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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

What's Next for Vanadium Dioxide?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide Calculations Confirm Material's Potential for Next-Generation Electronics, Energy...

2

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

3

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

4

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

5

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

6

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

7

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

8

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

9

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

10

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

11

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

12

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

13

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

14

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

15

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

16

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

17

Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries. Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries....

18

Upgrading the Vanadium Redox Battery | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Upgrading the Vanadium Redox Battery Upgrading the Vanadium Redox Battery New electrolyte mix increases energy storage by 70 percent After developing a more effective...

19

Synthesis of Nanodispersed Oxides of Vanadium, Titanium, Molybdenum...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanadium, Titanium, Molybdenum, and Tungsten on Mesoporous Silica using Atomic Layer Synthesis of Nanodispersed Oxides of Vanadium, Titanium, Molybdenum, and Tungsten on...

20

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Magnetism in small vanadium clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the self-consistent-field molecular-orbital theory and the density-functional approximation, we show that vanadium could become magnetic if its size and dimension were constrained. This is illustrated for vanadium forming clusters with body-centered-cubic (bcc) geometry as well as for linear chains. The magnetic moment of the bcc clusters is found to vanish abruptly as the size increases, while the clusters always retain their moment in the linear-chain configurations. The moments are also found to be finite for large interatomic spacings irrespective of the cluster topology, and tend to vanish when the interatomic distances are reduced. The results are explained by using a simple Stoner criterion.

Feng Liu; S. N. Khanna; P. Jena

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels March 26, 2012 Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose biomass into high-value commodity chemicals. The journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition published

23

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

24

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

25

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

26

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2005, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for 86% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

27

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is an attractive alternative as a feedstock for the production of renewable chemicals and fuels. Get Expertise Researcher Susan Hanson Inorganic Isotope & Actinide Chem Email Researcher Ruilian Wu Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Researcher Louis "Pete" Silks Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Vanadium is an inexpensive, earth-abundant metal that is well suited for promoting oxidations in air. Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is

28

Methods for making lithium vanadium oxide electrode materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making vanadium oxide formulations is presented. In one method of preparing lithium vanadium oxide for use as an electrode material, the method involves: admixing a particulate form of a lithium compound and a particulate form of a vanadium compound; jet milling the particulate admixture of the lithium and vanadium compounds; and heating the jet milled particulate admixture at a temperature below the melting temperature of the admixture to form lithium vanadium oxide.

Schutts, Scott M. (Menomonie, WI); Kinney, Robert J. (Woodbury, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method for preparing high purity vanadium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing high purity vanadium having a low silicon content has been developed. Vanadium pentoxide is reduced with a stoichiometric, or slightly deficient amount of aluminum to produce a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing an excess of oxygen. Silicon is removed by electron-beam melting the alloy under oxidizing conditions to promote the formation of SiO which is volatile at elevated temperatures. Excess oxygen is removed by heating the alloy in the presence of calcium metal to form calcium oxide.

Schmidt, Frederick (Ames, IA); Carlson, O. Norman (Ames, IA)

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

30

Vanadium Respiration by Geobacter metallireducens: Novel Strategy for In Situ Removal of Vanadium from Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and can be found in uranium-bearing minerals...reductive precipitation of uranium from contaminated groundwater...a former vanadium and uranium ore processing facility...liter (6 muM) human health risk-based concentration...vanadium(V) became depleted, with a generation time...

Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Robert T. Anderson; Helen A. Vrionis; Derek R. Lovley

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Production of zinc pellets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Production of zinc pellets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Influences of Permeation of Vanadium Ions through PVDF-g-PSSA Membranes on Performances of Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) proposed by Skyllas-Kazacos and co-workers1-3 in 1985 has received considerable attention due to its long cycle life, flexible design, fast response time, deep-discharge capability, and low cost in energy storage. ... Figure 1 Schematic illustration of a vanadium redox flow battery. ... Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Performance. ...

Xuanli Luo; Zhengzhong Lu; Jingyu Xi; Zenghua Wu; Wentao Zhu; Liquan Chen; Xinping Qiu

2005-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

34

Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

Gordon, Roy G. (Cambridge, MA)

1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

35

Improved zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention comprises an improved rechargeable zinc-air cell/battery having recirculating alkaline electrolyte and a zinc electrode comprising a porous foam support material which carries the active zinc electrode material. 5 figs.

Ross, P.N. Jr.

1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

36

Irradiation creep of vanadium-base alloys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of irradiation creep in vanadium-base alloys is underway with experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the US. Test specimens are thin-wall sealed tubes with internal pressure loading. The results from the initial ATR irradiation at low temperature (200-300 C) to a neutron damage level of 4.7 dpa show creep rates ranging from {approx}0 to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}5}/dpa/MPa for a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. These rates were generally lower than reported from a previous experiment in BR-10. Because both the attained neutron damage levels and the creep strains were low in the present study, however, these creep rates should be regarded as only preliminary. Substantially more testing is required before a data base on irradiation creep of vanadium alloys can be developed and used with confidence.

Tsai, H.; Matsui, H.; Billone, M. C.; Strain, R. V.; Smith, D. L.

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions. 4 figs.

Nilsen, J.

1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser (10) is formed of a vanadium (12) and titanium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions (32).

Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Optimized Anion Exchange Membranes for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

vanadium redox flow battery; anion exchange membrane; ion exchange capacity; cycling performance; power density ... All electrochemical measurements were conducted using a fully automated redox flow battery testing system (Scribner 857 Redox Flow Cell System). ... Characteristics of a new all-vanadium redox flow battery ...

Dongyang Chen; Michael A. Hickner; Ertan Agar; E. Caglan Kumbur

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fact Sheet: Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (October 2012) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (October 2012) Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (October 2012) DOE's Energy Storage Program is funding research to develop next-generation vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs) that reduce costs by improving energy and power densities, widening the operating temperature window, and simplifying and optimizing stack/system designs. These efforts build on Pacific Northwest National Laboratory research that has developed new redox electrolytes that enable increased VRB operating temperatures and energy storage capabilities. Fact Sheet: Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (October 2012) More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Day 3, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

42

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

Sugama, T.

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube/Graphite Felts as Advanced Electrode Materials for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

vanadium redox flow battery; nitrogen doping; carbon nanotubes; graphite felt ... Nanorod Niobium Oxide as Powerful Catalysts for an All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery ... Nanorod Niobium Oxide as Powerful Catalysts for an All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery ...

Shuangyin Wang; Xinsheng Zhao; Thomas Cochell; Arumugam Manthiram

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Vanadium Flow Battery for Energy Storage: Prospects and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vanadium Flow Battery for Energy Storage: Prospects and Challenges ... Her work involves investigating the strategy to improve the stability of electrolytes for the vanadium flow battery. ... Dr. Huamin Zhang currently is a tenured Professor at Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science; he serves as the head of the energy storage division and chief scientist of the 973 National Project on Flow Battery. ...

Cong Ding; Huamin Zhang; Xianfeng Li; Tao Liu; Feng Xing

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method of forming vanadium oxide films and vanadium oxide thin-films prepared thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed of forming a vanadium oxide film on a substrate utilizing plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The method includes positioning a substrate within a plasma reaction chamber and then forming a precursor gas comprised of a vanadium-containing chloride gas in an inert carrier gas. This precursor gas is then mixed with selected amounts of hydrogen and oxygen and directed into the reaction chamber. The amounts of precursor gas, oxygen and hydrogen are selected to optimize the final properties of the vanadium oxide film An rf plasma is generated within the reaction chamber to chemically react the precursor gas with the hydrogen and the oxygen to cause deposition of a vanadium oxide film on the substrate while the chamber deposition pressure is maintained at about one torr or less. Finally, the byproduct gases are removed from the plasma reaction chamber.

Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Turner, John A. (Littleton, CO); Liu, Ping (Lakewood, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Photovoltaic cells employing zinc phosphide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic cell having a zinc phosphide absorber. The zinc phosphide can be a single or multiple crystal slice or a thin polycrystalline film. The cell can be a Schottky barrier, heterojunction or homojunction device. Methods for synthesizing and crystallizing zinc phosphide are disclosed as well as a method for forming thin films.

Barnett, Allen M. (Newark, DE); Catalano, Anthony W. (Wilmington, DE); Dalal, Vikram L. (Newark, DE); Masi, James V. (Wilbraham, MA); Meakin, John D. (Newark, DE); Hall, Robert B. (Newark, DE)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

In-situ Investigation of Vanadium Ion Transport in Redox Flow Battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will show a new method to differentiate the vanadium transport from concentration gradient and that from electric field. Flow batteries with vanadium and iron redox couples as the electro-active species were employed to investigate the transport behavior of vanadium ions in the presence of electric field. It was shown that electric field accelerated the positive-to-negative and reduced the negative-to-positive vanadium ions transport in charge process and affected the vanadium ions transport in an opposite way in discharge process. In addition, a method was designed to differentiate the concentration gradient-driven vanadium ions diffusion and electric field-driven vanadium ions migration. Simplified mathematical model was established to simulate the vanadium ions transport in real charge-discharge operation of flow battery. The concentration gradient diffusion coefficients and electric-migration coefficients of V2+, V3+, VO2+, and VO2+ across Nafion membrane were obtained by fitting the experimental data.

Luo, Qingtao; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Bin; Chen, Baowei; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Interactions of vanadium-rich slags with crucible materials during viscosity measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum coke (petcoke) ash can contain high concentrations of vanadium ... Vanadium oxide is a major impurity in the petcoke slags which is not found in coal ... gasification of coal–petroleum coke blended feed...

Alexander Y. Ilyushechkin; Marc A. Duchesne; San S. Hla…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ORNUTM-13249 DRAFT AN ECOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF A VANADIUM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ORNUTM-13249 ORNUTM-13249 DRAFT AN ECOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF A VANADIUM AND URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE 1. G. Smith, M. J. Peterson, and M. G. Ryon Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program Environmental Sciences Division Oak RidgeNational Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 1996 Prepared for Gretchen A. Pierce Healthand Safety Research Division Environmental Technology Section Oak RidgeNational Laboratory GrandJunction, Colorado Prepared by the Environmental Sciences Division Oak RidgeNational Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-960R22464 I. INTRODUCTION From 1942 through 1946, the Vanadium Corporation of America operated a vanadium and uranium mill in Monticello, Utah (Rust Geotech 1995a). In 1948, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) purchased the mill site

53

Measurement of Lattice Vibrations in Vanadium by Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of slow neutrons inelastically scattered by vanadium metal has been measured by the time-of-flight technique. The neutrons gain energy by absorbing quanta of lattice vibration energy (phonons). As the nuclear scattering amplitude of vanadium is incoherent, the energy distribution of scattered neutrons is directly related to the frequency distribution of lattice vibrations. The measured neutron energy spectrum, as well as the derived frequency distribution, shows a clearly resolved double peak. This structure, which is distinctly different from the simple Debye distribution, but expected on the basis of detailed calculations, has heretofore not been amenable to direct measurement. The measured frequency distribution is compared with calculations for a body-centered cubic lattice by the Born-von Kármán theory and qualitative agreement is obtained. A more exact comparison awaits measurement of the elastic constants of vanadium.

C. M. Eisenhauer; I. Pelah; D. J. Hughes; H. Palevsky

1958-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

55

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

56

It's Elemental - The Element Zinc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copper Copper Previous Element (Copper) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gallium) Gallium The Element Zinc [Click for Isotope Data] 30 Zn Zinc 65.38 Atomic Number: 30 Atomic Weight: 65.38 Melting Point: 692.68 K (419.53°C or 787.15°F) Boiling Point: 1180 K (907°C or 1665°F) Density: 7.134 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word zink. Say what? Zinc is pronounced as ZINK. History and Uses: Although zinc compounds have been used for at least 2,500 years in the production of brass, zinc wasn't recognized as a distinct element until much later. Metallic zinc was first produced in India sometime in the 1400s by heating the mineral calamine (ZnCO3) with wool. Zinc was rediscovered by

57

Chapter 9 - Zinc and Residue Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Annual global production of zinc is more than 13 million tons. More than 50% of this amount is used for galvanizing while the rest is mainly split into brass production, zinc-based alloys, semi manufacturers and zinc compounds such as zinc oxide and zinc sulfate. For the zinc and steel industries, recycling of zinc-coated steel provides an important new source of raw material. Historically, the generation of zinc-rich dusts from steel recycling was a source of loss from the life-cycle (landfill); however, technologies today provide incentive for steel recyclers to minimize waste. Thus, the recycling loop is endless—both zinc and steel can be recycled again and again without losing any of their physical or chemical properties. Depending on the composition of the scrap being recycled, it can either be remelted or returned to the refining process. This chapter describes the main processes for zinc recycling from different scraps and residues.

Jürgen Antrekowitsch; Stefan Steinlechner; Alois Unger; Gernot Rösler; Christoph Pichler; Rene Rumpold

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Isobutane oxidation in the presence of a soluble propylene glycol/vanadium catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for oxidizing isobutane with an oxygen-containing material in the presence of an effective amount of a soluble propylene glycol/vanadium catalyst.

Sanderson, J.R.; Marquis, E.T.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

High-throughput synthesis and characterization of vanadium mixed metal oxide pigments using synchroton radiation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??UNA range of inorganic vanadium mixed metal oxides, with potential applications as inorganic pigments, have been synthesised and characterised in terms of their crystal structure,… (more)

Russu, Sergio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminia supported vanadium Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sively studied... of the less expen- sive apparatus and its versatility. As an electrochromic material, however, vanadium Source: Artuso, Florinda - Department of Environment,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Shunt current loss of the vanadium redox flow battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The shunt current loss is one of main factors to affect the performance of the vanadium redox flow battery, which will shorten the cycle life and decrease the energy transfer efficiency. In this paper, a stack-level model based on the circuit analog method is proposed to research the shunt current loss of the vanadium redox flow battery, in which the SOC (state of charge) of electrolyte is introduced. The distribution of shunt current is described in detail. The sensitive analysis of shunt current is reported. The shunt current loss in charge/discharge cycle is predicted with the given experimental data. The effect of charge/discharge pattern on the shunt current loss is studied. The result shows that the reduction of the number of single cells in series, the decrease of the resistances of manifold and channel and the increase of the power of single cell will be the further development for the VRFB stack.

Feng Xing; Huamin Zhang; Xiangkun Ma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fact Sheet: Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries (October 2012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Breakthrough Breakthrough Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a new sulfate (SO 4 2- ) and chloride (Cl - ) mixed solution that is used as the electrolyte. Compared to pure sulfuric acid, the new solution can hold more than 70% more vanadium ions, increasing energy storage capacity by more than 70%. The use of Cl - in the new solution also increases the operating temperature window by 83%, so the battery

63

High power density self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket concept capable of operating with 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading has been developed. The blanket has liquid lithium as the tritium breeder and the coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because it can accommodate high heat loads. Also, it has good mechanical properties at high temperatures, high neutron fluence capability, low degradation under neutron irradiation, good compatibility with the blanket materials, low decay heat, low waste disposal rating, and adequate strength to accommodate the electromagnetic loads during plasma disruption events. Self-healing electrical insulator (CaO) is utilized to reduce the MHD pressure drop. A poloidal coolant flow with high velocity at the first wall is used to reduce the peak temperature of the vanadium structure and to accommodate high surface heat flux. The blanket has a simple blanket configuration and low coolant pressure to reduce the fabrication cost, to improve the blanket reliability, and to increase confidence in the blanket performance. Spectral shifter, moderator, and reflector are utilized to improve the blanket shielding capability and energy multiplication, and to reduce the radial blanket thickness. Natural lithium is used to avoid extra cost related to the lithium enrichment process.

Gohar, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bismuth Nanoparticle Decorating Graphite Felt as a High-Performance Electrode for an All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bismuth Nanoparticle Decorating Graphite Felt as a High-Performance Electrode for an All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery ... Employing electrolytes containing Bi3+, bismuth nanoparticles are synchronously electrodeposited onto the surface of a graphite felt electrode during operation of an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). ... Energy storage; redox flow battery; electrode; catalyst; vanadium ...

Bin Li; Meng Gu; Zimin Nie; Yuyan Shao; Qingtao Luo; Xiaoliang Wei; Xiaolin Li; Jie Xiao; Chongmin Wang; Vincent Sprenkle; Wei Wang

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

Influence of Solvent on Polymer Prequaternization toward Anion-Conductive Membrane Fabrication for All-Vanadium Flow Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Influence of Solvent on Polymer Prequaternization toward Anion-Conductive Membrane Fabrication for All-Vanadium Flow Battery ... The all-vanadium redox flow battery (VFB) can potentially circumvent the mismatch between the generation and end use of renewable but unsteady energies such as photovoltaics and wind turbines. ... 2.3 All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (VFB) Performance ...

Fengxiang Zhang; Huamin Zhang; Chao Qu

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vanadium pentoxide modified polycrystalline silicon anode for active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vanadium pentoxide modified polycrystalline silicon anode for active-matrix organic light to be an efficient anode for organic light-emitting diode OLED X. L. Zhu, J. X. Sun, H. J. Peng, Z. G. Meng, M. Wong an ultrathin vanadium pentoxide V2O5 layer on the p-Si anode, the performance of the OLED can be greatly

67

Organometallics 1987, 6, 2551-2556 2551 Seven-Coordinate Titanium and Vanadium Carbonyls. Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with sodium naphthalenide in thf under carbon monoxide gives the titanium(0) carbonyl [~-BUSOrganometallics 1987, 6, 2551-2556 2551 Seven-Coordinate Titanium and Vanadium Carbonyls. Synthesis of the fourfold and threefold faces; the titanium and vanadium structures may also be described in terms of a face

Girolami, Gregory S.

68

TITANIUM AND VANADIUM CHEMISTRY IN LOW-MASS DWARF STARS Katharina Lodders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The most profound effect of a decrease in temperature is that carbon monoxide (CO) con- verts to methaneTITANIUM AND VANADIUM CHEMISTRY IN LOW-MASS DWARF STARS Katharina Lodders Planetary Chemistry The equilibrium gas and condensation chemistry of titanium and vanadium in M, L, and T dwarf atmos- pheres

Fegley Jr., Bruce

69

Response of zinc, iron and copper status parameters to supplementation with zinc or zinc and iron in women  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supplementation with zinc at levels available over-the-counter may compromise iron or copper status. This study examined the effects of zinc(50mg/day) or zinc and iron(50 mg each/day) on 18 women aged 25-40. Subjects were matched on initial levels of serum ferritin(SF) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase(ESOD) and randomly assigned to Group Z (zinc) or F-Z (iron and zinc). The following were measured pretreatment and after 6 and 10 weeks treatment: serum zinc (BZ), salivary sediment zinc (SSZ), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), SF, serum ceruloplasmin (Cp) and ESOD. Effects of treatment and weeks of treatment on changes from initial blood and saliva levels were analyzed using AOV. BZ increased (P=0.0144) and ESOD decreased (P=0.0001) with weeks of treatment. Differences due to treatment are presented. No effects were noted on Hgb, Hct or Cp. Intakes of zinc supplements at about 4X RDA appear to decrease copper(ESOD) and iron(SF) status. Use of iron w/zinc may be protective for FE but not Cu, and may compromise zinc (SSZ) status.

Yadrick, K.; Kenney, M.A.; Winterfeldt, E.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vanadium Corp of America - PA 15  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Vanadium Corp of America - PA 15 Vanadium Corp of America - PA 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Vanadium Corp. of America (PA.15) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP. Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: UMTRAP Vicinity Property No. CA-401 PA.15-5 Location: Mayer Street - Collier Township , Bridgeville , Pennsylvania PA.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 PA.15-2 Site Operations: Faclility used to grind pitchblende ore during the early 1940's for processing by Vitro at Canonsburg. Conducted research and developed processes for concentration of Colorado Plateau ores (uranium-vanadium) PA.15-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - site cleaned up as a vicinity property of the Canonsburg Site in 1986 under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP). PA.15-5

71

Effect of manganese addition on hydrogen storage performance of vanadium-based BCC hydrogen storage alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of manganese addition on hydrogen storage performance of vanadium-based BCC alloys was ... plateau pressure and a reverse effect on maximum hydrogen storage capacity. However, an effective hydrogen storage

Chan-Yeol Seo; Zhao-Liang Zhang; Jin-Ho Kim…

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Integration of a Structural Water-Gas-Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 The InTegraTIon of a STrucTural WaTer- gaS-ShIfT caTalyST WITh a VanadIum alloy hydrogen TranSporT deVIce Description The purpose of this project is to produce a scalable device that simultaneously performs both water-gas-shift (WGS) and hydrogen separation from a coal-derived synthesis gas stream. The justification of such a system is the improved efficiency for the overall production of hydrogen. Removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas (syngas) stream allows the WGS reaction to convert more carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and maximizes the total hydrogen produced. An additional benefit is the reduction in capital cost of plant construction due to the removal of one step in the process by integrating WGS with the membrane separation device.

73

Method for the regeneration of spent molten zinc chloride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a process for regenerating spent molten zinc chloride which has been used in the hydrocracking of coal or ash-containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous materials derived therefrom and which contains zinc chloride, zinc oxide, zinc oxide complexes and ash-containing carbonaceous residue, by incinerating the spent molten zinc chloride to vaporize the zinc chloride for subsequent condensation to produce a purified molten zinc chloride: an improvement comprising the use of clay in the incineration zone to suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc. Optionally water is used in conjunction with the clay to further suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc.

Zielke, Clyde W. (McMurray, PA); Rosenhoover, William A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Structure and properties of a rapidly solidified dispersion strengthened aluminum-iron-vanadium-silicon alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF A RAPIDLY SOLIDIFIED DISPERSION STRENGTHENED ALUMINUM-IRON-VANADIUM-SILICON ALLOY A Thesis by STAFFORD DEAN LITTLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF A RAPIDLY SOLIDIFIED DISPERSION STRENGTHENED ALUMINUM-IRON-VANADIUM-SILICON ALLOY A Thesis by STAFFORD DEAN LITTLE Approved...

Little, Stafford Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Removal of Vanadium(IV) from Aqueous Solutions by Adsorption Process with Aluminum-Pillared Bentonite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this research work is to investigate the possibility of using a natural bentonite clay as a precursor to produce aluminum-pillared clay (Al?PILC) for the removal of vanadium(IV) from aqueous solutions. ... The original bentonite and Al?PILC were characterized with the help of surface area analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and potentiometric titration. ... The adsorption of vanadium(IV) onto Al?PILC has been dynamically and thermodynamically investigated. ...

D. M. Manohar; B. F. Noeline; T. S. Anirudhan

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nanorod Niobium Oxide as Powerful Catalysts for an All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanorod Niobium Oxide as Powerful Catalysts for an All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery ... A powerful low-cost electrocatalyst, nanorod Nb2O5, is synthesized using the hydrothermal method with monoclinic phases and simultaneously deposited on the surface of a graphite felt (GF) electrode in an all vanadium flow battery (VRB). ... Flow battery cyclic performance also demonstrates the excellent stability of the as prepared Nb2O5 catalyst enhanced electrode. ...

Bin Li; Meng Gu; Zimin Nie; Xiaoliang Wei; Chongmin Wang; Vincent Sprenkle; Wei Wang

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tantalum and vanadium response to shock-wave loading at normal and elevated temperatures. Non-monotonous decay of the elastic wave in vanadium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the elastic precursor waves in pure tantalum and vanadium is presented at normal and elevated temperatures over propagation distances that ranged from 0.125 to 3?mm. Measurements were performed in order to obtain experimental data about the temperature-rate dependence of the yield stress of the two metals. With increasing propagation distance, the rate of the decay of elastic precursor decreases, as the shear stress in the elastic precursor wave approaches the Peierls stresses. It has been found that the decay, with propagation distance, of the post-spike minimum of the spike-like elastic precursor wave in vanadium is essentially non-monotonous. The experiments also revealed that annealing of tantalum and vanadium increases their Hugoniot elastic limit. The anomalous increase of the high strain rate yield stress with temperature, as observed earlier for some FCC and HCP metals, has not been detected in these measurements.

Zaretsky, E. B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben Gurion University, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Kanel, G. I. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13, bld.2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermodynamic Investigation of Electrolytes of the Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (III): Volumetric Properties of Aqueous VOSO4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Investigation of Electrolytes of the Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (III): Volumetric Properties of Aqueous VOSO4 ... The all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) as an effective energy-storage system proposed by Skyllas-Kazacos et al. has been investigated extensively. ... Oriji, G.; Katayama, Y.; Miura, T.Investigation on V(IV)/V(V) species in a vanadium redox flow battery Electrochim. ...

Ye Qin; Jian-Guo Liu; Chuan-Wei Yan

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Morphology control of zinc regeneration for zinc–air fuel cell and battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Morphology control is crucial both for zinc–air batteries and for zinc–air fuel cells during zinc regeneration. Zinc dendrite should be avoided in zinc–air batteries and zinc pellets are yearned to be formed for zinc–air fuel cells. This paper is mainly to analyze the mechanism of shape change and to control the zinc morphology during charge. A numerical three-dimensional model for zinc regeneration is established with COMSOL software on the basis of ionic transport theory and electrode reaction electrochemistry, and some experiments of zinc regeneration are carried out. The deposition process is qualitatively analyzed by the kinetics Monte Carlo method to study the morphological change from the electrocrystallization point of view. Morphological evolution of deposited zinc under different conditions of direct currents and pulse currents is also investigated by simulation. The simulation shows that parametric variables of the flowing electrolyte, the surface roughness and the structure of the electrode, the charging current and mode affect morphological evolution. The uniform morphology of deposited zinc is attained at low current, pulsating current or hydrodynamic electrolyte, and granular morphology is obtained by means of an electrode of discrete columnar structure in combination with high current and flowing electrolyte.

Keliang Wang; Pucheng Pei; Ze Ma; Huachi Xu; Pengcheng Li; Xizhong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Precursors of copper/zinc oxide catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent results on hydroxycarbonate precursors of copper/zinc oxide catalysts for methanol synthesis are reinterpreted, taking into account earlier work on these systems.

M.S. Spencer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

82

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1997, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production: Mine, recoverable 488 570 614 600 6071 Primary slab zinc 240 217

83

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2001, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

84

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

85

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1999, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999e Production: Mine, recoverable1 614 600 605 722 775 Primary slab zinc 232 226

86

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1998, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

192 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998e Production: Mine, recoverable 570 614 598 605 6551 Primary slab zinc

87

Regulation of Zinc Transport in the Choroid Plexus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expression by prolactin. These data indicate there is a coordinated regulation of MT-1 and zinc transporters during extracellular zinc depletion or supplementation....

Aquino, Mayra

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

THE SYNTHESIS OF MONOCLINIC ZINC DIPHOSPHIDE SINGLE CRYSTALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Phosphorous Deposit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ampules Zinc Diphosphide C. Phosphorous Sesquizinc Mechanismi 43, 114 The Zinc-Phosphorous System, L. A. Bitjutskaya, B.

Mowles, Thomas Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An evaluation of the acute toxicity of vanadium to five estuarine species: Penaeus aztecus, Rangia cuneata, Cyprinodon variegatus, Neanthes arenaceodentata and Brachionus plicatilis / b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through the use of blank tissue samples spiked with known quantities of the vanadium standard. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used both to check the validity of the vanadium standard used for spectrophotometric analysis... is shown in Figure 2. The working region of the standard curve used for routine analysi. . of vanadium was the region between 0. 02 and 1 . 06 absorbance units or I to 40 micrograms of' vanadium per gram of sample. It was also determined that +he...

Hobson, David Wayne

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Original article Improvement of zinc intestinal absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Improvement of zinc intestinal absorption and reduction of zinc/iron interaction of caseins, improves its absorption and could prevent inhibition by other nutrients such as iron (Fe). The absorption of Zn (100 Ilmol/L) bound to the 1-25 CN ((3-CN(1-25)) of (3-casein, or as ZnS04 was studied using

Boyer, Edmond

91

Rational Design of Zinc Phosphide Heterojunction Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rational Design of Zinc Phosphide Heterojunction Photovoltaics Thesis by Jeffrey Paul Bosco would meet me with the same energy and enthusiasm regarding the topic of zinc phosphide photovoltaics to the field of earth-abundant photovoltaics has been indispensable to my work. Greg also made a great mentor

Winfree, Erik

92

Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Under Pressure, Vanadium Won't Turn Down the Volume | Advanced Photon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles Patterning High-density Arrays of Nanospheres with Self Assembly Cells Forming Blood Vessels Send Their Copper to the Edge A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness Water Theory is Watertight Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Under Pressure, Vanadium Won't Turn Down the Volume MARCH 7, 2007 Bookmark and Share The upper panel is the diffraction pattern of vanadium recorded on an image plate at 18 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The indexing is based on a body centered cubic lattice. The lower panel is the diffraction pattern of vanadium at 73 GPa. Inserts are zoomed images showing the splitting of 110,

94

A coupled-physics model for the vanadium oxygen fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A stationary two-dimensional model for the vanadium oxygen fuel cell is developed. The model consists of a single cell with two membranes, set up as of two half-cells and an intermediate chamber. The transport and balance of mass, momentum and charge are linked to the electrochemical reaction kinetics of the vanadium species and oxygen. The kinetic model for the cathode half-cell is extended by an empirical logistic function to describe the transient behavior of the half-cell. Additionally, experiments are conducted on a single vanadium oxygen fuel cell with 40 cm2 active membrane area. The experimental results are used to validate the simulation data. The effects of constant current discharging, polarization behavior and different flow rates on the cathode overpotential are studied by means of this model.

F.T. Wandschneider; M. Küttinger; J. Noack; P. Fischer; K. Pinkwart; J. Tübke; H. Nirschl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A three-dimensional model for negative half cell of the vanadium redox flow battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stationary, isothermal, three-dimensional model for negative half cell of the vanadium redox flow battery is developed, which is based on the comprehensive conservation laws, such as charge, mass and momentum, together with a kinetic model for reaction involving vanadium species. The model is validated against the results calculated by the available two-dimensional model. With the given geometry of the negative half cell, the distributions of velocity, concentration, overpotential and transfer current density in the sections that are perpendicular and parallel to the applied current are studied. It is shown that the distribution of the electrolyte velocity in the electrode has significant impact on the distribution of concentration, overpotential and transfer current density. The lower velocity in the electrode will cause the higher overpotential, further result in the side reaction and corrosion of key materials locally. The development of the design of the vanadium redox flow battery is discussed, and the further research is proposed.

Xiangkun Ma; Huamin Zhang; Feng Xing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Strong reduction of V{sup 4+} amount in vanadium oxide/hexadecylamine nanotubes by doping with Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions: Electron paramagnetic resonance and magnetic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we present a complete characterization and magnetic study of vanadium oxide/hexadecylamine nanotubes (VO{sub x}/Hexa NT's) doped with Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions. The morphology of the NT's has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, while the metallic elements have been quantified by the instrumental neutron activation analysis technique. The static and dynamic magnetic properties were studied by collecting data of magnetization as a function of magnetic field and temperature and by electron paramagnetic resonance. At difference of the majority reports in the literature, we do not observe magnetic dimers in vanadium oxide nanotubes. Also, we observed that the incorporation of metallic ions (Co{sup 2+}, S = 3/2 and Ni{sup 2+}, S = 1) decreases notably the amount of V{sup 4+} ions in the system, from 14-16% (nondoped case) to 2%-4%, with respect to the total vanadium atoms (fact corroborated by XPS experiments) anyway preserving the tubular nanostructure. The method to decrease the amount of V{sup 4+} in the nanotubes improves considerably their potential technological applications as Li-ion batteries cathodes.

Saleta, M. E.; Troiani, H. E.; Ribeiro Guevara, S.; Ruano, G.; Sanchez, R. D. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA, (8400) S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Malta, M. [Depto. de Cs. Exatas e da Terra, Univ. do Estado da Bahia, Cabula Salvador CP 2555 (Brazil); Torresi, R. M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo CP 26077, 05513-970 (Brazil)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Study of hydrogen isotopes super permeation through vanadium membrane on 'Prometheus' setup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop the membrane pumping technology by means of superpermeable membranes at RFNC-VNIIEF in the 'Prometheus' setup, the experiments on superpermeation of hydrogen isotopes through metal membranes were carried out. The experimental results on superpermeation of thermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes including tritium through a cylindrical vanadium membrane are presented. The possibility of effective pumping, compression and recuperation of hydrogen isotopes by means of superpermeable membrane was demonstrated. The evaluation of membrane pumping rates and asymmetry degree of pure vanadium membrane was given. The work was performed under the ISTC-2854 project. (authors)

Musyaev, R. K.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Lebedev, B. S. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics RFNC-VNIIEF, 607188, Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Busnyuk, A. O.; Notkin, M. E.; Samartsev, A. A.; Livshits, A. I. [St. Peterburg State Univ. of Telecommunications SUT, St. Peterburg (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Rechargeable zinc cell with alkaline electrolyte which inhibits shape change in zinc electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved rechargeable zinc cell is described comprising a zinc electrode and another electrode such as, for example, a nickel-containing electrode, and having an electrolyte containing KOH and a combination of KF and K[sub 2]CO[sub 3] salts which inhibits shape change in the zinc electrode, i.e., the zinc electrode exhibits low shape change, resulting in an improved capacity retention of the cell over an number of charge-discharge cycles, while still maintaining high discharge rate characteristics. 8 figures.

Adler, T.C.; McLarnon, F.R.; Cairns, E.J.

1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

100

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Wednesday, 26 September 2007 00:00 Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Extracellular Proteins Promote Zinc Sulfide Aggregation Print Researchers from the ALS, Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed biofilm samples rich in zinc sulfide and dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were collected from lead-zinc mine waters. The researchers were curious about the relationship of the organic material and metals, particularly how organics affect mobility, and its potential for bioremediation. It is known that some organics promote aggregation. Amine-bearing molecules, for example, can organize sulfide nanoparticles into semiconductor nanowires. The research team used a series of imaging techniques and detectors to analyze aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals in the biofilms. Their examination yielded excellent results and some surprises. They were able to prove that natural organic matter promotes dense aggregation of the zinc sulfide nanocrystals into much larger spheroids and that the organic matter is preserved in nanometer-scale pores in the spheroids. What was not expected was the presence of proteins in the spheroids, making them a key component in aggregation and an example of extracellular biomineralization.

102

Costs of chronic waterborne zinc exposure and the consequences of zinc acclimation on the gill/zinc interactions of rainbow trout in hard and soft water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to zinc in both moderately hard water and soft water for 30 d. Only the 450 {micro}g/L zinc-exposed fish experienced significant mortality. Zinc exposure caused no effect on growth rate, but growth affected tissue zinc levels. Whole body zinc levels were elevated, but gill sand liver showed no consistent increases relative to controls over the 30 d. Therefore, tissue zinc residues were not a good indicator of chronic zinc exposure. After the 30-d exposure, physiological function tests were performed. Zinc was 5.4 times more toxic in soft water. All zinc-exposed trout had acclimated to the metal, as seen by an increase in the LC50 of 2.2 to 3.9 times over that seen in control fish. Physiological costs related to acclimation appeared to be few. Zinc exposure had no effect on whole body Ca{sup 2+} or Na{sup +} levels, on resting or routine metabolic rates, or on fixed velocity sprint performance. However, critical swimming speed (U{sub Crit}) was significantly reduced in zinc-exposed fish, an effect that persisted in zinc-free water. Using radioisotopic techniques to distinguish new zinc incorporation, the gills were found to possess two zinc pools: a fast turnover pool and a slow turnover pool. The fast pool was much larger in soft water than in hard water, but at most it accounted for < 3.5% of the zinc content of the gills. The size of the slow pool was unknown, but its loading rate was faster in soft water. Chronic zinc exposure was found to increase the size of the fast pool and to increase the loading rate of the slow pool.

Alsop, D.H.; McGeer, J.C.; McDonald, D.G.; Wood, C.M. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids (shale oil, SRC, etc.) by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1985-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100 C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Displacive Phase Transition of Vanadium Dioxide and the Effect of Doping with Tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, comparison of the two structures in Figure 1 showed that it was possible to construct the tetragonal structure using the lower-symmetry but equivalent unit cell indicated by the green quadrilateral (each of whose corners is midway between two vanadium ions) in Figure 1a. ... Woodley, S. M.; Battle, P. D.; Catlow, C. R. A.; Gale, J. D. J. Phys. ...

Makondelele Netsianda; Phuti E. Ngoepe; C. Richard A. Catlow; Scott M. Woodley

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Materials Science and Engineering B88 (2002) 7378 Processing and properties of vanadium doped strontium niobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strontium niobate Seana Seraji, Yun Wu, Steven Limmer, Tammy Chou, Caroyln Nguyen, Mike Forbess, G.Z. Cao October 2001 Abstract Strontium niobate was doped with vanadium and the resulting effects a relatively high vapor pressure [5]. Strontium niobate (Sr2Nb2O7) is a very promising candidate

Cao, Guozhong

109

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of a microstructure evolution model with experiments on irradiated vanadium S. Sharafat vacancy ¯ux to grow matrix and precipitate-axed bubbles. The direct formation of vacancy and interstitial and its alloys are now considered as candidate structural materials in fu- sion reactors, because

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

110

Investigation of Vanadium Compounds in Ashes from a CFBC Firing 100 Petroleum Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Vanadium Compounds in Ashes from a CFBC Firing 100 Petroleum Coke ... The ash pits have since gone through an extensive remedial process. ... The other metals investigated (i.e., Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb) also were present predominantly as sulfates. ...

L. Jia; E. J. Anthony; J. P. Charland

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hydrogen-impurity binding energy in vanadium and niobium A. Mokrani and C. Demangeat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2243 Hydrogen-impurity binding energy in vanadium and niobium A. Mokrani and C. Demangeat IPCMS, UM by the hydrogen) contribution, ii) the band structure contribution, iii) the electron-electron interaction without. Strong H-H repulsion is observed when the hydrogen atoms are at first nearest neighbouring positions

Boyer, Edmond

112

Thermodynamics of strained vanadium dioxide single crystals Yijia Gu,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics of strained vanadium dioxide single crystals Yijia Gu,1,a Jinbo Cao,2 Junqiao Wu,2 condition plays an important role. To investigate the strain contribution, a phenomenological thermodynamic films. In order to control and manipulate the MIT, it is necessary to understand the thermodynamics

Wu, Junqiao

113

Nano-structured vanadium: processing and mechanical properties under quasi-static and dynamic compression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nano-structured vanadium: processing and mechanical properties under quasi-static and dynamic form 16 September 2003; accepted 9 October 2003 Abstract We have processed fully dense, nano that the grain size of the consolidated V is around 100 nm. Mechanical properties of the nano-structured V were

Wei, Qiuming

114

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Painesville Municipal Electric Power Vanadium Redox Battery Demo Project - Jodi Startari, Ashlawn Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Power Electric Power Vanadium Redox Battery Demonstration Project Jodi Startari Ashlawn Energy LLC Briefing Overview * Painesville Municipal Electric Power Plant Project Synopsis * Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Technology * City of Painesville Municipal Electric Plant History * Project Multiple Objectives and Additional Detail * Project Risk Analysis presented at previous Peer Review * Project to date progress * Cost Distribution * Summary/Conclusions * Future Tasks * Questions US Produced Vanadium Redox Flow Battery for Bulk Storage, Peak Shaving * 8 MW Hour redox flow battery (1MW 8 hours) * To be installed at Painesville Municipal Electric Plant (PMEP), a 32 MW coal fired facility * Most efficient PMEP operation is steady state at 26 MW (lowest emissions, lowest operating cost)

115

Zinc and Health: Current Status and Future Directions Zinc Transport in the Brain: Routes of Zinc Influx and Efflux in Neurons1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

homeostasis. J. Nutr. 130: 1484S--1487S, 2000. KEY WORDS: zinc ion transport heavy metal ions trace and that mediate extracellular zinc toxicity and (3) a plasma membrane transporter potentially present in all elements metal transporters rat Large amounts of zinc are present in the brain, yet very little

116

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

118

Effect of the metal-semiconductor phase transition on the rate of hydrogen penetration into vanadium dioxide thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rates of hydrogen penetration from an aqueous solution of glycerin into ... compared. It has been found that the rate of hydrogen penetration into the metal phase of vanadium dioxide ... order of magnitude hi...

V. N. Andreev; V. A. Klimov

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Role of vanadium pentoxide hole-extracting nanolayer in rubrene/C70-based small molecule organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) was inserted between the donor layer and the anode as a hole-extracting nanolayer. Compared with devices without a hole-extracting layer, short-circuit current density (JSC), open-circuit ...

Zhen Zhan, Jing Cao, Weiguang Xie, Lintao Hou, Qin Ye, Pengyi Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Targeted sensors for investigating mobile Zinc in biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Sensing Strategies for Detection of Mobile Zinc. Mobile zinc plays important physiological roles in areas such as the hippocampus, prostate, and pancreas. A better understanding of the distribution of intracellular ...

Chyan, Wen, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

122

Characterization of a plasma membrane zinc transporter in rat brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ireland Ltd. Keywords: Ion transport; Membrane vesicles; Excitotoxicity; Zinc homeostasis; TransitionCharacterization of a plasma membrane zinc transporter in rat brain Robert A. Colvin* Department transport in the brain. This report provides convincing evidence of a zinc transporter in plasma membrane

123

Regenerative zinc/air and zinc/ferricyanide batteries for stationary power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report a novel configuration for a zinc-particle, packed-bed anode in which an open structure of high hydraulic permeability is maintained indefinitely in a cell with closely spaced walls by the formation of particle bridges and associated gaps. The configuration minimizes electrolyte pumping costs, allows rapid refueling and partial recharge, and provides for 100% zinc consumption. This approach benefits zinc/air fuel batteries by allowing nearly continuous operation and fuel recycle without commercial infrastructure; it benefits Zn/[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup {minus}3} batteries by eliminating shape-change and polarization problems found with planar anodes.

Cooper, J.F.; Keene, L.E.; Noring, J.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Measurements of ultracold neutron upscattering and absorption in polyethylene and vanadium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of neutron cross sections for elements used as efficient ``absorbers'' of ultracold neutrons (UCN) is crucial for many precision experiments in nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and gravity. In this context, ``absorption'' includes both the capture and upscattering of neutrons to the energies above the UCN energy region. The available data, especially for hydrogen, do not agree between themselves or with the theory. In this report we describe measurements performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory UCN facility of the UCN upscattering cross sections for vanadium and for hydrogen in CH$_2$ using simultaneous measurements of the radiative capture cross sections for these elements. We measured $\\sigma_{up}=1972\\pm130$ b for hydrogen in CH$_2$, which is below theoretical expectations, and $\\sigma_{up} < 25\\pm9$ b for vanadium, in agreement with the expectation for the neutron heating by thermal excitations in solids.

E. I. Sharapov; C. L. Morris; M. Makela; A. Saunders; Evan R. Adamek; Yelena Bagdasarova; L. J. Broussard; C. B. Cude-Woods; Deon E Fellers; Peter Geltenbort; S. I. Hasan; K. P. Hickerson; G. Hogan; A. T. Holley; Chen-Yu Liu; M. P. Mendenhall; J. Ortiz; R. W. Pattie Jr.; D. G. Phillips; J. Ramsey; D. J. Salvat; S. J. Seestrom; E. Shaw; Sky Sjue; W. E. Sondheim; B. VornDick; Z. Wang; T. L. Womack; A. R. Young; B. A. Zeck

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

125

Measurements of ultracold neutron upscattering and absorption in polyethylene and vanadium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of neutron cross sections for elements used as efficient ``absorbers'' of ultracold neutrons (UCN) is crucial for many precision experiments in nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and gravity. In this context, ``absorption'' includes both the capture and upscattering of neutrons to the energies above the UCN energy region. The available data, especially for hydrogen, do not agree between themselves or with the theory. In this report we describe measurements performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory UCN facility of the UCN upscattering cross sections for vanadium and for hydrogen in CH$_2$ using simultaneous measurements of the radiative capture cross sections for these elements. We measured $\\sigma_{up}=1972\\pm130$ b for hydrogen in CH$_2$, which is below theoretical expectations, and $\\sigma_{up} < 25\\pm9$ b for vanadium, in agreement with the expectation for the neutron heating by thermal excitations in solids.

Sharapov, E I; Makela, M; Saunders, A; Adamek, Evan R; Bagdasarova, Yelena; Broussard, L J; Cude-Woods, C B; Fellers, Deon E; Geltenbort, Peter; Hasan, S I; Hickerson, K P; Hogan, G; Holley, A T; Liu, Chen-Yu; Mendenhall, M P; Ortiz, J; Pattie, R W; Phillips, D G; Ramsey, J; Salvat, D J; Seestrom, S J; Shaw, E; Sjue, Sky; Sondheim, W E; VornDick, B; Wang, Z; Womack, T L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Catalytic pyrolysis of straight-run gasoline on a promoted vanadium catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years the catalytic pyrolysis has been studied of various hydrocarbon materials - from gaseous (ethane, propane and n-butane) to heavy petroleum fractions with an end boiling point higher than 500/sup 0/C. The process indices for all the raw materials studied were significantly better than those from thermal pyrolysis. Improvement of operational properties for the vanadium catalyst for pyrolysis involved the selecting a better acceptor and the use of promotor additives which inhibit coke formation.

Chernykh, S.P.; Adel'son, S.V.; Rudyk, E.M.; Zhagfarov, F.G.; Motorina, I.A.; Nikonov, V.I.; Mukhina, T.N.; Barabanov, N.L.; Pyatiletov, V.I.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A preliminary study of zinc-catalyzed polycarbonate production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company. Adipic acid was pruchased fron MCB Manufacturing Chemists, Inc. 12 2. Synthesized Reagents a. Zinc Adipate from Zinc metal lb. 4 g (0. 251 mol) of zinc filings were dissolved in 50 mL of concentrated hydrochloric acid, generating a solution... Figure 12. Two identical catalytic runs using the same batch of Strem catalyst A comparison between the zinc glutarate and zinc adipate catalyst was then made by comparing the rates of production of the polymer and the cyclic carbonate. The rates...

Griffith, Amy Elizabeth

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Electrodialysis of vanadium(III) and iron(II) ions from a simulated decontamination solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transport of vanadium(III) and iron(II) ions through the Nafion 117 cation-exchange membrane in the presence of picolinic acid was investigated by simulating the equilibrium distribution of ionic species as a function of pH, and by electrodialyzing the simulated waste solution. From distribution calculations of the model reaction systems it could be predicted that at pH 1.6 most vanadium ions exist predominantly in the form of the V{sup III}(Pic{sup {minus}}){sub 2}{sup +} complex, and this form of complex permeates across the cation-exchange membrane during electrodialysis. The experimental results, including variations in the color and cation concentrations of the catholyte, confirm the existence of the vanadium(III) picolinate complex. Iron ions permeated into the catholyte were converted to their hydroxide precipitates, which could be formed at the high pH condition resulting from the reduction of hydrogen ions and the production of OH{sup {minus}} ions by water electrolysis at the cathode. It was also found that the in-situ precipitation of iron in the electrodialyzer could be self-modulated by shifting the catholyte pH from the acidic state to the alkaline state during electrodialysis operation.

Shim, J.B.; Oh, W.Z.; Lee, B.J.; Park, H.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.D. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Research on pollution prevention and control technologies in the industry of vanadium extraction from stone coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technology of pollution prevention and control in the industry of vanadium extraction from stone coal acts as a key factor in deciding whether the vanadium can be extracted from stone coal effectively. This paper focuses on analysing related pollutants, including their features, and major problems existing in field of vanadium extraction, as well as investigating the technology used to prevent and control the pollutants in wastewater, gas and slag. In accordance with the current efforts of pollution prevention, it can be concluded that this industry must reduce its resources, energy consumption and pollutant discharge strength, enhance pollution prevention, guarantee ecology safety and human health so that improvement in production capacity, craft and pollution abatement technique can be promoted. Therefore, concrete proposals and expectations on technological control are offered, including building up a real-time monitoring system and a decision support system. This study can help the research and development staff to understand technologies related to reducing the environmental pollution clearly and to achieve sustainable development simultaneously.

Jia Li; Yimin Zhang; Tao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Multiplier, moderator, and reflector materials for lithium-vanadium fusion blankets.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has several attractive operational and environmental features. In this concept, liquid lithium works as the tritium breeder and coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because of its superior performance relative to other alloys for this application. However, this concept has poor attenuation characteristics and energy multiplication for the DT neutrons. An advanced self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has been developed to eliminate these drawbacks while maintaining all the attractive features of the conventional concept. An electrical insulator coating for the coolant channels, spectral shifter (multiplier, and moderator) and reflector were utilized in the blanket design to enhance the blanket performance. In addition, the blanket was designed to have the capability to operate at high loading conditions of 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading. This paper assesses the spectral shifter and the reflector materials and it defines the technological requirements of this advanced blanket concept.

Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Zinc ?2-Glycoprotein: A Multidisciplinary Protein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the seminal fluid (18). Hale et al. (44) determined the...Electrophoresis 2007;28:1989-96. 44 Hale LP, Price DT, Sanchez LM...quality index, ATP utilization, gas exchange, and ionic balance...Diabetes 2003;52:2175-81. 136 Hale LP. Zinc alpha-2-glycoprotein...

Md. Imtaiyaz Hassan; Abdul Waheed; Savita Yadav; Tej P. Singh; and Faizan Ahmad

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Process for preparing zinc oxide-based sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

Gangwal, Santosh Kumar (Cary, NC); Turk, Brian Scott (Durham, NC); Gupta, Raghubir Prasad (Durham, NC)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

In Situ X-ray Near-Edge Absorption Spectroscopy Investigation of the State of Charge of All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

all-vanadium flow battery; X-ray near-edge adsorption spectroscopy; synchrotron; in situ; state of charge; electrolyte ... Among different types of RFBs, the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) displays excellent electrochemical activity and reversibility. ... To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to use the in situ synchrotron techniques to study the redox flow battery. ...

Chuankun Jia; Qi Liu; Cheng-Jun Sun; Fan Yang; Yang Ren; Steve M. Heald; Yadong Liu; Zhe-Fei Li; Wenquan Lu; Jian Xie

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

135

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

136

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

137

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

139

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2012, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

140

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2010, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2011, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

142

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

143

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2009, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

184 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

144

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2000, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major

145

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fluorescent chemosensors for exploring zinc metalloneurochemistry and detecting mercury in aqueous solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. An Introduction to Zinc Metalloneurochemistry and Zinc Detection in Biology. This chapter presents an overview of zinc neurophysiology and pathology, which provides motivation for the design of new tools and ...

Nolan, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Marie), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids determines zinc Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

zinc transporter in rat brain Summary: as 15% of brain zinc is sequestered in synap- tic vesicles 3 associated with excitatory amino acid... .41 mM EGTA. Zinc65 caught on...

148

Commercial Pecans: Controlling Rosette, Diseases and Zinc Deficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pecan losses from diseases and insufficient zinc nutrition can be prevented by following effective grove management practices. Descriptions of diseases and recommendations for controls are included....

Lee, Thomas A.; Krausz, Joseph P.

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Peel, Kate, Dominik Weiss, and Laura Sigg. Zinc isotope ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zinc isotope composition of settling particles as a proxy for biogeochemical processes in lakes: Insights from the eutrophic Lake Greifen, Switzerland. Kate Peel ...

2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nanoscale imaging of the electronic and structural transitions in vanadium dioxide.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the electronic and structural changes at the nanoscale in vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) in the vicinity of its thermally driven phase transition. Both electronic and structural changes exhibit phase coexistence leading to percolation. In addition, we observe a dichotomy between the local electronic and structural transitions. Nanoscale x-ray diffraction reveals local, nonmonotonic switching of the lattice structure, a phenomenon that is not seen in the electronic insulator-to-metal transition mapped by near-field infrared microscopy.

Qazilbash, M. M.; Tripathi, A.; Schafgans, A. A.; Kim, B.-J.; Kim, H.-T.; Cai, Z.; Holt, M. V.; Maser, J. M.; Keilmann, F.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Basov, D. N. (X-Ray Science Division); ( CNM); (Univ. of California at San Diego); (Electronics and Telecommunications Research IInst.); (Univ. of Science and Technology); (Munich Centre for Advanced Photonics and Center for NanoScience)

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nanoscale structural evolution of electrically driven insulator to metal transition in vanadium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural evolution of tensile strained vanadium dioxide thin films was examined across the electrically driven insulator-to-metal transition by nanoscale hard X-ray diffraction. A metallic filament with rutile (R) structure was found to be the dominant conduction pathway for an electrically driven transition, while the majority of the channel area remained in the monoclinic M1 phase. The filament dimensions were estimated using simultaneous electrical probing and nanoscale X-ray diffraction. Analysis revealed that the width of the conducting channel can be tuned externally using resistive loads in series, enabling the M1/R phase ratio in the phase coexistence regime to be tuned.

Freeman, Eugene, E-mail: exf181@psu.edu; Shukla, Nikhil; Datta, Suman [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Stone, Greg; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Gopalan, Venkatraman [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Paik, Hanjong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Moyer, Jarrett A. [Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cai, Zhonghou; Wen, Haidan [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effect of pH, phosphorus, and water-extractable zinc of soil on plant growth and zinc absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF pH~ PHOSPHORilS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPT1ON A Thesis Najafali Karimian Submitted to the Graduate College cf Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1970 Major Sub ject: Soil Chemistry EFFECT OF pH, PHOSPHORUS, AND WATER-EXTRACTABLE ZINC OF SOIL ON PLANT GROWTH AND ZINC ABSORPTION A Thesis by NajafaIi Karimian Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman Committee...

Karimian, Najafali

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial zinc finger Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for creating designer zinc finger Summary: Heterodimeric DNA methyltransferases as a platform for creating designer zinc finger... hypomethylation. The end-to-end fusion of...

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - air zinc increases Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forms of Zinc in a Smelter- Summary: , and the application of sewage sludge and agrochemicals, soils are increasingly contaminated with zinc. In Switzerland... 2-64 GEOLOGICAL...

155

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

156

Zinc Treatment Effects on Corrosion Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace levels of soluble zinc(II) ions (30 ppb) maintained in mildly alkaline, hydrogenated water at 260 C were found to lower the corrosion rate of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400) by about a factor of five, relative to a non-zinc baseline test after 10,000 hr. Characterizations of the corrosion oxide layer via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with argon ion milling and target factor analysis, confirmed the presence of two spinel oxide phases and minor amounts of recrystallized nickel. Based on the distribution of the three oxidized alloying constituents (Fe, Cr, Ni) with respect to depth and oxidation state, it was concluded that: (a) corrosion occurs in a non-selective manner, but approximately 30% of the oxidized iron is released to the water, and (b) the two spinel oxides exist as a ferrite-based outer layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 4} on top of a chromite-based inner layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.7})(Fe{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.6}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. These results suggest that immiscibility in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} binary may play a role in controlling the zinc content of the outer layer. On the other hand, the lower corrosion rate caused by zinc additions is believed to be a consequence of corrosion oxide film stabilization due to the substitution reaction equilibrium: z Zn{sup 2+}(aq) + FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) {approx} z Fe{sup 2+}(aq) + (Zn{sub z}Fe{sub 1-z})Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s). The liquid-solid distribution coefficient for the reaction, defined by the ratio of total zinc to iron ion concentrations in solution divided by the Zn(II)/Fe(II) ratio in the solid, z/(1-z), was found to be 0.184. This interpretation is consistent with the benefits of zinc treatment being concentration dependent.

S.E. Ziemniak; M. Hanson

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

158

Efficient Solar Energy Storage Using A TiO2/WO3 Tandem Photoelectrode in An All-vanadium Photoelectrochemical Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using a photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell to convert solar energy to either electricity or chemical fuels has attracted much attention in the last four decades. However, two major obstacles that hinder wide-spread application of this approach lie in the relatively wide bandgap of chemically stable semiconducotrs, e.g., TiO2, and the rapid recombination of photogenerated charge carriers once they are generated within the semiconductors. We reported herein a method that utilized vanadium redox pairs, which are commonly used in vanadium redox-flow batteries (VRB), to mitigate charge carrier recombination and thus to improve photoresponse in regenerative solar energy storage for the first time. The results showed significant improvement in photocurrent during photo-charging of the all-vanadium PEC storage cell with the addition of a very low morlarity of vanadium redox species (0.01 M) to the acid electrolytes. Additonally, the photocurrent was almost doubled even with a TiO2 electrode when two vanadium redox species were used in a full-cell configuration instead of a half-cell setup. To further enhance the light absorption, a TiO2/WO3 tandem electrode was studied and compared to the TiO2 electrode in various vanadium redox electrolytes. The tandem electrode showed higher photoresponse in all electrolytes investigated. Furthermore, the important role of vanadium redox species and WO3 have been discussed.

Dong Liu; Zi Wei; Chia-jen Hsu; Yi Shen; Fuqiang Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Catalytic reactions on well-characterized vanadium oxide catalysts. 1. Oxidation of carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of carbon monoxide over unsupported and supported vanadium oxide catalysts was investigated from the standpoint of structure sensitivity. The activity of unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ markedly decreased the turnover frequency, while the reduction-oxidation treatment of the fused catalyst increased it. The turnover frequency of V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with low V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content was much smaller than that of the V/sub 2/O/sub 5//TiO/sub 2/ with high V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content or the unsupported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Such a retarding effect of the TiO/sub 2/ support on the activity of the oxidation of carbon monoxide is in contrast to the known promoting effect of TiO/sub 2/ for the oxidations of various hydrocarbons. From these results coupled with the characterization of the catalysts, it was concluded that the oxidation of carbon monoxide on vanadium oxide catalysts is a structure-sensitive reaction and that the activity of surface defects such as steps, kinks, and vacancies is much higher than that of the surface V=O species in the smooth (010) face of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. 39 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

Mori, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Murakami, Y.

1984-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development of a Novel Iodine-Vitamin C/Vanadium Redox Flow Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel (I+/I2)/vitamin C vs. V4+/V5+ semi-vanadium redox flow battery (semi-VRFB) with iodine, vitamin C, and V4+/V5+ redox couples, using multiple electrodes was investigated. The electrodes, Ni-P/carbon paper and Ni-P/TiO2/carbon paper, were modified by the electroless plating method and sol-gel process. The electrochemical characteristics and the performance of the semi-VRFB were verified by the cyclic voltammetry method and a charge-discharge test. This study shows modified electrodes can improve the reversibility and symmetry of the oxidation-reduction reaction of the semi-VRFB system, and effectively raise its storage ability. The coulomb efficiency of the semi-VRFB system is close to 96%, which is higher than the all-VRFB. The semi-VRFB system can reduce the amount of vanadium salt, therefore, it is not only a reduction in cost, but also has a great potential for the development of energy storage systems.

Mei-Ling Chen; Shu-Ling Huang; Chin-Lung Hsieh; Jan- Yen Lee; Tz-Jiun Tsai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

162

Practical and commercial issues in the design and manufacture of vanadium flow batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The vanadium flow battery has emerged as one of the most favourable types of flow batteries for a number of reasons, including the lack of cross-contamination that troubled many earlier systems such as the Fe/Cr flow battery. Because the vanadium flow battery employs the same metal ion in both electrolytes, albeit in different oxidation states, there is no cumulative loss in performance, just an effective reversible self-discharge current. The self discharge that occurs in the vanadium flow batteries is limited to the electrolyte volume in the cells. However it can become substantial under low load conditions. The pumps also use power from the battery and may be considered as another source of self discharge. Taking these and maintenance considerations into account the layout of a 10 kW, 100 kWh, 48 V vanadium flow battery was designed as a “Multi-Stage-Operation” system to provide maximum performance at all levels of load, ease of use and optimum maintenance conditions. Experimental A complete energy storage system with 10 kW in power and 100 kWh in energy was designed. It consists of a vanadium flow battery with smart controller and configurable power electronics housed in a weatherproof housing. The battery can be charged and discharged at up to 10 kW and provides up to 100 kWh of energy. The smart controller ensures that the battery operates at maximum efficiency at all times and allows remote observation of various battery parameters, including a reliable state of charge (SOC) measurement. The option of different arrangements of power electronics gives almost complete freedom in specification of electrical output (dc, single or three-phase ac). The battery can also be connected to photovoltaic, wind turbine, diesel/petrol/gas/biogas generators, fuel cells and water turbines to form discrete autonomous power supplies or to be part of a micro-, mini- or smart-grid. The FB10/100 battery for “Multi-Stage-Operation” is comprised of 5 strings of 36–40 cells each in 3 separate fluid circuits. The first fluid circuit, containing a single string, is always actively pumped with electrolyte and electrically connected to the charger and load. The second and third fluid circuits contain 2 strings each and are only actively pumped and electrically connected when the voltage reaches preset limits. When the circuits are in “standby”, i.e. not actively pumped and electrically connected, the self discharge is limited to the small volume of electrolyte in the cells. There is also a significant saving of pumping energy, because 3 pairs of small pumps are used in place of 1 pair of more powerful pumps. Results In “Multi-Stage-Operation” mode, the overall battery performance is improved significantly. This is very important in off-grid installations, where loads are typically small compared to the power levels necessary for charging; i.e. a solar powered telemetric station may use 500 W continuous power but requires fast charging due to the narrow time window when solar energy is available. In example, at a 1 kW load the battery provides 25% more energy when operated in “Multi-Stage-Operation” mode compared to all stacks in operation. Since 2008, several power station have been equipped with FB10/100 storage units and put into operation. Within the presentation a report on the latest results including technical performance and cost issues will be given.

Martha Schreiber; Martin Harrer; Adam Whitehead; Herbert Bucsich; Matthias Dragschitz; Ernst Seifert; Peter Tymciw

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in Vanadium Dioxide Nanobeams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Observation of Nanoscale Peltier and Joule Effects at Metal- Insulator Domain Walls localized alternating Peltier heating and cooling as well as Joule heating concentrated at the M-I domain the monoclinic phase identification. KEYWORDS: Vanadium dioxide, thermoreflectance microscopy, Peltier effect

Wu, Junqiao

164

Glutamine and zinc methionine supplementation to dairy calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into 4 treatment groups with 5 animals each. The calves were fed milk-replacer diets supplemented with 0 or 1% L-glutamine, 1% glycine, or zinc methionine (40 ppm zinc) for a 45-day-period. Next, calves were subjected to intravenous administration...

Simon, Robin Renee

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

COPPER AND ZINC DEFICIENCIES TREATMENT BY INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS IN SHEEP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPPER AND ZINC DEFICIENCIES TREATMENT BY INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS IN SHEEP M. LAMAND Claudine LAB in the injection site. Copper per os dosing is efficient for treating deficient animals (Lamand et al., 1969 consuming. Therefore we tried to per- fect a copper and zinc deficiency treatment allowing the injection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Recent developments in zinc oxide target chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zinc oxide targets irradiated with high energy protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) contain a number of radioactive spallation products in quantities large enough to warrant recovery. This paper describes methods for recovering {sup 7}Be, {sup 46}Sc, and {sup 48}V from such targets and offers suggestions on possible ways to recover additional isotopes. The proposed methods are based on traditional precipitation and ion exchange techniques, are readily adaptable to hot cell use, and produce no hazardous waste components. The products are obtained in moderate to high yields and have excellent radiopurity.

Heaton, R.C.; Taylor, W.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Garcia, J.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

168

Polarization and corrosion of electrogalvanized steel - evaluation of zinc coatings obtained from waste-derived zinc electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion of electrogalvanized 1070 steel wire has been investigated in molar quiescent ammonium chloride and ammonium sulfate under near-neutral conditions. Zinc coatings obtained from waste-derived electrolytes were evaluated vs. coatings from relatively pure zinc electrolytes. The waste source of zinc was brass smelter flue dust. Corrosion rates were measured by Tafel line extrapolation and the polarization resistance technique. Values of the Tafel slopes and the corrosion currents were also compared with those for pure zinc (99.999%). Corrosion rates were found to be affected by the medium employed, pH, and bimetal diameter reduction (drawing). Drawn electrogalvanized stee displays higher values of the Tafel slopes than do the as-plated samples. The Tafel slopes are different from thos obtained on pure zinc. This is assumed to be due to inhomogeneous surface features obtained from additive adsorption (during plating) and residual lubricants used in the drawing process as well as surface structure. The corrosion rates of electrogalvanized samples plated in the waste-derived zinc electrolytes were similar to the corrosion rates of samples plated in relatively pure zinc electrolytes. Therefore, wastes are a potential source of zinc for electrogalvanizing.

Dattilo, M.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

171

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

172

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

173

Studying the semiconductor-metal phase transition in nanoscale vanadium dioxide, doped with ions of 3d-elements on a silicon surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoscale vanadium dioxide doped with chromium and iron is obtained via molecular layering method on the surface of a single-crystal silicon. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the samples is dete...

D. V. Nazarov; O. M. Osmolowskaya…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Characterization and catalytic performance of vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-PILC catalysts issued from different Ti-precursors in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide by ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vanadium supported on sulfated Ti-pillared clay catalysts (STi-PILCs) issued from different Ti-precursors were investigated for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3 in the presence of O2. The STi-PILC...

J. Arfaoui; L. Khalfallah Boudali; A. Ghorbel; G. Delahay

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Properties Investigation of Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone)/Polyacrylonitrile Acid–Base Blend Membrane for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid–base blend membrane prepared from sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was detailedly evaluated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application. SPEEK/PAN blend membrane exhibited dense and homogeneous cross-...

Zhaohua Li; Wenjing Dai; Lihong Yu; Le Liu; Jingyu Xi; Xinping Qiu; Liquan Chen

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles via electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate solutions. ? Design of a Taguchi orthogonal array to identify the optimal experimental conditions. ? Controlling the size and shape of particles via applied voltage and oxalate concentration. ? Characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles by SEM, UV–vis, FT-IR and TG–DTA. - Abstract: A rapid, clean and simple electrodeposition method was designed for the synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles. Zinc oxalate nanoparticles in different size and shapes were electrodeposited by electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate aqueous solutions. It was found that the size and shape of the product could be tuned by electrolysis voltage, oxalate ion concentration, and stirring rate of electrolyte solution. A Taguchi orthogonal array design was designed to identify the optimal experimental conditions. The morphological characterization of the product was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. UV–vis and FT-IR spectroscopies were also used to characterize the electrodeposited nanoparticles. The TG–DTA studies of the nanoparticles indicated that the main thermal degradation occurs in two steps over a temperature range of 350–430 °C. In contrast to the existing methods, the present study describes a process which can be easily scaled up for the production of nano-sized zinc oxalate powder.

Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushani, Mahmoud [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Ilam University, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Synergistic Effect of Carbon Nanofiber/Nanotube Composite Catalyst on Carbon Felt Electrode for High-Performance All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synergistic Effect of Carbon Nanofiber/Nanotube Composite Catalyst on Carbon Felt Electrode for High-Performance All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery ... Carbon nanofiber/nanotube (CNF/CNT) composite catalysts grown on carbon felt (CF), prepared from a simple way involving the thermal decomposition of acetylene gas over Ni catalysts, are studied as electrode materials in a vanadium redox flow battery. ... Energy storage; redox flow battery; electrode; carbon nanofiber; carbon nanotube; catalyst ...

Minjoon Park; Yang-jae Jung; Jungyun Kim; Ho il Lee; Jeaphil Cho

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Development of Vanadium Phosphaate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE sponsored study of methane partial oxidation was initiated at Amax Research and Development in Golden, CO in October of 1993. Shortly thereafter the management of Amax closed this R&D facility and the PI moved to the Colorado School of Mines. The project was begun again after contract transfer via a novation agreement. Experimental work began with testing of vandyl pyrophosphate (VPO), a well known alkane selective oxidation catalyst. It was found that VPO was not a selective catalyst for methane conversion yielding primarily CO. However, promotion of VPO with Fe, Cr, and other first row transition metals led to measurable yields for formaldehyde, as noted in the summary table. Catalyst characterization studies indicated that the role of promoters was to stabilize some of the vanadium in the V{sup 5+} oxidation state rather than the V{sup 4+} state formally expected for (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

McCormick, R.L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Transport properties of lithium- lead-vanadium-telluride glass and glass ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glasses with the chemical composition 35Li{sub 2}O-(45-x)V{sub 2}O{sub 5?}20PbO-xTeO{sub 2} (where x = 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15 mol %) have prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The electrical conductivity of Li{sup +} ion conducting lead vanadium telluride glass samples has been carried out both as a function of temperature and frequency in the temperature range 503K-563K and over frequencies 40 Hz to 10 MHz. The electronic conduction has been observed in the present systems. When these samples annealed around 400°C for 2hour become the glass ceramic, which also shows increase tendency of conductivity. SEM confines glass and glass ceramic nature of the prepared samples.

Sathish, M., E-mail: sathishphy79@gmail.com [Department of Physics, GOVT first grade College, Doddaballapur-561203 (India); Eraiah, B., E-mail: eraiah@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore-560056, India (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development of carbon composite bipolar plate (BP) for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) is one of the most promising energy storage systems (ESSs) due to its safety, durability and scalability. However, high cost of its components has been obstacle for commercialization of VRFB. Especially, bipolar plates (BPs) which are the main components of VRFB, are fabricated using graphite, which increases not only its manufacturing cost, but also decreases the reliability of VFRB, especially for the large area BP due to the brittleness of graphite although the graphite has high electrical conductivity and chemical stability. In this work, a carbon composite BP for the VRFB has been developed optimally considering its electrical as well as chemical stabilities against strong acids. Charge/discharge tests of the VRFB using the developed carbon composite \\{BPs\\} were performed to observe its energy and voltage efficiencies, from which the durability of the composite BP was estimated.

Ki Hyun Kim; Bu Gi Kim; Dai Gil Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Modeling a vanadium redox flow battery system for large scale applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation model of a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) system based on measurements with a kilowatt scale real life VRFB unit was developed. Various hourly charging and discharging cycles were performed for states of charge (SOC) of 75%, 60%, 40% and 20% at different power values ranging from 2 kW to 10 kW. The dependence of the overall system efficiency in a VRFB unit on the SOC was determined by considering the energy losses at stacks during the electrochemical conversion and by the auxiliary power consumption of the hydraulic circuits as well as the power conversion systems. Using the model, optimal number of modules for certain power levels during charging and discharging operations were estimated for megawatt scale operations.

Burak Turker; Sebastian Arroyo Klein; Eva-Maria Hammer; Bettina Lenz; Lidiya Komsiyska

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Testing of a refuelable zinc/air bus battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report tests of a refuelable zinc/air battery of modular, bipolar-cell design, intended for fleet electric busses and vans. The stack consists of twelve 250-cm{sup 2} cells built of two units: (1) a copper-clad glass-reinforced epoxy board supporting anode and cathode current collectors, and (2) polymer frame providing for air- and electrolyte distribution and zinc fuel storage. The stack was refueled in 4 min. by a hydraulic transfer of zinc particles entrained in solution flow.

Cooper, J.F.; Fleming, D.; Koopman, R.; Hargrove, D.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.

1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Simple Oxygen Detector Using Zinc–Air Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elementary/Middle School Science; High School/Introductory Chemistry; Demonstrations; Hands-On Learning/Manipulatives; Gases; Laboratory Equipment/Apparatus ... Therefore, Faraday’s law can be confirmed by measuring the change in the volume of O2 consumed or the gained mass of the zinc–air battery with increasing quantity of electricity in a circuit using the zinc–air battery as the power source. ... (2-4) At the operating voltage of the zinc–air battery (1.4 V), the electric current in a circuit, with a small resistance, linearly changes with respect to the atmospheric O2 concentration. ...

Yoong Kin Hooi; Masayoshi Nakano; Nobuyoshi Koga

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Zinc oxide thin film acoustic sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the implementation of (750 nm) thickness of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film for the piezoelectric pressure sensors. The film was prepared and deposited employing the spray pyrolysis technique. XRD results show that the growth preferred orientation is the (002) plane. A polycrystalline thin film (close to mono crystallite like) was obtained. Depending on the Scanning Electron Microscopy photogram, the film homogeneity and thickness were shown. The resonance frequency measured (about 19 kHz) and the damping coefficient was calculated and its value was found to be about (2.5538), the thin film be haves as homogeneous for under and over damped. The thin film pressure sensing was approximately exponentially related with frequency, the thin film was observed to has a good response for mechanical stresses also it is a good material for the piezoelectric properties.

Mohammed, Ali Jasim; Salih, Wafaa Mahdi; Hassan, Marwa Abdul Muhsien; Nusseif, Asmaa Deiaa; Kadhum, Haider Abdullah [Department of Physics , College of Science, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad (Iraq); Mansour, Hazim Louis [Department of Physics , College of Education, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad (Iraq)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Influence of pyridine and compounds of vanadium, iron, and molybdenum on the carbonylation of azo and nitro compounds in the presence of RhCl3-4H2O  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rhodium trichloride tetrahydrate without promoters catalyzes the synthesis of isocyanates by the carbonylation of azobenzenes. Pyridine, compounds of vanadium, molybdenum, and iron acetylacetonate inhibit this re...

V. I. Manov-Yuvenskii; K. B. Petrovskii…

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Dispenser Printed Zinc Microbattery with an Ionic Liquid Gel Electrolyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thin-film rechargeable batteries. Materials Science andMicroscopic Nickel-Zinc Batteries for Use in AutonomousM, and RJ Brodd. “What Are Batteries, Fuel Cells, and

Ho, Christine Chihfan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The effects of alcohol use on zinc status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alcohol consumption has been shown to have adverse affects on bone growth and maintenance, although the mechanism has not been elucidated. The objective of this research was to look at the relationship between zinc and alcohol as a possible...

Chapman, Lisa Louise

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

AN INVENTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHS OF ZINC ELECTRODEPOSITED FROM ACID ELECTROLYTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical circuit diagram Experimental apparatus Limiting current plaT7~us, 0.05 Levich plot (i vs. :;Electrical Circuit Diagrams Striated Zinc Deposit (GOULD, Inc. Photograph) Typical Striated Deposits Striation Length vs.

Faltemier, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Optoelectronics Devices Based on Zinc Oxide Thin Films and Nanostructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is promising for UV optoelectronics, such as photodetectors,for future ZnO optoelectronics. References Ü. Özgür, Ya. I.OF THE DISSERTATION Optoelectronics Devices Based on Zinc

Chu, Sheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Synthesis and Characterization of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Ethanol Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pure phase, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were synthesized at lower temperature by microwave assisted auto combustion synthesis method. As-synthesized particles had sizes ~50 nm with spherical shape. Gas respons...

Sachin Tyagi; Sarita Devi; Ashok K. Paul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reactivity studies of a pseudo three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex: Synthesis of terminal oxo and sulfido complexes of vanadium(IV) and S?S and Se?Se reductive bond cleavage reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terminal oxo and sulfido complexes in the form of (nacnac)V=E(Ntol{sub 2}) (nacnac = [ArNC(CH{sub 3})]{sub 2}CH{sup -}, Ar = 2,6-(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, Ntol{sub 2} = {sup -}N(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-Me), E = O (1), S (2)) were isolated from treatment of the masked three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex, (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}), with C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NO and S{sub 8}, respectively. Both vanadium(IV) species, 1 and 2, have been characterized by room temperature X-band EPR spectroscopic studies, and in the case of complex 1, a single crystal molecular structure confirmed the presence of a terminal oxo moiety. Moreover, reaction of (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}) with diphenyl-disulfide and diphenyl-diselenide results in the reductive cleavage of these compounds to produce the vanadium(III) complexes (nacnac)V(XPh)(Ntol{sub 2}) (X = S, (3), Se (4)). A molecular structure of the phenylsulfide complex, 3, confirmed formation of the d{sup 2} complex resulting from reductive cleavage of the S-S bond.

Tran, Ba L.; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Mindiola, Daniel J. (Indiana)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

194

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nanoporous Polytetrafluoroethylene/Silica Composite Separator as a High-Performance All-Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driven by the motivation of searching for low-cost membrane alternatives, a novel nanoporous polytetrafluoroethylene/silica composite separator has been prepared and evaluated for its use in all-vanadium mixed-acid redox flow battery. This separator consisting of silica particles enmeshed in a polytetrafluoroethylene fibril matrix has no ion exchange capacity and is featured with unique nanoporous structures, which function as the ion transport channels in redox flow battery operation, with an average pore size of 38nm and a porosity of 48%. This separator has produced excellent electrochemical performance in the all-vanadium mixed-acid system with energy efficiency delivery comparable to Nafion membrane and superior rate capability and temperature tolerance. The separator also demonstrates an exceptional capacity retention capability over extended cycling, offering additional operational latitude towards conveniently mitigating the capacity decay that is inevitable for Nafion. Because of the inexpensive raw materials and simple preparation protocol, the separator is particularly low-cost, estimated to be at least an order of magnitude more inexpensive than Nafion. Plus the proven chemical stability due to the same backbone material as Nafion, this separator possesses a good combination of critical membrane requirements and shows great potential to promote market penetration of the all-vanadium redox flow battery by enabling significant reduction of capital and cycle costs.

Wei, Xiaoliang; Nie, Zimin; Luo, Qingtao; Li, Bin; Chen, Baowei; Simmons, Kevin L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

197

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

198

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

199

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

200

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

202

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

203

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

204

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

205

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

206

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

207

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

208

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

209

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

210

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

211

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

212

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

213

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

214

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

215

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

216

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

217

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

218

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

219

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

220

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

222

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

223

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

224

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

225

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

226

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

227

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

228

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

229

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

230

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

231

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

232

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

233

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

234

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

235

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

236

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

237

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

238

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

239

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

240

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

242

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

243

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

244

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

245

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

246

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

247

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

248

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

249

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

250

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

251

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

252

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

253

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

254

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

255

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

256

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

257

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

258

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

259

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

260

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solarthermal and Solar Quasi-Electrolytic Processing and Separations:? Zinc from Zinc Oxide as an Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

8 Carbonaceous material has been steam reformed in a solar furnace in an endothermic process9 which stores solar energy as an enhanced heating value of the products, hydrogen and/or synthesis gas, without having to burn any of the feedstocks to provide the energy needed to reform them, and methane has been reformed with carbon dioxide by Levy et al.10 to produce synthesis gas and store solar energy in a study aimed at developing a technique for transporting solar heat from the Negev to industrial regions. ... Inasmuch as CO and CO2 are gases, as long as only solid ZnO and C are initially present in a closed container, the solids can react to produce zinc and the appropriate equilibrium mixture of CO, CO2, and zinc vapor in contact with the solid reactants until the sum of the partial pressures of the gaseous components reaches the temperature-dependent unique “saturation pressure” of a ZnO?C mixture. ... A rapid quench would not be needed, though one might choose to cool the product gas quickly by expanding it through a nozzle or turbine rather than in a heat exchanger, to make economic use of its sensible enthalpy. ...

Edward A. Fletcher

1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dynamic electro-thermal modeling of all-vanadium redox flow battery with forced cooling strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study focuses on the dynamic electro-thermal modeling for the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) with forced cooling strategies. The Foster network is adopted to dynamically model the heat dissipation of VRB with heat exchangers. The parameters of Foster network are extracted by fitting the step response of it to the results of linearized CFD model. Then a complete electro-thermal model is proposed by coupling the heat generation model, Foster network and electrical model. Results show that the established model has nearly the same accuracy with the nonlinear CFD model in electrolyte temperature prediction but drastically improves the computational efficiency. The modeled terminal voltage is also benchmarked with the experimental data under different current densities. The electrolyte temperature is found to be significantly influenced by the flow rate of coolant. As compared, although the electrolyte flow rate has unremarkable impact on electrolyte temperature, its effect on system pressure drop and battery efficiency is significant. Increasing the electrolyte flow rate improves the coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency and energy efficiency simultaneously but at the expense of higher pump power demanded. An optimal flow rate exists for each operating condition to maximize the system efficiency.

Zhongbao Wei; Jiyun Zhao; Binyu Xiong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Static Recrystallization and Precipitation Behavior of a Weathering Steel Microalloyed with Vanadium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The static recrystallization (SRX) and precipitation behavior of a weathering steel microalloyed with vanadium were investigated through double-pass compression tests under controlled conditions using the MMS-300 thermal-mechanical simulator. The deformation temperatures ranged from 800 °C to 1000 °C, and the inter-pass time from 1 s to 500 s. The simulation results showed that SRX occurred after 5–10 s at the first compression deformation. The softening fraction of SRX was found to increase with increasing the deformation temperature and the pre-strain. However, the softening fraction scarcely changed during the process of strain-induced precipitation. In addition, the kinetics of SRX was described by the Avrami equation, and the Avrami exponent appeared to be closely associated with the deformation temperature. The microstructure evolution was investigated at the initiation and completion of recrystallization. The amount and distribution of the precipitates were analyzed. The relationship between the driving force of SRX and the pinning force of precipitation was discussed. Besides, the recrystallization inhibition was detected at the early stage of precipitation, and the pinning forces were found to be of a magnitude comparable to the driving force. Moreover, the pinning forces were found to increase with the degree of precipitation and reach a peak at the intermediate stage of precipitation, and finally reduce as the particles coarsened.

Hongyan Wu; Linxiu Du; Zhengrong Ai; Xianghua Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - ahmtp1 zinc transporters Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

jxberr025 Summary: ) RESEARCH PAPER Poplar maintains zinc homeostasis with heavy metal genes HMA4 and PCS1 Joshua P. Adams1... necessary heavy metals like zinc (Zn) while...

265

Exploring the Zinc Metallome of Cultured Cortical Neurons Using Synchroton Radiation X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zinc is abundant in the brain, and dysregulation of zinc ion homeostasis has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease pathology and neuronal death after brain ischemia. Many studies have established that cytosol...

Robert A. Colvin PhD; Christian J. Stork; Yang V. Li; Barry Lai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Formation of Biomimetic Porous Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Surfaces of Polyethylene/Zinc Stearate Blends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of Biomimetic Porous Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Surfaces of Polyethylene/Zinc Stearate phosphate coating, polyethylene Abstract Studies were undertaken investigating improvements presented in this paper concentrated on adding zinc stearate to polyethylene. Important potential benefits

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

267

Ratiometric and intensity-based zinc sensors built on rhodol and rhodamine platforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A xanthene-forming condensation reaction yields rhodol and rhodamine dyes carrying a zinc-binding ligand that includes the aniline-type nitrogen donor of the fluorophores. Upon zinc coordination in neutral aqueous solution, ...

Tomat, Elisa

268

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Zinc finger point mutations within the WT1 gene in Wilms tumor patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Genetics Zinc finger point mutations within the WTI gene in Wilms tumor patients (zinc finger...1992 ABSTRACT A proposed Wilms tumor gene, WTI, which encodes a zinc ringer protein...amino acid change. To our knowl- edge, a WTI gene missense mutation has not been detected...

M H Little; J Prosser; A Condie; P J Smith; V Van Heyningen; N D Hastie

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Separation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of copper and zinc from aqueous solution.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Oil shale; Ash; Adsorption; Copper and zinc removal 1. IntroductionSeparation and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251­257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

271

HIGH-CURRENT ZINC-AIR MICROBATTERY BASED ON A MICROMACHINED MULTILAYER LATERAL METALLIC SCAFFOLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH-CURRENT ZINC-AIR MICROBATTERY BASED ON A MICROMACHINED MULTILAYER LATERAL METALLIC SCAFFOLD A, characterized, and compared with commercially available zinc-air batteries. A single layer initial structure maximum energy density [1]. Zinc-air batteries are good candidates for the previously mentioned microscale

272

Optical waveguides in SBN by zinc vapor diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at 600'C for a 12. 5 i1m Wide 1000'C Zinc Vapor Diffused SBN:60 Waveguide Measured at X = 0. 81 pm. IV. SBN:60 Amplitude Modulator Results . . . . . V. SBN:60 Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Results. . . . VI. Voltage-Length Product Comparison...: (a) extraordinary (TM), (b) 1. 5 x ordinary (TE). 12. Surface damage on SBN:60 diffused at 1000'C with an SiOz diffusion mask. 13. Zinc in-diffusion in SBN:60 25 . . . . . 26 . . . . . 27 . . . . . 28 29 14. Barium out-diffuison in SBN:60...

Quinn, Jeffrey Dale

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nano zinc oxide for UV protection of textiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the effect on the fading of dyed polyester fabrics in artificial sunlight, when the Ultra Violet (UV) component of the radiation was blocked by coating the fabric with zinc oxide nanoparticles, dispersed in an acrylic polymer. Zinc oxide is photoactive and generates superoxide and hydroxyl radicals (Reactive Oxygen Species; ROS) when irradiated with UV in the presence of oxygen and water. The results for the four dyes studied show that different dye chromophores interact differently with ROS. Selection of dyes with anti oxidant properties or addition of other anti oxidants may reduce the adverse effects of ROS.

Lu Sun; John A. Rippon; Peter G. Cookson; Xungai Wang; Ken King; Olga Koulaeva; Reno Beltrame

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Internal Electric Field Behavior of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors Under High Carrier Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of the internal electric-field of nuclear-radiation detectors substantially affects the detector's performance. We investigated the distribution of the internal field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors under high carrier injection. We noted the build-up of a space charge region near the cathode that produces a built-in field opposing the applied field. Its presence entails the collapse of the electric field in the rest of detector, other than the portion near the cathode. Such a space-charge region originates from serious hole-trapping in CZT. The device's operating temperature greatly affects the width of the space-charge region. With increasing temperature from 5 C to 35 C, its width expanded from about 1/6 to 1/2 of the total depth of the detector.

Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fate of Sulfur, Chlorine, Alkali Metal, and Vanadium Species during High-Temperature Gasification of Canadian Tar Sand Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-feed of alternative fuels, e.g., petcoke, gains increasing importance for energy conversion in not only Germany but also worldwide. ... The aim of this work was to obtain detailed information on the influence of fuel composition of the refinery product line tar sand, bitumen, and petcoke in comparison to the standard fuel hard coal on the release of sodium, potassium, chlorine, sulfur, and vanadium species during high-temperature gasification. ... In addition to the pure fuels, blends of hard coal and petcoke were gasified in lab-scale experiments in a helium/oxygen atmosphere at 1500 °C. ...

Marc Bläsing; Kaveh Nazeri; Michael Müller

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Bio-mass derived mesoporous carbon as super electrode in all vanadium redox flow battery with multicouple reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We first report the multi-couple reaction in all vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB) while using bio-mass (coconut shell) derived mesoporous carbon as electrode. The presence of V3+/V4+ redox couple certainly supplies the additional electrons for the electrochemical reaction and subsequently provides improved electrochemical performance of VRFB system. The efficient electro-catalytic activity of such coconut shell derived high surface area mesoporous carbon is believed for the improved cell performance. Extensive power and electrochemical studies are performed for VRFB application point of view and described in detail.

Mani Ulaganathan; Akshay Jain; Vanchiappan Aravindan; Sundaramurthy Jayaraman; Wong Chui Ling; Tuti Mariana Lim; M.P. Srinivasan; Qingyu Yan; Srinivasan Madhavi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Optical switching and photoluminescence in erbium-implanted vanadium dioxide thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) is under intensive consideration for optical switching due to its reversible phase transition, which features a drastic and rapid shift in infrared reflectivity. Classified as an insulator–to–metal transition, the phase transition in VO{sub 2} can be induced thermally, electrically, and optically. When induced optically, the transition can occur on sub-picosecond time scales. It is interesting to dope VO{sub 2} with erbium ions (Er{sup 3+}) and observe their combined properties. The first excited-state luminescence of Er{sup 3+} lies within the wavelength window of minimal transmission-loss in silicon and has been widely utilized for signal amplification and generation in silicon photonics. The incorporation of Er{sup 3+} into VO{sub 2} could therefore result in a novel photonic material capable of simultaneous optical switching and amplification. In this work, we investigate the optical switching and photoluminescence in Er-implanted VO{sub 2} thin films. Thermally driven optical switching is demonstrated in the Er-implanted VO{sub 2} by infrared reflectometry. Photoluminescence is observed in the thin films annealed at ?800?°C or above. In addition, Raman spectroscopy and a statistical analysis of switching hysteresis are carried out to assess the effects of the ion implantation on the VO{sub 2} thin films. We conclude that Er-implanted VO{sub 2} can function as an optical switch and amplifier, but with reduced switching quality compared to pure VO{sub 2}.

Lim, Herianto, E-mail: mail@heriantolim.com; Stavrias, Nikolas; Johnson, Brett C.; McCallum, Jeffrey C. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Marvel, Robert E.; Haglund, Richard F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37240 (United States)

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

RNA binding by the Wilms tumor suppressor zinc finger proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...November 5, 1995) ABSTRACT The Wilms tumor suppressor gene WTI is implicated in the ontogeny of genito-urinary abnormalities, including Denys-Drash syndrome and Wilms tumor of the kidney. WTI encodes Kruppel-type zinc finger proteins that can regulate...

A Caricasole; A Duarte; S H Larsson; N D Hastie; M Little; G Holmes; I Todorov; A Ward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Zinc-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide has recently been paid attention in the field of extraction, separation, and reaction medium, its aptitude for both a reaction solvent and a reactant was examined in zinc glutarate-catalyzed reactions. As a result, it was proved that supercritical...

Katsurao, Takumi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Speciation and bioavailability of zinc in amended sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation and bioavailability of zinc (Zn) in smelter-contaminated sediments were investigated as a function of phosphate (apatite) and organic amendment loading rate. Zinc species identified in preamendment sediment were zinc hydroxide-like phases, sphalerite, and zinc sorbed to an iron oxide via X-ray adsorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Four months after adding the amendments to the contaminated sediment, hopeite, a Zn phosphate mineral, was identified indicating phosphate was binding and sequestering available Zn and Zn pore water concentrations were decreased at levels of 90% or more. Laboratory experiments indicate organic amendments exhibit a limited effect and may hinder sequestration of pore water Zn when mixed with apatite. The acute toxicity of the sediment Zn was evaluated with Hyalella azteca, and bioaccumulation of Zn with Lumbriculus variegates. The survivability of H. azteca increased as a function of phosphate (apatite) loading rate. In contaminated sediment without apatite, no specimens of H. azteca survived. The bioaccumulation of Zn in L. variegates also followed a trend of decreased bioaccumulation with increased phosphate loading in the contaminated sediment. The research supports an association between Zn speciation and bioavailability.

Williams, Aaron G.B.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; McDermott, Gregory; Gratson, David; Neptune, Dean; Ryan, James A.

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide semiconductor thin film transistors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We reported on the performance and electrical properties of co-sputtering-processed amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (?-HfIZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). Co-sputtering-processed ?-HfIZO thin films have shown an amorphous phase in nature. ...

Sheng-Po Chang; San-Syong Shih

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nanocomposite electrical generator based on piezoelectric zinc oxide nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanocomposite electrical generator based on piezoelectric zinc oxide nanowires K. Momeni, G. M October 2010; published online 1 December 2010 A nanocomposite electrical generator composed of an array system and loading configuration can generate up to 160% more electric potential than the values reported

Endres. William J.

283

Zinc-oxide-based sorbents and processes for preparing and using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them are provided. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

Gangwal, Santosh Kumar (Cary, NC); Turk, Brian Scott (Durham, NC); Gupta, Raghubir Prasael (Durham, NC)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Transient fluctuations of intracellular zinc ions in cell proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zinc is essential for cell proliferation, differentiation, and viability. When zinc becomes limited for cultured cells, DNA synthesis ceases and the cell cycle is arrested. The molecular mechanisms of actions of zinc are believed to involve changes in the availability of zinc(II) ions (Zn{sup 2+}). By employing a fluorescent Zn{sup 2+} probe, FluoZin-3 acetoxymethyl ester, intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations were measured in undifferentiated and in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations are pico- to nanomolar in PC12 cells and are higher in the differentiated than in the undifferentiated cells. When following cellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations for 48 h after the removal of serum, a condition that is known to cause cell cycle arrest, Zn{sup 2+} concentrations decrease after 30 min but, remarkably, increase after 1 h, and then decrease again to about one half of the initial concentration. Cell proliferation, measured by an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, decreases after both serum starvation and zinc chelation. Two peaks of Zn{sup 2+} concentrations occur within one cell cycle: one early in the G1 phase and the other in the late G1/S phase. Thus, fluctuations of intracellular Zn{sup 2+} concentrations and established modulation of phosphorylation signaling, via an inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases at commensurately low Zn{sup 2+} concentrations, suggest a role for Zn{sup 2+} in the control of the cell cycle. Interventions targeted at these picomolar Zn{sup 2+} fluctuations may be a way of controlling cell growth in hyperplasia, neoplasia, and diseases associated with aberrant differentiation.

Li, Yuan [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)] [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Maret, Wolfgang, E-mail: womaret@utmb.edu [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States) [Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

286

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

287

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

288

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

289

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

290

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

291

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

293

Combinatorial study of zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groups of thin-film transistors using a zinc tin oxide semiconductor layer have been fabricated via a combinatorial rf sputtering technique. The ZnO:SnO{sub 2} ratio of the film varies as a function of position on the sample, from pure ZnO to SnO{sub 2}, allowing for a study of zinc tin oxide transistor performance as a function of channel stoichiometry. The devices were found to have mobilities ranging from 2 to 12 cm{sup 2}/V s, with two peaks in mobility in devices at ZnO fractions of 0.80{+-}0.03 and 0.25{+-}0.05, and on/off ratios as high as 10{sup 7}. Transistors composed predominantly of SnO{sub 2} were found to exhibit light sensitivity which affected both the on/off ratios and threshold voltages of these devices.

McDowell, M. G.; Sanderson, R. J.; Hill, I. G. [Dalhousie University, Department of Physics, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Zinc levels in hair of pre-adolescent females  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , and. Hart, E. B. (1934) Am. J. Physiol. ~10 , 146 10. Tucker, H. F. , and Salmon, W. D. (1955) Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 88, 613 11. Keilin, D. , and. Mann, T. (1939) Nature (London) 144, 442 12. Orten, J. M. (1966) in Zinc Metabolism (Prasad. A... TABLE A-2 Standard Curve II ? 1974 Samples Zinc ml fo abs o ti on 10X scale 0. 25 0. 50 0 75 1. 0 25 0. 40 0. 9 1. 35 1. 75 3. &5 7 ' 5 10. 0 6. 9 20. 0 extrapolated 7. 0 g. O O 4 50 )0 3. 0 I. O 2. 0 4. 0 6. 0 8. 0 IO. O 12. 0 I...

Earp, Cheryl Fricke

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

296

Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Head of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Zinc Sorption by Iron Oxides and Soil Samples. (May 1989) Markku Juhani Yli-Halla, M. S. University of Helsinki, Finland Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Zn sorption by synthetic Fe oxide... and soil samples was studied. The purpose was to examine the effect of crystallinity and adsorbed silica on Zn adsorption by synthetic Fe oxide using goethite and ferrihydrite as test materials. Zn sorption by acid soil samples from Finland and a...

Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Characterization of polyacrylic acid modified zinc phosphate crystal conversion coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy have been used to investigate the composition and surface structure of polyacrylic acid modified zinc phosphate crystal conversion coatings on steel. Zinc phosphate coatings are used extensively to provide corrosion protection and to improve adherence of top coatings to steel. Within the last few years it has been demonstrated that addition of high molecular weight polyacrylic acid (PAA) to the phosphating bath can significantly improve both resistance to corrosion and topcoat adherence. It has been reported that the addition of PAA reduces the size of crystallites, which leads to greater film ductility, and therefore to fewer sites for corrosive attack, and that organic molecular segments from the PAA are incorporated into the surface structure and provide additional adhesive bonding with polymeric topcoats. In this work Raman spectra show the compositions of both unmodified and PAA modified films to be zinc phosphate dihydrate, Zn[sub 3](PO[sub 4])[sub 2] [times] 2H[sub 2]O. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure the morphologies of single crystallite surfaces. Morphologies of the unmodified and modified films obtained by AFM are in general quite similar, but subtle differences are apparent.

Wragg, J.L.; Chamberlain, J.E.; Chann, L.; White, H.W. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Sugama, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Efficiency and Conservation Div.); Manalis, S. (Digital Instruments, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States))

1993-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

299

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The effect of dietary zinc on the hypothalamo-adenohypophyseal-thyroid axis of male broiler chickens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and nonpregnant women consume a diet that contains 15 mg zinc per day (25). Intake of zinc in the United States typically ranges from 8-12 mg per day (2). Thus, some scientists have concluded that the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for zinc is too high... cell response to available testosterone (12). Basal serum levels of LH and FSH did not differ among the treatment groups, however, zinc-deficient rats had a significantly enhanced gonadotropin (FSH and LH) response compared with all three control...

Dean, Carlton E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Flexographically Printed Rechargeable Zinc-based Battery for Grid Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration with photovoltaic cells: Research on integrationpower harvesting using photovoltaic cells for lower-powerof printable photovoltaic cell, zinc-based battery as well

Wang, Zuoqian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air zinc Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: nanoparticles have a range of potential applications in electronic, optoelectronic and spintronic devices. Zinc... , reflection and electrical properties of the...

303

STUDIES OF MICROMORPHOLOGY AND CURRENT EFFICIENCY OF ZINC ELECTRODEPOSITED FROM FLOWING CHLORIDE ELECTROLYTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zinc and chloride by atomic absorption by the spectroscopy.College The atomic absorption spectroscopy was performed ofrandom error is about atomic absorption spectroscopy. Many

Mc Vay, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Zinc oxide nanoparticle-polymeric thin films for dynamic strain sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

010-4940-3 Zinc oxide nanoparticle-polymeric thin ?lms forcharacterized by a unique nanoparticle weight fraction; theinvestigate the effects of nanoparticle weight fractions on

Loh, Kenneth J.; Chang, Donghee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

306

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

307

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

308

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

309

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 6: Lead and Zinc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Lead and Zinc Lead and zinc ores are usually found together with gold and silver. A lead-zinc ore may also contain lead sulfide, zinc sulfide, iron sulfide, iron carbonate, and quartz. When zinc and lead sulfides are present in profitable amounts they are regarded as ore minerals. The remaining rock and minerals are called gangue. Forms of Lead and Zinc Ore The two principal minerals containing lead and zinc are galena and sphalerite. These two minerals are frequently found together along with other sulfide minerals, but one or the other may be predominant. Galena may contain small amounts of impurities including the precious metal silver, usually in the form of a sulfide. When silver is present in sufficient quantities, galena is regarded as a silver ore and called argentiferous galena. Sphalerite is zinc sulfide, but

312

Effect of zinc salt on transport, structural, and thermal properties of PEG-based polymer electrolytes for battery application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based electrolytes composed with zinc acetate Zn(CH3COO)2...have been prepared by using solution blending. We proposed a scheme of PEG–zinc acetate for battery application....

Anji Reddy Polu; Ranveer Kumar; Girish M. Joshi

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

314

July 2012 | ucsf global health sciences stuDent Policy brief | scaling uP oral rehyDration salts anD zinc Scaling up oral rehydration salts and zinc to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and zinc in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Tanzania.5 The Scaling Up of Zinc for Young Children (SUZY) Project.wpro.who.int/ internet/resources.ashx/CHD/docs/ENAcute_Diarrhoea_reprint.pdf. 3. Every Woman, Every Child. Zinc- hood diarrhoea in Bangladesh:

Klein, Ophir

315

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

316

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1996 was about $800 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production: Mine, recoverable 523 488 570 614 6201 Primary slab zinc

317

Zinc and Magnesium in Human Prostate Gland: Normal, Hyperplastic, and Neoplastic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hyperplastic gland. In addition, there was a marked...through a mixed-bed ion-exchange resin. All zinc and magnesium...plastic gland. In addition, there was a marked...S. Histochemi cal Demonstration of Zinc in the Dorsolateral...

Ferenc Györkey; Kyung-Whan Min; James A. Huff; and Phyllis Györkey

1967-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

pH dependence and compartmentalization of zinc transported across plasma membrane of rat cortical neurons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pH dependence and compartmentalization of zinc transported across plasma membrane of rat corticalH dependence and compartmental- ization of zinc transported across plasma membrane of rat cortical neurons. Am; ion transport; transition elements; primary culture IT IS KNOWN THAT Zn2 can enter neurons by two

319

MAGNESIUM AND ZINC BLOOD LEVELS IN MICE SENSITIVE TO AUDIOGENIC SEIZURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNESIUM AND ZINC BLOOD LEVELS IN MICE SENSITIVE TO AUDIOGENIC SEIZURES J.G. HENROTTE G. FRANCK., 1973 ; Durlach, 1976). Thus, it seemed of interest to study the zinc and magnesium levels in the blood the animals contained 2 % of a mineral mixture composed of magnesium hydroxide (13.8 %), Ca diphosphate (70

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

320

Effects of zinc on Salmonella in the layer house environments and laying hens, and the ability of zinc to induce molt in laying hens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environments, and its ability to induce a molt in single comb white leghorn hens. In part, the antibacterial properties of zinc may reduce environmental contamination in a poultry house by interrupting airborne routes. The first phase involved detecting...

Park, Shinyoung

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Analysis of Zinc 65 Contamination after Vacuum Thermal Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive contamination with a gamma energy emission consistent with {sup 65}Zn was detected in a glovebox following a vacuum thermal process. The contaminated components were removed from the glovebox and subjected to examination. Selected analytical techniques were used to determine the nature of the precursor material, i.e., oxide or metallic, the relative transferability of the deposit and its nature. The deposit was determined to be borne from natural zinc and was further determined to be deposited as a metallic material from vapor.

Korinko, Paul S.; Tosten, Michael H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Interactions of Zinc Thiolate Complexes and Exogenous Metal Species: Investigations of Thiolate Bridging and Metal Exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation and zinc displacement. To study such possible interactions between zinc finger proteins and platinum-bound DNA, the ZnN2S2 dimeric complex, N,N?-bis(2- mercaptoethyl)-1,4-diazacycloheptane zinc (II), [Zn-1?]2, has been examined for Znbound thiolate...

Almaraz, Elky

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

324

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Silver vanadium diphosphate Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Electrochemistry and characterization of reduced material providing mechanistic insights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silver vanadium phosphorous oxides (Ag{sub w}V{sub x}P{sub y}O{sub z}) are notable battery cathode materials due to their high energy density and demonstrated ability to form in-situ Ag metal nanostructured electrically conductive networks within the cathode. While analogous silver vanadium diphosphate materials have been prepared, electrochemical evaluations of these diphosphate based materials have been limited. We report here the first electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}, where the structural differences associated with phosphorous oxides versus diphosphates profoundly affect the associated electrochemistry. Reminiscent of Ag{sub 2}VO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} reduction, in-situ formation of silver metal nanoparticles was observed with reduction of Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. However, counter to Ag{sub 2}VO{sub 2}PO{sub 4} reduction, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} demonstrates a significant decrease in conductivity upon continued electrochemical reduction. Structural analysis contrasting the crystallography of the parent Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} with that of the proposed Li{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} reduction product is employed to gain insight into the observed electrochemical reduction behavior, where the structural rigidity associated with the diphosphate anion may be associated with the observed particle fracturing upon deep electrochemical reduction. Further, the diphosphate anion structure may be associated with the high thermal stability of the partially reduced Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8} materials, which bodes well for enhanced safety of batteries incorporating this material. - Graphical abstract: Structure and galvanostatic intermittent titration-type test data for silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. Highlights: ? First electrochemical study of a silver vanadium diphosphate, Ag{sub 2}VP{sub 2}O{sub 8}. ? In-situ formation of Ag{sup 0} nanoparticles was observed upon electrochemical reduction. ? Structural analysis used to provide insight of the electrochemical behavior.

Takeuchi, Esther S., E-mail: esther.takeuchi@stonybrook.edu [Department Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Global and Regional Solutions Directorate, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Lee, Chia-Ying; Cheng, Po-Jen [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Menard, Melissa C. [Department Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Marschilok, Amy C., E-mail: amy.marschilok@stonybrook.edu [Department Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Takeuchi, Kenneth J., E-mail: kenneth.takeuchi.1@stonybrook.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80 C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5--5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150 C to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2 [times] 10[sup 5] gave improved ductility modulus effect. 5 figs.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.R.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

327

Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80.degree. C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5-5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150.degree. C. to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2.times.10.sup.5 gave improved ductility modulus effect.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Carciello, Neal R. (Bellport, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

329

Precursors of the copper-zinc oxide methanol synthesis catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coprecipitated hydroxycarbonate precursor of the methanol synthesis and shift reaction catalyst based on 30 at.% copper and 70 at.% zinc oxide, which was previously reported to be a mixture of hydrozincite Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 and rosasite (Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2 (R. G. Herman, K. Klier, G. W. Simmons, B. P. Finn, J. B. Bulko, and T. P. Kobylinski, J. Catal. 56, 407, 1979) or a single-phase hydrozincite (G. Petrini, F. Montino, A. Bossi, and G. Gaybassi, in “Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis. Preparation of Catalysis III” (G. Poncelet, P. Grange, and P. A. Jacobs, Eds.), Vol. 16, p. 735. Elsevier, The Netherlands, 1983), is herein shown to be a single-phase aurichalcite (Cu0.3Zn0.7)5(CO3)2(OH)6. The orthorhombic B2212 aurichalcite is crystallograpically distinct from the monoclinic \\{C2m\\} hydrozincite, although these two compounds have the same ratio of metal ions to carbonate and hydroxyl anions. Both aurichalcite and hydrozincite are chemically and structurally distinct from the monoclinic \\{P21a\\} rosasite. The earlier erroneous assignments are attributed to the structural similarity of the three hydroxycarbonates in question. An energy-dispersive characteristic X-ray emission analysis of individual particles in the scanning transmission electron microscope reveals a uniform distribution of copper and zinc at the analytical concentration CuZn = 3070. Precursors with less than 30% copper consist of mixtures of aurichalcite and hydrozincite.

P.B. Himelfarb; G.W. Simmons; K. Klier; R.G. Herman

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Zinc oxide nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amylase inhibitors also known as starch blockers contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body via inhibiting breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ones. In this sense these materials are projected as having potential applications in diabetes control. In this context we report on zinc oxide nanoparticles as possible alpha-amylase inhibitors. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using soft-chemistry approach and 1-thioglycerol was used as a surfactant to yield polycrystalline nanoparticles of size ? 18 ? nm stabilized in wurtzite structure. Conjugation study and structural characterization have been done using x-ray diffraction technique Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy UV-visible spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity studies on human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) and skin carcinoma (A-431) cell lines as well as mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 20 ? ? g / ml ZnOnanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. We report for the first time the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of ZnOnanoparticles wherein an optimum dose of 20 ? ? g / ml was sufficient to exhibit 49% glucose inhibition at neutral p H and 35 ? ° C temperature. This inhibitory activity was similar to that obtained with acarbose (a standard alpha-amylase inhibitor) thereby projecting ZnOnanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors.

Sandip Dhobale; Trupti Thite; S. L. Laware; C. V. Rode; Soumya J. Koppikar; Ruchika-Kaul Ghanekar; S. N. Kale

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.

D. W. Akers

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Third order nonlinear optical properties of bismuth zinc borate glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Third order nonlinear optical characterization of bismuth zinc borate glasses are reported here using different laser pulse durations. Bismuth zinc borate glasses with compositions xBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30ZnO-(70-x) B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x?=?30, 35, 40, and 45?mol. %) have been prepared by melt quenching method. These glasses were characterized by Raman, UV-Vis absorption, and Z scan measurements. Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopic results indicate that non-bridging oxygens increase with increase of bismuth content in the glass. Nonlinear absorption and refraction behavior in the nanosecond (ns), picosecond (ps), and femtosecond (fs) time domains were studied in detail. Strong reverse saturable absorption due to dominant two-photon absorption (TPA) was observed with both ps and fs excitations. In the case of ns pulse excitations, TPA and free-carrier absorption processes contribute for the nonlinear absorption. Two-photon absorption coefficient (?) and the absorption cross section due to free carriers (?{sub e}) are estimated by theoretical fit of the open aperture Z-scan measurements and found to be dependent on the amount of bismuth oxide in the glass composition. In both ns and fs regimes the sign and magnitude of the third order nonlinearity are evaluated, and the optical limiting characteristics are also reported.

Shanmugavelu, B.; Ravi Kanth Kumar, V. V., E-mail: ravi.phy@pondiuni.edu.in [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Kuladeep, R.; Narayana Rao, D. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, Andhra Pradesh (India)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

334

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

335

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

336

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

337

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

338

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

339

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

340

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

342

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

343

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

344

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

345

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

346

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

347

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

348

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

349

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

350

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

351

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

352

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

353

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

354

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

355

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

356

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

357

Effect of morphology and solvent on two-photon absorption of nano zinc oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? ZnO nanospheres and triangular structures synthesis by novel precipitation technique. ? The effect of precursor concentration on the size and shape of nano ZnO. ? Open aperture Z-scan measurements of the ZnO nanoparticle dispersions. ? Nanospheres exhibit higher two photon absorption coefficient than triangular nanostructures. ? Nanospheres dispersed in water exhibit higher two photon absorption coefficient than its dispersion in 2-propanol. - Abstract: In this paper, we report the effect of morphology and solvent on the two-photon absorption of nano zinc oxide. Zinc oxide nanoparticles in two different morphologies like nanospheres and triangular nanostructures are synthesized by novel precipitation technique and their two-photon absorption coefficient is measured using open aperture Z-scan technique. Experimental results show that the zinc oxide nanospheres exhibit higher two-photon absorption coefficient than the zinc oxide triangular nanostructures. The zinc oxide nanospheres dispersed in water exhibit higher two-photon absorption coefficient than that of its dispersion in 2-propanol. The zinc oxide nanospheres dispersed in water shows a decrease in two-photon absorption coefficient with an increase in on-axis irradiance. The result confirms the dependence of shape and solvent on the two-photon absorption of nano zinc oxide.

Kavitha, M.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India); Haripadmam, P.C.; Gopinath, Pramod; Krishnan, Bindu [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India); John, Honey, E-mail: honey@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

The magnetic properties of the iron-rich, iron-nickel-zinc alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this density. The samples were again sealed in steel jackets with a 12 small amount of zinc to maintain the vapor pressure high enough to al- low the impregnated zinc to remain in the samples. The jacketed speci- 0 mens were heated to 1000 C for two hours.... This curve indicated that the coercive force is strongly affected by the zinc content of the al- loy. Fig, 12 is a plot of hardness against nickel content. The 10 w/o Zn al'loys gave the greatest hardness with low nickel content. As the nickel content...

Gupton, Paul Stephen

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermodynamic Investigation of Electrolytes of the Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (II): A Study on Low-Temperature Heat Capacities and Thermodynamic Properties of VOSO4·2.63H2O(s)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Investigation of Electrolytes of the Vanadium Redox Flow Battery (II): A Study on Low-Temperature Heat Capacities and Thermodynamic Properties of VOSO4·2.63H2O(s) ... The low-temperature heat capacities of VOSO4·2.63H2O(s) which is a key component in the electrolyte of the vanadium redox flow battery were measured by adiabatic calorimetry in the temperature range of (78 to 388) K, and the experimental values of the molar heat capacities in the temperature regions of (78 to 372) K were fitted to a polynomial equation. ... The vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) was first proposed and investigated by Skyllas-Kazacos et al.,(1, 2) in which the V(II)/V(III) and V(IV)/V(V) redox couples were successfully employed as the negative and positive half-cell electrolytes. ...

Ye Qin; Jian-Guo Liu; You-Ying Di; Chuan-Wei Yan; Chao-Liu Zeng; Jia-Zhen Yang

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

362

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

363

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

364

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

365

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

366

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

367

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

368

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

369

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

370

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

371

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

372

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

373

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

374

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

375

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

376

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

377

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

378

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

379

Zinc oxysulfide ternary alloy nanocrystals: A bandgap modulated photocatalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Herein, we report a green economic route for the synthesis of a series of Zinc Oxysulfide (ZOS) (ZnO{sub 1-x}S{sub x}; 0 {<=} x {>=} 1; x = Sulfur) alloys nanoparticles. The crystallographic features of ZnO, ZOS, and ZnS confirmed by X-Ray Diffraction and validated by Transmission Electron Microscopy reveal the variation of lattice spacing in binary and ternary compositions with homogenous elemental distribution. The photocatalytic analysis of ZOS (0.4) is performed and compared with Degussa P25 to ascertain its photocatalytic activity against methyl orange under irradiation of 365 nm UV-Vis light. A bandgap of 2.7 eV for ZOS (0.4) aptly establishes its prospects for sunlight driven photocatalysis.

Pandey, Shiv K. [Department of Chemistry, MN National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India) [Department of Chemistry, MN National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India); Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad (India); Pandey, Shipra; Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad (India)] [Nanotechnology Application Centre, University of Allahabad, Allahabad (India); Mehrotra, G. K. [Department of Chemistry, MN National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India)] [Department of Chemistry, MN National Institute of Technology, Allahabad (India)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

380

Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; and James, R.B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

382

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

383

Performance Enhancement of a Graphene-Zinc Phosphide Solar Cell Using the Electric Field-Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Enhancement of a Graphene-Zinc Phosphide Solar Cell Using the Electric Field, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, United States Material Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, United States § Department of Applied Physics

Javey, Ali

384

Understanding Zinc Quantification with Existing and Advanced Ditopic Fluorescent Zinpyr Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment of aqueous zinc solutions with incremental additions of a ditopic fluorescent sensor of the Zinpyr family, based on pyridine/pyrazine-containing metal recognition units, affords a fluorescence titration curve ...

Buccella, Daniela

385

Mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores: Problems and solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores are most often found in the transition, and occasionally in the oxidised, zones of lead–zinc ore-bodies. They are of great importance because there are numerous unexploited or abandoned reserves of these ores in the world. However they present difficulties for conventional mineral processing due to complex mineralogy. In this paper, the specific problems associated with these types of ores are described and methods for solving these problems, combining economic and technical considerations, are discussed. The results of experiments carried out at laboratory scale are presented, in which the dissolution of mixed ore in sulphuric acid without oxidising agents was investigated. The results show the feasibility of zinc recovery from mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores, which underlines the potential of this approach. We also propose a conceptual flow diagram for the hydrometallurgical processing of these ores.

S. Moradi; A.J. Monhemius

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Ribosomal Zinc Finger Proteins: The Structure and the Function of Yeast YL37a  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zinc finger motifs are common in ribosomal proteins: they are widely distributed in nature, having been found amongst the proteins of both subunits of the ribosomes of all species examined in the three kingdom...

John Dresios; Yuen-Ling Chan; Ira G. Wool

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Comparison of Nanocomposites Prepared from Sodium, Zinc, and Lithium Ionomers of Ethylene/Methacrylic Acid Copolymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morphology and mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared by melt mixing a montmorillonite-based organoclay with lithium, sodium, and zinc ionomers of poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) are presented here. The effect of the type of neutralizing ...

Rhutesh K. Shah; D. R. Paul

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dependence of the activation energy of vacancy formation on the zinc content in alpha brasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations on quenched-in resistivity in alpha brasses showed an apparent decrease in the activation energy of vacancy formation with increasing zinc content from a value of 0·85 eV ... up to a concentration of...

R. Kamel; T. H. Youssef

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum-doped zinc oxide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for the first time at 800 Torr... reserved. Keywords: Transparent-conducting oxide (TCO); AlZnO; PECVD 1. Introduction Aluminum-doped zinc... PECVD for the deposition of ......

390

Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

Simchi, Hamidreza, E-mail: simchi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Semiconductor Technology Center, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi@iust.ac.ir; Mazidabadi, Hossein [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

CATALYTIC LIQUEFACTION BY ZINC CHLORIDE MELTS AT PRE-PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3% Zn and 14% CH oH (50 g coal 9 300 g melt) Atomic TempVermeulen, "High-Yield Coal Conversion in a Zinc Chloride/H. Shinn, and T. Vermeulen, "Coal Lic;uefaction Catalysis by

Vermeulen, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electrical current suppression in Pd-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires caused by reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pd nanoparticle-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires (Pd-VONs) were synthesized. Electrical current suppression was observed when the Pd-VON was exposed to hydrogen gas, which cannot be explained by the work function changes mentioned in previous report such as Pd-doped carbon nanotubes and SnO{sub 2} nanowires. Using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we found that the reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure plays an important role in the current suppression of the Pd-VON.

Kim, Byung Hoon; Oh, Soon-Young; Yu, Han Young; Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Yark Yeon; Hong, Won G. [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Jeong Yong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Jin [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

C:\Documents and Settings\burris\My Documents\My Files\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Zinc\June 2007\Eco-SSL for Zinc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-73 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 June 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR ZINC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE .

394

The effect of phosphorus and zinc on mineral nutrition and growth of flax plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF PHOSPHORUS AND ZINC ON NINERAL NUTRITICN AND GROWTH OF FLAX PLANTS A THESIS PAUL B. I'IATOCHA, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AkN University in partial fulfillment oi' the requirements for the degree... of PASTER QF SCIENCE January 1967 Najor Subject: Agronomy THE EFFECT OF PHOSPHORUS AND ZINC GN MINERAL NUTRITION AND GROMTH OF FLAX PLANTS A Thesis PAUL B. MATOCHA, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ~v...

Matocha, Paul B

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF[sub 2], ThO[sub 2], YDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]-0.15YO[sub 1.5]), and LDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]- 0.15LaO[sub 1.5]) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}, YDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}-0.15YO{sub 1.5}), and LDT(0.85ThO{sub 2}- 0.15LaO{sub 1.5}) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

Ebbinghaus, B.B.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2013, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials included galvanizing residues and crude zinc oxide processed from electric arc furnace dust. Import Sources (2009­12): Ore and concentrate: Peru, 76%; Ireland, 8%; Mexico, 8%; Canada, 7%; and other, 1%. Metal: Canada, 72%; Mexico, 13%; Peru, 7%; Spain, 2%; and other, 6%. Waste and scrap: Canada, 65

398

Compositions of nickel and vanadium porphyrins of the new Albany shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Post-depositional processes, both biologic and non-biologic, may alter the stable isotopic composition of total organic matter in sediments. However, because geoporphyrins are primarily derived from chlorophyll their stable isotopic composition is most likely representative of the stable isotopic composition of primary photosynthate. Hence, development of reliable methods for the isolation of geoporphyrin concentrates from geologic samples is of considerable geochemical significance. Existing methods for isolation of geoporphyrins tend to be slow, labor intensive and sample specific. Organic-rich shales typically contain 1 to 1,000 ppm geoporphyrin. Six to nine orders of magnitude of chemical purification are, thus, required in order to obtain a purified geoporphyrin sample suitable for a carbon isotopic composition measurement. Because of the diversity of chemical constituents in geologic samples, purification of geoporphyrins must involve multi-step separations. High multiples of chemical selectivity can be obtained when successive steps include a series of unrelated sorptive modes. Modern liquid chromatographic and spectrophotometric detection techniques offer capabilities needed to purify the nearly non-volatile geoporphyrins and to aid the establishment of reliable and rapid analytical methodology. Such methodology is not easily developed, and the use of carbon-isotopic mass spectrometry is explored here for its possible value to method development, method evaluation and, finally, a meaningful determination of isotopic composition. The relationship between chemical and isotopic composition if of particular interest in the work presented here.

Freeman, D.H.; Angeles, R.M.; Takigiku, R.; Hayes, J.M.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

405

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

406

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

407

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

408

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

409

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

410

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

411

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

412

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

413

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

414

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

415

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

416

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

417

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

418

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

419

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

420

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

422

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

423

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

424

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

425

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

426

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

427

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

432

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,262 1,938 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total

Kay, Mark A.

435

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (?)-Acylfulvene and (?)- Irofulven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report our full account of the enantioselective total synthesis of (?)-acylfulvene (1) and (?)-irofulven (2), which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of the molecular framework of these antitumor ...

Movassaghi, Mohammad

436

A GENUINELY HIGH ORDER TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TVD) schemes solving one-dimensional scalar conservation laws degenerate to first order .... where the total variation is measured by the standard bounded variation ..... interval Ij and into the jump discontinuities at cell interfaces, see [12].

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

438

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

439

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

440

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

442

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

443

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

444

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

445

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

446

Retaining the 3D Framework of Zinc Sponge Anodes upon Deep Discharge in Zn–Air Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

zinc; zinc?air; batteries; morphology; energy; three-dimensional architecture ... Zinc-based batteries offer many appealing characteristics, including low-cost components, water-based electrolytes, and high energy density, yet their broader applicability has been limited by suboptimal performance of the Zn anode, which undergoes complex chemical and electrochemical reactions during operation. ... discharge depth-of-discharge specific capacityaverage dischargespecific energy Rcell,initialc Rcell,post?dischargec ...

Joseph F. Parker; Eric S. Nelson; Matthew D. Wattendorf; Christopher N. Chervin; Jeffrey W. Long; Debra R. Rolison

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Ordered Nucleation Sites for the Growth of Zinc Oxide Nanofibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) offer a promising route to low cost photovoltaic (PV) technology that can be inexpensively manufactured on a large scale for use in power generation and commercial products. Solar power conversion efficiencies of laboratory scale OPV devices have recently reached ~5%; however, projected efficiencies of at least 10% will be required for commercialization. An analogous approach that has arisen recently that can potentially increase efficiencies employs metal oxide semiconductors as the electron acceptor, creating a hybrid organic-inorganic device. This approach offers the advantage that the conduction band of the oxide can be tuned in a systematic way through doping, thus potentially achieving higher photovoltages in the device. Additionally, nanostructures of these materials can be easily grown from precursor solutions, providing a technique to precisely control the nanoscale geometry. This work focuses on using ZnO, which is known to have high electron mobility (>100 cm2/Vs), as the electron acceptor. Nanofibers of ZnO can be grown from precursors such as zinc acetate or zinc nitrate to form arrays of nanofibers into which a conjugated polymer can be intercalated to form a composite PV device. The morphology of the nanofiber array is critical to the performance of the device, but current methods of nanofiber growth from a flat, polycrystalline nucleation layer allow for little morphological control. To overcome this limitation, we have created ordered arrays of ZnO nucleation sites with controllable size and spacing. Toluene solutions of diblock copolymer micelles with ZnCl2 incorporated into the micellar cores were spin-coated onto glass substrates and etched with an O2 plasma to yield hexagonally ordered arrays of ZnO nanoparticles that functioned as nucleation sites. Changing the concentration of ZnCl2 and the molecular weight and ratio of the diblock copolymer resulted in systematic variation in the size and spacing of the nucleation sites. Thermal anneal treatment provided further modification of the nucleation layer, from which ZnO nanofibers were successfully grown from solution, although at present it is not known if the geometry of the as-grown ZnO nanofibers precisely reflects that of the underlying nucleation layer. This work provides a simple and useful method for potentially controlling the nucleation of ZnO nanofibers to be used in hybrid ZnO/organic nanocomposite PV devices.

Wang, J.; Ginley, D.S.; Shaheen, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Synthesis of Nanostructured Carbides of Titanium and Vanadium from Metal Oxides and Ferroalloys Through High-energy Mechanical Milling and Heat Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbides of Ti and V have been synthesized directly from their oxides and ferroalloys through mechanical milling and heat treatment. The powder mixtures are milled in a planetary ball mill from 15-80 hours and subsequently heat treated at 1000-1300 deg. C for TiO{sub 2}-C mixtures, at 500-550 deg. C for V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-C mixtures and at 600-1000 deg. C for (Fe-V)-C mixtures. The milled and heat treated powders are characterized by SEM, EDAX, XRD, and BET techniques. Nanostructured TiC has been successfully synthesized under suitable processing conditions. However, carbides of vanadium is unidentified even though possibilities of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-C reaction are indicated with an extent of induced amorphism in the powder mixture. Density, specific surface area and particle size of the milled and heat treated mixtures are correlated with heat treatment temperatures. Similar attempts are also made to synthesize vanadium carbides from industrial grade Fe-V.

Basu, P.; Jian, P. F.; Seong, K. Y.; Seng, G. S.; Hussain, Z.; Aziz, A. [School of Materials and Minerals Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Masrom, A. K. [Advanced Materials Research Centre (AMREC), SIRIM Bhd, Kulim Hi-Tech Park, Kulim 09000 (Malaysia)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

449

| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory | Total Scattering at the Lujan Center Neutron Powder Diffractometer (NPDF) High-Intensity Powder. Shoemaker, et al., Reverse Monte Carlo neutron scattering study of disordered crystalline materials neutron| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments

Magee, Joseph W.

450

Structural basis for the selective nuclear import of the C2H2 zinc-finger protein Snail by importin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The X-ray structure of the complex of the nuclear transporter importin with the zinc-finger-type transcription regulator Snail1 is reported.

Choi, S.

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

451

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C8, suppZ6ment au n08, Tome 41, aoGt 1980, page C8-163 STUDY OF LIQUID NICKEL-VANADIUM ALLOYS BY NEUTRON DIFFRACTION AND MODEL SIMULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 28 i s the scattering angle, X the neutron wave- length, Q = 4n the modulus of the scattering vector NICKEL-VANADIUM ALLOYS BY NEUTRON DIFFRACTION AND MODEL SIMULATION J.L. Lemarchand, J. Bletry and P with model c a l c u l a t i o ~can lead to a quantitative interpreta- tion. In this paper, neutron

Boyer, Edmond

452

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

453

Degradation characteristics of air cathode in zinc air fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) is a promising candidate for electrical energy storage and electric vehicle propulsion. However, its limited durability has become a major obstacle for its successful commercialization. In this study, 2-cell stacks, 25 cm² cells and three-electrode half-cells are constructed to experimentally investigate the degradation characteristics of the air cathode. The results of electrochemical tests reveal that the peak power density for the 25 cm2 cell with a new air cathode is 454 mW cm?2, which is twice as the value of the used air cathode. The electrochemical impedance analysis shows that both the charge transfer resistance and the mass transfer resistance of the used air cathodes have increased, suggesting that the catalyst surface area and gas diffusion coefficient have decreased significantly. Additionally, the microstructure and morphology of the catalytic layer (CL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are characterized by scanning electron microscopes (SEM). SEM results confirm that the micropores in CL and GDL of the used air cathode are seriously clogged, and many catalyst particles are lost. Therefore, the performance degradation is mainly due to the clogging of micropores and loss of catalyst particles. Furthermore, hypotheses of degradation mechanism and mitigation strategies for GDL and CL are discussed briefly.

Ze Ma; Pucheng Pei; Keliang Wang; Xizhong Wang; Huachi Xu; Yongfeng Liu; Guanlin peng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Adhesion properties of polyelectrolyte-chemisorbed zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been reported that when mild carbon cold-rolled steels are immersed in the Zn/sub 3/(PO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ . 2H/sub 2/O-H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O solution systems, the surface microfeatures of crystalline zinc phosphate (Zn . Ph) conversion coating deposited on the steel substrate surface were characterized by large rectangular-like crystal arrays of insoluble Zn . Ph hydrate. Deformation failures of layers having low stiffness characteristics appear to be directly related to the development of micropores and fissures which reduce the effectiveness of the corrosion-resistant coatings. Thus, it is necessary to increase the flexural modulus of the layers in order to restrain the physical deformation failures of the crystalline precoats. The brittle characteristics of the Zn . Ph can be modified by the introduction of the polyacrylic acid (PAA) macromolecules into the phosphating solutions. The incorporation of PAA, which is generally expressed as a polyelectrolyte macromolecule, was shown to form a highly dense fine crystal topography, suggesting that the crystal formation results in an improvement in the stiffness and ductility characteristics of the normally brittle Zn . Ph layers. Accordingly, emphasis of the present paper is given to the finding as to how the molecular structures and functional species of polyelectrolytes act to suppress crystal growth of Zn . Ph and improve interfacial bond durability of Zn . Ph-to-polymeric adhesive joints. 2 refs., 5 figs.

Sugama, T.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

457

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

458

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

459

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Degradation of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings by vanadium pentoxide, phosphorous pentoxide, and sodium sulfate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of vanadium, phosphorus, and sodium impurities in petcoke and coal/petcoke blends used in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature material degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbines. In this study, degradation reactions of free-standing air plasma-sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) in contact with V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were investigated at temperatures up to 1200{sup o}C. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Molten V{sub 2}O{sub 5} reacted with solid YSZ to form ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} at temperatures below 747{sup o}C. However, at temperatures above 747{sup o}C, molten V{sub 2}O{sub 5} reacted with YSZ to form yttrium vanadate (YVO{sub 4}). The formation of YVO{sub 4} led to the depletion of the Y2O{sub 3} stabilizer and deleterious transformation to the monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} phase. In addition, studies on YSZ degradation by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and a Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+V{sub 2}O{sub 5} mixture (50-50 mol%) showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} itself had no effect on the degradation of YSZ. However, in the presence of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at high temperatures, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} forms vanadate compounds having a lower melting point such as sodium metavanadate (610{sup o}C), which was found to degrade YSZ by the formation of YVO{sub 4} at a relatively lower temperature of 700{sup o}C. P{sub 2}O{sub 5} was found to react with APS YSZ by the formation of ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} at all the temperatures studied. At temperatures as low as 200{sup o}C and as high as 1200{sup o}C, molten P{sub 2}O{sub 5} was observed to react with solid YSZ to yield ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, which led to the depletion of ZrO{sub 2} in YSZ that promoted the formation of the fluorite-cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase.

Mohan, P.; Yuan, B.; Patterson, T.; Desai, V.H.; Sohn, Y.H. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

462

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA...

463

Threshold concentrations in zinc-doped lithium niobate crystals and their structural conditionality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of precise X-ray diffraction study of lithium niobate single crystals of congruent composition and four zinc-doped (at 2.8, 5.2, 7.6, and 8.2 mol %) crystals, structural conditionality of the threshold concentrations of the dopant has been established. At these concentrations, the mechanism of zinc incorporation into crystal changes. As the zinc concentration increases, this element first substitutes excess niobium, localized in lithium positions, with a simultaneous decrease in the number of vacancies in these positions. Then zinc substitutes lithium with formation of new lithium vacancies. When a certain limit on the number of vacancies is reached, zinc begins to substitute niobium in its main positions. This process is naturally accompanied by a decrease in the number of vacancies to their complete disappearance and formation of a self-compensating crystal. The character of the dependence of the crystal physical properties on the dopant concentration changes specifically when the impurity concentration passes through the threshold values.

Chernaya, T. S.; Volk, T. R.; Verin, I. A.; Simonov, V. I., E-mail: simonov@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

The Leica TCRA1105 Reflectorless Total Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster provides an overview of SLAC's TCRA1105 reflectorless total station for the Alignment Engineering Group. This instrument has shown itself to be very useful for planning new construction and providing quick measurements to difficult to reach or inaccessible surfaces.

Gaudreault, F.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

465

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA SÃ?RENSEN in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback been built and the experiments verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation

Skogestad, Sigurd

466

Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 12 Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their Phenomenological Effect on Climate. Phenomenological solar signature on climate 310 9. Conclusion 312 1. INTRODUCTION A contiguoustotal solar from each other, in particular about whether the TSI minimum during solar Cycles 22e23 (1995

Scafetta, Nicola

467

A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

468

One-Step Synthesis of Graphene/Polypyrrole Nanofiber Composites as Cathode Material for a Biocompatible Zinc/Polymer Battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-Step Synthesis of Graphene/Polypyrrole Nanofiber Composites as Cathode Material for a Biocompatible Zinc/Polymer Battery ... Miniature or flexible aqueous metal–air batteries are currently considered to be one of the most promising candidates for powering mIMDs, which mainly include the zinc–air battery system and the magnesium–air battery system. ...

Sha Li; Kewei Shu; Chen Zhao; Caiyun Wang; Zaiping Guo; Gordon Wallace; Hua Kun Liu

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

469

Contribution of calcium-conducting channels to the transport of zinc ions Alexandre Bouron 1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Contribution of calcium-conducting channels to the transport of zinc ions Alexandre Bouron 1. The mechanisms controlling its transport through the plasma membrane are far from being completely understood in the cellular uptake of zinc. These ion channels are currently described as systems dedicated to the transport

470

The insert of zinc oxide thin film in indium tin oxide anode for organic electroluminescence devices q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure including a trans- parent anode, an organic active layer, and a metallic cathode. It has recently zinc oxide films have been actively investigated as alternate materials to ITO because zinc oxide consisted of Al as a cathode, Al2O3 as an electro transport layer, Alq3 as a luminously layer, TPD as a hole

Boo, Jin-Hyo

471

Co-sputtered Aluminum Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Film as Transparent Anode for Organic Light-emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co-sputtered Aluminum Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Film as Transparent Anode for Organic Light and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China ABSTRACT Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO that MTDATA matches better with AZO than CuPc, which served as hole injection layer. Keywords: Aluminum doped

472

Zinc Deficiency Linked to Increased Risk of Less-Common Form of Esophageal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Cancer Institute National Cancer Institute Journal of the NCI X-ray Microscopy Group Zinc Deficiency Linked to Increased Risk of Less-Common Form of Esophageal Cancer Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at X-ray Operations and Research beamline 2-BM at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source have found that zinc deficiency in humans is associated with an increased risk of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, an often-fatal form of esophageal cancer that has about 7,000 cases a year. NCI researchers used a novel approach to measure the concentration of zinc and other elements directly in the esophageal tissue. Their results, appearing in the February 15, 2005, Journal of the National

473

Selenium, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc Concentrations in Sediments and Mullet (Mugil cephalus) from the Southern Basin of Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selenium, Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc Concentrations in Sediments and Mullet (Mugil cephalus) from. Selenium, cadmium, copper, and zinc concentrations were measured in sediments and the tissues of mullet­19; cadmium, 14­42; copper, 1.5­3.6; zinc, 0.77­2.2 times background). Selenium, cadmium, and copper in Lake

Canberra, University of

474

Water Quality: Its Relationship to Livestock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concen- trations. Examples are iron, copper, cobalt, zinc, iodide and manganese. These elements do not seem to accumu- late in meat or milk to the extent that they would cause a problem. The most common water quality problems affecting livestock... 0.002 0.01 0.01 Molybdenum Not established No limit Nickel 1.0 Nitrate-N 10.0 100 300 Nitrite-N 10 10 Salinity See Table 2 Selenium 0.01 Silver 0.05 Sulfate e 250 Total Dissolved Solids e 500 Vanadium 0.1 1.0 Zinc 5.0 25...

Faries Jr., Floron C.; Sweeten, John M.; Reagor, John C.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

The mass transfer and kinetics for zinc deposition from bromide media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bro, I. 0 MNctBr 7. 0 5. 0 5 E 40 3. 0 2. 0 I. O 4 8 12 16 20 24 I/~ Vw (RAD/S) Figure 8. Limiting currents for zinc deposition as a function of the square root of rotational speed. 34 Table 1. Analysis of the Zn Diffusion Coefficient +2...THE MASS TRANSFER AND KINETICS FOR ZINC DEPOSITION FROM BROMIDE MEDIA A Thesis by MARK ALAN EDMUND Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Comnittee) (Member (Member) (Member) (Head of Department) May 1980 1385319 ABSTRACT...

Edmund, Mark Alan

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Humectants To Augment Current From Metallized Zinc Cathodic Protection Systems on Concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cathodic protection (CP) systems using thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are employed to mitigate the corrosion process in reinforced concrete structures. However, the performance of the anodes is improved by moisture at the anode-concrete interface. Research was conducted to investigate the effect of hydrophilic chemical additives, humectants, on the electrical performance and service life of zinc anodes. Lithium bromide and lithium nitrate were identified as feasible humectants with lithium bromide performing better under galvanic CP and lithium nitrate performing better under impressed current CP. Both humectants improved the electrical operating characteristics of the anode and increased the service life by up to three years.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino Jr., Bernard S.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Russell, James H. Russell; Bullard, Sophie J.; Collins, W. Keith; Bennett, Jack E. (J.E. Bennett Consulting, Inc.); Soltesz, Steven M. (ODOT); Laylor, H. Martin (ODOT)

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 .mu.m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO.sub.3 ; and then indurating it at 800.degree. to 900.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Durham, NC); Jain, Suresh C. (Morgantown, WV)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Characteristics of polyacrylic acid-complexed zinc phosphate conversion films deposited on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When water-soluble polyacrylic acid (PAA) macromolecules having MW 90,000 to 250,000 are introduced into zinc phosphating liquids, significant improvements in the properties of conventional crystalline zinc phosphate conversion films deposited on carbon steel surfaces can be obtained. The improvements include the controllability of the crystal dimensions, the degree of crystallinity, and the coating weight. The conversion complex formation plays an essential role in increasing the ductility of the normally brittle conventional crystal films. Furthermore, the thickness (20 to 40 A) and surface roughness of the thin PAA overlayer significantly acts to enhance the adhesive force at the interface between organic polymer topcoats and the complex coating.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

The pH dependence of dihydroorotic acid synthesis catalyzed by zinc and cobalt dihydroorotase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE pH DEPENDENCE (P DIHYDROGRCTIC ACID SYNTHESIS CATALYZED BY ZINC AND COBALT DIHYDROORC1IASE A Thesis by RITA ROY CHOUDHJRY ~roved style and content: ( zrrren af Ccmittee) (Manter ) ( ) ( of Iepsrt~t) Ann~st I984 The pH Dependence... of Dihydroorotic Acid Synthesis Catalyzed by Zinc and Cobalt Dihydroorotase. (August 1984 ) Rita Roy Choudhury, N. Sc, University of Banbay Chairman af Advisory Ccmitee: Dr. E. G. Sander Dihydroorotase (1-5, 6 dihydroorotate mnidohydrolase E. C. 3. 5. 2. 3...

Roy Choudhury, Rita

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vanadium zinc total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network

482

Total Neutron Scattering in Vitreous Silica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of Corning superpure vitreous silica glass has been investigated with neutrons. A new method of analysis using variable neutron wavelengths and the measurement of total scattering cross sections from transmission experiments is developed and the results are compared with those from differential x-ray scattering. The total neutron scattering method permits a simple and direct structure analysis with resolution apparently superior to x-rays. The preliminary results compare well in a first approximation analysis with the basic structure model of Warren and others and in addition the neutron-determined atomic radial distribution curve exhibits some finer details than the x-ray results. Thermal inelastic scattering of neutrons was corrected for in an approximate way.

R. J. Breen; R. M. Delaney; P. J. Persiani; A. H. Weber

1957-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

484

Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Low-temperature oriented growth of vanadium dioxide films on CoCrTa metal template on Si and vertical metal-insulator transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors achieved oriented growth of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) films on CoCrTa metal template grown on an Si substrate. Low-temperature ({approx}250 Degree-Sign C) deposition of VO{sub 2} films using inductively coupled-plasma-assisted sputtering technique realized an abrupt interface between VO{sub 2} and CoCrTa layers, suppressing the oxidation and diffusion of metal components. The films revealed a metal-insulator transition with resistance change of over 2 orders of magnitude. The CoCrTa film, in which Co hexagonal crystalline grains with c-axis orientation were surrounded by segregated Cr and Ta, serves for the oriented growth of VO{sub 2} crystalline film, enabling higher orders of transition in resistance and low voltage switching, even for the vertical (out-of-plane) direction.

Okimura, Kunio; Mian, Md.Suruz [School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Improved selection in totally monotone arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper's main result is an O(({radical}{bar m}lgm)(n lg n) + mlg n)-time algorithm for computing the kth smallest entry in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array. (A two-dimensional A = a(i,j) is totally monotone if for all i{sub 1} < i{sub 2} and j{sub 1} < j{sup 2}, < a(i{sub 1},j{sub 2}) implies a(i{sub 2},j{sub 1})). For large values of k (in particular, for k=(n/2)), this algorithm is significantly faster than the O(k(m+n))-time algorithm for the same problem due to Kravets and Park. An immediate consequence of this result is an O(n{sup 3/2} lg{sup 2}n)-time algorithm for computing the kth nearest neighbor of each vertex of a convex n-gon. In addition to the main result, we also give an O(n lg m)-time algorithm for computing an approximate median in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array; this approximate median is an entry whose rank in its row lies between (n/4) and (3n/4) {minus} 1. 20 refs., 3 figs.

Mansour, Y. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Aiken Computation Lab.); Park, J.K. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Schieber, B. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Sen, S. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

488

Zirconium vanadium chromium alloy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ternary intermetallic compound having the formula Zr(V/sub 1-x/Cr/sub x/)/sub 2/ where x is in the range of 0.01 to 0.90 is capable of reversibly sorbing hydrogen at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200/sup 0/C, at pressures down to 10/sup -6/ torr. The compound is suitable for use as a hydrogen getter in low pressure, high temperature applications such as magnetic confinement fusion devices.

Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.

1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

489

Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

72 Federal Register 72 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update student financial aid records using telecommunication software. Eligible respondents include the following, but are not limited to, institutions of higher education that participate in Title IV, HEA assistance programs, third-party servicers of eligible institutions,

490

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Neutron Total Cross Sections at 20 Mev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the T(d, n)He4 reaction as a monoenergetic source of neutrons of about 20 Mev, the total cross sections of 13 elements have been measured by a transmission experiment. These cross sections vary approximately as A23 as is to be expected from the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. The cross section for hydrogen at 19.93 Mev is 0.504±0.01 barn. This result, together with other results at lower energies, seems to require a Yukawa potential in both the singlet and triplet n-p states and a singlet effective range that is lower than that obtained from p-p scattering data.

Robert B. Day and Richard L. Henkel

1953-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

Phytoextraction of Zinc by Oat (Avena sativa), Barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phytoextraction of Zinc by Oat (Avena sativa), Barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea) ... When the point is reached where barley fails to maintain a high rate of Zn removal, chelate addition could then be used with B. juncea to solubilize residual Zn that had previously been unavailable for uptake. ...

Stephen D. Ebbs; Leon V. Kochian

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

493

ON THE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF POROUS ELECTROPLATED ZINC COATINGS IN DIFFERENT CORROSIVE MEDIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ON THE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF POROUS ELECTROPLATED ZINC COATINGS IN DIFFERENT CORROSIVE MEDIA Y(0)546457272. e-mail : fpedraza@univ-lr.fr Abstract The corrosion resistance of an electroplated (EP) Zn coating corrosive media (NaCl, NaOH and rain water). Four different faradaic relaxation processes were clearly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

494

Events associated with restoration by zinc of meiosis in apomictic Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was not detected in A-P conditions. blance to those reported to accompany heat shock...imperfectly ordered zinc-induced tubulin sheets using cross-correlation and real space...meiotic systems. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. 27. Moens, P. B...

C A Bilinski; J J Miller; S C Girvitz

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Intercombination lines of the zinc isoelectronic sequence for Z = 50–70  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intercombination lines of the zinc sequence corresponding to the transition 4s4p 3P1?4s2 1S0 have been observed for xenon, lanthanum, neodymium, europium, gadolinium, and ytterbium in the Princeton Large Torus tokamak discharges.

E. Hinnov; P. Beiersdorfer; R. Bell; J. Stevens; S. Suckewer; S. von Goeler; A. Wouters; D. Dietrich; M. Gerassimenko; E. Silver

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Kinetics of Zinc/ Arsenate Co-Sorption at the Goethite-Water Interface. (5827)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aging time. Arsenate and zinc formed adamite-like and koettigite-like surface precipitates on goethite and was cyclic for the adamite and koettigite-like surface precipitates reflecting the concentric and plane-layered structures of adamite and koettigite, respectively. Speaker Information: Markus Grafe, University of Delaware

Sparks, Donald L.

497

Investigation of zinc oxide doped with metal impurities for use as thin film conductive phosphors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a viable flat panel display, low voltage, conductive phosphors which emit blue, red, and green light will be required for the field emission technology. This thesis examines zinc oxide (ZnO) based thin ( ) phosphors for such an application. ZnO is a...

Evatt, Steven R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Processing and Characterization of P-Type Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) for optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, semiconductor lasers, and solar cells have not yet been realized due to the lack of high-quality p-type ZnO. In the research presented herein, pulsed laser...

Myers, Michelle Anne

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

499

The effect of zinc methionine or copper lysine on stocker calves grazing oat pastures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fourty eight Hereford and Angus stocker steers (average weight 259.7 kg) were placed in twelve, five acre, pastures (four steers per pasture) planted with oat forage for a 91 d grazing trial to determine the effect of supplementing zinc methionine...

Griffeth, Laura Ann

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm Helga C. Lichtenegger* , Thomas of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently and mechanical properties such as fracture toughness, wear resistance, and hardness (1). Invertebrate jaws

Lichtenegger, Helga C.