced electrical conductance after a phase transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.

    1973-03-06

    The patent describes an improved thermal battery whose novel design eliminates various disadvantages of previous such devices. Its major features include a halide cathode, a solid metal halide electrolyte which has a substantially greater electrical conductance after a phase transition at some temperature, and a means for heating its electrochemical cells to activation temperature.

  7. Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, D.G.; Miller, J.L.

    1993-02-23

    Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

  8. Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G.; Miller, John L.

    1993-01-01

    Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

  9. Metal-halide perovskites for photovoltaic and light-emitting devices* |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Metal-halide perovskites for photovoltaic and light-emitting devices* September 15, 2015 at 4:30 pm/36-428 Sam Stranks Massachusetts Institute of Technology stranks.02 Metal halide perovskites are exotic hybrid crystalline materials developed out of curiosity. Unexpectedly, solar cells incorporating these perovskites are rapidly emerging as serious contenders to rival the leading photovoltaic technologies. Power conversion efficiencies have jumped from 3% to

  10. Radiation-induced defects in GaN bulk grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzn, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2014-09-08

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in thick free-standing GaN layers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy. In as-grown materials, six electron traps, labeled D2 (E{sub C}0.24?eV), D3 (E{sub C}0.60?eV), D4 (E{sub C}0.69?eV), D5 (E{sub C}0.96?eV), D7 (E{sub C}1.19?eV), and D8, were observed. After 2?MeV electron irradiation at a fluence of 1??10{sup 14?}cm{sup ?2}, three deep electron traps, labeled D1 (E{sub C}0.12?eV), D5I (E{sub C}0.89?eV), and D6 (E{sub C}1.14?eV), were detected. The trap D1 has previously been reported and considered as being related to the nitrogen vacancy. From the annealing behavior and a high introduction rate, the D5I and D6 centers are suggested to be related to primary intrinsic defects.

  11. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution | Department of Energy Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution January 30, 2014 - 9:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Energy Department's efforts to develop efficiency standards that cut carbon pollution and save money by saving energy, U.S. Energy Secretary

  12. DEPOSITION OF METAL ON NONMETAL FILAMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for purifying metallic uranium by passing a halogen vapor continuously over the impure uranium to form uranium halide vapor and immediately passing the halide vapor into contact with a nonmetallic refractory surface which is at a temperature above the melting point of uranium metal. The halide is decomposed at the heated surface depositing molten metal, which collects and falls into a receiver below.

  13. Method for hydrocracking a heavy polynuclear hydrocarbonaceous feedstock in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, Everett

    1981-01-01

    A method for hydrocracking a heavy polynuclear hydrocarbonaceous feedstock to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, the method comprising: mixing the feedstock with a heavy naphtha fraction which has an initial boiling point from about 100.degree. to about 160.degree. C. with a boiling point difference between the initial boiling point and the final boiling point of no more than about 50.degree. C. to produce a mixture; thereafter contacting the mixture with partially spent molten metal halide and hydrogen under temperature and pressure conditions so that the temperature is near the critical temperature of the heavy naphtha fraction; separating at least a portion of the heavy naphtha fraction and lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the partially spent molten metal halide, unreacted feedstock and reaction products; thereafter contacting the partially spent molten metal halide, unreacted feedstock and reaction products with hydrogen and fresh molten metal halide in a hydrocracking zone to produce additional lighter hydrocarbon fuels and separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide.

  14. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  15. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  18. Metal halide solid-state surface treatment for nanocrystal materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luther, Joseph M.; Crisp, Ryan; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-04-26

    Methods of treating nanocrystal and/or quantum dot devices are described. The methods include contacting the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots with a solution including metal ions and halogen ions, such that the solution displaces native ligands present on the surface of the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots via ligand exchange.

  19. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 timesmore » better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.« less

  20. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  1. Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2012-03-14

    Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X− = Cl−, Br−) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3−n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ≥0.05 M X−. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M−1 s−1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M−1 s−1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

  2. Methods for reducing the loss of metal in a metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Methods are provided for reducing loss of metal from a metal vapor laser by collecting metal present outside the hot zone of the laser and introducing or confining it in the hot zone.

  3. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  4. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunnmann, Walter; Larese, John Z.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  5. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  6. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 times better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.

  7. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  8. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  9. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  10. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  11. Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, David P.

    2001-01-01

    A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

  12. VAPORIZATION OF TUNGSTEN-METAL IN STEAM AT HIGH TEMPERATURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2000-10-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  13. Metal Halide Solid-State Surface Treatment for High Efficiency PbS and PbSe QD Solar Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crisp, R. W.; Kroupa, D. M.; Marshall, A. R.; Miller, E. M.; Zhang, J.; Beard, M. C.; Luther, J. M.

    2015-04-24

    We developed a layer-by-layer method of preparing PbE (E = S or Se) quantum dot (QD) solar cells using metal halide (PbI2, PbCl2, CdI2, or CdCl2) salts dissolved in dimethylformamide to displace oleate surface ligands and form conductive QD solids. The resulting QD solids have a significant reduction in the carbon content compared to films treated with thiols and organic halides. We find that the PbI2 treatment is the most successful in removing alkyl surface ligands and also replaces most surface bound Cl- with I-. The treatment protocol results in PbS QD films exhibiting a deeper work function and bandmore » positions than other ligand exchanges reported previously. The method developed here produces solar cells that perform well even at film thicknesses approaching a micron, indicating improved carrier transport in the QD films. We demonstrate QD solar cells based on PbI2 with power conversion efficiencies above 7%.« less

  14. Metal Halide Solid-State Surface Treatment for High Efficiency PbS and PbSe QD Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisp, R. W.; Kroupa, D. M.; Marshall, A. R.; Miller, E. M.; Zhang, J.; Beard, M. C.; Luther, J. M.

    2015-04-24

    We developed a layer-by-layer method of preparing PbE (E = S or Se) quantum dot (QD) solar cells using metal halide (PbI2, PbCl2, CdI2, or CdCl2) salts dissolved in dimethylformamide to displace oleate surface ligands and form conductive QD solids. The resulting QD solids have a significant reduction in the carbon content compared to films treated with thiols and organic halides. We find that the PbI2 treatment is the most successful in removing alkyl surface ligands and also replaces most surface bound Cl- with I-. The treatment protocol results in PbS QD films exhibiting a deeper work function and band positions than other ligand exchanges reported previously. The method developed here produces solar cells that perform well even at film thicknesses approaching a micron, indicating improved carrier transport in the QD films. We demonstrate QD solar cells based on PbI2 with power conversion efficiencies above 7%.

  15. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  16. Low temperature photochemical vapor deposition of alloy and mixed metal oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, David K.

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for formation of an alloy thin film, or a mixed metal oxide thin film, on a substrate at relatively low temperatures. Precursor vapor(s) containing the desired thin film constituents is positioned adjacent to the substrate and irradiated by light having wavelengths in a selected wavelength range, to dissociate the gas(es) and provide atoms or molecules containing only the desired constituents. These gases then deposit at relatively low temperatures as a thin film on the substrate. The precursor vapor(s) is formed by vaporization of one or more precursor materials, where the vaporization temperature(s) is selected to control the ratio of concentration of metals present in the precursor vapor(s) and/or the total precursor vapor pressure.

  17. Low temperature photochemical vapor deposition of alloy and mixed metal oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, D.K.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus are described for formation of an alloy thin film, or a mixed metal oxide thin film, on a substrate at relatively low temperatures. Precursor vapor(s) containing the desired thin film constituents is positioned adjacent to the substrate and irradiated by light having wavelengths in a selected wavelength range, to dissociate the gas(es) and provide atoms or molecules containing only the desired constituents. These gases then deposit at relatively low temperatures as a thin film on the substrate. The precursor vapor(s) is formed by vaporization of one or more precursor materials, where the vaporization temperature(s) is selected to control the ratio of concentration of metals present in the precursor vapor(s) and/or the total precursor vapor pressure. 7 figs.

  18. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazza, G.; Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G.; Soria, J.

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  19. Electrically driven rapidly vaporizing foils, wires and strips used for collision welding and sheet metal forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vivek, Anupam; Daehn, Glenn S; Taber, Geoffrey A; Johnson, Jason R

    2015-05-05

    A method for forming a piece of a sheet metal is performed by positioning a consumable body, made of metal, proximate to the piece of the sheet metal. The consumable body is rapidly vaporized, and the gas pressure generated thereby is directed into the piece of the sheet metal. This results in acceleration of the piece of sheet metal, and it is collided into a stationary body at a velocity, generally in excess of 200 m/s. Depending upon the type of stationary body, the piece of sheet metal is deformed into a predetermined shape or is welded onto the stationary body. The vaporization is accomplished by passing a high current of electricity into the consumable body. The effect of the vaporized metal may be augmented by additional components in the consumable body.

  20. Regeneration of zinc halide catalyst used in the hydrocracking of polynuclear hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, Everett

    1978-01-01

    Improved recovery of spent molten zinc halide hydro-cracking catalyst is achieved in the oxidative vapor phase regeneration thereof by selective treatment of the zinc oxide carried over by the effluent vapors from the regeneration zone with hydrogen halide gas under conditions favoring the reaction of the zinc oxide with the hydrogen halide, whereby regenerated zinc halide is recovered in a solids-free state with little loss of zinc values.

  1. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.

  2. Lutetium gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Kanai S.; Higgins, William M; Van Loef, Edgar V; Glodo, Jaroslaw

    2010-07-13

    Lutetium gadolinium halide scintillators, devices and methods, including a composition having the formula Lu.sub.xGd.sub.(1-x)Halide and a dopant.

  3. Mechanical properties of vapor-deposited thin metallic films: a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, P.H.

    1982-12-17

    The mechanical properties of vapor-deposited thin metallic films are being studied in conjunction with the target fabrication group associated with the laser-fusion energy program. The purpose of the work is to gain an understanding as to which metals are structurally best suited to contain a glass microsphere filled with deuterium-tritium (D-T) gas at large internal pressures.

  4. High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Cook, Edward G.; Miller, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

  5. Multi-cathode metal vapor arc ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. One embodiment of the appaatus utilizes a multi-cathode arrangement for interaction with the anode.

  6. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals, Phase 1 and Phase 2. Final report, October 1979 - February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, C.R.; Gould, R.K.; Felder, W.

    1981-03-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon are described. Product separation and collection processes were evaluated, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes and effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction were determined, and preliminary engineering and economic analysis of a scaled up process were made. The feasibility of the basic process to make and collect silicon was demonstrated. The jet impaction/separation process was demonstrated to be a purification process. The rate at which gas phase species from silicon particle precursors, the time required for silane decomposition to produce particles, and the competing rate of growth of silicon seed particles injected into a decomposing silane environment were determined. The extent of silane decomposition as a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure was measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. A simplistic model is presented to explain the growth of silicon in a decomposing silane enviroment.

  7. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  8. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  9. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  10. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  11. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  12. Using laser absorption spectroscopy to monitor composition and physical properties of metal vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berzins, L.V.

    1993-09-03

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program has been using laser absorption spectroscopy to monitor vapor densities for over 15 years. Laser absorption spectroscopy has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both density and composition. During this time the diagnostic has moved from a research tool toward a robust component of a process control system. The hardware used for this diagnostic is discussed elsewhere at this symposium. This paper describes how the laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostic is used as a component of a process control system as well as supplying detailed measurements on vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures, and constituent distributions. Examples will be drawn from the uranium AVLIS program. In addition potential applications such as composition control in the production of metal matrix composites or aircraft alloys will be discussed.

  13. Vapor-Particle Separation Using Microporous Metallic Membrane in Crossflow Filtration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous separation of vapor and particles in industrial processes could be a key step toward manufacturing of high-quality goods. The separation is critical for successful measurement of volatile or semi-volatile aerosol particles, which no reliable technique exists. We have developed a technique for separation of vapor and particles simultaneously using a specialty microporous metallic membrane. The separator allows the thermally denuded particles traverse straight through the membrane tube, while the vapor molecules permeate through the membrane, separate from the particles and are removed subsequently. The separation technique virtually eliminates the possibility of contamination by vapor re- condensation. We tested the prototype of the vapor-particle separator (VPS) using aerosols prepared from sodium chloride to represent non-volatile aerosols. Chemical like dioctyl phthalate was chosen to represent volatile particles. The test aerosol particles were generated by an atomizer followed by a tandem differential mobility analyser to produce a stream of monodisperse particles in the size range of 10 to 100 nm. In real world particles, we tested the VPS using diesel engine particles that is a mixture of complex chemical composition. Number concentration of the nonvolatile particles reduced as the temperature increased, but the mode diameter of the aerosol population remained unchanged. Number concentration of the volatile particles was also reduced as the temperature increased, but their mode diameters became smaller as particles shrunk in diameter. Differences in the thermal behaviour of the particles were attributed to its transition energy barrier and evaporation rate. Mass balance analysis suggests the separation of vapor and test particles was reasonably complete. Thus, we conclude the VPS could provide an effective means for quantitative characterization of aerosol volatility and separation of vapors from particles.

  14. Actinide halide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  15. Actinide halide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avens, Larry R.; Zwick, Bill D.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Clark, David L.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  16. Halide and Oxy-halide Eutectic Systems for High Performance High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Halide and Oxy-halide Eutectic Systems for High Performance High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids Halide and Oxy-halide Eutectic Systems for High Performance High Temperature Heat ...

  17. APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

    1961-08-22

    Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

  18. Note: Design principles of a linear array multi-channel effusive metal-vapor atom source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, B.; Majumder, A.; Thakur, K. B.; Das, A. K.

    2013-10-15

    Atomic beams can easily be produced by allowing atoms to effuse through a channel. In an earlier investigation [A. Majumder et al., Vacuum 83, 989 (2009)], we had designed, fabricated, and characterized an effusive metal-vapor source using collinear-array of multi-channel. In this note, we describe the theoretical basis of designing the source. Atom density in atomic beam has been estimated using a set of analytical expressions for long-channel operated in transparent mode. Parametric studies on aspect ratio of channel, inter-channel separation, beam width, and vertical distance from the source are carried out. They are useful in providing physical picture and optimizing design parameters.

  19. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  20. Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, J.N.

    1999-07-13

    The purpose of this report is to calculate the cost of producing high temperature superconducting wire by the Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) process. The technology status is reviewed from the literature and a plant conceptual design is assumed for the cost calculation. The critical issues discussed are the high cost of the metal organic precursors, the material utilization efficiency and the capability of the final product as measured by the critical current density achieved. Capital, operating and material costs are estimated and summed as the basis for calculating the cost per unit length of wire. Sensitivity analyses of key assumptions are examined to determine their effects on the final wire cost. Additionally, the cost of wire on the basis of cost per kiloampere per meter is calculated for operation at lower temperatures than the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature. It is concluded that this process should not be ruled out on the basis of high cost of precursors alone.

  1. Coalescence-controlled and coalescence-free growth regimes during deposition of pulsed metal vapor fluxes on insulating surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L, B.; Mnger, E. P.; Sarakinos, K.

    2015-04-07

    The morphology and physical properties of thin films deposited by vapor condensation on solid surfaces are predominantly set by the processes of island nucleation, growth, and coalescence. When deposition is performed using pulsed vapor fluxes, three distinct nucleation regimes are known to exist depending on the temporal profile of the flux. These regimes can be accessed by tuning deposition conditions; however, their effect on film microstructure becomes marginal when coalescence sets in and erases morphological features obtained during nucleation. By preventing coalescence from being completed, these nucleation regimes can be used to control microstructure evolution and thus access a larger palette of film morphological features. Recently, we derived the quantitative criterion to stop coalescence during continuous metal vapor flux deposition on insulating surfaceswhich typically yields 3-dimensional growthby describing analytically the competition between island growth by atomic incorporation and the coalescence rate of islands [L et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 163107 (2014)]. Here, we develop the analytical framework for entering a coalescence-free growth regime for metal vapor deposition on insulating substrates using pulsed vapor fluxes, showing that there exist three distinct criteria for suppressing coalescence that correspond to the three nucleation regimes of pulsed vapor flux deposition. The theoretical framework developed herein is substantiated by kinetic Monte Carlo growth simulations. Our findings highlight the possibility of using atomistic nucleation theory for pulsed vapor deposition to control morphology of thin films beyond the point of island density saturation.

  2. Metal vapor plasma behavior during vacuum arc remelting of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Maguire, M.C.; Williamson, R.L. ); Adasczik, C.B. ); Roberts, R.R. ); Strohecker, R. )

    1992-01-01

    A production vacuum arc remelt (VAR) furnace was modified to enable direct viewing of the metal vapor arc and molten electrode tip during melting of 432 mm dia. alloy 718 electrodes into 508 mm dia. ingots. Diffuse and constricted arcing conditions were characterized using high speed cinematography, standard video format, and monochromatic imaging. Constricted arcing was observed while melting electrodes contaminated with oxide slag of the type used for refractory linings in vacuum induction furnaces. Monochromatic imaging was used in visualize the ion distribution in the arc plasma; these images clearly showed whether the arc operated in a diffuse or constricted model. Diffuse arc melting conditions were very similar to those previously reported in the literature for smaller laboratory sized melts.

  3. Metal vapor plasma behavior during vacuum arc remelting of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanner, F.J.; Maguire, M.C.; Williamson, R.L.; Adasczik, C.B.; Roberts, R.R.; Strohecker, R.

    1992-05-01

    A production vacuum arc remelt (VAR) furnace was modified to enable direct viewing of the metal vapor arc and molten electrode tip during melting of 432 mm dia. alloy 718 electrodes into 508 mm dia. ingots. Diffuse and constricted arcing conditions were characterized using high speed cinematography, standard video format, and monochromatic imaging. Constricted arcing was observed while melting electrodes contaminated with oxide slag of the type used for refractory linings in vacuum induction furnaces. Monochromatic imaging was used in visualize the ion distribution in the arc plasma; these images clearly showed whether the arc operated in a diffuse or constricted model. Diffuse arc melting conditions were very similar to those previously reported in the literature for smaller laboratory sized melts.

  4. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  5. Project Profile: Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids | Department of Energy Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids Logos from The University of Arizona, Arizona State University, and Georgia Institute of Technology, and Three side-by-side graphics showing the experimental design, a photomultiplier tube, and a graph

  6. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  7. Ultralow-power local laser control of the dimer density in alkali-metal vapors through photodesorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Dorfman, Konstantin E. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Yi Zhenhuan; Yuan Luqi; Welch, George R. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Sautenkov, Vladimir A. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Joint Institute of High Temperature, RAS, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Rostovtsev, Yuri V. [University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Zheltikov, Aleksei M. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-27

    Ultralow-power diode-laser radiation is employed to induce photodesorption of cesium from a partially transparent thin-film cesium adsorbate on a solid surface. Using resonant Raman spectroscopy, we demonstrate that this photodesorption process enables an accurate local optical control of the density of dimer molecules in alkali-metal vapors.

  8. Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature...

  9. Project Profile: Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems forHigh...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, ...

  10. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  11. Double-sided reel-to-reel metal-organic chemical vapor deposition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; BARIUM OXIDES; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; COPPER OXIDES; CRITICAL CURRENT; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; ...

  12. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  13. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, P. Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Martinez, J.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ?10{sup 7?}cm{sup ?2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300?cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  14. PREPARATION OF HALIDES OF PLUTONIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garner, C.S.; Johns, I.B.

    1958-09-01

    A dry chemical method is described for preparing plutonium halides, which consists in contacting plutonyl nitrate with dry gaseous HCl or HF at an elevated temperature. The addition to the reaction gas of a small quantity of an oxidizing gas or a reducing gas will cause formation of the tetra- or tri-halide of plutonium as desired.

  15. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  16. Volatile organometallic complexes suitable for use in chemical vapor depositions on metal oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Giolando, Dean M.

    2003-09-30

    Novel ligated compounds of tin, titanium, and zinc are useful as metal oxide CVD precursor compounds without the detriments of extreme reactivity yet maintaining the ability to produce high quality metal oxide coating by contact with heated substrates.

  17. sup 3 P Hg, Cd, and Zn photosensitized chemistry of vinyl halides in krypton matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartland, H.E.; Pimentel, G.C. )

    1990-01-25

    The reaction of group IIB metals in the {sup 3}P state with vinyl fluoride, chloride, and bromide is studied in krypton matrix. The primary process in all cases is hydrogen halide elimination to form a hydrogen halide/acetylene hydrogen-bonded complex. Insertion of metal atoms into C-Cl and C-Br bonds, but not into C-H and C-F bonds, is also observed. The insertion photochemistry can be explained by a mechanism which requires that the process occur on a triplet surface with the vinyl halide in the planar ground-state conformation.

  18. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Quarterly report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, I.; Swift, W.M.; Lee, S.H.D.; Boyd, W.A.

    1980-07-01

    In the application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBC) to the generation of electricity, hot corrosion of gas turbine components by alkali metal compounds is a potential problem. The objective of this investigation is to develop a method for removing these gaseous alkali metal compounds from the high-pressure high-temperature gas from a PFBC before the gas enters the gas turbine. A granular-bed filter, using either diatomaceous earth or activated bauxite as the bed material, is the concept currently being studied. Results are presented for the testing of diatomaceous earth for alkali vapor sorption at 800/sup 0/C and 9-atm pressure, using a simulated flue gas. Activated bauxite sorbent can be regenerated by leaching with water, and the kinetics of the leaching is under study.

  19. Graphitized hollow carbon spheres and yolk-structured carbon spheres fabricated by metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xufan; Chi, Miaofang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Liu, Rui; Chuang, Yen -Jun; Dai, Sheng; Pan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-18

    Hard-sphere-templating method has been widely used to synthesize hollow carbon spheres (HCSs), in which the spheres were firstly coated with a carbon precursor, followed by carbonization and core removal. The obtained HCSs are generally amorphous or weakly graphitized (with the help of graphitization catalysts). In this work, we report on the fabrication of graphitized HCSs and yolk–shell Au@HCS nanostructures using a modified templating method, in which smooth, uniform graphene layers were grown on SiO2 spheres or Au@SiO2 nanoparticles via metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of methane. Furthermore, our work not only provides a new method to fabricate high-quality, graphitized HCSsmore » but also demonstrates a reliable approach to grow quality graphene on oxide surfaces using CVD without the presence of metal catalysts.« less

  20. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  1. ELECTROLYTIC PROCESS FOR PRODUCING METALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, B.; Holden, R.B.

    1961-06-01

    A method is described for reducing beryllium halides to beryllium. The beryllfum halide fs placed in an eutectic mixture of alkali halides and alkaline earth halides. The constituents of this eutectic bath are so chosen that it has a melting point less than the boiling point of mercury, which acts as a cathode for the system. The beryllium metal is then deposited in the mercury upon electrolysis.

  2. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  3. RARE-EARTH METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM LIQUID U-Bi

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiswall, R.H.

    1960-05-10

    Fission product metals can be removed from solution in liquid bismuth without removal of an appreciable quantity of uranium by contacting the liquid metal solution with fused halides, as for example, the halides of sodium, potassium, and lithium and by adding to the contacted phases a quantity of a halide which is unstable relative to the halides of the fission products, a specific unstable halide being MgCl/sub 3/.

  4. PROCESSING OF URANIUM-METAL-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-10-01

    A process is given for recovering uranium from neutronbombarded uranium- aluminum alloys. The alloy is dissolved in an aluminum halide--alkali metal halide mixture in which the halide is a mixture of chloride and bromide, the aluminum halide is present in about stoichiometric quantity as to uranium and fission products and the alkali metal halide in a predominant quantity; the uranium- and electropositive fission-products-containing salt phase is separated from the electronegative-containing metal phase; more aluminum halide is added to the salt phase to obtain equimolarity as to the alkali metal halide; adding an excess of aluminum metal whereby uranium metal is formed and alloyed with the excess aluminum; and separating the uranium-aluminum alloy from the fission- productscontaining salt phase. (AEC)

  5. METHOD OF ALLOYING REACTIVE METALS WITH ALUMINUM OR BERYLLIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runnalls, O.J.C.

    1957-10-15

    A halide of one or more of the reactive metals, neptunium, cerium and americium, is mixed with aluminum or beryllium. The mass is heated at 700 to 1200 deg C, while maintaining a substantial vacuum of above 10/sup -3/ mm of mercury or better, until the halide of the reactive metal is reduced and the metal itself alloys with the reducing metal. The reaction proceeds efficiently due to the volatilization of the halides of the reducing metal, aluminum or beryllium.

  6. Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Jana Pfeiffer; Martha R. Finck

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

  7. Diamond films treated with alkali-halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1997-04-08

    A secondary electron emitter is provided and includes a substrate with a diamond film, the diamond film is treated or coated with an alkali-halide. 5 figs.

  8. Diamond films treated with alkali-halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1997-01-01

    A secondary electron emitter is provided and includes a substrate with a diamond film, the diamond film is treated or coated with an alkali-halide.

  9. Lanthanide doped strontium barium mixed halide scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bizarri, Gregory A.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2016-03-15

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a lanthanide-doped strontium barium mixed halide useful for detecting nuclear material.

  10. Lanthanide doped strontium barium mixed halide scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E

    2013-07-16

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a lanthanide-doped strontium barium mixed halide useful for detecting nuclear material.

  11. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Barbara K.

    1991-01-01

    Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  12. Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards.

  13. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  14. Adsorption calorimetry during metal vapor deposition on single crystal surfaces: Increased flux, reduced optical radiation, and real-time flux and reflectivity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellers, Jason R. V.; James, Trevor E.; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Farmer, Jason A.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-12-15

    Thin films of metals and other materials are often grown by physical vapor deposition. To understand such processes, it is desirable to measure the adsorption energy of the deposited species as the film grows, especially when grown on single crystal substrates where the structure of the adsorbed species, evolving interface, and thin film are more homogeneous and well-defined in structure. Our group previously described in this journal an adsorption calorimeter capable of such measurements on single-crystal surfaces under the clean conditions of ultrahigh vacuum [J. T. Stuckless, N. A. Frei, and C. T. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 2427 (1998)]. Here we describe several improvements to that original design that allow for heat measurements with ∼18-fold smaller standard deviation, greater absolute accuracy in energy calibration, and, most importantly, measurements of the adsorption of lower vapor-pressure materials which would have previously been impossible. These improvements are accomplished by: (1) using an electron beam evaporator instead of a Knudsen cell to generate the metal vapor at the source of the pulsed atomic beam, (2) changing the atomic beam design to decrease the relative amount of optical radiation that accompanies evaporation, (3) adding an off-axis quartz crystal microbalance for real-time measurement of the flux of the atomic beam during calorimetry experiments, and (4) adding capabilities for in situ relative diffuse optical reflectivity determinations (necessary for heat signal calibration). These improvements are not limited to adsorption calorimetry during metal deposition, but also could be applied to better study film growth of other elements and even molecular adsorbates.

  15. PROJECT PROFILE: Stable Perovskite Solar Cells via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project is focused on novel approaches to remove risk related to the development of hybrid perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). Researchers will synthesize a new and chemically stable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite that eliminates decomposition of the absorber layer upon exposure to water vapor, which is a chief obstacle to widespread use of HPSC technology. They will also demonstrate a unique and industrially-scalable chemical vapor deposition method without halides or iodine, which are the main contributors to perovskite degradation.

  16. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Liquid-Solid and Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Metals and Alloys, Grant DE-FG02-06ER46321

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Stuart

    2012-09-27

    The research supported by ER46321 was designed to understand in microscopic detail the structures of the interfaces between liquid metals and alloys and solid media. The system chosen for study, because of detailed knowledge of the structure of the corresponding liquid alloy-vapor interface, was the interface between a Si crystal and a dilute alloy of Pb in Ga. Experimental study of the Si:PbGa interface was anticipated to be very difficult; it requires preparation of an interface between a liquid metal and a solid surface that is flat to better than a nanometer on the scale length of the x-ray coherence, alignment of the x-ray beam and the surface in the sub-micro radian regime, and the use of high energy x-rays to penetrate the window and reach the interface without disastrous loss of intensity. The experimental design was subject to compromises forced by the limit to the highest x-ray energy available at the ChemMatCARS beam-line, namely 30 keV, which reduced the scattered signal relative to what can be obtained with higher x-ray energy. Although considerable progress was achieved during the support period and its no-cost extension, the difficulties encountered prevented completion of the studies and the data collected are incomplete. These data hint at the existence of unexpected structural features of the interface, in particular that Pb dimers play an important role in the interfacial structure. These data provide a different picture of the interface from the pentagonal structure inferred to be present in the interface between pure Pb and Si 001 (Nature 408, 839 (2000)), but much like the Ga dimers in the interface between liquid Ga and the 100 face of diamond (Nature 390, 379 (1997), J. Chem. Phys. 123, 104703 (2005)). However, during the latter part of the support period significant progress was made in the theoretical description of the liquid metal-crystal interface. In particular, stimulated by the results of an experimental study of the interface

  18. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17

    Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  19. Enhanced Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium Halide/Copper Photocathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Lingmei; Joly, Alan G.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Gong, Yu; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-04-28

    The quantum efficiency of Cu is found to increase dramatically when coated by a CsI film and then irradiated by a UV laser. Over three orders of magnitude quantum efficiency enhancement at 266 nm is observed in CsI/Cu(100), indicating potential application in future photocathode devices. Upon laser irradiation, a large work function reduction to a value less than 2 eV is also observed, significantly greater than for similarly treated CsBr/Cu(100). The initial QE enhancement, prior to laser irradiation, is attributed to interface interaction, surface cleanliness and the intrinsic properties of the Cs halide film. Further QE enhancement following activation is attributed to formation of inter-band states and Cs metal accumulation at the interface induced by laser irradiation.

  20. METAL SURFACE TREATMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-12

    Improved flux baths are described for use in conjunction with hot dipped coatings for uranium. The flux bath consists of molten alkali metal, or alkaline earth metal halides. One preferred embodiment comprises a bath containing molten KCl, NaCl, and LiCl in proportions approximating the triple eutectic.

  1. Effects of growth temperature on the properties of InGaN channel heterostructures grown by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yachao; Zhou, Xiaowei; Xu, Shengrui; Wang, Zhizhe; Chen, Zhibin; Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jincheng E-mail: xd-zhangyachao@163.com; Hao, Yue E-mail: xd-zhangyachao@163.com

    2015-12-15

    Pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition (P-MOCVD) is introduced into the growth of high quality InGaN channel heterostructures. The effects of InGaN channel growth temperature on the structural and transport properties of the heterostructures are investigated in detail. High resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that the quality of InGaN channel strongly depends on the growth temperature. Meanwhile, the atomic force microscopy (AFM) results show that the interface morphology between the InGaN channel and the barrier layer also relies on the growth temperature. Since the variation of material properties of InGaN channel has a significant influence on the electrical properties of InAlN/InGaN heterostructures, the optimal transport properties can be achieved by adjusting the growth temperature. A very high two dimension electron gas (2DEG) density of 1.92 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} and Hall electron mobility of 1025 cm{sup 2}/(V⋅s) at room temperature are obtained at the optimal growth temperature around 740 °C. The excellent transport properties in our work indicate that the heterostructure with InGaN channel is a promising candidate for the microwave power devices, and the results in this paper will be instructive for further study of the InGaN channel heterostructures.

  2. Low-temperature growth and orientational control in RuO{sub 2} thin films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, G.R.; Wang, A.; Foster, C.M.; Vetrone, J.; Patel, J.; Wu, X.

    1996-08-01

    For growth temperatures in the range of 275 C to 425 C, highly conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films with either (110)- or (101)-textured orientations have been grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on both SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) and Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates. Both the growth temperature and growth rate were used to control the type and degree of orientational texture of the RuO{sub 2} films. In the upper part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 350 C) and at a low growth rate (< 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (110)-textured. In contrast, at the lower part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 300 C) and at a high growth rate (> 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (101)-textured. In contrast, a higher growth temperatures (> 425 C) always produced randomly-oriented polycrystalline films. For either of these low-temperature growth processes, the films produced were crack-free, well-adhered to the substrates, and had smooth, specular surfaces. Atomic force microscopy showed that the films had a dense microstructure with an average grain size of 50--80 nm and a rms. surface roughness of {approximately} 3--10 nm. Four-probe electrical transport measurements showed that the films were highly conductive with resistivities of 34--40 {micro}{Omega}-cm ({at} 25 C).

  3. Vapor deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.C.; Pattillo, S.G.; Laia, J.R. Jr.; Sattelberger, A.P.

    1990-10-05

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl){sub 3}, iridium(allyl){sub 3}, molybdenum(allyl){sub 4}, tungsten(allyl){sub 4}, rhenium (allyl){sub 4}, platinum(allyl){sub 2}, or palladium(allyl){sub 2} are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  4. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, David C. (Los Alamos, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Laia, Jr., Joseph R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  5. Solvent vapor collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1979-01-30

    A solvent vapor collector is mounted on the upstream inlet end of an oven having a gas-circulating means and intended for curing a coating applied to a strip sheet metal at a coating station. The strip sheet metal may be hot and solvent vapors are evaporated at the coating station and from the strip as it passes from the coating station to the oven. Upper and lower plenums within a housing of the collector are supplied with oven gases or air from the gas-circulating means and such gases or air are discharged within the collector obliquely in a downstream direction against the strip passing through that collector to establish downstream gas flows along the top and under surfaces of the strip so as, in turn, to induct solvent vapors into the collector at the coating station. A telescopic multi-piece shroud is usefully provided on the housing for movement between an extended position in which it overlies the coating station to collect solvent vapors released thereat and a retracted position permitting ready cleaning and adjustment of that coating station.

  6. The Electrolytic Production of Metallic Uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosen, R.

    1950-08-22

    This patent covers a process for producing metallic uranium by electrolyzing uranium tetrafluoride at an elevated temperature in a fused bath consisting essentially of mixed alkali and alkaline earth halides.

  7. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  8. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires Authors: Eaton, Samuel W. ; Lai, Minliang ; Gibson, Natalie A. ; Wong, Andrew B. ; Dou, Letian ; Ma, Jie ; Wang, ...

  9. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocher, Jr., John M.; Veigel, Neil D.; Landrigan, Richard B.

    1983-04-19

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  10. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  11. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vectormore » machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.« less

  12. Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moisture Control Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders Vapor Barriers or Vapor ... can be part of an overall moisture control strategy for your home. | Photo courtesy ...

  13. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY ...

  14. Reversible and irreversible ion migration processes in lead halide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perovskites for photovoltaics | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Reversible and irreversible ion migration processes in lead halide perovskites for photovoltaics March 9, 2016 at 4:30 PM/36-462 Eric Hoke Stanford University, Draper Laboratory hoke-eric Lead hybrid perovskites are a promising family of photovoltaic absorber materials that have achieved power conversion efficiencies of over 20%. Lead halide perovskites are ionic materials with a low lattice energy which are unusual properties

  15. Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, F.E.; Wasley, R.J.

    1982-06-22

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm[sup 2] or less of energy fluence.

  16. Metal-halide perovskites for photovoltaic and light-emitting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems. *This talk is the first of the Perovskites Seminar Series organized by Sam Stranks and sponsored by the Center for Excitonics. For more info contact Sam: stranks@mit.edu

  17. Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less of energy fluence.

  18. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WASHINGTON - As part of the Energy Department's efforts to develop efficiency standards that cut carbon pollution and save money by saving energy, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest ...

  19. Metal Halide Surface Treatment of Quantum Dots - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The method developed produces solar cells that perform well even at film thicknesses approaching a micron, indicating improved carrier transportation in the QD films. The best QD ...

  20. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  1. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  2. Water Vapor Experiment Concludes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Water Vapor Experiment Concludes The AIRS (atmospheric infrared sounder) Water Vapor Experiment - Ground (AWEX-G) intensive operations period (IOP) at the SGP central facility ...

  3. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  4. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  5. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  6. Lattice dynamics in perovskite halides CsSn X 3 with X = I ,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lattice dynamics in perovskite halides CsSn X 3 with X I , Br , Cl Prev Next Title: Lattice dynamics in perovskite halides CsSn X 3 with X I , Br , Cl Authors: Huang, ...

  7. Lattice dynamics in perovskite halides CsSn X 3 with X = I ,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lattice dynamics in perovskite halides CsSn X 3 with X I , Br , Cl Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lattice dynamics in perovskite halides CsSn X 3 with X I , Br , Cl ...

  8. Unexpected bismuth concentration profiles in metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy-grown Ga(As{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x})/GaAs superlattices revealed by Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A. W.; Babcock, S. E.; Guan, Y.; Forghani, K.; Anand, A.; Kuech, T. F.

    2015-03-01

    A set of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x}/GaAs multilayer quantum-well structures was deposited by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at 390 °C and 420 °C. The precursor fluxes were introduced with the intent of growing discrete and compositionally uniform GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} well and GaAs barrier layers in the epitaxial films. High-resolution high-angle annular-dark-field (or “Z-contrast”) scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed concentration profiles that were periodic in the growth direction, but far more complicated in shape than the intended square wave. The observed composition profiles could explain various reports of physical properties measurements that suggest compositional inhomogeneity in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} alloys as they currently are grown.

  9. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Mendoza, Daniel; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  10. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrah, Larry A.; Allred, Ronald E.; Wilson, Jr., Kennard V.

    1992-01-01

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  11. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrah, L.A.; Allred, R.E.; Wilson, K.V. Jr.

    1992-02-18

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  12. ARM Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Water Vapor IOP The SGP CART site will host the third ARM water vapor IOP on September 18-October 8, 2000. The CART site is home to a powerful array of instruments capable of ...

  13. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product Citation Details In-Document Search Title: G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) ...

  14. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS You are ...

  15. Method and apparatus for conducting variable thickness vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nesslage, G.V.

    1984-08-03

    A method of vapor depositing metal on a substrate in variable thickness comprises conducting the deposition continuously without interruption to avoid formation of grain boundaries. To achieve reduced deposition in specific regions a thin wire or ribbon blocking body is placed between source and substrate to partially block vapors from depositing in the region immediately below.

  16. Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherize » Moisture Control » Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders Vapor Barriers or Vapor Diffusion Retarders Vapor diffusion retarders installed in a crawlspace can be part of an overall moisture control strategy for your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. Vapor diffusion retarders installed in a crawlspace can be part of an overall moisture control strategy for your home. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. In most U.S. climates, vapor barriers, or -- more

  17. Vapor spill monitoring method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Gregory M.; McRae, Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

  18. ARM - Water Vapor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Vapor Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, ... FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Water ...

  19. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  20. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  1. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    water and ionic contributions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ...

  2. Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet details a SunShot-funded solar project led by the University of Arizona to using ab initio computational modeling along with rapid material screening methods to identify halide salt mixtures with a melting point below 250°C that are stable at temperatures well above 800°C. This research has the potential to help concentrating solar power systems achieve greater efficiencies and reduce overall costs.

  3. Vapor Pressures and Heats of Vaporization of Primary Coal Tars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Therefore, future research could be directed at measuring the vapor pressures for the ... The results from the current work show that measuring the vapor pressures of complicated ...

  4. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  5. Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Clouds" Project ID: 0011106 ... measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well ...

  6. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  7. Apparatus and method for removing mercury vapor from a gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Kumar

    2008-01-01

    A metallic filter effectively removes mercury vapor from gas streams. The filter captures the mercury which then can be released and collected as product. The metallic filter is a copper mesh sponge plated with a six micrometer thickness of gold. The filter removes up to 90% of mercury vapor from a mercury contaminated gas stream.

  8. Impact of the organic halide salt on final perovskite composition for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David T.; Sai, Hiroaki; Wee Tan, Kwan; Estroff, Lara A.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    The methylammonium lead halide perovskites have shown significant promise as a low-cost, second generation, photovoltaic material. Despite recent advances, however, there are still a number of fundamental aspects of their formation as well as their physical and electronic behavior that are not well understood. In this letter we explore the mechanism by which these materials crystallize by testing the outcome of each of the reagent halide salts. We find that components of both salts, lead halide and methylammonium halide, are relatively mobile and can be readily exchanged during the crystallization process when the reaction is carried out in solution or in the solid state. We exploit this fact by showing that the perovskite structure is formed even when the lead salt's anion is a non-halide, leading to lower annealing temperature and time requirements for film formation. Studies into these behaviors may ultimately lead to improved processing conditions for photovoltaic films.

  9. Fundamental studies and new applications of hybrid lead halide perovskites*

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Fundamental studies and new applications of hybrid lead halide perovskites* November 10, 2015 at 4:30pm/Duboc Room: 4-331 Riccardo Comin University of Toronto comin-1 In recent years light-harvesting devices based on a new class of organometallic lead iodide perovskites (CH3NH3PbI3) were demonstrated to exhibit power conversion efficiencies beyond 20%, rapidly approaching the performance of commercial silicon-based modules. Besides photovoltaics, important

  10. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1986-08-15

    The atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process for the enrichment of uranium is evaluated. (AIP)

  11. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  12. Oxide Film Aging on Alloy 22 in Halide Containing Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Martin A.; Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-07-01

    Passive and corrosion behaviors of Alloy 22 in chloride and fluoride containing solutions, changing the heat treatment of the alloy, the halide concentration and the pH of the solutions at 90 deg. C, was investigated. The study was implemented using electrochemical techniques, which included open circuit potential monitoring over time, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements carried out at open circuit and at passivity potentials. Corrosion rates obtained by EIS measurements after 24 h immersion in naturally aerated solutions were below 0.5 {mu}m/year. The corrosion rates were practically independent of solution pH, alloy heat treatment and halide ion nature and concentration. EIS low frequency resistance values increased with applied potential in the passive domain and with polarization time in pH 6 - 1 M NaCl at 90 deg. C. This effect was attributed to an increase in the oxide film thickness and oxide film aging. High frequency capacitance measurements indicated that passive oxide on Alloy 22 presented a double n-type/p-type semiconductor behavior in the passive potential range. (authors)

  13. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  14. Resistivity measurements of halide-salt/MgO separators for thermal cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redey, L.; McParland, M. ); Guidotti, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Resistivities of 20 compositions of halide-salt/MgO mixtures (various selections and percentages of LiF, LiCl, LiBr, KCl, KBr, CsBr, and MgO) to be used in Li-alloy/metal sulfide cells have been measured at temperatures between the melting point of a particular mixture and 500{degrees}C. The resistivities were determined with cold-pressed electrolyte-binder pellets by using a special cell and DC measuring technique. Temperature, salt composition, and MgO content were found to have a strong influence on resistivity. These factors are listed in decreasing order of the magnitude of the effect. The fabrication density (porosity) of the pellet also has some effect on resistivity. These measured resistivities provide a data base to select optimum compositions of electrolyte-binder pellets for LiSi/FeS{sub 2} thermal batteries and to calculate area-specific resistances of these components for battery modeling and optimization. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Vapor concentration monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  16. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  17. Heavy oil upgrading using halide catalysts in a bubbling microautoclave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakma, A.; Chornet, E.; Overend, R.P.; Dawson, W. )

    1988-01-01

    Athabasca bitumen has been treated with halide catalysts under a continuous flow of H{sub 2} in a 15 ml microautoclave. The H{sub 2} was bubbled through the liquid using a microporous steel grid. ZnCl{sub 2}, CuCl and ZnCl{sub 2}/CuCl mixtures, with and without tetralin, were used as catalysts. The experimental conditions were: 13.8 MPa operating pressure, 1 liter STP/min as H{sub 2} flow rate, 425-450 C and 30 min as reaction temperature and time, respectively. ZnCl{sub 2} has been found effective for converting asphaltenes into maltenes while lowering the coke formation with respect to the uncatalyzed reaction. The addition of tetralin to the reaction mixture minimized coke and gas formation.

  18. Heavy oil upgrading using halide catalysts in a bubbling microautoclave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakma, A.; Chornet, E.; Overend, R.P. ); Dawson, W. )

    1988-06-01

    Athabasca bitumen with halide catalysts has been treated under a continuous flow of H/sub 2/ in a 15 mL microautoclave. The H/sub 2/ was bubbled through the liquid using a microporous steel grid. ZnCl/sub 2/, CuCl and ZnCl/sub 2//CuCl mixtures, with and without tetralin, were used as catalysts. The experimental conditions were: 13.8 MPa operating pressure, 1 L/sub STP/min/ as H/sub 2/ flowrate, 425 - 450/sup 0/C and 30 min as reaction temperature and time respectively. ZnCl/sub 2/ has been found effective for converting asphaltenes into maltenes while lowering the coke formation with respect to the uncatalyzed reaction. The addition of tetralin to the reaction mixture minimized coke and gas formation.

  19. Category:Mercury Vapor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mercury Vapor Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Mercury Vapor page? For detailed information on Mercury Vapor as...

  20. Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

    2013-02-19

    A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

  1. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  2. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2016-05-03

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  3. Stratified vapor generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, Vahab

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  4. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell is made, having a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where the electrolyte is formed by hot chemical vapor deposition, where a solid, interlayer material, which is electrically conductive, oxygen permeable, and protective of electrode material from hot metal halide vapor attack, is placed between the first electrode and the electrolyte, to protect the first electrode from the hot metal halide vapors during vapor deposition.

  5. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell is made, having a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where the electrolyte is formed by hot chemical vapor deposition, where a solid, interlayer material, which is electrically conductive, oxygen permeable, and protective of electrode material from hot metal halide vapor attack, is placed between the first electrode and the electrolyte, to protect the first electrode from the hot metal halide vapors during vapor deposition.

  6. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1985-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell is made, having a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where the electrolyte is formed by hot chemical vapor deposition, where a solid, interlayer material, which is electrically conductive, oxygen permeable, and protective of electrode material from hot metal halide vapor attack, is placed between the first electrode and the electrolyte, to protect the first electrode from the hot metal halide vapors during vapor deposition.

  7. Filter vapor trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  8. UV-visible spectroscopy of macrocyclic alkyl, nitrosyl and halide complexes of cobalt and rhodium. Experiment and calculation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hull, Emily A.; West, Aaron C.; Pestovsky, Oleg; Kristian, Kathleen E.; Ellern, Arkady; Dunne, James F.; Carraher, Jack M.; Bakac, Andreja; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-01-22

    In this paper, transition metal complexes (NH3)5CoX2+ (X = CH3, Cl) and L(H2O)MX2+, where M = Rh or Co, X = CH3, NO, or Cl, and L is a macrocyclic N4 ligand are examined by both experiment and computation to better understand their electronic spectra and associated photochemistry. Specifically, irradiation into weak visible bands of nitrosyl and alkyl complexes (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L(H2O)MIIIX2+ (X = CH3 or NO) leads to photohomolysis that generates the divalent metal complex and ˙CH3 or ˙NO, respectively. On the other hand, when X = halide or NO2, visible light photolysis leads to dissociation of X– and/ormore » cis/trans isomerization. Computations show that visible bands for alkyl and nitrosyl complexes involve transitions from M–X bonding orbitals and/or metal d orbitals to M–X antibonding orbitals. In contrast, complexes with X = Cl or NO2 exhibit only d–d bands in the visible, so that homolytic cleavage of the M–X bond requires UV photolysis. UV-Vis spectra are not significantly dependent on the structure of the equatorial ligands, as shown by similar spectral features for (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L1(H2O)CoCH32+.« less

  9. The vapor pressures of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 C.

  10. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, E. W., E-mail: magee1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universitt Erlangen-Nrnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ?10{sup ?7} Torr at ?1000?C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  11. FUSED SALT METHOD FOR COATING URANIUM WITH A METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubank, L.D.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for coating uranium with a less active metal such as Cr, Ni, or Cu comprising immersing the U in a substantially anhydrous molten solution of a halide of these less active metals in a ternary chloride composition which consists of selected percentages of KCl, NaCl and another chloride such as LiCl or CaCl/sub 2/.

  12. AlGaAsSb/GaSb Distributed Bragg Reflectors Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; C.J. Vineis; D.R. Calawa

    2002-02-13

    The first AlGaAsSb/GaSb quarter-wave distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metallic vapor phase epitaxy are reported. The peak reflectance is 96% for a 10-period structure.

  13. Vaporization of zinc from scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The rate of zinc vaporization from galvanized scrap was measured using a thermogravimetric apparatus along with chemical analysis. It is found that the rate of zinc vaporization is very fast in nitrogen and carbon monoxide atmospheres at temperatures higher than 950 C. At lower temperature rate decreases with decreasing temperature and is controlled by the gas phase mass transport. The simultaneous oxidation and vaporization of zinc occurs when the samples were heated in carbon dioxide and air. The current experimental results indicate that almost all of the zinc from scrap vaporizes during the heating process in a very short period of time after the temperature reaches above 850 C.

  14. Understanding Metal Directed-Assembly Growth of Single-Crystal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The deterministic growth of oriented crystalline organic nanowires (CONs) from the vapor-solid chemical reaction (VSCR) between small-molecule reactants and metal nanoparticles has ...

  15. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  16. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-04

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  17. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique.

  18. Shape Evolution and Single Particle Luminescence of Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Feng; Men, Long; Guo, Yijun; Zhu, Qiaochu; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Goodwin, Peter M.; Petrich, Jacob W.; Smith, Emily A.; Vela, Javier

    2015-02-09

    Organometallic halide perovskites CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) have quickly become one of the most promising semiconductors for solar cells, with photovoltaics made of these materials reaching power conversion efficiencies of near 20%. Improving our ability to harness the full potential of organometal halide perovskites will require more controllable syntheses that permit a detailed understanding of their fundamental chemistry and photophysics. In our manuscript, we systematically synthesize CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br) nanocrystals with different morphologies (dots, rods, plates or sheets) by using different solvents and capping ligands. CH3NH3PbX3 nanowires and nanorods capped with octylammonium halides show relatively higher photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields and long PL lifetimes. CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires monitored at the single particle level show shape-correlated PL emission across whole particles, with little photobleaching observed and very few off periods. Our work highlights the potential of low-dimensional organometal halide perovskite semiconductors in constructing new porous and nanostructured solar cell architectures, as well as in applying these materials to other fields such as light-emitting devices and single particle imaging and tracking.

  19. Shape Evolution and Single Particle Luminescence of Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Feng; Men, Long; Guo, Yijun; Zhu, Qiaochu; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Goodwin, Peter M.; Petrich, Jacob W.; Smith, Emily A.; Vela, Javier

    2015-02-09

    Organometallic halide perovskites CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) have quickly become one of the most promising semiconductors for solar cells, with photovoltaics made of these materials reaching power conversion efficiencies of near 20%. Improving our ability to harness the full potential of organometal halide perovskites will require more controllable syntheses that permit a detailed understanding of their fundamental chemistry and photophysics. In our manuscript, we systematically synthesize CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br) nanocrystals with different morphologies (dots, rods, plates or sheets) by using different solvents and capping ligands. CH3NH3PbX3 nanowires and nanorods capped with octylammonium halides show relatively highermore » photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields and long PL lifetimes. CH3NH3PbI3 nanowires monitored at the single particle level show shape-correlated PL emission across whole particles, with little photobleaching observed and very few off periods. Our work highlights the potential of low-dimensional organometal halide perovskite semiconductors in constructing new porous and nanostructured solar cell architectures, as well as in applying these materials to other fields such as light-emitting devices and single particle imaging and tracking.« less

  20. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton; Wai, Chien M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  1. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  2. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Alison J.

    2015-08-25

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently come to prominence as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon based solar cells. In an effort to create consistent and high-quality films, we studied the effect of various annealing conditions as well as the effect of pyridine vapor treatment on mixed halide methylammonium lead perovskite films. Of six conditions tested, we found that annealing at 100 degree Celsius for 90 minutes followed by 120 degree Celsius for 15 minutes resulted in the purest perovskite. Perovskite films made using that condition were treated with pyridine for various amounts of time, and the effects on perovskite microstructure were studied using x-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime analysis (TRPL). A previous study found that pyridine vapor caused perovskite films to have higher photoluminescence intensity and become more homogenous. In this study we found that the effects of pyridine are more complex: while films appeared to become more homogenous, a decrease in bulkphotoluminescence lifetime was observed. In addition, the perovskite bandgap appeared to decrease with increased pyridine treatment time. Finally, X-ray diffraction showed that pyridine vapor treatment increased the perovskite (110) peak intensity but also often gave rise to new unidentified peaks, suggesting the formation of a foreign species. It was observed that the intensity of this unknown species had an inverse correlation with the increase in perovskite peak intensity, and also seemed to be correlated with the decrease in TRPL lifetime.

  3. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Alison

    2015-08-20

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently come to prominence as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon based solar cells. In an effort to create consistent and high-quality films, we studied the effect of various annealing conditions as well as the effect of pyridine vapor treatment on mixed halide methylammonium lead perovskite films. Of six conditions tested, we found that annealing at 100°C for 90 minutes followed by 120°C for 15 minutes resulted in the purest perovskite. Perovskite films made using that condition were treated with pyridine for various amounts of time, and the effects on perovskite microstructure were studied using x-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime analysis (TRPL). A previous study found that pyridine vapor caused perovskite films to have higher photoluminescence intensity and become more homogenous. In this study we found that the effects of pyridine are more complex: while films appeared to become more homogenous, a decrease in bulk photoluminescence lifetime was observed. In addition, the perovskite bandgap appeared to decrease with increased pyridine treatment time. Finally, X-ray diffraction showed that pyridine vapor treatment increased the perovskite (110) peak intensity but also often gave rise to new unidentified peaks, suggesting the formation of a foreign species. It was observed that the intensity of this unknown species had an inverse correlation with the increase in perovskite peak intensity, and also seemed to be correlated with the decrease in TRPL lifetime.

  4. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF HALIDE MODIFIERS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF THE LI-MG-N-H SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, D.; Gray, J.; Price, C.; Lascola, R.

    2011-07-20

    The effects of different transition metal halides (TiCl{sub 3}, VCl{sub 3}, ScCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2}) on the sorption properties of the 1:1 molar ratio of LiNH{sub 2} to MgH{sub 2} are investigated. The modified mixtures were found to contain LiNH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2} and LiCl. TGA results showed that the hydrogen desorption temperature was reduced with the modifier addition in this order: TiCl{sub 3} > ScCl{sub 3} > VCl{sub 3} > NiCL{sub 2}. Ammonia release was not significantly reduced resulting in a weight loss greater than the theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The isothermal sorption kinetics of the modified systems showed little improvement after the first dehydrogenation cycle over the unmodified system but showed drastic improvement in rehydrogenation cycles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy identified the cycled material to be composed of LiH, MgH{sub 2}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

  6. Underwater vapor phase burning of aluminum particles and on aluminum ignition during steam explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, M. )

    1991-09-01

    Recently reported experimental studies on aluminum-water steam explosions indicate that there may be a critical metal temperature at which the process changes over from a physical explosion to one which is very violent and involves the rapid liberation of chemical energy. In this report we examine the hypothesis that vapor-phase burning of aluminum is a necessary condition for the occurrence of such ignition-type'' steam explosions. An available two-phase stagnation flow film-boiling model is used to calculate the steam flux to the vaporizing aluminum surface. Combining this calculation with the notion that there is an upper limit to the magnitude of the metal vaporization rate at which the reaction regime must change from vapor phase to surface burning, leads to prediction of the critical metal surface temperature below which vapor phase burning is impossible. The critical temperature is predicted for both the aluminum-water pre-mixture configuration in which coarse drops of aluminum are falling freely through water and for the finely-fragmented aluminum drops in the wake of the pressure shock that triggers'' the explosion. Vapor phase burning is predicted to be possible during the pre-mixture phase but not very likely during the trigger phase of a steam explosion. The implications of these findings in terms of the validity of the hypothesis that ignition may begin with the vapor phase burning of aluminum is discussed. Recently postulated, alternative mechanisms of underwater aluminum ignition are also discussed.

  7. Underwater vapor phase burning of aluminum particles and on aluminum ignition during steam explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, M.

    1991-09-01

    Recently reported experimental studies on aluminum-water steam explosions indicate that there may be a critical metal temperature at which the process changes over from a physical explosion to one which is very violent and involves the rapid liberation of chemical energy. In this report we examine the hypothesis that vapor-phase burning of aluminum is a necessary condition for the occurrence of such ``ignition-type`` steam explosions. An available two-phase stagnation flow film-boiling model is used to calculate the steam flux to the vaporizing aluminum surface. Combining this calculation with the notion that there is an upper limit to the magnitude of the metal vaporization rate at which the reaction regime must change from vapor phase to surface burning, leads to prediction of the critical metal surface temperature below which vapor phase burning is impossible. The critical temperature is predicted for both the aluminum-water pre-mixture configuration in which coarse drops of aluminum are falling freely through water and for the finely-fragmented aluminum drops in the wake of the pressure shock that ``triggers`` the explosion. Vapor phase burning is predicted to be possible during the pre-mixture phase but not very likely during the trigger phase of a steam explosion. The implications of these findings in terms of the validity of the hypothesis that ignition may begin with the vapor phase burning of aluminum is discussed. Recently postulated, alternative mechanisms of underwater aluminum ignition are also discussed.

  8. Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, Lane A.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

  9. Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, L.A.

    1996-08-13

    Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

  10. Method of Obtaining Uniform Coatings on Graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, I. E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  11. METHOD OF OBTAINING UNIFORM COATINGS ON GRAPHITE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, I.E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  12. Laser absorption spectroscopy system for vaporization process characterization and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galkowski, J.; Hagans, K.

    1993-09-07

    In support of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program, a laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed. This multi-laser system is capable of simultaneously measuring the line densities of {sup 238}U ground and metastable states, {sup 235}U ground and metastable states, iron, and ions at up to nine locations within the separator vessel. Supporting enrichment experiments that last over one hundred hours, this laser spectroscopy system is employed to diagnose and optimize separator system performance, control the electron beam vaporizer and metal feed systems, and provide physics data for the validation of computer models. As a tool for spectroscopic research, vapor plume characterization, vapor deposition monitoring, and vaporizer development, LLNL`s LAS laboratory with its six argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers and recently added Ti:Sapphire and external-cavity diode-lasers has capabilities far beyond the requirements of its primary mission.

  13. PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

    1959-01-13

    A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

  14. Fixation of nitrogen in the presence of water vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harteck, Paul

    1984-01-01

    A process for the fixation of nitrogen is disclosed which comprises combining a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, metal oxide and water vapor, initially heating the combination to initiate a reaction which forms nitrate, but at a temperature and pressure range below the dissociation pressure of the nitrate. With or without the water component, the yield of fixed nitrogen is increased by the use of a Linde Molecular Sieve Catalyst.

  15. Brazing titanium-vapor-coated zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M.L. ); Pak, J.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Partially stabilized zirconia was vacuum furnace brazed to itself, to nodular cast iron, and to commercially pure titanium with a Ag-30Cu-10Sn wt% filler metal. Wetting was obtained by coating the ZrO[sub 2] surfaces with Ti prior to brazing by RF sputtering or electron beam evaporation. Braze joints made with Ti-sputter-coated ZrO[sub 2] contained high levels of porosity, but those made with Ti coatings deposited by evaporation, referred to as Ti-vapor-coated, contained little or no porosity. Brazing caused the ZrO[sub 2] within about 1 mm (0.04 in.) of the joint surfaces to turn black in color, and thermodynamic analysis indicated that the discoloration was likely due to oxygen diffusion out of the ZrO[sub 2] into the Ti vapor coating during brazing. Braze joint strength was determined by flexure testing in the four-point bend arrangement, and on a more limited basis, by shear testing. The latter method was used mainly as a screening test for ZrO[sub 2]-Fe and ZrO[sub 2]-Ti joints. Flexure testing of ZrO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2] and ZrO[sub 2]-Fe braze joints was done at 25, 200, 400, and 575 C (77, 392, 752 and 1,067 F) in air. For flexure testing, average strengths of joint specimens decreased with increasing test temperature. The lower average strengths of ZrO[sub 2]-Fe specimens compared to those from ZrO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2] joints was attributed to higher residual stresses in the ceramic-to-metal joints.

  16. Vapor-deposited porous films for energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Hayes, Jeffrey P.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2005-07-05

    Metallic films are grown with a "spongelike" morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous and open porosity on the submicron scale. The stabilization of the spongelike morphology is found over a limited range of the sputter deposition parameters, that is, of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This spongelike morphology is an extension of the features as generally represented in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings were deposited with working gas pressures up 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1000 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross section views with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) under which the spongelike metal deposits are produced appear universal for other metals including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  17. Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowiresvia Chemical Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2006-03-13

    We utilized a vapor-liquid-solid growth technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tin oxide nanowires using chemical vapor transport with gold nanoparticles as the catalyst. Using identical growth parameters we were able to synthesize single crystal nanowires typically 40-100 nm diameter and more than 10-100 microns long. The products were characterized by means of XRD, SEM and HRTEM. All the wires were grown under the same growth conditions with growth rates inversely proportional to the source metal vapor pressure. Initial experiments show that different transparent oxide nanowires can be grown simultaneously on a single substrate with potential application for multi-component gas sensors.

  18. Investigation into Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr{sub 3} for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guss, P., Guise, R., Mukhopadhyay, S., Yuan, D.

    2011-06-22

    This slide-show presents work on radiation detection with nanostructured lanthanum halides and CeBr{sub 3}. The goal is to extend the gamma energy response on both low and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy x-rays and relatively high-energy activation prompt gamma rays simultaneously using the nano-structured lanthanum bromide, lanthanum fluoride, cerium bromide, or other nanocrystal material. Homogeneous and nano structure cases are compared.

  19. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2008-06-03

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  20. THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magel, T.T.; Brewer, L.

    1959-02-10

    A method is presented of preparing uranium metal of high purity consisting contacting impure U metal with halogen vapor at between 450 and 550 C to form uranium halide vapor, contacting the uranium halide vapor in the presence of H/sub 2/ with a refractory surface at about 1400 C to thermally decompose the uranium halides and deposit molten U on the refractory surface and collecting the molten U dripping from the surface. The entire operation is carried on at a sub-atmospheric pressure of below 1 mm mercury.

  1. Preferential Eu Site Occupation and Its Consequences in the Ternary Luminescent HalidesAB2I5:Eu2+(A=Li–Cs;B=Sr, Ba)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, C.  M.; Biswas, Koushik

    2015-07-22

    Several rare-earth-doped, heavy-metal halides have recently been identified as potential next-generation luminescent materials with high efficiency at low cost. AB2I5:Eu2+ (A=Li–Cs; B=Sr, Ba) is one such family of halides. Its members, such as CsBa2I5:Eu2+ and KSr2I5:Eu2+, are currently being investigated as high-performance scintillators with improved sensitivity, light yield, and energy resolution less than 3% at 662 keV. Within the AB2I5 family, our first-principles-based calculations reveal two remarkably different trends in Eu site occupation. The substitutional Eu ions occupy both eightfold-coordinated B1(VIII) and the sevenfold-coordinated B2(VII) sites in the Sr-containing compounds. However, in the Ba-containing crystals, Eu ions strongly prefer themore »B2(VII)sites. This random versus preferential distribution of Eu affects their electronic properties. The calculations also suggest that in the Ba-containing compounds one can expect the formation of Eu-rich domains. These results provide atomistic insight into recent experimental observations about the concentration and temperature effects in Eu-doped CsBa2I5. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to luminescent properties and applications. We also hypothesize Sr, Ba-mixed quaternary iodides ABaVIIISrVIII5:Eu as scintillators having enhanced homogeneity and electronic properties.« less

  2. Preferential Eu Site Occupation and Its Consequences in the Ternary Luminescent HalidesAB2I5:Eu2+(A=Li–Cs;B=Sr, Ba)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, C.  M.; Biswas, Koushik

    2015-07-22

    Several rare-earth-doped, heavy-metal halides have recently been identified as potential next-generation luminescent materials with high efficiency at low cost. AB2I5:Eu2+ (A=Li–Cs; B=Sr, Ba) is one such family of halides. Its members, such as CsBa2I5:Eu2+ and KSr2I5:Eu2+, are currently being investigated as high-performance scintillators with improved sensitivity, light yield, and energy resolution less than 3% at 662 keV. Within the AB2I5 family, our first-principles-based calculations reveal two remarkably different trends in Eu site occupation. The substitutional Eu ions occupy both eightfold-coordinated B1(VIII) and the sevenfold-coordinated B2(VII) sites in the Sr-containing compounds. However, in the Ba-containing crystals, Eu ions strongly prefer themore » B2(VII)sites. This random versus preferential distribution of Eu affects their electronic properties. The calculations also suggest that in the Ba-containing compounds one can expect the formation of Eu-rich domains. These results provide atomistic insight into recent experimental observations about the concentration and temperature effects in Eu-doped CsBa2I5. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to luminescent properties and applications. We also hypothesize Sr, Ba-mixed quaternary iodides ABaVIIISrVIII5:Eu as scintillators having enhanced homogeneity and electronic properties.« less

  3. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  4. Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  5. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles The water vapor ...

  6. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the

  7. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP ... Responses to Site Operations Questionnaires for Water Vapor IOP Instrument Name Instrument ...

  9. Vapor Retarder Classification - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Vapor Retarder Classification - Building America Top Innovation Vapor Retarder Classification - Building America Top Innovation Photo of a vapor retarder classification. Air-tight and well-insulated homes have little or no tolerance for drying if they get wet; moisture control is critical. This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research that established vapor retarder classifications and appropriate applications that has been instrumental in the market

  10. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Eddie C.

    1995-01-01

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500.degree. C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  11. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brian, Riley; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1989-01-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  12. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  14. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid--starting as "feedwater" heating where no vapors are present, progressing to "nucleate" heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with "film" heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10-30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  15. Means and method for vapor generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, L.W.

    A liquid, in heat transfer contact with a surface heated to a temperature well above the vaporization temperature of the liquid, will undergo a multiphase (liquid-vapor) transformation from 0% vapor to 100% vapor. During this transition, the temperature driving force or heat flux and the coefficients of heat transfer across the fluid-solid interface, and the vapor percentage influence the type of heating of the fluid - starting as feedwater heating where no vapors are present, progressing to nucleate heating where vaporization begins and some vapors are present, and concluding with film heating where only vapors are present. Unstable heating between nucleate and film heating can occur, accompanied by possibly large and rapid temperature shifts in the structures. This invention provides for injecting into the region of potential unstable heating and proximate the heated surface superheated vapors in sufficient quantities operable to rapidly increase the vapor percentage of the multiphase mixture by perhaps 10 to 30% and thereby effectively shift the multiphase mixture beyond the unstable heating region and up to the stable film heating region.

  16. Nuclear heated and powered metal excimer laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womack, D. R.

    1985-03-19

    A laser using heat and thermionic electrical output from a nuclear reactor in which heat generated by the reactor is utilized to vaporize metal lasants. Voltage output from a thermionic converter is used to create an electric discharge in the metal vapors. In one embodiment the laser vapors are excited by a discharge only. The second embodiment utilizes fission coatings on the inside of heat pipes, in which fission fragment excitation and ionization is employed in addition to a discharge. Both embodiments provide efficient laser systems that are capable of many years of operation without servicing. Metal excimers are the most efficient electronic transition lasers known with output in the visible wavelengths. Use of metal excimers, in addition to their efficiency and wavelengths, allows utilization of reactor waste heat which plagues many nuclear pumped laser concepts.

  17. Nuclear heated and powered metal excimer laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womack, D.R.

    1982-02-11

    A laser uses heat and thermionic electrical output from a nuclear reactor in which heat generated by the reactor is utilized to vaporize metal lasants. Voltage output from a thermionic converter is used to create an electric discharge in the metal vapors. In one embodiment the laser vapors are excited by a discharge only. The second embodiment utilizes fission coatings on the inside of heat pipes, in which fission fragment excitation and ionization is employed in addition to a discharge. Both embodiments provide efficient laser systems that are capable of many years of operation without servicing. Metal excimers are the most efficient electronic transition lasers known with output in the visible wavelengths. Use of metal excimers, in addition to their efficiency and wavelengths, allows utilization of reactor waste heat which plagues many nuclear pumped laser concepts.

  18. Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R.; Coleman, Sabre J.; Reynolds, John G.

    2006-12-12

    Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

  19. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  20. Self-regulation mechanism for charged point defects in hybrid halide perovskites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walsh, Aron; Scanlon, David O.; Chen, Shiyou; Gong, X. G.; Wei, Su -Huai

    2014-12-11

    Hybrid halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) exhibit unusually low free-carrier concentrations despite being processed at low-temperatures from solution. We demonstrate, through quantum mechanical calculations, that an origin of this phenomenon is a prevalence of ionic over electronic disorder in stoichiometric materials. Schottky defect formation provides a mechanism to self-regulate the concentration of charge carriers through ionic compensation of charged point defects. The equilibrium charged vacancy concentration is predicted to exceed 0.4 % at room temperature. Furthermore, this behavior, which goes against established defect conventions for inorganic semiconductors, has implications for photovoltaic performance.

  1. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  2. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  3. Process for recovering organic vapors from air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for recovering and concentrating organic vapor from a feed stream of air having an organic vapor content of no more than 20,000 ppm by volume. A thin semipermeable membrane is provided which has a feed side and a permeate side, a selectivity for organic vapor over air of at least 50, as measured by the ratio of organic vapor permeability to nitrogen permeability, and a permeability of organic vapor of at least 3.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.3 (STP) cm/cm.sup.2 sec.cm Hg. The feed stream is passed across the feed side of the thin semipermeable membrane while providing a pressure on the permeate side which is lower than the feed side by creating a partial vacuum on the permeate side so that organic vapor passes preferentially through the membrane to form an organic vapor depleted air stream on the feed side and an organic vapor enriched stream on the permeate side. The organic vapor which has passed through the membrane is compressed and condensed to recover the vapor as a liquid.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  5. Control of flow through a vapor generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2005-11-08

    In a Rankine cycle system wherein a vapor generator receives heat from exhaust gases, provision is made to avoid overheating of the refrigerant during ORC system shut down while at the same time preventing condensation of those gases within the vapor generator when its temperature drops below a threshold temperature by diverting the flow of hot gases to ambient and to thereby draw ambient air through the vapor generator in the process. In one embodiment, a bistable ejector is adjustable between one position, in which the hot gases flow through the vapor generator, to another position wherein the gases are diverted away from the vapor generator. Another embodiment provides for a fixed valve ejector with a bias towards discharging to ambient, but with a fan on the downstream side of said vapor generator for overcoming this bias.

  6. Calcium manganate: A promising candidate as buffer layer for hybrid halide perovskite photovoltaic-thermoelectric systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Pengjun; Wang, Hongguang; Kong, Wenwen; Xu, Jinbao Wang, Lei; Ren, Wei; Bian, Liang; Chang, Aimin

    2014-11-21

    We have systematically studied the feasibility of CaMnO{sub 3} thin film, an n-type perovskite, to be utilized as the buffer layer for hybrid halide perovskite photovoltaic-thermoelectric device. Locations of the conduction band and the valence band, spontaneous polarization performance, and optical properties were investigated. Results indicate the energy band of CaMnO{sub 3} can match up well with that of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} on separating electron-hole pairs. In addition, the consistent polarization angle helps enlarge the open circuit voltage of the composite system. Besides, CaMnO{sub 3} film shows large absorption coefficient and low extinction coefficient under visible irradiation, demonstrating high carrier concentration, which is beneficial to the current density. More importantly, benign thermoelectric properties enable CaMnO{sub 3} film to assimilate phonon vibration from CH{sub 3}NH3PbI{sub 3}. All the above features lead to a bright future of CaMnO{sub 3} film, which can be a promising candidate as a buffer layer for hybrid halide perovskite photovoltaic-thermoelectric systems.

  7. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic–inorganic perovskite films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    deQuilettes, Dane W.; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M.; Graham, Daniel J.; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulovic, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J.; Ginger, David S.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2016-05-24

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced 'brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging themore » same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. In conclusion, our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance.« less

  8. Non-Vapor Compression HVAC Technologies Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    While vapor-compression technologies have served heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) needs very effectively, and have been the dominant HVAC technology for close to 100 years, the conventional refrigerants used in vapor-compression equipment contribute to global climate change when released to the atmosphere. The Building Technologies Office is evaluating low-global warming potential (GWP) alternatives to vapor-compression technologies.

  9. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  10. Transparent Metal-Organic Framework/Polymer Mixed Matrix Membranes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Metal-Organic FrameworkPolymer Mixed Matrix Membranes as Water Vapor Barriers Previous Next List Bae, Youn Jue; Cho, Eun Seon; Qu, Fen; Sun, Daniel T.; Williams, ...

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWater Vapor IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Water Vapor IOP 2000.09.18 - 2000.10.08 Lead Scientist : Henry Revercomb For data sets, see below. Abstract Scientific hypothesis: 1. Microwave radiometer (MWR) observations of the 22 GHz water vapor line can accurately constrain the total column amount of water vapor (assuming a calibration accuracy of 0.5 degC or better, which

  12. Ambient-temperature superconductor symetrical metal-dihalide bis-(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jack M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K. which is high for organic superconductors.

  13. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

    2012-12-05

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

  14. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  15. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  16. MEMS Lubrication by In-Situ Tribochemical Reactions From the Vapor Phase.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael T.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2008-01-01

    Vapor Phase Lubrication (VPL) of silicon surfaces with pentanol has been demonstrated. Two potential show stoppers with respect to application of this approach to real MEMS devices have been investigated. Water vapor was found to reduce the effectiveness of VPL with alcohol for a given alcohol concentration, but the basic reaction mechanism observed in water-free environments is still active, and devices operated much longer in mixed alcohol and water vapor environments than with chemisorbed monolayer lubricants alone. Complex MEMS gear trains were successfully lubricated with alcohol vapors, resulting in a factor of 104 improvement in operating life without failure. Complex devices could be made to fail if operated at much higher frequencies than previously used, and there is some evidence that the observed failure is due to accumulation of reaction products at deeply buried interfaces. However, if hypothetical reaction mechanisms involving heated surfaces are valid, then the failures observed at high frequency may not be relevant to operation at normal frequencies. Therefore, this work demonstrates that VPL is a viable approach for complex MEMS devices in conventional packages. Further study of the VPL reaction mechanisms are recommended so that the vapor composition may be optimized for low friction and for different substrate materials with potential application to conventionally fabricated, metal alloy parts in weapons systems. Reaction kinetics should be studied to define effective lubrication regimes as a function of the partial pressure of the vapor phase constituent, interfacial shear rate, substrate composition, and temperature.

  17. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  18. Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimotake, Hiroshi; Bartholme, Louis G.

    1984-01-01

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  19. Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

    1982-09-27

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  20. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time.

  1. Stacked vapor fed amtec modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sievers, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a stacked AMTEC module. The invention includes a tubular member which has an interior. The member is comprised of a ion conductor that substantially conducts ions relative to electrons, preferably a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, positioned about the interior. A porous electrode for conducting electrons and allowing sodium ions to pass therethrough, and wherein electrons and sodium ions recombine to form sodium is positioned about the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte. The electrode is operated at a temperature and a pressure that allows the recombined sodium to vaporize. Additionally, an outer current collector grid for distributing electrons throughout the porous electrode is positioned about and contacts the porous electrode. Also included in the invention is transporting means for transporting liquid sodium to the beta"-alumina solid electrolyte of the tubular member. A transition piece is positioned about the interior of the member and contacts the transporting means. The transition piece divides the member into a first cell and a second cell such that each first and second cell has a beta"-alumina solid electrolyte, a first and second porous electrode and a grid. The transition piece conducts electrons from the interior of the tubular member. There is supply means for supplying sodium to the transporting means. Preferably the supply means is a shell which surrounds the tubular member and is operated at a temperature such that the vaporized sodium condenses thereon. Returning means for returning the condensed sodium from the shell to the transporting means provides a continuous supply of liquid sodium to the transporting means. Also, there are first conducting means for conducting electric current from the transition piece which extends through the shell, and second conducting means for conducting electric current to the grid of the first cell which extends through the shell.

  2. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

  3. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  4. High bandwidth vapor density diagnostic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Globig, Michael A.; Story, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    A high bandwidth vapor density diagnostic system for measuring the density of an atomic vapor during one or more photoionization events. The system translates the measurements from a low frequency region to a high frequency, relatively noise-free region in the spectrum to provide improved signal to noise ratio.

  5. Quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundel, Lara; Daisey, Joan M.; Stevens, Robert K.

    1998-01-01

    A quantitative organic vapor-particle sampler for sampling semi-volatile organic gases and particulate components. A semi-volatile organic reversible gas sorbent macroreticular resin agglomerates of randomly packed microspheres with the continuous porous structure of particles ranging in size between 0.05-10 .mu.m for use in an integrated diffusion vapor-particle sampler.

  6. An application of oil vaporization evaluation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleckenstein, W.W. ); Bouck, L.S.; Hudgens, D. ); Querin, M. ); Williams, L. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and quantifies the benefits of residual oil vaporization in an enhanced recovery gas injection project. Vaporized oil is recovered as natural gas liquid (NGL) when the injected gas is produced. In the reservoir application studied, 20% of the liquid hydrocarbons produced were being recovered as NGL. (VC)

  7. An application of oil vaporization evaluation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleckenstein, W.W.; Bouck, L.S.; Hudgens, D.; Querin, M.; Williams, L.

    1992-02-01

    This paper describes and quantifies the benefits of residual oil vaporization in an enhanced recovery gas injection project. Vaporized oil is recovered as natural gas liquid (NGL) when the injected gas is produced. In the reservoir application studied, 20% of the liquid hydrocarbons produced were being recovered as NGL. (VC)

  8. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  9. APPARATUS FOR VACUUM DEPOSITION OF METALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milleron, N.

    1962-03-13

    An apparatus and a method are described for continuous vacuum deposition of metals for metallic coatings, for ultra-high vacuum work, for purification of metals, for maintaining high-density electron currents, and for other uses. The apparatus comprises an externally cooled feeder tube extending into a container and adapted to feed metal wire or strip so that it emerges in a generally vertical position therein. The tube also provides shielding from the heat produced by an electron beam therein focused to impinge from a vertical direction upon the tip of the emerging wire. By proper control of the wire feed, coolant feed, and electron beam intensity, a molten ball of metal forms upon the emerging tip and remains self-supported thereon by the interaction of various forces. The metal is vaporized and travels in a line of sight direction, while additional wire is fed from the tube, so that the size of the molten ball remains constant. In the preferred embodiments, the wire is selected from a number of gettering metals and is degassed by electrical resistance in an adjacent chamber which is also partially evacuated. The wire is then fed through the feed tube into the electron beam and vaporizes and adsorbs gases to provide pumping action while being continuously deposited upon surfaces within the chamber. Ion pump electrodes may also be provided within line of sight of the vaporizing metal source to enhance the pumping action. (AEC)

  10. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; Leonard, D. N.; Elsentriecy, H. H.; Unocic, K. A.; Anovitz, L. M.; Cakmak, E.; Keiser, J. R.; Song, G. L.; et al

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.