Sample records for vaisala ceilometer vceil

  1. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  2. ARM: ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: cloud boundaries from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  3. ARM - PI Product - Vaisala CL51 ceilometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. ARM: ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Widener, Kevin; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Johnson, Karen; Martin, Timothy

    ARSCL: cloud base height from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  5. he NCAR and Vaisala collaboration project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Junhong

    T he NCAR and Vaisala collaboration project started in 1998 and built on a mutual effort uncertainties at very cold temperatures. The ATD-Vaisala correction procedures compile these sometimes and drop- sondes to support short-term research projects around the world. Researchers often use the ATD

  6. ARM - Instrument - vceil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Ritsche, Michael

    Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH. The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere, and the wind speed and direction.

  8. WBI Ceilometer/MLH andWBI Ceilometer/MLH and CO2 Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanier, Charlie

    99 m 420 460 mole/mole 99 m 379 m 340 380 CO2um Time where tower levels 1&2 become well mixed Time/mole 99 m 379 m 340 380 CO2um Time where tower levels 1&2 become well mixed Time where tower levels 1 379 m 340 380 CO2um Time where tower levels 1&2 become well mixed Time where tower levels 1-3 become

  9. Impact of Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Corrections on ARM IOP Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Dry Bias in Vaisala RS90 Radiosonde Humidity Profiles over Antarctica PENNY M. ROWE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    measurements made by radio- sondes. Some radiosonde humidity sensors experience a dry bias caused by solar were launched in clear skies at solar zenith angles (SZAs) near 83° and 62°. As part of this field) for SZAs near 83°; they are 20% 6% and 24% 5% for SZAs near 62°. Assuming solar heating is minimal at SZAs

  11. In Situ Validation of a Correction for Time-Lag and Bias Errors in Vaisala RS80-H Radiosonde Humidity Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270 300Aptamers and GraphenePhase Evolution in aIn

  12. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of radar, lidar, and ceilometer data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements Southern Great [1995] and Chernykh and Eskridge [1996]. The lidar and ceilometer data yield lowest-level cloud base. These quantities are used to assess the accuracy of coincident cloud base heights obtained from radar and the two

  13. www.pmel.noaa.gov/OCS September 2012 NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Background The Vaisala WXT520 is a combination weather instrument, with sensors that the wind speed sensors of some Vaisala WXT520 combination weather sensors were was going to fix the problem in new instruments. A new sensor received in 2012

  14. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  15. THE MAGIC FIELD CAMPAIGN IN THE EASTERN NORTH PACIFIC E. R. Lewis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    at the 7th International Scientific Conference on the Global Water and Energy Cycle, the Hague, Netherlands (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Climate Research Facility of the US Department of Energy, occurred between radars, lidars, a ceilometer, microwave radiometers, a total sky imager, disdrometers, and other

  16. Southern Great Plains Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prell

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This months issue contains the following articles: (1) Scientists convene at SGP site for complex convective cloud experiment; (2) VORTEX2 spins down; (3) Sunphotometer supports SPARTICUS (a Sun and Aureole Measurement imaging sunphotometer) campaign and satellite validation studies; and (4) Ceilometer represents first deployment of new ground-based instruments from Recovery Act.

  17. Professional Paper 13 Climatological Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Professional Paper 13 Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean Rockvilie, Ud. December 1982 U .l #12;ERRATA SHEET for: "Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean" NOAA Professional Paper No. 13 1. .. .. .. 3) Throughout the atlas the quantity Brunt-Vaisala frequency i s specified as having units of cycles

  18. Van der Meulen and Brandsma Februari 2007 Thermometer Screen Intercomparison in De Bilt (the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    conditions during a 6- year field experiment in De Bilt (the Netherlands). The comparison comprised two versions of an aspi- rated Young screen, 4 naturally ventilated round-shaped multi-plate screens (KNMI, Vaisala, Young, Socrima), a slightly aspirated version of the KNMI screen, a synthetic Stevenson screen

  19. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLIMATOLOGY Int. J. Climatol. (in press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandsma, Theo

    field experiment in De Bilt (the Netherlands). The comparison comprised two versions of an aspirated Young screen, four naturally ventilated round shaped multi-plate screens (KNMI, Vaisala, Young, Socrima conditions. The response time of the screens is studied by making a daily comparison of the time stamps

  20. Solar Power Forecasting at UC San Diego Jan Kleissl, Dept of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, UCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    show 2 cloud layers. Vaisala Fig. 4: Observed solar power output (black line) and simulation (Fig. 4). Tier 3: Power output forecast As cloud related solar radiation reductions are observed algorithm to determine actual expected solar power output at each PV array over the hour ahead. #12;

  1. J . Fluid Mech. (1975),vo2. 67, part 2, pp. 397-412 Printed in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    -Vaisala frequency N ,the condition for the existence of closed streamlines is shown to be h,R-l > min [.som or compressed over an infini- tesimal distance. Instead,the column bends markedly and the fluid flows around fantastic'' the fluid in the vertical cylinder circumscribing the obstacle was stagnant with respect

  2. Proceedings of the Midwest Poultry Federation Convention, St. Paul, MN. March 16-18, 2004 Ammonia Emission from Iowa Layer Houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    conversion as one of eight principles to reduce ammonia emission from layer hen houses. Research on reduction., Pittsburg, PA) for NH3 measurement and infrared sensor (0-5000 ± 20 ppm; Vaisala, Inc., Woburn, MA) for CO2 - Ammonia Emission from Iowa Layer Houses H. Xin1 , Y. Liang2 , R.S. Gates3 , E. F. Wheeler4 1 Professor

  3. X-band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (X-SAPR) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N

    2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-band scanning ARM cloud radar (X-SAPR) is a full-hemispherical scanning polarimetric Doppler radar transmitting simultaneously in both H and V polarizations. With a 200 kW magnetron transmitter, this puts 100 kW of transmitted power for each polarization. The receiver for the X-SAPR is a Vaisala Sigmet RVP-900 operating in a coherent-on-receive mode. Three X-SAPRs are deployed around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility in a triangular array. A fourth X-SAPR is deployed near Barrow, Alaska on top of the Barrow Arctic Research Center.

  4. ARM - People Address Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. 1

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  6. Frequency ratio method for seismic modeling of Gamma Doradus stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moya, A; Amado, P J; Martin-Ruiz, S; Garrido, R

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for obtaining asteroseismological information of a Gamma Doradus oscillating star showing at least three pulsation frequencies is presented. This method is based on a first-order asymptotic g-mode expression, in agreement with the internal structure of Gamma Doradus stars. The information obtained is twofold: 1) a possible identification of the radial order n and degree l of observed frequencies (assuming that these have the same l), and 2) an estimate of the integral of the buoyancy frequency (Brunt-Vaisala) weighted over the stellar radius along the radiative zone. The accuracy of the method as well as its theoretical consistency are also discussed for a typical Gamma Doradus stellar model. Finally, the frequency ratios method has been tested with observed frequencies of the Gamma Doradus star HD 12901. The number of representative models verifying the complete set of constraints (the location in the HR diagram, the Brunt-Vaisala frequency integral, the observed metallicity and frequencies and a re...

  7. SOAR Data: Data from Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR)1999 through 2001

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Click on the DATA menu button and then click on a specific ship to find instructions on accessing data from that particular cruise. Instructions will lead you to an FTP site from which data can be downloaded. SOAR data for 1999 through 2001 is reported. SOAR is a global network of research and volunteer ships that carry global change instrumentation. The primary emphasis for SOAR is solar and IR radiation but some ships cary ceilometers, meteorological instruments, and related equipment. All data are collected in a central data collection computer and the flexible data collection software can be adapted to any other user instrumentation. Currently SOAR is installed pas permanent instrumentation on four ships operating in the western Pacific, eastern tropical Pacific, West Indies, and an oceanographic ship that operates around the world. In addition, six other system are used on cruises of opportunity. [Taken from SOAR homepage at http://www.gim.bnl.gov/soar/index.html

  8. The Frequency Ratio Method for the seismic modelling of gamma Doradus stars. II The role of rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surez, J C; Martin-Ruiz, S; Amado, P J; Garrido, A G R

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of rotation on the Frequency Ratio Method (Moya et al. 2005) is examined. Its applicability to observed frequencies of rotating gamma Doradus stars is discussed taking into account the following aspects: the use of a perturbative approach to compute adiabatic oscillation frequencies; the effect of rotation on the observational Brunt-Vaisala integral determination and finally, the problem of disentangling multiplet-like structures from frequency patterns due to the period spacing expected for high-order gravity modes in asymptotic regime. This analysis reveals that the FRM produces reliable results for objects with rotational velocities up to 70 kms/s, for which the FRM intrinsic error increases one order of magnitude with respect to the typical FRM errors given in Moya et al. (2005). Our computations suggest that, given the spherical degree "l" identification, the FRM may be discriminating for m = 0 modes, in the sense that the method avoids any misinterpretation induced by the presence of rotation...

  9. Sonde Adjust Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyan, D

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sonde Adjust (SONDEADJUST) value-added product (VAP) creates a file that includes all fields from original Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM Facility) radiosonde files and contains several value-added fields that provide adjustments related to well-known humidity issues. SONDEADJUST produces data that correct documented biases in radiosonde humidity measurements. Previous efforts towards applying some of these corrections are available via the discontinued PI product sgpsondecorr1miloC1. Unique fields contained within this datastream include smoothed original relative humidity, dry bias corrected relative humidity, and final corrected relative humidity. The smoothed RH field refines the relative humidity from integers-the resolution of the instrument-to fractions of a percent. This profile is then used to calculate the dry bias corrected field. The final correction fixes the time-lag problem and uses the dry-bias field as input into the algorithm. In addition to dry bias, solar heating is another correction that is encompassed in the final corrected RH field. Output from SONDEADJUST differs from the previous RH-corrected datastreams in important ways. First, all three types of ARM radiosondes-Vaisala RS-80, RS-90, and RS-92-are corrected using dedicated procedures and/or parameters. Second, the output variables include all of those found in the original radiosonde file: dry bulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, wind speed, wind direction, eastward wind component, northward wind component, wind status (a Vaisala-produced field used in conjunction with the Loran system), ascent rate, and original relative humidity. Additional humidity fields are smoothed relative humidity, dry biased corrected relative humidity, final ambient relative humidity, and scaled adjusted relative humidity. Third, quality control (QC) flags of the fields from the original radiosonde datastream are brought into the SONDEADJUST output file. Additional QC variables are created for the new fields.

  10. A 25-month database of stratus cloud properties generated from ground-based measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (United States); Ackerman, Thomas P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DOE, Richland, Washington (United States); Clothiaux, Eugene E. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Mace, Gerald G. [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)] [Meteorology Department, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Long, Charles N. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)] [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States); Liljegren, James C. [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)] [Ames Laboratory, DOE, Ames, Iowa (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A 25-month database of the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of isolated and overcast low-level stratus clouds has been generated using a newly developed parameterization and surface measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement central facility in Oklahoma. The database (5-min resolution) includes two parts: measurements and retrievals. The former consist of cloud base and top heights, layer-mean temperature, cloud liquid water path, and solar transmission ratio measured by a ground-based lidar/ceilometer and radar pair, radiosondes, a microwave radiometer, and a standard Eppley precision spectral pyranometer, respectively. The retrievals include the cloud-droplet effective radius and number concentration and broadband shortwave optical depth and cloud and top-of-atmosphere albedos. Stratus without any overlying mid or high-level clouds occurred most frequently during winter and least often during summer. Mean cloud-layer altitudes and geometric thicknesses were higher and greater, respectively, in summer than in winter. Both quantities are positively correlated with the cloud-layer mean temperature. Mean cloud-droplet effective radii range from 8.1 {mu}m in winter to 9.7 {mu}m during summer, while cloud-droplet number concentrations during winter are nearly twice those in summer. Since cloud liquid water paths are almost the same in both seasons, cloud optical depth is higher during the winter, leading to greater cloud albedos and lower cloud transmittances. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  11. Stability and Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Comparison of Remote Sensing and Tower Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, K.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.; Kalina, E. A.; Marshall, R. F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When monitoring winds and atmospheric stability for wind energy applications, remote sensing instruments present some advantages to in-situ instrumentation such as larger vertical extent, in some cases easy installation and maintenance, measurements of vertical humidity profiles throughout the boundary layer, and no restrictions on prevailing wind directions. In this study, we compare remote sensing devices, Windcube lidar and microwave radiometer, to meteorological in-situ tower measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of these measurements and to assess the utility of the remote sensing instruments in overcoming tower limitations. We compare temperature and wind observations, as well as calculations of Brunt-Vaisala frequency and Richardson numbers for the instrument deployment period in May-June 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The study reveals that a lidar and radiometer measure wind and temperature with the same accuracy as tower instruments, while also providing advantages for monitoring stability and turbulence. We demonstrate that the atmospheric stability is determined more accurately when the liquid-water mixing ratio derived from the vertical humidity profile is considered under moist-adiabatic conditions.

  12. AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment): Observations of the Madden-Julian Oscillation for Modeling Studies Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, C; Del Genio, A; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Klein, S; Leung, L Ruby; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Wu, X; Xie, S

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep convection in the tropics plays an important role in driving global circulations and the transport of energy from the tropics to the mid-latitudes. Understanding the mechanisms that control tropical convection is a key to improving climate modeling simulations of the global energy balance. One of the dominant sources of tropical convective variability is the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), which has a period of approximately 3060 days. There is no agreed-upon explanation for the underlying physics that maintain the MJO. Many climate models do not show well-defined MJO signals, and those that do have problems accurately simulating the amplitude, propagation speed, and/or seasonality of the MJO signal. Therefore, the MJO is a very important modeling target for the ARM modeling community geared specifically toward improving climate models. The ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) period coincides with a large international MJO initiation field campaign called CINDY2011 (Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011) that will take place in and around the Indian Ocean from October 2011 to January 2012. AMIE, in conjunction with CINDY2011 efforts, will provide an unprecedented data set that will allow investigation of the evolution of convection within the framework of the MJO. AMIE observations will also complement the long-term MJO statistics produced using ARM Manus data and will allow testing of several of the current hypotheses related to the MJO phenomenon. Taking advantage of the expected deployment of a C-POL scanning precipitation radar and an ECOR surface flux tower at the ARM Manus site, we propose to increase the number of sonde launches to eight per day starting in about mid-October of the field experiment year, which is climatologically a period of generally suppressed conditions at Manus and just prior to the climatologically strongest MJO period. The field experiment will last until the end of the MJO season (typically March), affording the documentation of conditions before, during, and after the peak MJO season. The increased frequency of sonde launches throughout the experimental period will provide better diurnal understanding of the thermodynamic profiles, and thus a better representation within the variational analysis data set. Finally, a small surface radiation and ceilometer system will be deployed at the PNG Lombrum Naval Base about 6 km away from the ARM Manus site in order to provide some documentation of scale variability with respect to the representativeness of the ARM measurements.