Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Deep Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Mission of the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative is to protect water resources across the DOE complex over the long-term by developing effective solutions to solve DOE’s most...

2

Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applied Field Research Initiative Applied Field Research Initiative Deep Vadose Zone Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. Led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex deep vadose zone contamination challenges. Challenge Many vadose zone environments within the DOE complex consist of complex stratified layers of unconsolidated and water-unsaturated sediments that are, in many places, con-

3

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

DEEP VADOSE ZONE TREATABILITY TEST PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

{sm_bullet} Treatability test plan published in 2008 {sm_bullet} Outlines technology treatability activities for evaluating application of in situ technologies and surface barriers to deep vadose zone contamination (technetium and uranium) {sm_bullet} Key elements - Desiccation testing - Testing of gas-delivered reactants for in situ treatment of uranium - Evaluating surface barrier application to deep vadose zone - Evaluating in situ grouting and soil flushing

GB CHRONISTER; MJ TRUEX

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mass transport of volatile organic compounds between the saturated and vadose zones. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in the saturated zone are transported into the vadose zone primarily by gaseous phase diffusion. If the saturated zone is remediated, VOCs present in the vadose zone may become a secondary source of contamination for the groundwater. The amount of VOCs that remain in the vadose zone is dependent on site hydrology, soil properties, and the chemical properties of the contaminants. The purpose of this study was to determine what conditions caused VOC concentrations in the vadose zone to significantly recontaminate the saturated zone. A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the transport of a VOC, trichioroethylene, between the saturated and vadose zones under a variety of conditions. The model featured steady-state unsaturated water flow and transient contaminant transport. Transport mechanisms included aqueous phase advection-dispersion and gaseous phase diffusion. Partitioning between the water, gas, and soil compartments were modeled as equilibrium processes. Sensitivity analyses were performed on several variables including soil type (homogeneous and heterogeneous profiles), water infiltration rate and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant rate, and vadose zone depth. Results indicated that recontamination was most significant in the presence of heterogeneous soils, low infiltration rates and deep vadose zones.

Harner, M.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative has partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to bring together a special section of the recent issue (November 2012). The section was prepared in association with the Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative-led symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." The section consists of 12 papers which present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

7

Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Vadose Zone Pore Fluids at Hanford, Washington: Vadose Zone

Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Integrated Strategy to Address Hanford’s Deep Vadose Zone Remediation Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vast majority of Hanford’s remaining in-ground contaminants reside in the vadose zone of the Central Plateau, where reprocessing operations occurred. The vadose zone is comprised of about 75 meters of water-unsaturated sediments above groundwater. These contaminants have, and continue to release into groundwater that discharges to the Columbia River. If left untreated, these contaminants could remain a threat for centuries. Much of this contamination resides deep in the vadose zone, below the effective depth of tradition surface remedy influence. In 2008, the Department of Energy initiated deep vadose zone treatability testing to seek remedies for technetium-99 and uranium contamination. These tests include the application of desiccation for technetium-99 and reactive gas technologies for uranium. To complement these efforts, the Department of Energy has initiated a “defense-in-depth” approach to address the unique challenges for characterization and remediation of the deep vadose zone. This defense-in-depth approach will implement multiple approaches to understand and control contaminant flux from the deep vadose zone to the groundwater. Among these approaches is an increased investment in science and technology solutions to resolve deep vadose zone challenges including characterization, prediction, remediation, and monitoring.

Triplett, Mark B.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Charboneau, Briant L.; Morse, John G.; Lober, Robert W.; Chronister, Glen B.

2010-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

9

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue. DVZ-AFRI conducted a symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." They produced 12 papers that present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. The publications can be accessed here. For more information, contact Skip Chamberlain with the EM's Office of Soil

10

Implementation of variably saturated flow into PHREEQC for the simulation of biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A software tool for the simulation of one-dimensional unsaturated flow and solute transport together with biogeochemical reactions in the vadose zone was developed by integrating a numerical solution of Richards' equation into the geochemical modelling ... Keywords: Cation exchange, Geochemical modelling, Hydraulic properties, Reactive transport, Surface complexation, Unsaturated flow

L. Wissmeier; D. A. Barry

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Colloid Facilitated Transport of Radioactive Cations in the Vadose Zone: Field Experiments Oak Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching goal of this study was to improve understanding of colloid-facilitated transport of radioactive cations through unsaturated soils and sediments. We conducted a suite of laboratory experiments and field experiments on the vadose-zone transport of colloids, organic matter, and associated contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The laboratory and field experiments, together with transport modeling, were designed to accomplish the following detailed objectives: 1. Evaluation of the relative importance of inorganic colloids and organic matter to the facilitation of radioactive cation transport in the vadose zone; 2. Assessment of the role of adsorption and desorption kinetics in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 3. Examination of the effects of rainfall and infiltration dynamics and in the facilitated transport of radioactive cations through the vadose zone; 4. Exploration of the role of soil heterogeneity and preferential flow paths (e.g., macropores) on the facilitated transport of radioactive cations in the vadose zone; 5. Development of a mathematical model of facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone that accurately incorporates pore-scale and column-scale processes with the practicality of predicting transport with readily available parameters.

James E. Saiers

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leadking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situe mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment.

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

13

Laboratory investigation of explosives degradation in vadose zone soil using carbon source additions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Explosives contamination in vadose zone soil presents difficulties in remediation. Because vadose zone contamination can extend deep into the subsurface and underneath existing buildings and… (more)

Radtke, Corey William

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Bioremediation of explosives in vadose zone soil using vapor phase carbon source additions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Explosives contamination in vadose zone soil presents difficulties in remediation. Because vadose zone contamination can extend deep into the subsurface and underneath existing buildings and… (more)

Radtke, Corey William

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Deficiencies in Vadose Zone Understanding at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface contamination in the vadose zone, that portion of the subsurface pathway between land surface and an underlying aquifer, poses environmental problems at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in eastern Idaho and across the U.S. Department of Energy complex. Assessing potential adverse impacts from these contaminated sites requires an understanding of the mechanisms controlling contaminant transport. Currently, vadose zone experts at the INEEL cannot with confidence predict the movement of water and contaminants in the complex, heterogeneous, fractured subsurface at the INEEL, especially within the vadose zone. In the draft version (Revision 1) of the Vadose Zone Deficiencies document, deficiencies in scientific understanding of flow and transport processes in the vadose zone at the INEEL were identified and grouped into 13 categories and recommendations were provided to address each of the deficiencies. The draft document provided the basis for an INEEL Vadose Zone Workshop that was conducted October 20 and 21, 1999, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The workshop was conducted to group and rank the previously identified deficiencies and for the subsequent development of science plans to address the deficiencies that limit reliable predictions of water and contaminant movement in the subsurface. The workshop participants, comprising INEEL and scientists and project managers and non-INEEL scientists knowledgeable about the vadose zone, developed science- and technology-based recommendations derived through a series of technical sessions at the workshop. In this document, the final version of the Vadose Zone Deficiencies document, the draft document has been incorporated, largely intact, as well as the results from the workshop. The workshop participants grouped the deficiencies in vadose zone understanding at the INEEL into seven categories. These seven categories will be the focus areas of five science plans that are being developed to address the deficiencies. This document lays the foundation for the INEEL Site-wide vadose zone roadmap.

Wood, Thomas Ronald; Bates, Dona Louise; Bishop, Carolyn Wagoner; Heard, Robert Eugene; Hubbell, Joel Michael; Hull, Laurence Charles; Lehman, Richard Michael; Magnuson, Swen O; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Mccarthy, James Michael; Porro, Indrek; Ritter, Paul David; Roddy, Michael Scott; Singler, Robert Edward; Smith, Richard Paul

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for \\textit{in situ} mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facili\\-tated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment. We have previously shown that upon contact with simulated waste tank solutions, Hanford sediments change their mineralogical composition. Certain minerals, i.e., quartz, smectite, and kaolinite, are partially dissolved, and new mineral phases, i.e., the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite, are formed. We have characterized these mineral transformations and clarified the mineral transformation pathways. The new minerals were mainly in the colloidal size fraction (diameter less than 2 mum), had a negative surface charge, and were microporous, meaning they contained small pores. When Cs was present during the formation of the minerals, contaminants, like Cs, could be trapped inside the mineral structure. Transport experiments under water saturated and unsaturated conditions showed that the colloids were mobile in Hanford sediments. As the water saturation of the sediments decreased, the amount of colloids transported also decreased. The colloids had the ability to enhance the migration of the radionuclide Cs; however, Cs initially sorbed to colloids was desorbed during transport through uncontaminated Hanford sediments. The finding that Cs was stripped off the colloids during the transport through uncontaminated sediments implies that colloids will likely not be an effective carrier for Cs, unless the Cs is incorporated into the mineral structure of the colloids such that the radionuclide cannot desorb from the colloids. Nevertheless, it appears that the amount of Cs that can be transported by mobile colloids beneath Hanford waste tanks is limited. Colloids will not be able to move the bulk mass of Cs through the vadose zone at Hanford. Colloid stability studies indicate that Hanford sediment form stable colloidal suspensions when suspended in Hanford sediment pore waters. Colloid stability was assessed by determination of the critical coagulation concentration, i.e., the chemical electrolyte concentration at which colloidal suspensions flocculate and settle out (become unstable). Although in the stable mode, Hanford colloids will settle out of solution after extended periods of time (months to years). Given the low recharge rates at Hanford range, which from near 0 to more than 100 mm/year, and the long travel times for rainwater to reach the groundwater of more than 40 years, it appears that colloidal transport is unlikely to occur if colloids are initially to be suspended close to the soil surface by infiltrating rainwater. However, if preferential flow or transient flow occurs, then colloidal transport may become more important. The results of this project have also led to improvements of our fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions in porous media. We have found that colloid attachment to the liquid-gas interface is not that relevant and that colloids rather attached near the triple phase interface where air, water, and solid phases meet. We have also found that capillary forces are the most dominant forces governing

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy; Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

17

Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for \\textit{in situ} mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facili\\-tated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment. We have previously shown that upon contact with simulated waste tank solutions, Hanford sediments change their mineralogical composition. Certain minerals, i.e., quartz, smectite, and kaolinite, are partially dissolved, and new mineral phases, i.e., the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite, are formed. We have characterized these mineral transformations and clarified the mineral transformation pathways. The new minerals were mainly in the colloidal size fraction (diameter less than 2 mum), had a negative surface charge, and were microporous, meaning they contained small pores. When Cs was present during the formation of the minerals, contaminants, like Cs, could be trapped inside the mineral structure. Transport experiments under water saturated and unsaturated conditions showed that the colloids were mobile in Hanford sediments. As the water saturation of the sediments decreased, the amount of colloids transported also decreased. The colloids had the ability to enhance the migration of the radionuclide Cs; however, Cs initially sorbed to colloids was desorbed during transport through uncontaminated Hanford sediments. The finding that Cs was stripped off the colloids during the transport through uncontaminated sediments implies that colloids will likely not be an effective carrier for Cs, unless the Cs is incorporated into the mineral structure of the colloids such that the radionuclide cannot desorb from the colloids. Nevertheless, it appears that the amount of Cs that can be transported by mobile colloids beneath Hanford waste tanks is limited. Colloids will not be able to move the bulk mass of Cs through the vadose zone at Hanford. Colloid stability studies indicate that Hanford sediment form stable colloidal suspensions when suspended in Hanford sediment pore waters. Colloid stability was assessed by determination of the critical coagulation concentration, i.e., the chemical electrolyte concentration at which colloidal suspensions flocculate and settle out (become unstable). Although in the stable mode, Hanford colloids will settle out of solution after extended periods of time (months to years). Given the low recharge rates at Hanford range, which from near 0 to more than 100 mm/year, and the long travel times for rainwater to reach the groundwater of more than 40 years, it appears that colloidal transport is unlikely to occur if colloids are initially to be suspended close to the soil surface by infiltrating rainwater. However, if preferential flow or transient flow occurs, then colloidal transport may become more important. The results of this project have also led to improvements of our fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions in porous media. We have found that colloid attachment to the liquid-gas interface is not that relevant and that colloids rather attached near the triple phase interface where air, water, and solid phases meet. We have also found that capillary forces are the most dominant forces governing

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy; Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Deep Vadose Zone–Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2012.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) Located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources by addressing the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. Led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Initiative is a collaborative effort that leverages Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research and the work of site contractors to address the complex deep vadose zone contamination challenges. The Mission of the Deep Vadose

20

MODELING U TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT PENA BLANCA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

We present a quantitative model to describe transport of radionuclides underground. Applicable to unsaturated (vadose) as well as saturated (phreatic) layers, the model provides constraints on the in-situ migratory behavior of radioisotopes in dissolved and colloidal pools of a groundwater system. It shows, for examples, that uranium in water percolating through the vadose zone will have its concentration and ratio {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U linearly correlated under the ideal condition of a constant removal of the two U isotopes from vadose-zone solids. The intercept and slope of the linearity serve to constrain removal rates of the two uranium isotopes from solids to the solution through dissolution and alpha recoil. The model also allows estimation of the fluid transit time in the vadose zone. At Pena Blanca, the uneven distribution of rainfall between winter (wet) and summer (dry) results in a conspicuous seasonal variability in uranium removal rate, hence dissolved uranium signals, within the unsaturated zone. Our data indicate a much higher uranium dissolution rate during the dry season than during the wet season, possibly reflecting a condition of increased oxygenation in the zone during the dry period.

T.L. Ku; S. Luo; M. Murrell; S. Goldstein

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site May 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution RICHLAND, Wash. - Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex. Characterizing the distribution of the resulting environmental contamination remains one of the single most significant challenges limiting subsurface remediation and closure, particularly for the

22

Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopic Evidence for Uranium Bearing Precipitates in Vadose Zone Sediments at the Hanford 300 collected beneath the former North Process Pond (NPP) in the 300 Area of the Hanford site (Washington the Hanford site in the state of Washington (U.S.). The 300 Area is one of many

24

Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation Treatments within the Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foam is a promising vehicle for delivering amendments into the vadose zone for in situ remediation; it is an approach being considered for in situ treatment and stabilization of metals and radionuclides located within the deep vadose zone of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site, WA. A central aspect of evaluating the effectiveness of this approach is the ability to monitor foam distribution, its transformation, and the reactions that it induces in the subsurface, ideally in a non-invasive manner. In this study, we performed laboratory experiments to evaluate the potential of geophysical methods (complex resistivity and time domain reflectometry, TDR) as tools for monitoring foam assisted amendment delivery in the deep vadose zone. Our results indicated great sensitivity of electrical methods to foam transportation and evolution in unsaturated porous media that were related to foam bubble coalescence and drainage processes. Specifically, we observed (1) a decrease of electrical resistivity (increase of electrical conductivity) by over an order of magnitude in both silica sand and natural sediment matrices during foam transportation; (2) an increase of resistivity (decrease of conductivity) by over two fold during foam coalescence and drainage; (3) a distinct phase and imaginary conductivity signature related to the evolution of water films on sediment grains during foam injection and evolution processes. To assist with the interpretation of these data, TDR measurements were used to monitor moisture content, which provided complementary information about foam distribution and drainage. Our results clearly demonstrated the sensitivity of electrical and TDR signals to foam transportation and evolution in unsaturated porous media and suggested the potential of these methods for monitoring the response of a system to foam based remediation treatments at field scales.

Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Wellman, Dawn M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Perface: Research advances in vadose zone hydrology throughsimulations with the TOUGH codes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulators are playing an increasingly important role in advancing our fundamental understanding of hydrological systems. They are indispensable tools for managing groundwater resources, analyzing proposed and actual remediation activities at contaminated sites, optimizing recovery of oil, gas, and geothermal energy, evaluating subsurface structures and mining activities, designing monitoring systems, assessing the long-term impacts of chemical and nuclear waste disposal, and devising improved irrigation and drainage practices in agricultural areas, among many other applications. The complexity of subsurface hydrology in the vadose zone calls for sophisticated modeling codes capable of handling the strong nonlinearities involved, the interactions of coupled physical, chemical and biological processes, and the multiscale heterogeneities inherent in such systems. The papers in this special section of ''Vadose Zone Journal'' are illustrative of the enormous potential of such numerical simulators as applied to the vadose zone. The papers describe recent developments and applications of one particular set of codes, the TOUGH family of codes, as applied to nonisothermal flow and transport in heterogeneous porous and fractured media (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/TOUGH2). The contributions were selected from presentations given at the TOUGH Symposium 2003, which brought together developers and users of the TOUGH codes at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California, for three days of information exchange in May 2003 (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/TOUGHsymposium). The papers presented at the symposium covered a wide range of topics, including geothermal reservoir engineering, fracture flow and vadose zone hydrology, nuclear waste disposal, mining engineering, reactive chemical transport, environmental remediation, and gas transport. This Special Section of ''Vadose Zone Journal'' contains revised and expanded versions of selected papers from the symposium, with special attention to issues related to the vadose zone and unsaturated flow systems. The first paper, written by the original developer of TOUGH, Karsten Pruess, provides an overview of the history of the TOUGH codes, the main physical processes considered, their mathematical and numerical implementation, and case studies. That paper is followed by a review article summarizing inverse modeling applications performed by iTOUGH2. A subsequent group of papers deals with diverse unsaturated zone systems, highlighting the versatility of the code to handle a variety of processes in different geologic settings. Simulation capabilities of the TOUGH codes are increasingly used for geologic carbon sequestration studies as testified by the next group of papers. The final series of papers demonstrates the use of the TOUGH codes in support of remediation and engineering applications. These studies discuss biological and reactive chemical transport simulations, the design of clean-up operations and landfill management, and the analysis of engineered soil stabilization. As guest editors, we thank the authors for their interesting contributions, and the many reviewers for their careful and constructive review comments. Finally, on behalf of all of the authors and ourselves, we express our sincerest appreciation to Rien van Genuchten for providing the opportunity to publish these papers together in a Special Section of ''Vadose Zone Journal''.

Finsterle, Stefan; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Potential for Microbial Stimulation in Deep Vadose Zone Sediments by Gas-Phase Nutrients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viable microbial populations are low, typically 10{sup 4} cells per gram, in deep vadose zones in arid climates. There is evidence that microbial distribution in these environments is patchy. In addition, infiltration or injection of nutrient-laden water has the potential to spread and drive contaminants downward to the saturated zone. For these reasons, there are uncertainties regarding the feasibility of bioremediation of recalcitrant contaminants in deep vadose zones. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of denitrifying activity and gaseous carbon-utilizing activity in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments contaminated with, and/or affected by past exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (CT). These metabolisms are known to degrade CT and/or its breakdown product chloroform under anoxic conditions. A second objective was to determine if CT would be degraded in these sediments under unsaturated, bulk-phase aerobic incubation conditions. Both denitrifier population (determined by MPN) and microbial heterotrophic activity (measured by mineralization of 14-C labeled glucose and acetate) were relatively low and the sediments with greater in situ moisture (10-21% versus 2-7%) tended to have higher activities. When sediments were amended with gaseous nutrients (nitrous oxide and triethyl/tributyl phosphate) and gaseous C sources (a mixture of methane, ethane, propylene, propane, and butane) and incubated for 6 months, approximately 50% of the samples showed removal of one or more gaseous C sources, with butane most commonly used (44% of samples), followed by propylene (42%), propane (31%), ethane (22%), and methane (4%). Gaseous N and gaseous P did not stimulate removal of gaseous C substrates compared to no addition of N and P. CT and gaseous C sources were spiked into the sediments that removed gaseous C sources to determine if hydrocarbon-degraders have the potential to degrade CT under unsaturated conditions. In summary, gaseous C sources--particularly butane and propylene--have promise for increasing the numbers and activity of indigenous microbial populations in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments.

Li, S.W.; Plymale, A. E.; Brockman, F.J.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

27

Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

An Experimental Study of Diffusivity of Technetium-99 in Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the methods being considered at the Hanford site in Washington for safely disposing of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) is to encase the waste in concrete and entomb the packages in the Hanford vadose zone sediments. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages with concrete. Any failure of the concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface sediments. It is therefore necessary to conduct an assessment of the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the surrounding soil’s ability to retard radionuclide migration. The retardation factors for radionuclides contained in the waste packages can be determined from measurements of diffusion coefficients for these contaminants through concrete and fill material. Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, the radionuclides, 99Tc and 129I were identified as long-term dose contributors in LLW. The leachability and/or diffusion of these radionuclide species must be measured in order to assess the long-term performance of waste grouts when contacted with vadose-zone porewater or groundwater. To measure the diffusivity, a set of experiments were conducted using 99Tc-spiked concrete (with 0 and 4% metallic iron additions) in contact with unsaturated soil half-cells that reflected the typical moisture contents of Hanford vadose zone sediments. The 99Tc diffusion profiles in the soil half cells were measured after a time lapse of ~1.9 yr. Using the concentration profiles, the 99Tc diffusivity coefficients were calculated based on Fick’s Second Law.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Wood, Marcus I.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This paper describes processes and technologies being developed to use in the ongoing effort to remediate the contamination in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Site.

CHRONISTER GB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

30

Vadose Zone Characterization Techniques Developed by EMSP Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses research contributions made by Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research in the area of geophysical characterization of the subsurface. The goal of these EMSP research projects is to develop combined high-resolution measurement and interpretation packages that provide accurate, timely information needed to characterize the vadose zone. Various types of geophysical imaging techniques can be used to characterize the shallow subsurface. Since individual geophysical characterization tools all have specific limitations, many different techniques are being explored to provide more widespread applicability over a range of hydrogeologic settings. A combination of laboratory, field, theoretical, and computational studies are necessary to develop our understanding of how contaminants move through the vadose zone. This entails field tests with field-hardened systems, packaging and calibration of instrumentation, data processing and analysis algorithms, forward and inverse modeling, and so forth. DOE sites are seeking to team with EMSP researchers to leverage the basic science research investment and apply these advances to address subsurface contamination issues that plague many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.

Guillen, Donna P.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

In Situ Characterization of Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Properties at the Maricopa Environmental Monitoring Site.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Characterization of the unsaturated hydraulic properties is fundamental in modeling soil water flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone. The objective of this study… (more)

Graham, Aaron Robert.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

2000-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

EVALUATION OF VADOSE ZONE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES TO IMMOBILIZE TECHNETIUM-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site End State Vision document (DOE/RL-2003-59) states: ''There should be an aggressive plan to develop technology for remediation of the contamination that could get to the groundwater (particularly the technetium [{sup 99}Tc])''. In addition, there is strong support from the public and regulatory agencies for the above statement, with emphasis on investigation of treatment alternatives. In July 2004, PNNL completed a preliminary evaluation of remediation technologies with respect to their effectiveness and implementability for immobilization of {sup 99}Tc beneath the BC Cribs in the 200 West Area (Truex, 2004). As a result of this evaluation, PNNL recommended treatability testing of in situ soil desiccation, because it has the least uncertainty of those technologies evaluated in July 2004 (Treatability Test Outline, September 30, 2004). In 2005, DOE-RL and Fluor Hanford convened an independent technical panel to review alternative remediation technologies, including desiccation, at a three-day workshop in Richland, Washington. The panel was composed of experts in vadose-zone transport, infiltration control, hydrology, geochemistry, environmental engineering, and geology. Their backgrounds include employment in academia, government laboratories, industry, and consulting. Their review, presented in this document, is based upon written reports from Hanford, oral presentations from Hanford staff, and each panel members' years of experience in their particular field of expertise. The purpose of this report is to document the panel's evaluation of various treatment alternatives with potential for minimizing contaminant migration in the deep vadose zone at the Department of Energy Hanford Site. The panel was tasked with assessing the most viable and practical approach and making recommendations for testing. The evaluation of vadose-zone treatment alternatives was conducted to be broadly applicable at a variety of locations at Hanford. However, because of limitations of time, the panel was asked to focus on one example, {sup 99}Tc contamination below the BC Cribs and Trenches. It is well recognized that conditions at BC Cribs and Trenches are not the same as those at other Hanford locations, but it was selected so that the panel could develop an understanding of site conditions at one location. The recommendations in this report are not intended to address the regulatory decision process for this site.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Characterization of Direct Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the T and TY Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect

This report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 5 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with leaks from tanks 241-TY-105 (UPR-200-W-152) and 241-TY-106 (UPR-200-W-153). Tank 241-TY-105 is estimated to have leaked 35,000 gal of tributyl phosphate (TBP) waste from the uranium recovery process to the vadose zone in 1960. Tank 241-TY-106 is estimated to have leaked 20,000 gal of TBP-uranium recovery waste to the vadose zone in 1959. Although several drywells in the vicinity of tank 241-TY-106 contain measurable quantities of cesium-137 and/or cobalt-60, their relatively low concentrations indicate that the contaminant inventory in the vadose zone around tank 241-TY-106 is quite small. Additionally, this report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from 7 direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with an overfill event and leak from tank 241-T-101.

Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

35

Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

J. Conca

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Vadose Zone Modeling Workshop proceedings, March 29--30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site, the record of decision for remediation of CERCLA sites is largely based on results of the baseline risk and performance assessment of the remedial action alternatives. These assessments require the ability to predict the fate and transport of contaminants along appropriate exposure pathways which, in case of the Hanford Site, includes the migration of contaminants through the vadose zone to the water table. Listed below are some of the requirements, as prescribed by the regulators, relative to CERCLA risk and performance assessment at Hanford. A workshop was organized by the Environmental Risk and Performance Assessment Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company on March 29--30, 1993 at the Richland Best Western Tower Inn. During the workshop, an assessment was made of the need for and scope of various tasks being conducted or planned as part of the Hanford Site waste isolation performance assessment/risk assessment activities. Three external, nationally-recognized experts served as part of a review panel for the workshop: (a) Professor Lynn Gelhar of MIT; (b) Professor Peter Wierenga of University of Arizona; and (c) Dr. Rien van Genuchten of US Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, California. The technical experts provided their perspectives on the current state-of-the-art in vadose zone flow and transport modeling. In addition, the technical experts provided an outside independent assessment of the work being performed or planned in support of various activities identified in TPA Milestone M-29-02. This document includes the following: Recommendations from the three peer reviewers; areas of expertise of the three peer reviewers; workshop agenda; copies of viewgraphs (where available) from presenters at the workshop; workshop minutes; and list of workshop attendees.

Khaleel, R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nuclear-waste isolation in the unsaturated zone of arid regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vadose zone in arid regions is considered as a possible environment for geologic isolation of nuclear waste. There are several topographic and lithologic combinations in the vadose zone of arid regions that may lend themselves to waste isolation considerations. In some cases, topographic highs such as mesas and interbasin ranges - comprised of several rock types, may contain essentially dry or partially saturated conditions favorable for isolation. The adjacent basins, especially in the far western and southwestern US, may have no surface or subsurface hydrologic connections with systems ultimately leading to the ocean. Some rock types may have the favorable characteristics of very low permeability and contain appropriate minerals for the strong chemical retardation of radionuclides. Environments exhibiting these hydrologic and geochemical attributes are the areas underlain by tuffaceous rocks, relatively common in the Basin and Range geomorphic province. Adjacent valley areas, where tuffaceous debris makes up a significant component of valley fill alluvium, may also contain thick zones of unsaturated material, and as such also lend themselves to strong consideration as respository environments. This paper summarizes the aspects of nuclear waste isolation in unsaturated regimes in alluvial-filled valleys and tuffaceous rocks of the Basin and Range province.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Wang, J.S.Y.; Korbin, G.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modeling studies of mountain-scale radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations at Yucca Mountain - The Potential Repositoryin the Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ResourcesIN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA George J.

Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Wu, Yu-Shu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

New Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Provides Path  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Provides Path Forward for Site Closure New Approach to Assess Volatile Contamination in Vadose Zone Provides Path Forward for Site Closure April 24, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Conceptual site model for evaluating soil vapor extraction system performance to determine if the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another approach. Conceptual site model for evaluating soil vapor extraction system performance to determine if the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another approach. RICHLAND, Wash. and LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Through the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI), scientists and engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation

40

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Remedy Evaluation Framework for Inorganic, Non-Volatile Contaminants in the Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants in the vadose zone may act as a potential long-term source of groundwater contamination and need to be considered in remedy evaluations. In many cases, remediation decisions for the vadose zone will need to be made all or in part based on projected impacts to groundwater. Because there are significant natural attenuation processes inherent in vadose zone contaminant transport, remediation in the vadose zone to protect groundwater is functionally a combination of natural attenuation and use of other remediation techniques, as needed, to mitigate contaminant flux to groundwater. Attenuation processes include both hydrobiogeochemical processes that serve to retain contaminants within porous media and physical processes that mitigate the rate of water flux. In particular, the physical processes controlling fluid flow in the vadose zone are quite different and generally have a more significant attenuation impact on contaminant transport relative to those within the groundwater system. A remedy evaluation framework is presented herein that uses an adaptation of the established EPA Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) evaluation approach and a conceptual model based approach focused on identifying and quantifying features and processes that control contaminant flux through the vadose zone. A key concept for this framework is to recognize that MNA will comprise some portion of all remedies in the vadose zone. Thus, structuring evaluation of vadose zone waste sites to use an MNA-based approach provides information necessary to either select MNA as the remedy, if appropriate, or to quantify how much additional attenuation would need to be induced by a remedial action (e.g., technologies considered in a feasibility study) to augment the natural attenuation processes and meet groundwater protection goals.

Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Evaluation of Soil Flushing for Application to the Deep Vadose Zone in the Hanford Central Plateau  

SciTech Connect

Soil flushing was included in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau as a technology with the potential to remove contaminants from the vadose zone. Soil flushing operates through the addition of water, and if necessary an appropriate mobilizing agent, to mobilize contaminants and flush them from the vadose zone and into the groundwater where they are subsequently captured by a pump-and-treat system. There are uncertainties associated with applying soil flushing technology to contaminants in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Central Plateau. The modeling and laboratory efforts reported herein are intended to provide a quantitative assessment of factors that impact water infiltration and contaminant flushing through the vadose zone and into the underlying groundwater. Once in the groundwater, capture of the contaminants would be necessary, but this aspect of implementing soil flushing was not evaluated in this effort. Soil flushing was evaluated primarily with respect to applications for technetium and uranium contaminants in the deep vadose zone of the Hanford Central Plateau.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Z. F.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Schramke, Janet A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Gordon, Kathryn A.; Last, George V.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Vadose Zone Hydrogeology Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect

This data package documents the technical basis for selecting physical and geochemical parameters and input values that will be used in vadose zone modeling for Hanford assessments. This work was originally conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington, and revised as part of the Characterization of Systems Project managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). This data package describes the geologic framework, the physical, hydrologic, and contaminant transport properties of the geologic materials, and deep drainage (i.e., recharge) estimates, and builds on the general framework developed for the initial assessment conducted using the System Assessment Capability (SAC) (Bryce et al. 2002). The general approach for this work was to update and provide incremental improvements over the previous SAC data package completed in 2001. As with the previous SAC data package, much of the data and interpreted information were extracted from existing documents and databases. Every attempt was made to provide traceability to the original source(s) of the data or interpretations.

Last, George V.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Fayer, Michael J.; Gee, Glendon W.; Nichols, William E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small. These results of our study are particularly relevant for colloid mobilization and transport related to three process in the vadose zone at Hanford: (1) water infiltration into sediments during rainfall or snowmelt events, (2) groundwater fluctuations as caused by river stage fluctuations, and (3) steady-state, low-flow recharge in deep vadose zone sediments. Transient water flow, like during infiltration or groundwater level fluctuations, are most conducive for colloid mobilization, but even during steady-state, low-flow recharge, colloids can be mobile, although to a much lesser extent. The results of this project have led to a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions at the Hanford site.

Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Long-Term Colloid Mobilization And Colloid-Facilitated Transport Of Radionuclides In A Semi-Arid Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigations of single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. Field experiment using a vadose zone lysimeter facility at the Hanford site showed that surface-applied Eu colloids can be translocated rapidly under natural precipitation as well as artificial irrigation. Small amounts of applied colloids were translocated from the surface to a depth of two meters within two months and only 20 mm of cumulative infiltration. Large water infiltration events, mimicking snow melt, enhanced movement of Eu colloids. Nonetheless the majority of Eu colloids remained in the top 30 cm of the soil after 3.5 years of monitoring. These results suggest that colloid and radionuclide transport can occur in the near-surface vadose zone at Hanford under field conditions, but that the magnitude of the transport is less than what has been reported from laboratory studies. We further studied colloid mobilization from undisturbed sediment cores under a flow rate of 18 mm/year, a typical low flow rate at Hanford. Under this low flow rate, we observed continuous colloid mobilization from the sediments, although the total amounts of colloids mobilized are small, only 0.5% of available colloids were mobilized during 5 years of observations. These results demonstrate that colloidal particles are mobile even under the low recharge rates found in a semi-arid site like Hanford. Under higher flow rates, we would expect colloid transport to be even more pronounced. These results of our study are particularly relevant for colloid mobilization and transport related to three process in the vadose zone at Hanford: (1) water infiltration into sediments during rainfall or snowmelt events, (2) groundwater fluctuations as caused by river stage fluctuations, and (3) steady-state, low-flow recharge in deep vadose zone sediments. Transient water flow, like during infiltration or groundwater level fluctuations, are most conducive for colloid mobilization, but even during steady-state, low-flow recharge, colloids can be mobile, although to a much lesser extent. The results of this project have led to a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of colloid transport and mobilization under unsaturated flow conditions at the Hanford site.

Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zhang, Fred; Gee, Glendon W; Mattson, Earl D; Lichtner, Peter C

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

46

A site scale model for modeling unsaturated zone processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for theZone Trocesses at yucca Mountain, N G. S. Bodvarsson, Y. S.unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a permanent

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Long-Term Strategic Plan for Hanford Sediment Physical Property and Vadose Zone Hydraulic Parameter Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical property data and unsaturated hydraulic parameters are critical input for analytic and numerical models used to predict transport and fate of contaminants in variably saturated porous media and to assess and execute remediation alternatives. The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), has been compiling physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to support risk analyses and waste management decisions at Hanford. Efforts have been initiated to transfer sediment physical property data and vadose zone hydraulic parameters to CHPRC for inclusion in HEIS-Geo, a new instance of the Hanford Environmental Information System database that is being developed for borehole geologic data. This report describes these efforts and a strategic plan for continued updating and improvement of these datasets.

Rockhold, Mark L.; Last, George V.; Middleton, Lisa A.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

A National Roadmap for Vadose Zone Science and Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This roadmap is a means of achieving, to the best of our current knowledge, a reasonable scientific understanding of how contaminants of all forms move in the vadose geological environments. This understanding is needed to reduce the present uncertainties in predicting contaminant movement, which in turn will reduce the uncertainties in remediation decisions.

Kowall, Stephen Jacob

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Evaluation of In Situ Grouting as a Potential Remediation Method for the Hanford Central Plateau Deep Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau report identifies in situ grouting as a potential remediation technology for the deep vadose zone and includes a planned effort to evaluate in situ grouting to provide information for future feasibility studies. This report represents the first step in this evaluation effort.

Truex, Michael J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Mattigod, Shas V.

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

The impact of climate change on vadose zone pore waters and its implication for long-term monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protecting groundwater is of growing interest as pressure on these resources grows. Recharge of groundwater takes place through the vadose zone, where complex interactions between thermal-hydrological-geochemical processes affect water quality. Monitoring ... Keywords: climate change, massively parallel computers, monitoring, nuclear waste disposal, pore water chemistry, reactive transport, vadose zone

William E. Glassley; John J. Nitao; Charles W. Grant; James W. Johnson; Carl I. Steefel; James R. Kercher

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Quantifying the effects of small-scale heterogeneities on fl ow and transport in undisturbed cores from the Hanford formation. Vadose Zone J  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT more than 4 million liters of hazardous and radioactive Accelerated migration of contaminants in the vadose zone has waste in the vadose zone. Relatively mobile radionuclides such as 99Tc, 129I, U, and 3 been observed beneath tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s H have traveled further Hanford Reservation, Richland, WA. This paper focuses on quantify- than predicted by current models and have been deing hydrologic processes that control the fate and transport of contami- tected in the groundwater, which eventually flows to nants in the unsaturated sediments beneath the Hanford tank farms. the Columbia River (Dirkes and Hanf, 1997; Hartman The experimental approach involved the use of field relevant, longterm unsaturated nonreactive transport experiments in undisturbed sediments from the Hanford Formation. Undisturbed sediment cores were collected from a laminated fine-grained sand unit within the Hanford Formation in both the vertical direction (flow cross bedding) and the horizontal direction (flow bedding parallel). Laboratory-scale saturated and unsaturated flow experiments were conducted using multiple nonreactive tracers to investigate hydrologic processes controlling

M. N. Pace; M. A. Mayes; P. M. Jardine; T. L. Mehlhorn; J. M. Zachara; B. N. Bjornstad

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

AL Ward; GW Gee

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modeling thermal-hydrological response of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to thermal load at a potential repository  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Repository at Yucca Mountain. In Materials Research Societystudies using the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone model.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water Resources

Haukwa, C.B.; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Field-Scale Assessment of Desiccation Implementation for Deep Vadose Zone Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desiccation of the vadose zone has the potential to reduce the flux of contaminants to underlying groundwater by removing moisture and decreasing the aqueous-phase permeability of the desiccated zone. However, data to evaluate implementation of desiccation are needed to enable consideration of desiccation as a potential remedy. Implementation of desiccation was field tested by injecting dry nitrogen gas to a target treatment zone and monitoring the spatial and temporal progress of the drying process. Aqueous waste discharges to disposal cribs approximately 50 years ago distributed water and contaminants, including primarily technetium-99 and nitrate, within the 100-m deep vadose zone at the test site. A field test location was selected adjacent to one of the former disposal cribs. The test was conducted in a contaminated portion of the vadose zone dominated by fine sands with lenses of silt material. Desiccation reduced volumetric moisture content to as low as 0.01. The lateral and vertical distribution of drying from the injection well was influenced by the subsurface heterogeneity. However, over time, desiccation occurred in the initially wetter, lower permeability lenses.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.; Johnson, Christian D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Soil Desiccation for Vadose Zone Remediation: Report for Fiscal Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

Apart from source excavation, the options available for the remediation of vadose zone metal and radionuclide contaminants beyond the practical excavation depth (0 to 15 m) are quite limited. Of the available technologies, very few are applicable to the deep vadose zone with the top-ranked candidate being soil desiccation. An expert panel review of the work on infiltration control and supplemental technologies identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be overcome before soil desiccation could be deployed. The report documents some of the research conducted in the last year to fill these knowledge gaps. This work included 1) performing intermediate-scale laboratory flow cell experiments to demonstrate the desiccation process, 2) implementing a scalable version of Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases–Water-Air-Energy (STOMP-WAE), and 3) performing numerical experiments to identify the factors controlling the performance of a desiccation system.

Ward, Andy L.; Oostrom, Mart; Bacon, Diana H.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DEEP VADOSE ZONE APPLIED FIELD RESEARCH CENTER: TRANSFORMATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

DOE-EM, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation and DOE Richland, in collaboration with the Hanford site and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have established the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The DVZ-AFRC leverages DOE investments in basic science from the Office of Science, applied research from DOE EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development, and site operation (e.g., site contractors [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Contractor and Washington River Protection Solutions], DOE-EM RL and ORP) in a collaborative effort to address the complex region of the deep vadose zone. Although the aim, goal, motivation, and contractual obligation of each organization is different, the integration of these activities into the framework of the DVZ-AFRC brings the resources and creativity of many to provide sites with viable alternative remedial strategies to current baseline approaches for persistent contaminants and deep vadose zone contamination. This cooperative strategy removes stove pipes, prevents duplication of efforts, maximizes resources, and facilitates development of the scientific foundation needed to make sound and defensible remedial decisions that will successfully meet the target cleanup goals for one of DOE EM's most intractable problems, in a manner that is acceptable by regulators.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Gephart, Roy E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Chronister, Glen B.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Skip; Marble, Justin; Ramirez, Rosa

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

300 Area Treatability Test: Laboratory Development of Polyphosphate Remediation Technology for In Situ Treatment of Uranium Contamination in the Vadose Zone and Capillary Fringe  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to stabilize uranium within the 300 Area vadose and smear zones of the Hanford Site. The general treatability testing approach consisted of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, to develop an effective chemical formulation and infiltration approach for the polyphosphate amendment under site conditions. Laboratory-scale dynamic column tests were used to 1) quantify the retardation of polyphosphate and its degradation products as a function of water content, 2) determine the rate of polyphosphate degradation under unsaturated conditions, 3) develop an understanding of the mechanism of autunite formation via the reaction of solid phase calcite-bound uranium and aqueous polyphosphate remediation technology, 4) develop an understanding of the transformation mechanism, the identity of secondary phases, and the kinetics of the reaction between uranyl-carbonate and -silicate minerals with the polyphosphate remedy under solubility-limiting conditions, and 5) quantify the extent and rate of uranium released and immobilized based on the infiltration rate of the polyphosphate remedy and the effect of and periodic wet-dry cycling on the efficacy of polyphosphate remediation for uranium in the vadose zone and smear zone.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Oostrom, Martinus; Gunderson, Katie M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Clayton, Eric T.; Parker, Kent E.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Baum, Steven R.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research andfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from a geologic carbon sequestration site showing the

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flow and transport model using porewater chloride data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S.infiltration for the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada. Milestonethe unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.

Liu, Jianchun; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: U Tank Farm Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE-GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides that are distributed in the vadose zone sediments beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources when possible, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information regarding vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. This information is presently limited to detection of gamma-emitting radionuclides from both natural and man-made sources. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank in a tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the U Tank Farm. Logging operations used high-purity germanium detection systems to acquire laboratory-quality assays of the gamma-emitting radionuclides in the sediments around and below the tanks. These assays were acquired in 59 boreholes that surround the U Tank Farm tanks. Logging of all boreholes was completed in December 1995, and the last Tank Summary Data Report for the U Tank Farm was issued in September 1996.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: BY Tank Farm report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the contamination distributed in the vadoze zone sediment beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information about the vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the BY Tank Farm.

Kos, S.E.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Simulations of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport in the Vadose and Saturated Zones beneath Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to predict the migration of radionuclides from the disposal units at Material Disposal Area G through the vadose zone and into the main aquifer in support of a radiological performance assessment and composite analysis for the site. The calculations are performed with the finite element code, FEHM. The transport of nuclides through the vadose zone is computed using a three-dimensional model that describes the complex mesa top geology of the site. The model incorporates the positions and inventories of thirty-four disposal pits and four shaft fields located at Area G as well as those of proposed future pits and shafts. Only three nuclides, C-14, Tc-99, and I-129, proved to be of concern for the groundwater pathway over a 10,000-year period. The spatial and temporal flux of these three nuclides from the vadose zone is applied as a source term for the three-dimensional saturated zone model of the main aquifer that underlies the site. The movement of these nuclides in the aquifer to a downstream location is calculated, and aquifer concentrations are converted to doses. Doses related to aquifer concentrations are six or more orders of magnitude lower than allowable Department of Energy performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste sites. Numerical studies were used to better understand vadose-zone flow through the dry mesa-top environment at Area G. These studies helped define the final model used to model flow and transport through the vadose zone. The study of transient percolation indicates that a steady flow vadose-zone model is adequate for computing contaminant flux to the aquifer. The fracture flow studies and the investigation of the effect of basalt and pumice properties helped us define appropriate hydrologic properties for the modeling. Finally, the evaporation study helped to justify low infiltration rates.

Kay H. Birdsell; Kathleen M. Bower; Andrew V. Wolfsberg; Wendy E. Soll; Terry A. Cherry; Tade W. Orr

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments from C Waste Management Area: Investigation of the C-152 Transfer Line Leak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in January 2007. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within waste management area (WMA) C. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data compiled on vadose zone sediment recovered from direct-push samples collected around the site of an unplanned release (UPR), UPR-200-E-82, adjacent to the 241-C-152 Diversion Box located in WMA C.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Lanigan, David C.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

70

Vapor Flow to Horizontal Wells in Unsaturated Zones Hongbin Zhan* and Eungyu Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor Flow to Horizontal Wells in Unsaturated Zones Hongbin Zhan* and Eungyu Park ABSTRACT and vaporthree dimensional form for a horizontal-well sink in an unsaturated zone. This is done by solving; horizontal-well axis to obtain the solution of flow to a horizontal-well Zhan and Cao, 2000). Horizontal

Zhan, Hongbin

71

Simulation of heat transfer in the unsaturated zone  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer can play an important role in fluid flow near the emplacement site of high-level nuclear waste. The effects on far- field flow can be important in understanding net moisture fluxes above the repository zone. The convection in the unsaturated zone at the Yucca Mountain site was responsible for this movement. If this is so, then the convection could provide a mechanism for drying the rock above the repository zone and thus provide a buffer for heavy rainfall events. In addition, the convection would increase the movement of gaseous radionuclides such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, tritiated water vapor, and {sup 129}I (Weeks, 1987). Because of the complexity of the problem, numerical models were required to calculate gas flow and vapor transport at the site. Kipp previously modeled this problem using the code HST3D. This code represents the flow of a single-phase fluid with both heat- and mass-transfer effects included. Water density and partial pressure effects are accounted for by the virtual temperature method. In this paper, the problem was simulated using the code FEHMN, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code being developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work described in this paper was done in preparation of the upcoming problem to be formulated for the Performance Assessment Calculation Exercise. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Zyvoloski, G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Site-Scale Model For Fluid And Heat Flow In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A three-dimensional unsaturated-zone numerical model has been developed to simulate flow and distribution of moisture, gas and heat at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential repository site for high-level radioactive waste. The model takes into account the simultaneous flow dynamics of liquid water, vapor, air and heat in the highly heterogeneous, fractured porous rock in the unsaturated zone (UZ). This model is intended for use in the prediction of the current and future conditions in the UZ so

73

Implementation Plan for the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Center  

SciTech Connect

The Long-Range Deep Vadose Zone Program Plan was published in October 2010. It summarized the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) state-of-knowledge about the contaminant remediation challenges facing the deep vadose zone (DVZ) beneath the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site and their approach to solving those challenges. Developing an implementation plan is the next step to address the knowledge and capabilities required to solve DVZ challenges when needed. This multi-year plan (FY-11 through FY-20) identifies the short to long-term research, management, and execution plans required to solve those problems facing the DVZ-Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The schedule supporting implementation overlies existing activities and milestones from Hanford’s DOE-Environmental Management (EM) end-user projects. Success relies upon multi-project teams focused on coordinated subsurface projects undertaken across the DOE Complex combined with facilitated, problem-focused, research investments implemented through the DVZ-AFRC.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gephart, Roy E.; Triplett, Mark B.; Johnson, Timothy C.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

75

The DOE Vadose Zone Science and Technology Roadmap: A National Program to Address Characeterization, Monitoring and Simulation of Subsurface Contaminant Fate and Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vadose zone comprises the region lying between the earth’s surface and the top of the regional seasonal aquifer. Until recently contamination in the vadose zone was believed to remain relatively immobile. Thus, little attention was paid to understanding the nature of the vadose zone or the potential pathways for contaminants to migrate through it to the water table or other accessible environments. However, recent discoveries of contaminants migrating considerable distances through the vadose zone at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have changed many assumptions both about the nature and function of the vadose zone and the importance we place on understanding this region. As a result of several vadose zone surprises, DOE Environmental Management (EM) tasked the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to lead the development of a vadose zone science and technology roadmap. The roadmap is focused on identifying research spanning the next 25 years necessary to be able to better predict the fate and transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. This in turn will provide the basis for reducing scientific uncertainty in environmental remediation and, especially, vadose zone related long-term stewardship decisions across the DOE complex. Vadose zone issues are now recognized as a national problem affecting other federal agencies as well as state and municipal sites with similar problems. Over the next few decades, dramatic and fundamental advances in computing, communication, electronics and micro-engineered systems will transform our understanding of many aspects of the scientific and technical challenges we face today. The roadmap will serve to develop a common perspective on possible future science and technology needs in an effort to help make better R&D investment decisions.

Kowall, Stephen Jacob

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Appraisal of nuclear waste isolation in the vadose zone in arid and semiarid regions (with emphasis on the Nevada Test Site)  

SciTech Connect

An appraisal was made of the concept of isolating high-level radioactive waste in the vadose zone of alluvial-filled valleys and tuffaceous rocks of the Basin and Range geomorphic province. Principal attributes of these terranes are: (1) low population density, (2) low moisture influx, (3) a deep water table, (4) the presence of sorptive rocks, and (5) relative ease of construction. Concerns about heat effects of waste on unsaturated rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity are considered. Calculations show that a standard 2000-acre repository with a thermal loading of 40 kW/acre in partially saturated alluvium or tuff would experience an average temperature rise of less than 100{sup 0}C above the initial temperature. The actual maximum temperature would depend strongly on the emplacement geometry. Concerns about seismicity, volcanism, and future climatic change are also mitigated. The conclusion reached in this appraisal is that unsaturated zones in alluvium and tuff of arid regions should be investigated as comprehensively as other geologic settings considered to be potential repository sites.

Wollenberg, H.A.; Wang, J.S.Y.; Korbin, G.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

EVALUATION OF A TECHNETIUM-99 DETECTOR BASED ON LABORATORY TESTING FOR USE IN IN-SITU VADOSE ZONE APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This document evaluates the feasibility of in-situ detection of technetium-99 in Hanford Site vadose zone soils (the soils between the surface and groundwater) using laboratory tests. The detector system performs adequately for high technetium concentration, but more development and laboratory testing is needed before field demonstration is performed.

MANN FM; MYERS DA

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

79

T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration—Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank of the 241-T Tank Farm in 1973. Five tanks are assumed to have leaked in the TY Farm. Many of the contaminants from those leaks still reside within the vadose zone within the T and TY Tank Farms. The Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection seeks to minimize the movement of these contaminant plumes by placing interim barriers on the ground surface. Such barriers are expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plumes and moving them further. The soil water regime is monitored to determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barriers. Soil-water content and water pressure are monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. Four instrument nests were installed in the T Farm in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY2007; two nests were installed in the TY Farm in FY2010. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, and four heat-dissipation units. A meteorological station has been installed at the north side of the fence of the T Farm. This document summarizes the monitoring methods, the instrument calibration and installation, and the vadose zone monitoring plan for interim barriers in T farm and TY Farm.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

80

Baseline mapping study of the Steed Pond aquifer and vadose zone beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the second phase of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this second phase is to map the structure and distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized sediment) within the vadose zone beneath A/M Area. The results presented in this report will assist future characterization and remediation activities in the vadose zone and upper aquifer zones in A/M Area.

Jackson, D.G. Jr.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stochastic analysis of unsaturated flow with probabilistic collocation method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with probabilistic collocation method, Water Resour. Res., 45, W08425, doi:10.1029/2008WR007530. 1. Introduction [2, the vadose zone has received increasing attention in recent years. Because of the coexis- tence of water to study the effect of spatial variability on flow in unsaturated zone [Jury, 1982; Yeh et al., 1985a, 1985

Lu, Zhiming

82

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the < 2 mm fraction of the sediment samples and simulated Hanford groundwater solution. Periodic stop-flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. The results were fit using a two-site, one dimensional reactive transport model. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using an array of microscale techniques such as XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, XMP, and XANES. The following are important conclusions and implications. Results from column experiments indicated that most of contaminant Cr travels fast through the sediments and appears as Cr(VI) in the effluents. The significance of this for groundwater concentrations would, however, depend on the mass flux of recharge to the water table. adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments from spiked Cr(VI) solution is low; calculated retardation coefficients are close to one. Calcium polysulfide solutions readily reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in column experiments. However a significant amount of the Cr(VI) was mobilized ahead of the polysulfide solution front. This has significant implications for in-situ reductive remediation techniques. The experiments suggest that it would be difficult to design a remedial measure using infiltration of liquid phase reductants without increasing transport of Cr(VI) toward the water table. The microscopic characterization results are consistent with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EM/GJ1302- 2006, Stoller Hanford Office, Richland, WA. 2006.characterization of U(VI) in Hanford vadose zone poreUranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site. Pacific Northwest

Wan, Jiamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geochemistry and Distribution of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone of the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides a description of the geochemical processes that affect contaminant mobility in the vadose zone at the single-shell tank waste management areas located at the Hanford Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants inthe Hanford Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

Water and chemical transport from a point source withinvadose zone sediments at Hanford were examined with a leak testconsisting of five 3800-liter aliquots of water released at 4.5 m depthevery week over a 4-week period. The third aliquot contained bromide, D2Oand 87Sr. Movement of the tracers was monitored for 9 months by measuringpore water compositions of samples from boreholes drilled 2-8 m from theinjection point. Graded sedimentary layers acting as natural capillarybarriers caused significant lateral spreading of the leak water. D2Oconcentrations>50 percent of the concentration in the tracer aliquotwere detected at 9-11 m depth. However, increased water contents, lowerd18O values, and geophysical monitoring of moisture changes at otherdepths signified high concentrations of leak fluids were added where D2Oconcentrations were<3 percent above background, suggesting limitedmixing between different aliquots of the leak fluids. Initially highbromide concentrations decreased more rapidly over time than D2O,suggesting enhanced transport of bromide due to anion exclusion. Nosignificant increase in 87Sr was detected in the sampled pore water,indicating strong retardation of Sr by the sediments. These resultshighlight some of the processes strongly affecting chemical transport inthe vadose zone and demonstrate the significant separation of contaminantplumes that can occur.

Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee,Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geochemical Characterization Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank (SST) farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical information available for the vadose zone beneath the SST farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique for the Assessment and Monitoring of Leachates in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from 3D electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and/or 2D cross borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant of the vadose zone (from the ERT and XBGPR measurements, respectively) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related.

ALUMBAUGH,DAVID L.; YEH,JIM; LABRECQUE,DOUG; GLASS,ROBERT J.; BRAINARD,JAMES; RAUTMAN,CHRIS

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Slant Borehole SX-108 in the S-SX Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is the fourth in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a slant borehole installed beneath tank SX-108 (or simply SX-108 slant borehole).

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

89

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 41-09-39 in the S-SX Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 5.15. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 41-09-39 installed adjacent to tank SX-109.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Wilson, Teresa C.; Wagnon, Kenneth B.; Williams, Bruce A.; Burke, Deborah S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

Flow dynamics and potential for Biodegradation of Organic Contaminants in Fractured Rock Vadose Zones  

SciTech Connect

We present an experimental approach for investigating the potential for bioremediation of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in fractured-rock vadose zones. This approach is based on the coupling of fluid flow dynamics and biotransformation processes. Fluid flow and distribution within fracture networks may be a significant factor in the ability of microorganisms to degrade VOCs, as they affect the availability of substrate, moisture and nutrients. Biological activity can change liquid surface tension and generate biofilms that may change the nettability of solid surfaces, locally alter fracture permeability and redirect infiltrating liquids. Our approach has four components: (1) establishing a conceptual model for fluid and contaminant distribution in the geologic matrix of interest; (2) physical and numerical experiments of liquid seepage in the fracture plane; (3) non-destructive monitoring of biotransformations on rock surfaces at the micron-scale; and, (4) integration of flow and biological activity in natural rock ''geocosms''. Geocosms are core-scale flow cells that incorporate some aspects of natural conditions, such as liquid seepage in the fracture plane and moisture content. The experimental work was performed with rock samples and indigenous microorganisms from the site of the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), located in a basalt flow basin where VOC contamination threatens the Snake River Aquifer. The insights gained from this approach should contribute to the design of techniques to monitor and stimulate naturally occurring biological activity and control the spread of organic contaminants.

Geller, J.T.; Holman, H.-Y.; Su, T.-S.; Liou, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Pruess, K.; Hunter-Devera, J.C.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Quantifying Deep Vadose Zone Soil Water Potential Changes At A Waste Disposal Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in moisture monitoring using tensiometers has allowed long-duration, high quality data sets from within the deep vadose zone. A network of about 30 advanced tensiometers in 18 wells provided field-scale data to monitor moisture conditions and movement in the subsurface in and around a mixed waste disposal site at depths ranging from 6 to over 67 m below land surface (bls). Sensors are located in both sediments and fractured rock within the geologic profile and some have been in operation for over 10 years. The moisture monitoring was able to detect long term declines in moisture content presumably in response to lower than normal precipitation and resultant infiltration over the time period from 2000 to 2004. This trend was reversed in 2005 and 2006 in more than half of the monitoring sites over the 6 to 33 m depth interval and in several monitoring sites from 33 to 67 m, in response to normal to above normal precipitation. This tensiometer data can be used to evaluate the appropriateness of the current conceptual model of flow at this site. It also shows that a moisture monitoring system should be effective to rapidly validate that a proposed remedial action (such as placement of an ET cover) would be effective in reducing the moisture movement to levels similar to those in undisturbed sites outside of the disposal area. This paper will describe the instrument design, how the instruments were installed, and the resultant data from this monitoring system.

Joel M. Hubbell; Deborah L. McElroy

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments  

SciTech Connect

One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. This report presents the results of investigations elucidating the uranium mineral phases controlling the long-term fate of uranium within concrete waste forms and the solubility of these phases in concrete pore waters and alkaline, circum-neutral vadose zone environments.

Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bovaird, Chase C.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Characterization and Potential Remediation Approaches for Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford 241-SX Tank Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unplanned releases of radioactive and hazardous wastes have occurred at the 241-SX Tank Farm on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. Interim and long-term mitigation efforts are currently under evaluation for 241-SX Tank Farm. Two contiguous interim surface barriers have been designed for deployment at 241-SX Tank Farm to reduce future moisture infiltration; however, construction of the surface barriers has been deferred to allow testing of alternative technologies for soil moisture reduction and possibly contaminant source term reduction. Previous tests performed by other organizations at the Hanford Site have demonstrated that: vadose zone desiccation using large diameter (greater than 4 inch) boreholes is feasible; under certain circumstances, mobile contaminants may be removed in addition to water vapor; and small diameter (approximately 2 inch) boreholes (such as those placed by the direct push hydraulic hammer) can be used to perform vapor extractions. Evaluation of the previous work combined with laboratory test results have led to the design of a field proof-of-principle test to remove water and possibly mobile contaminants at greater depths, using small boreholes placed with the direct push unit.

Eberlein, Susan J.; Sydnor, Harold A.; Parker, Danny L.; Glaser, Danney R.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Sensitivity Analysis Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling Flow And Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Keni Zhang, Yu-Shu Wu,volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain have been intensivelyhydraulic properties, Yucca Mountain Introduction Site

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Houseworth, James E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Reactant Carrier Microfoam Technology for In-Situ Remediation of Radionuclide and Metallic Contaminants in Deep Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing advanced remedial technologies for addressing metal and radionuclide (Cr, Tc, and U) contamination in deep vadose zone environments. One of the transformational technology alternatives being considered by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, is the use of Reactant Carrier Microfoams (RCM) as a minimally invasive method for delivery and emplacement of reagents for in-situ immobilization of contaminants. Penetration of low permeability zones deep within the subsurface for Enhance Oil Recovery (EOR) has been well-established. Use of surfactant foams have also been explored for mobilizing DNAPL from sediments. So far, the concept of using RCM for immobilizing labile metal and long-lived radionuclide contaminants in the deep vadose zone has not been explored. We, at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), conducted studies to develop stable foams as a means to deliver reductive and/or precipitating reactants to the deep subsurface. To test the feasibility of this approach, we developed a preliminary foam formulation consisting of a mixture of an anionic and a nonionic surfactant with a reactant consisting of a 9:1 blend of tripoly- and orthophosphate. The MSE Technology Applications, Inc (MSE) in collaboration with PNNL, conducted a scale-up test to evaluate the efficacy of this reactant carrier foam for in-situ immobilization of U containing sediment zones in a heterogenous sediment matrix. The data indicated that successful immobilization of U contamination is feasible using specifically tailored reactant carrier foam injection technology. Studies are continuing for developing more robust optimized RCM for highly mobile contaminants such as Cr (VI), Tc (VII) in the deep vadose zone.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Zhong, Lirong; Jansik, Danielle P.; Foote, Martin; Hart, Andrea T.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Estimation of Unsaturated Zone Traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Las Vegas. The NTS is bordered by the Nellis Air Force Range and the Tonopah 5 #12;Test RangeEstimation of Unsaturated Zone Traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential

97

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 299-E33-45 Near BX-102 in the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.22. The data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The remaining text is unchanged from the original report issued in 2002. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area B-BX-BY. This report is the first in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole 299-E33-45 installed northeast of tank BX-102.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Last, George V.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Influence of Sources on Plutonium Mobility and Oxidation State Transformations in Vadose Zone Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-defined solid sources of Pu(III) (PuCl3), Pu(IV) (Pu (NO3)4 and Pu (C2O4)2), and Pu(VI) (PuO2(NO3)2) were placed in lysimeters containing vadose zone sediments and exposed to natural weather conditions for 2 or 11 years. The objective of this study was to measure the release rate of Pu and the changes in the Pu oxidation states from these Pu sources with the intent to develop a reactive transport model source-term. Pu(III) and Pu(IV) sources had identical Pu concentration depth profiles and similar Pu release rates. Source release data indicate that PuIV(C2O4)2 was the least mobile, whereas PuVIO2(NO3)2 was the most mobile. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) revealed that Pu was very unevenly distributed on the sediment and Mn concentrations were too low (630 mg kg-1) and perhaps of the wrong mineralogy to influence Pu distribution. The high stability of sorbed Pu(IV) is proposed to be due to the formation of a stable hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species. Plutonium X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis conducted on sediment recovered at the end of the study from the PuIV(NO3)4- and PuIIICl3-amended lysimeters contained essentially identical Pu distributions: approximately 37% Pu(III), 67% Pu(IV), 0% Pu(V), and 0% Pu(VI). These results were similar to those using a wet chemistry Pu oxidation state assay, except the latter method did not detect any Pu(III) present on the sediment but instead indicated that 93-98% of the Pu existed as Pu(IV). This discrepancy was likely attributable to incomplete extraction of sediment Pu(III) by the wet chemistry method. Although Pu has been known to exist in the +3 oxidation state under microbially induced reducing conditions for decades, to our knowledge, this is the first observation of steady-state Pu(III) in association with natural sediments. On the basis of thermodynamic considerations, Pu(III) has a wide potential distribution, especially in acidic environments, and as such may warrant further investigation.

Kaplan,D.; Powell, B.; Duff, M.; Demirkanli, D.; Denham, M.; Fjeld, R.; Molz, F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

An Investigation of Linked Physical And Biogeochemical Processes In Heterogeneous Soils In The Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical dynamics in the vadose zone are poorly understood due to the transient nature of chemical and hydrologic conditions, but are nonetheless critical to understanding contaminant fate and transport. This work explored the effects of soil structure (i.e. layers, lenses) on linked geochemical, hydrological, and microbiological processes under changing hydrologic conditions (e.g. rainfall, introduction of groundwater, and fluctuating water table heights). A homogenized medium-grained sand, homogenized organic-rich loam and a sand-over-loam layered column were constructed for the first series of experiments. The second series of experiments employed two soil columns with lenses that were packed identically with sterilized and untreated sediments. Each consisted of two lenses of organic-rich loam in a medium-grained sand matrix. Lenses were located at different vertical depths and were horizontally offset. In-situ collocated probes collected soil hydrologic and chemical data. In the layered column, enhanced biogeochemical cycling was observed over the texturally homogeneous soil columns. Enumerations of Fe(III) and SO42- reducing microorganisms also show 1-2 orders of magnitude greater community numbers in the layered column. The greatest concentrations of aqueous FeS clusters (FeSaq) were observed in close proximity to the soil interface. To our knowledge, this was the first documentation of FeSaq in partially saturated sediments. Mineral and soil aggregate composite layers were also most abundant near the soil layer interface; the presence of which, likely contributed to an order of magnitude decrease of hydraulic conductivity. In the live lens column, Fe-oxide bands formed at the fringes of the lenses that retarded water flow rates by an order of magnitude compared to the sterilized column. Microbial activity also produced insoluble gases and that led to the creation of a separate gas phase that reduced hydraulic conductivity. This limited the interaction between groundwater with soil-pore waters that led to the formation of geochemically distinct water masses in relatively close proximity to one another. No such changes were observed in the sterilized column. When compared to homogenous columns, the presence of soil heterogeneities altered biogeochemical and hydrologic processes considerably which highlights the need to consider soil heterogeneity in contaminant fate and transport models. These findings suggest that quantifying coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes occurring at small scale soil interfaces is critical to accurately describing and predicting chemical changes at the larger system scale.

Hansen, David Joseph

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Multiphase Reactive Transport modeling of Stable Isotope Fractionation of Infiltrating Unsaturated Zone Pore Water and Vapor Using TOUGHREACT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of transport and isotope fractionation provide a method to quantitatively interpret vadose zone pore water stable isotope depth profiles based on soil properties, climatic conditions, and infiltration. We incorporate the temperature-dependent equilibration of stable isotopic species between water and water vapor, and their differing diffusive transport properties into the thermodynamic database of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. These simulations are used to illustrate the evolution of stable isotope profiles in semiarid regions where recharge during wet seasons disturbs the drying profile traditionally associated with vadose zone pore waters. Alternating wet and dry seasons lead to annual fluctuations in moisture content, capillary pressure, and stable isotope compositions in the vadose zone. Periodic infiltration models capture the effects of seasonal increases in precipitation and predict stable isotope profiles that are distinct from those observed under drying (zero infiltration) conditions. After infiltration, evaporation causes a shift to higher 18O and D values, which are preserved in the deeper pore waters. The magnitude of the isotopic composition shift preserved in deep vadose zone pore waters varies inversely with the rate of infiltration.

Singleton, Michael J.; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22  

SciTech Connect

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.7 and 4.25. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2006. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at the Hanford Site. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. This report also presents the interpretation of data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the WMA A-AX, C, and U field investigation report in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

ReproducedfromVadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Colloid Transport in the Subsurface: Past, Present, and Future Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Colloid Transport in the Subsurface: Past, Present, and Future Challenges John F. McCarthy* and Larry D between wells and septic fieldssection on colloid transport within a more general perspective) for individual homes, subsurface systems. The focus will be on the transport of colloidal were based on empirical

McCarthy, John F.

104

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site - Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site, chromate was used throughout the 100 Areas (100-B, 100-C, 100-D/DR, 100-F, 100-H, and 100 K) as a corrosion inhibitor in reactor cooling water. Chromate was delivered in rail cars, tanker trucks, barrels, and local pipelines as dichromate granular solid or stock solution. In many occasions, chromate was inevitably discharged to surface or near-surface ground through spills during handling, pipeline leaks, or during disposal to cribs. The composition of the liquids that were discharged is not known and it is quite possible that Cr(VI) fate and transport in the contaminated sediments would be a function of the chemical composition of the waste fluids. The major objectives of this investigation which was limited in scope by the financial resources available, were to 1) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100-D Area spill sites; 2) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of macroscopic leaching studies, and microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone that can be used for developing options for environmental remediation. The information gathered from this research effort will help to further improve our understanding of Cr(VI) behavior in the vadose zone and will also help in accelerating the 100 Area Columbia River Corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of column experiments were conducted with contaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns. Column experiments used the field size fraction of the sediment samples and a simulated Hanford Site groundwater solution. Periodic stop flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using some microscale techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Dresel, P. Evan; McKinley, James P.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Um, Wooyong; Resch, Charles T.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Petersen, Scott W.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transort in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into drifts at Yucca Mountain. ” J. Contam. Hydrol. , 38(1–pneumatic response at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.unsaturated zone model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.

Moridis, G.J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

T-TY Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY10 Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection has constructed interim surface barriers over a portion of the T and TY tank farms as part of the Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The interim surface barriers (hereafter referred to as the surface barriers or barriers) are designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the soil zones containing radioactive contaminants and minimize the movement of the contaminants. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barriers at reducing soil moisture. Solar-powered systems were installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations in the T (i.e., instrument Nests TA, TB, TC, and TD) and the TY (i.e., instrument Nests TYA and TYB) Farms beneath the barriers and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nests TA and TYA are placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serve as controls, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barriers. Nest TB provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests TC, TD, and TYB are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barriers. Except for occasional times for TC and TD and planned dates for TYB, during FY10, the battery voltage at the TMS and instrument Nests in both T and TY tank farms remained above 12.0 V, denoting that the battery voltages were sufficient for the stations to remain functional. All the HDUs were functioning normally, but some pressure-head values were greater than the upper measurement limit. The values that exceeded the upper limit may indicate wet soil conditions and/or measurement error, but they do not imply a malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 through FY09, in FY10, the soil under natural conditions in the T Farm (Nest TA) was generally recharged during the winter period (October–March), and they discharged during the summer period (April–September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP, and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the TISB was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the TISB (Nests TC and TD), the CP-measured water content showed that ? at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water conditions beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) since the completion of the barrier decreased by 0.007 to 0.014 m3 m-3. The HDU-measured soil-water pressure at 1-m, 2-m, and 5-m depths decreased by 0.7 to 2.4 m, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the TISB (Nest TB), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 12.2 m (40 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than in Nests TC and TD; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes at Nest TB since the completion of the barrier were generally less than those at TC and TD, but more than those at TA. These results indicate that the TISB is performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil, and the soil is becoming drier gradually. The barrier also had some effects on the soil below the barrier edge, but at a reduced magnitude. There was no significant difference in soil-water regime between the two nests in the TY tank farm because the barrier at the TY Farm was just completed one month before the end of the FY.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zone Transport Field Study, PNNL-13454, Pacific NorthwestZone Transport Field Study, PNNL-13631, Pacific Northwestplan for simulated leak tests. PNNL-13263. Pacific Northwest

Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Final draft 20-01-2004 For submittal to Vadose Zone Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-tortuosity tensor for conduction of water in anisotropi c unsaturated soils. Peter A.C. Raats1 , Z. Fred Zhang2 to stratified soils. Theoretical analysis based on stochastic methods (Yeh et al., 1985) suggests head and water content of the soil decrease. Using the stochastic approach, Polmann et al. (1991

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

109

T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY09 Report  

SciTech Connect

DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier. Each instrument nest is composed of a capacitance probe (CP) with multiple sensors, multiple heat-dissipation units (HDUs), and a neutron probe (NP) access tube. The monitoring results in FY09 are summarized below. The solar panels functioned normally and could provide sufficient power to the instruments. The CP in Nest C after September 20, 2009, was not functional. The CP sensors in Nest B after July 13 and the 0.9-m CP sensor in Nest D before June 10 gave noisy data. Other CPs were functional normally. All the HDUs were functional normally but some pressure-head values measured by HDUs were greater than the upper measurement-limit. The higher-than-upper-limit values might be due to the very wet soil condition and/or measurement error but do not imply the malfunction of the sensors. Similar to FY07 and FY08, in FY09, the soil under natural conditions (Nest A) was generally recharged during the winter period (October-March) and discharged during the summer period (April-September). Soil water conditions above about 1.5-m to 2-m depth from all three types of measurements (i.e., CP, NP and HDU) showed relatively large variation during the seasonal wetting-drying cycle. For the soil below 2-m depth, the seasonal variation of soil water content was relatively small. The construction of the surface barrier was completed in April 2008. In the soil below the surface barrier (Nests C and D), the CP measurements showed that water content at the soil between 0.6-m and 2.3-m depths was very stable, indicating no climatic impacts on soil water condition beneath the barrier. The NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage seemed occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) in FY09. The HDU-measured water pressure decreased consistently in the soil above 5-m depth, indicating soil water drainage at these depths of the soil. In the soil below the edge of the surface barrier (Nest B), the CP-measured water content was relatively stable through the year except at the 0.9-m depth; the NP-measured water content showed that soil water drainage was occurring in the soil between about 3.4 m (11 ft) and 9.1 m (30 ft) but at a slightly smaller magnitude than those in Nests C and D; the HDU-measurements show that the pressure head changes in FY09 in Nest B were less than those for C and D but more than those for A. The soil-water-pressure head was more sensitive to soil water regime changes under dry conditions. In the soil beneath the barrier, the theoretical steady-state values of pressure head is equal to the negative of the distance to groundwater table. Hence, it is expected that, in the future, while the water content become stable, the pressure head will keep decreasing for a long time (e.g., many years). These results indicate that the T Tank Farm surface barrier was performing as expected by intercepting the meteoric water from infiltrating into the soil and the soil was becoming drier gradually. The barrier also has some effects on the soil below the barrier edge but at a reduced magnitude.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evolution of the conceptual model of unsaturated zone hydrology at yucca mountain, nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is an arid site proposed for consideration as the United States' first underground high-level radioactive waste repository. Low rainfall (approximately 170 mm/yr) and a thick unsaturated zone (500-1000 m) are important physical attributes of the site because the quantity of water likely to reach the waste and the paths and rates of movement of the water to the saturated zone under future climates would be major factors in controlling the concentrations and times of arrival of radionuclides at the surrounding accessible environment. The framework for understanding the hydrologic processes that occur at this site and that control how quickly water will penetrate through the unsaturated zone to the water table has evolved during the past 15 yr. Early conceptual models assumed that very small volumes of water infiltrated into the bedrock (0.5-4.5 mm/yr, or 2-3 percent of rainfall), that much of the infiltrated water flowed laterally within the upper nonwelded units because o f capillary barrier effects, and that the remaining water flowed down faults with a small amount flowing through the matrix of the lower welded, fractured rocks. It was believed that the matrix had to be saturated for fractures to show. However, accumulating evidence indicated that infiltration rates were higher than initially estimated, such as infiltration modeling based on neutron borehole data, bomb-pulse isotopes deep in the mountain, perched water analyses and thermal analyses. Mechanisms supporting lateral diversion did not apply at these higher fluxes, and the flux calculated in the lower welded unit exceeded the conductivity of the matrix, implying vertical flow of water into the high permeability fractures of the potential repository host rock, and disequilibrium between matrix and fracture water potentials. The development of numerical modeling methods and parameter values evolved concurrently with the conceptual model in order to account for the observed field data, particularly fracture flow deep in the unsaturated zone. This paper presents the history of the evolution of conceptual models of hydrology and numerical models of unsaturated zone flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Flint, A.L., Flint, L.E., Kwicklis, E.M., Bodvarsson, G.S., Fabryka-Martin, J.M., 2001. Hydrology of Yucca Mountain. Reviews of Geophysics in press). This retrospective is the basis for recommendations for optimizing the efficiency with which a viable and robust conceptual model can be developed for a complex site. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [References: 87

Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Bodvarsson, G. S.; Kwicklis, E. M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also appears to be transient such that the evolution of the contaminant plumes is transient.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Perched-Water Evaluation for the Deep Vadose Zone Beneath the B, BX, and BY Tank Farms Area of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Perched-water conditions have been observed in the vadose zone above a fine-grained zone that is located a few meters above the water table within the B, BX, and BY Tank Farms area. The perched water contains elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99. This perched-water zone is important to consider in evaluating the future flux of contaminated water into the groundwater. The study described in this report was conducted to examine the perched-water conditions and quantitatively evaluate 1) factors that control perching behavior, 2) contaminant flux toward groundwater, and 3) associated groundwater impact.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Carroll, KC; Chronister, Glen B.

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

113

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196, and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28, and 4.52. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the second of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. Finally, the measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared with a nearby borehole drilled in 1993, 299- W10-196, through the tank T-106 leak plume.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Borehole 299-E33-46 Near B 110 in the B BX-BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-ectractable sodium data from Table 4.17. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in December 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area. This report is the third in a series of three reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from a borehole installed approximately 4.5 m (15 ft) northeast of tank B- 110 (borehole 299-E33-46).

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; mccain, r. G.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Orr, Robert D.; Legore, Virginia L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Hydrologic-geophysical Method for Characterizing Flow and Transport Processes Within The Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this project was to employ two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar, to image a controlled infiltration of a saline tracer under unsaturated flow conditions. The geophysical techniques have been correlated to other more traditional hydrologic measurements including neutron moisture measurements and induction conductivity logs. Images that resulted during two successive infiltrations indicate the development of what appear to be preferential pathways through the finer grained materials, although the results could also be produced by cationic capture of free ions in clays. In addition the site as well as the developing solute plume exhibits electrical anisotropy which is likely related to flow properties. However the geologic significance of this phenomenon is still under investigation.

David Alumbaugh; Douglas LaBrecque; James Brainard; T.C. (Jim) Yeh

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Probe Holes C3830, C3831, C3832 and 299-W10-27  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area T-TX-TY. This report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from three probe holes (C3830, C3831, and C3832) in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27. Sediments from borehole 299-W-10-27 are considered to be uncontaminated sediments that can be compared with contaminated sediments. This report also presents our interpretation of the sediment lithologies, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the TX Tank Farm. Sediment from the probe holes was analyzed for: moisture, radionuclide and carbon contents;, one-to-one water extracts (soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), and 8 M nitric acid extracts. Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We did not observe significant indications of caustic alteration of the sediment mineralogy or porosity, or significant zones of slightly elevated pH values in the probe holes. The sediments do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms. Three primary stratigraphic units were encountered in each probe hole: (1) backfill material, (2) the Hanford formation, and (3) the Cold Creek unit. Each of the probe holes contain thin fine-grained layers in the Hanford H2 stratigraphic unit that may impact the flow of leaked fluids and effect irregular and horizontal flow. The probe holes could not penetrate below the enriched calcium carbonate strata of the Cold Creek lower subunit; therefore, we did not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. However, the more elevated portions of the electrical conductivity (EC) profile at probe hole C3830 currently resides at the bottom of a fine-grained thin lens in the Hanford H2 unit at 87 ft bgs. At C3831, we lack good sample coverage to ascertain whether the salt plume has significantly descended into the Cold Creek Unit. There is strong indication at probe hole C3832 that the saline plume has descended into the Cold Creek Unit. The profiles do collectively suggest that the deepest penetration of tank related fluids is found in probe hole C3832. The water potential data from 299-W10-27?s H2 unit, the unit where most of the contaminants reside in the TX probe holes, are consistent with a draining profile. Despite the evidence that elevated EC values may be present in all three probe holes to their depth of refusal, the concentrations of long-term risk drivers are not large. The inventories of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium-99, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In addition, in situ desorption Kd values for these contaminants are provided. For conservative modeling purposes, we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate and technetium-99, a value of 1 mL/g for uranium, and 10 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. These conservative Kd values along with the provided inventories in the vadose zone sediments obtained from the three probe holes can be used in long-term risk projections that rely on estimates of water recharge and vadose zone and aquifer transport calculations.

Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 12011, Vol. 10 Flow Processes in the Dry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(OBM). In the case of tight-gas sands, our method explains the marginal productivity of deeply invaded partially-depleted hydrocarbon-bearing sands and tight-gas sands. SIMULATION METHOD Petrophysical Analysis example considers a tight-gas sand invaded with WBM. The second example considers an oil-bearing zone

Wildenschild, Dorthe

119

Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Gas-Transported Reactants: Laboratory Scale Experiments in Support of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This laboratory-scale investigation is focused on decreasing mobility of uranium in subsurface contaminated sediments in the vadose zone by in situ geochemical manipulation at low water content. This geochemical manipulation of the sediment surface phases included reduction, pH change (acidic and alkaline), and additions of chemicals (phosphate, ferric iron) to form specific precipitates. Reactants were advected into 1-D columns packed with Hanford 200 area U-contaminated sediment as a reactive gas (for CO2, NH3, H2S, SO2), with a 0.1% water content mist (for NaOH, Fe(III), HCl, PO4) and with a 1% water content foam (for PO4). Uranium is present in the sediment in multiple phases that include (in decreasing mobility): aqueous U(VI) complexes, adsorbed U, reduced U(IV) precipitates, rind-carbonates, total carbonates, oxides, silicates, phosphates, and in vanadate minerals. Geochemical changes were evaluated in the ability to change the mixture of surface U phases to less mobile forms, as defined by a series of liquid extractions that dissolve progressively less soluble phases. Although liquid extractions provide some useful information as to the generalized uranium surface phases (and are considered operational definitions of extracted phases), positive identification (by x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, other techniques) was also used to positively identify U phases and effects of treatment. Some of the changes in U mobility directly involve U phases, whereas other changes result in precipitate coatings on U surface phases. The long-term implication of the U surface phase changes to alter U mass mobility in the vadose zone was then investigated using simulations of 1-D infiltration and downward migration of six U phases to the water table. In terms of the short-term decrease in U mobility (in decreasing order), NH3, NaOH mist, CO2, HCl mist, and Fe(III) mist showed 20% to 35% change in U surface phases. Phosphate addition (mist or foam advected) showed inconsistent change in aqueous and adsorbed U, but significant coating (likely phosphates) on U-carbonates. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U reduction, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals. In addition, simulations showed the greatest decrease in U mass transport time to reach groundwater (and concentration) for these silicate/phosphate minerals. Advection of reactive gasses was the easiest to implement at the laboratory scale (and presumably field scale). Both mist and foam advection show promise and need further development, but current implementation move reactants shorter distances relative to reactive gasses. Overall, the ammonia and carbon dioxide gas had the greatest overall geochemical performance and ability to implement at field scale. Corresponding mist-delivered technologies (NaOH mist for ammonia and HCl mist for carbon dioxide) performed as well or better geochemically, but are not as easily upscaled. Phosphate delivery by mist was rated slightly higher than by foam delivery simply due to the complexity of foam injection and unknown effect of U mobility by the presence of the surfactant.

Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Williams, Mark D.; Resch, Charles T.; McKinley, James P.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

120

Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is traditionally treated as the dominant mechanism of gas transport in unsaturated zones under natural conditions of the gas pressure are less than 5% [32], which is satisfied in natural attenuation. At the ground surface contri- bution of the advective flux is a more important concern in natural attenuation. According to Fig

Zhan, Hongbin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Ammonia Gas: FY 2010 Laboratory-Scale Experiments  

SciTech Connect

This investigation is focused on refining an in situ technology for vadose zone remediation of uranium by the addition of ammonia (NH3) gas. Objectives are to: a) refine the technique of ammonia gas treatment of low water content sediments to minimize uranium mobility by changing uranium surface phases (or coat surface phases), b) identify the geochemical changes in uranium surface phases during ammonia gas treatment, c) identify broader geochemical changes that occur in sediment during ammonia gas treatment, and d) predict and test injection of ammonia gas for intermediate-scale systems to identify process interactions that occur at a larger scale and could impact field scale implementation.Overall, NH3 gas treatment of low-water content sediments appears quite effective at decreasing aqueous, adsorbed uranium concentrations. The NH3 gas treatment is also fairly effective for decreasing the mobility of U-carbonate coprecipitates, but shows mixed success for U present in Na-boltwoodite. There are some changes in U-carbonate surface phases that were identified by surface phase analysis, but no changes observed for Na-boltwoodite. It is likely that dissolution of sediment minerals (predominantly montmorillonite, muscovite, kaolinite) under the alkaline conditions created and subsequent precipitation as the pH returns to natural conditions coat some of the uranium surface phases, although a greater understanding of these processes is needed to predict the long term impact on uranium mobility. Injection of NH3 gas into sediments at low water content (1% to 16% water content) can effectively treat a large area without water addition, so there is little uranium mobilization (i.e., transport over cm or larger scale) during the injection phase.

Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Mark D.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Zheming; Bargar, John; Faurie, Danielle K.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone, Addendum to the TX Tank Farm Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This addendum to the TX Tank Farm Report (GJO-97-13-TAR, GJO-HAN-11) published in September 1997 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the TX Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the TX Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

Spatz, R.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to Tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. Sediments from borehole 299-E27-22 were considered to be background uncontaminated sediments against which to compare contaminated sediments for the C Tank Farm characterization effort. This report also presents our interpretation of the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the A-AX, C and U Waste Management Area field investigation report(a) in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. A core log was generated for both boreholes and a geologic evaluation of all core samples was performed at the time of opening. Aliquots of sediment from the borehole core samples were analyzed and characterized in the laboratory for the following parameters: moisture content, gamma-emitting radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Two key radiocontaminants, technetium-99 and uranium-238, along with other trace metals were determined in acid and water extracts by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

SOIL DESICCATION TECHNIQUES STRATEGIES FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF DEEP VADOSE CONTAMINANTS AT THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect

Deep vadose zone contamination poses some of the most difficult remediation challenges for the protection of groundwater at the Hanford Site where processes and technologies are being developed and tested for use in the on-going effort to remediate mobile contamination in the deep vadose zone, the area deep beneath the surface. Historically, contaminants were discharged to the soil along with significant amounts of water, which continues to drive contaminants deeper in the vadose zone toward groundwater. Soil desiccation is a potential in situ remedial technology well suited for the arid conditions and the thick vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Desiccation techniques could reduce the advance of contaminants by removing the pore water to slow the rate of contaminants movement toward groundwater. Desiccation technologies have the potential to halt or slow the advance of contaminants in unsaturated systems, as well as aid in reduction of contaminants from these same areas. Besides reducing the water flux, desiccation also establishes capillary breaks that would require extensive rewetting to resume pore water transport. More importantly, these techniques have widespread application, whether the need is to isolate radio nuclides or address chemical contaminant issues. Three different desiccation techniques are currently being studied at Hanford.

BENECKE MW; CHRONISTER GB; TRUEX MJ

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

ReproducedfromVadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Analytical Solutions for Vertical Flow in Unsaturated, Rooted Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analytical solutions may be divided into two classes;describe the distribution of pressure head, water for the hydraulic ner, 1958; Warrick, 1975; Lomen and Warrick, 1978; Sri- conductivity and water content as function of the pressure head are vastava and Yeh, 1991; Basha, 2000; Chen et al., 2003), exponential, (ii) the initial

Lu, Zhiming

126

Remediation of chromium(VI) in the vadose zone: stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by sulfur dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immobilization and detoxification of chromium in the vadose zone is made possible by the existence of an effective reductant, SO2, that exists in a gaseous form at room temperature. Experimental studies were designed to characterize stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium reduction both in aqueous solutions at pH values near neutrality and in soil. First, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in water. The stoichiometric ratio of S(IV) removed to Cr(VI) removed ranged between 1.6 and 1.8. The overall reaction is believed to be the result of a linear combination of two reactions in which dithionate is an intermediate and sulfate is the stable oxidized product. The reaction was also rapid, with the half-time of about 45 minutes at pH 6 and about 16 hours at pH 7. A two-step kinetic model was developed to describe changes in concentrations of Cr(VI), S(IV), and S(V). Nonlinear regression was applied to obtain the kinetic parameters. The rate of reaction was assumed to be second-order with respect to [Cr(VI)] and first-order with respect to [S(IV)], and [S(V)]. The values for the rate coefficient for the first reaction (k1) were found to be 4.5 (?10%), 0.25 (?9.4%) (mM-2h-1) at pH 6 and 7, respectively. The values of the rate coefficient for the second reaction (k2) were 25 (?29%), 1.1 (? 30%) (mM-2h-1) at pH 6 and 7, respectively. The reaction rate decreased as pH increased. Experiments showed that the rate at pH 7 was lower than that at pH 6 by one order of magnitude. Second, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in soil. The stoichiometric ratio of S(IV) removed to Cr(VI) removed was almost 2, which is slightly higher than that for the reaction in water. This higher value may be due to S(IV) oxidation by soil-derived Fe(III). The reaction was rapid, with the half-time less than 2 minutes, which is faster than in water. The rate coefficients, k1 and k2, were 22 (?41%) and 13 (?77%) (M-2h-1), respectively.

Ahn, Min

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Characterization of Direct-Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical tests provide evidence for the transit of a plume of caustic waste solution through the sediment column at the Hanford 241-B and -BX Tank Farms. Direct-push samples recovered from boreholes surrounding Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-BX-102 and related waste transfer lines and diversion boxes included sediments typical of those previously recovered from other localities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford formation sediments are dominantly quartzo-feldspathic sands strewn with lithic fragments, displaying a range of particle size distributions and sorting characteristics. Some moderately well-sorted, fine-grained lithologies are interpreted as lenticular bodies irregularly dispersed in coarser-grained, more poorly sorted sediments. Tier I tests conducted on the vadose zone sediments revealed an inverse correlation between moisture content and sediment size fraction (i.e., there is greater moisture content in finer-grained sediments). The Tier I tests also showed that the pore water solutions were likely sodium-rich, moderately saline, and possessed higher pH values than background (untainted) sediments. These data are characteristic of sediments that have encountered sodium-rich, saline, caustic waste solution, as documented in other reports at other suspect contamination sites around Hanford. Analyses of solutions from 1:1 water extracts reveal relatively balanced cation and anion concentrations, indicating that most of the geochemical species have been accounted for. The water extract data for affected sediments also indicate unusually high concentrations of aluminum, iron, and phosphorus. The relatively high concentrations of aluminum and iron may be the result of dissolution of secondary amorphous phases that precipitated after a reactive plume partially dissolved aluminum- and iron-bearing phases as it migrated through the sediment column. On the other hand, the presence of elevated concentrations of phosphorous may be the tell-tale signature of wastes derived from the bismuth phosphate separation process. Elements typically mobile in the geosphere, such as technetium-99, are present at either low concentrations or are below the analytical detection limit. However, we expect that the mobile elements would be present mainly along a narrow plume front, and if this front had passed deeper into the sediment profile than depths sampled, the retention of these elements would be minor. On the other hand for the direct push sediments from around BX Tank Farm, uranium-238 was detected in nearly all sediment specimens (by acid extract experiments) at concentrations above the natural crustal average (0.763 pCi/g), and we also detected the presence of several anthropogenic radioisotopes, such as cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-154, and europium-155 (by gamma energy analysis). These data are direct confirmation of contamination of the sediments.

Brown, Christopher F.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Iovin, Cristian; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Current models using U- and Th-series disequilibria to study radioisotope transport in groundwater systems mostly consider a steady-state situation. These models have limited applicability to the vadose zone (UZ) where the concentration and migratory behavior of radioisotopes in fluid are often transitory. We present here, as a first attempt of its kind, a model simulating the non-steady state, intermittent fluid transport in vadose layers. It provides quantitative constraints on in-situ migration of dissolved and colloidal radioisotopes in terms of retardation factor and rock-water interaction (or water transit) time. For uranium, the simulation predicts that intermittent flushing in the UZ leads to a linear relationship between reciprocal U concentration and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in percolating waters, with the intercept and slope bearing information on the rates of dissolution and {alpha}-recoil of U isotopes, respectively. The general validity of the model appears to be borne out by the measurement of uranium isotopes in UZ waters collected at various times over a period during 1995-2006 from a site in the Pena Blanca mining district, Mexico, where the Nopal I uranium deposit is located. Enhanced {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratios in vadose-zone waters resulting from lengthened non-flushing time as prescribed by the model provide an interpretative basis for using {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U in cave calcites to reconstruct the regional changes in hydrology and climate. We also provide a theoretical account of the model's potential applications using radium isotopes.

Ku, T. L.; Luo, S.; Goldstein, S. J.; Murrell, M. T.; Chu, W. L.; Dobson, P. F.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Modeling studies of mountain-scale radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wu, and G.S. Bodvarsson, Radionuclide Transport Models Underdaughters of certain radionuclides. Increasing infiltrationOF MOUNTAIN-SCALE RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED

Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Wu, Yu-Shu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ESTIMATING FATE AND TRANSPORT OF MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING A MULTI-LAYERED SOIL COLUMN AND THREE-PHASE EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and contaminate drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminates. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: contaminant decay, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use.

Rucker, G

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect

This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.8. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in June 2003. The overall goals of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are: 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid via collection of geotechnical information and data, future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas. For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at the B-BX-BY tank farm waste management area are found in CH2M HILL (2000).

Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

132

Temporal Damping Effect of the Yucca Mountain Fractured Unsaturated Rock on Transient Infiltration Pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. J. of Cont. Hydrol. ,2003b. Calibration of Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone flowthe unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, USGS Water Resources

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pan, Lehua

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrical Resistivity Correlation to Vadose Zone Sediment and Pore-Water Composition for the BC Cribs and Trenches Area  

SciTech Connect

This technical report documents the results of geochemical and soil resistivity characterization of sediment obtained from four boreholes drilled in the BC Cribs and Trench area. Vadose zone sediment samples were obtained at a frequency of about every 2.5 ft from approximately 5 ft bgs to borehole total depth. In total, 505 grab samples and 39 six-inch long cores were obtained for characterization. The pore-water chemical composition data, laboratory-scale soil resistivity and other ancillary physical and hydrologic measurements and analyses described in this report are designed to provide a crucial link between direct measurements on sediments and the surface-based electrical-resistivity information obtained via field surveys. A second goal of the sediment characterization was to measure the total and water-leachable concentrations of key contaminants of concern as a function of depth and distance from the footprints of inactive disposal facilities. The total and water-leachable concentrations of key contaminants will be used to update contaminant distribution conceptual models and to provide more data for improving base-line risk predictions and remedial alternative selections. The ERC “ground truthing” exercise for the individual boreholes showed mixed results. In general, the high concentrations of dissolved salts in the pore waters of sediments from C5923, C5924 and C4191 produced a low resistivity “target” in the processed resistivity field surveys, and variability could be seen in the resistivity data that could relate to the variability in pore- water concentrations but the correlations (regression R2 were mediocre ranging from 0.2 to 0.7 at best; where perfect correlation is 1.0). The field-based geophysical data also seemed to suffer from a sort of vertigo, where looking down from the ground surface, the target (e.g., maximum pore-water salt concentration) depth was difficult to resolve. The best correlations between the field electrical resistivity surveys and borehole pore water data sets were obtained when focusing on areal extent of the salt plume. Lateral resolution of the geophysical field data is best conducted by comparing an aggregated set of geophysical data on all boreholes together. When assembling the pore-water data for all four boreholes in an aerial view, the field ERC data produce a reasonable aerial picture of where high salt plumes exist below the BC Cribs and Trenches area. Future work that relies on more laboratory soil resistivity and incorporation of other field data (spectral gamma, neutron moisture and soil density logs) and physical and hydraulic measurements on samples obtained from the boreholes will used develop a more detailed petrophysical model of the sediments below BC Cribs and Trenches. This more detailed model can be used as a more realistic “earth model” in the inversion process to better manipulate the raw field survey data. It is also recommended that one more borehole be drilled after a thorough vetting of the current data with geophysics experts and other Hanford stakeholder to optimize where to place the borehole, what electrical and other geophysical surveys should be conducted , where to take sediment samples and what parameters should be measured on the sediments to attempt one more “ground truthing” exercise.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Ward, Anderson L.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Rucker, Dale F.; Lanigan, David C.; Benecke, Mark W.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

GEOPHYSICS AND SITE CHARACTERIZATION AT THE HANFORD SITE THE SUCCESSFUL USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TO POSITION BOREHOLES TO DEFINE DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION - 11509  

SciTech Connect

Historic boreholes confirmed the presence of nitrate and radionuclide contaminants at various intervals throughout a more than 60 m (200 ft) thick vadose zone, and a 2010 electrical resistivity survey mapped the known contamination and indicated areas of similar contaminants, both laterally and at depth; therefore, electrical resistivity mapping can be used to more accurately locate characterization boreholes. At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington, production of uranium and plutonium resulted in the planned release of large quantities of contaminated wastewater to unlined excavations (cribs). From 1952 until 1960, the 216-U-8 Crib received approximately 379,000,000 L (100,000,000 gal) of wastewater containing 25,500 kg (56,218 lb) uranium; 1,029,000 kg (1,013 tons) of nitrate; 2.7 Ci of technetium-99; and other fission products including strontium-90 and cesium-137. The 216-U-8 Crib reportedly holds the largest inventory of waste uranium of any crib on the Hanford Site. Electrical resistivity is a geophysical technique capable of identifying contrasting physical properties; specifically, electrically conductive material, relative to resistive native soil, can be mapped in the subsurface. At the 216-U-8 Crib, high nitrate concentrations (from the release of nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}] and associated uranium and other fission products) were detected in 1994 and 2004 boreholes at various depths, such as at the base of the Crib at 9 m (30 ft) below ground surface (bgs) and sporadically to depths in excess of 60 m (200 ft) bgs. These contaminant concentrations were directly correlative with the presence of observed low electrical resistivity responses delineated during the summer 2010 geophysical survey. Based on this correlation and the recently completed mapping of the electrically conductive material, additional boreholes are planned for early 2011 to identify nitrate and radionuclide contamination: (a) throughout the entire vertical length of the vadose zone (i.e., 79 m [260 ft] bgs) within the footprint of the Crib, and (b) 15 to 30 m (50 to 100 ft) east of the Crib footprint, where contaminants are inferred to have migrated through relatively permeable soils. Confirmation of the presence of contamination in historic boreholes correlates well with mapping from the 2010 survey, and serves as a basis to site future characterization boreholes that will likely intersect contamination both laterally and at depth.

GANDER MJ; LEARY KD; LEVITT MT; MILLER CW

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

136

Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Central Block Area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Mapunsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resourcesisotope distributions at Yucca Mountain. Sandia National

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model  

SciTech Connect

Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

[Characterization of historical infiltration in the unsaturated zone at the Nevada Test Site using chloride, bromide, and chlorine-36 as environmental tracers]; [Final subcontract report  

SciTech Connect

This document is an end-of-contract report, prepared by Hydro Geo Chem for Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number 9-XDD-6329F-1. The ultimate goal of this work is to characterize historical infiltration and unsaturated flow in the Yucca Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site. Work on this contract has focused on using chloride, bromide, stable chlorine isotopes, and chlorine-36 distributions to evaluate the depth of infiltration in the unsaturated zone. Effort in support of this work has included developing analytical procedures, exploring ways in which to separate the. meteoric component from the rock component, and meeting quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1991-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

140

Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains geologic, geochemical, and physical characterization data collected on sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. The measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared to a nearby borehole 299-W10-196 placed through the plume from the 1973 T-106 tank leak. This report also presents the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the T Tank Farm. Sediment samples were characterized for: moisture content, gamma-emission radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, radionuclide and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We observed slight elevated pH values in samples from borehole C4104. The sediments from the three boreholes, C4104, C4105, and 299-W10-196 do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present below tank T-106 and have formed a salt plume. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms and slightly less than those from the most saline porewater found in contaminated TX tank farm sediments. The boreholes could not penetrate below the gravel-rich strata of the Ringold Formation Wooded Island member (Rwi) (refusal was met at about 130 ft bgs); therefore, we could not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. The moisture content, pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, and technetium-99 profiles versus depth in the three contaminated boreholes around T-106 do not clearly identify the leading edge of the plume. However, the profiles do collectively suggest that bulk of tank-related fluids (center of mass) still resides in Ringold Formation Taylor Flats member fine-grained sediments. Most of the chemical data, especially the nitrate and technetium-99 distributions with depth, support a flow conceptual model that suggests vertical percolation through the Hanford formation H2 unit near T-106 and then a strong horizontal spreading within the CCUu unit followed by more slow vertical percolation, perhaps via diffusion, into the deeper strata. Slow flushing by enhanced recharge and rapid snow melt events (Feb. 1979) appear to lead to more horizontal movement of the tank fluids downgradient towards C4105. The inventories as a function of depth of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In-situ Kd values were calculated from water and acid extract measurements. For conservative modeling purposes we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate, Co-60, and technetium-99, a value of 0.1 mL/g for uranium near borehole C4104 and 10 mL/g for U near borehole C4105, and 1 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. A technetium-99 groundwater plume exists northeast and east of T WMA. The highest technetium-99 concentration in fiscal year 2003 was 9,200 pCi/L in well 299-W11-39. The most probable source for the technetium-99 is the T waste management area. Groundwater from wells in the west (upgradient) and north of WMA T appear to be highly influenced by wastes disposed to the cribs and trenches on the west side of the WMA. Groundwater from wells at the northeast corner and the east side of the WMA appears to be evolving towards tank waste that has leaked from T-101 or T-106.

Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

User`s Guide: Database of literature pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginnings in 1949, hydrogeologic investigations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have resulted in an extensive collection of technical publications providing information concerning ground water hydraulics and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy through the Department of Energy Idaho Field Office in a grant to compile an INEL-wide summary of unsaturated zone studies based on a literature search. University of Idaho researchers are conducting a review of technical documents produced at or pertaining to the INEL, which present or discuss processes in the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions. Results of this review are being compiled as an electronic database. Fields are available in this database for document title and associated identification number, author, source, abstract, and summary of information (including types of data and parameters). AskSam{reg_sign}, a text-based database system, was chosen. WordPerfect 5.1{copyright} is being used as a text-editor to input data records into askSam.

Hall, L.F.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A mountain-scale model for characterizing unsaturated flow and transport in fractured tuffs of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Fault Zones at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, International2003c. Calibration of Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone FlowUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Unsaturated Zone I. Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste management program in addition to the site-characterization efforts at Yucca Mountain Upwelling at Yucca Mountain The Board completed its review of material (11 re- ports) first submitted that there is evidence of ongoing, intermittent hydrothermal upwelling at Yucca Mountain and that large earth- quake

144

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide guidance for land and water resources management. Atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations are two important natural processes at the upper and lower boundaries of the unsaturated zone, respectively. However, their significance has been neglected in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi-analytical and numerical solutions are developed to calculate the subsurface gas flow field and the gas phase transport of VOCs in active soil vapor extraction (SVE), barometric pumping (BP) and natural attenuation taking into account the atmospheric pressure and the water table fluctuations. The accuracy of the developed solutions are checked by comparing with published analytical solutions under extreme conditions, newly developed numerical solutions in COMSOL Multiphysics and field measured data. Results indicate that both the atmospheric pressure and the tidal-induced water table fluctuations significantly change the gas flow field in active SVE, especially when the vertical gas permeability is small (less than 0.4 Darcy). The tidal-induced downward moving water table increases the depth-averaged radius of influence (ROI) for the gas pumping well. However, this downward moving water table leads to a greater vertical pore gas velocity away from the gas pumping well, which is unfavorable for removing VOCs. The gas flow rate to/from the barometric pumping well can be accurately calculated by our newly developed solutions in both homogeneous and multi-layered unsaturated zones. Under natural unsaturated zone conditions, the time-averaged advective flux of the gas phase VOCs induced by the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux. The time-averaged advective flux is comparable with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is very small (less than 0.05). The density-driven flux is negligible.

You, Kehua

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two-phase zone, is the heat-pipe (i.e. , a zone of constant4a), when there is a heat pipe just above the emplacementduring ventilation, the heat-pipe signature is absent in

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Abstracts and parameter index database for reports pertaining to the unsaturated zone and surface water-ground water interactions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a product generated by faculty at the University of Idaho in support of research and development projects on Unsaturated Zone Contamination and Transport Processes, and on Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions and Regional Groundwater Flow at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These projects are managed by the State of Idaho`s INEL Oversight Program under a grant from the US Department of Energy. In particular, this report meets project objectives to produce a site-wide summary of hydrological information based on a literature search and review of field, laboratory and modeling studies at INEL, including a cross-referenced index to site-specific physical, chemical, mineralogic, geologic and hydrologic parameters determined from these studies. This report includes abstracts of 149 reports with hydrological information. For reports which focus on hydrological issues, the abstracts are taken directly from those reports; for reports dealing with a variety of issues beside hydrology, the abstracts were generated by the University of Idaho authors concentrating on hydrology-related issues. Each abstract is followed by a ``Data`` section which identifies types of technical information included in a given report, such as information on parameters or chemistry, mineralogy, stream flows, water levels. The ``Data`` section does not include actual values or data.

Bloomsburg, G.; Finnie, J.; Horn, D.; King, B.; Liou, J. [Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

An integrated methodology for characterizing flow and transport processes in fractured rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resourcesof the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, NV from three-in fractured tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Vadose Zone Journal,

Wu, Yu-Shu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase flow and multicomponent transport in porous andmultiphase, multicomponent fluids in permeable (fractured and porous)multiphase fluid flow, heat transfer, and deformation in fractured porous

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media.flows of multiphase, multicomponent fluids in permeable (fractured and porous) media (

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology. Within the ice phase (to T = 50 K and P ? 200the phase transition from liquid or gas to ice and viceand ice-liquid equilibrium lines of the water phase diagram)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Estimating large-scale fracture permeability of unsaturated rock using barometric pressure data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S. GeologicalUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resourcesstudies facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S. Geological

Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, Keni; Liu, Hui-Hai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Conceptual evaluation of the potential role of fractures in unsaturated processes at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Process Models, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. U.S. GeologicalUnsaturated Zone Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. Contam.Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain,

Hinds, Jennifer J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Nieder-Westermann, Gerald H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Modeling Unsaturated Flow and Transport Processes in Fractured Tuffs of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationsite-scale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestone 3GLM105M,unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Repository site data report for unsaturated tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is currently considering the thick sequences of unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, on the southwestern boundary of the Nevada Test Site, as a possible candidate host rock for a nuclear-waste repository. Yucca Mountain is in one of the most arid areas in the United States. The site is within the south-central part of the Great Basin section of the Basin and Range physiographic province and is located near a number of silicic calderas of Tertiary age. Although localized zones of seismic activity are common throughout the province, and faults are present at Yucca Mountain, the site itself is basically aseismic. No data are available on the composition of ground water in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. It has been suggested that the composition is bounded by the compositions of water from wells USW-H3, UE25p-1, J-13, and snow or rain. There are relatively few data available from Yucca Mountain on the moisture content and saturation, hydraulic conductivity, and characteristic curves of the unsaturated zone. The available literature on thermomechanical properties of tuff does not always distinguish between data from the saturated zone and data from the unsaturated zone. Geochemical, hydrologic, and thermomechanical data available on the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain are tabulated in this report. Where the data are very sparse, they have been supplemented by data from the saturated zone or from areas other than Yucca Mountain. 316 refs., 58 figs., 37 tabs.

Tien, P.L.; Updegraff, C.D.; Siegel, M.D.; Wahi, K.K.; Guzowski, R.V.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characterization of Spatial Variability of Hydrogeologic Properties for Unsaturated Flow in the Fractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using matrix properties , Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USGS Waterof hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.Unsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada . Water-Resources

Zhou, Quanlin; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Liu, Hui-Hai; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Estimation of field-scale soil hydraulic and dielectric parameters through joint inversion of GPR and hydrological data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalog of Vadose Zone Hydraulic Properties for the Hanfordand Measurement of the Hydraulic Properties of UnsaturatedEstimation for Soil Hydraulic Properties Using Zero-Offset

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

162

Review and selection of unsaturated flow models  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Stochastic analysis of flow in a heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of multiscale, nonstationary medium features. The unsaturated and saturated zones are coupled through the water table, whose position is random in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The presence of the water table zones [e.g., Dagan and Bresler, 1979; Bresler and Dagan, 1981; Andersson and Shapiro, 1983; Yeh et al

Zhang, Dongxiao

164

Saturated-Unsaturated flow in a Compressible Leaky-unconfined Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical solution is developed for three-dimensional flow towards a partially penetrating large-diameter well in an unconfined aquifer bounded below by an aquitard of finite or semi-infinite extent. The analytical solution is derived using Laplace and Hankel transforms, then inverted numerically. Existing solutions for flow in leaky unconfined aquifers neglect the unsaturated zone following an assumption of instantaneous drainage assumption due to Neuman [1972]. We extend the theory of leakage in unconfined aquifers by (1) including water flow and storage in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and (2) allowing the finite-diameter pumping well to partially penetrate the aquifer. The investigation of model-predicted results shows that leakage from an underlying aquitard leads to significant departure from the unconfined solution without leakage. The investigation of dimensionless time-drawdown relationships shows that the aquitard drawdown also depends on unsaturated zone properties and the pumping-well wellbore storage effects.

Phoolendra K. Mishra; Velimir V. Vessilinov; Kristopher L. Kuhlman

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

165

Saturated-Unsaturated flow in a Compressible Leaky-unconfined Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical solution is developed for three-dimensional flow towards a partially penetrating large-diameter well in an unconfined aquifer bounded below by an aquitard of finite or semi-infinite extent. The analytical solution is derived using Laplace and Hankel transforms, then inverted numerically. Existing solutions for flow in leaky unconfined aquifers neglect the unsaturated zone following an assumption of instantaneous drainage assumption due to Neuman [1972]. We extend the theory of leakage in unconfined aquifers by (1) including water flow and storage in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and (2) allowing the finite-diameter pumping well to partially penetrate the aquifer. The investigation of model-predicted results shows that leakage from an underlying aquitard leads to significant departure from the unconfined solution without leakage. The investigation of dimensionless time-drawdown relationships shows that the aquitard drawdown also depends on unsaturated zone properties and the pumping...

Mishra, Phoolendra K; Kuhlman, Kristopher L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Reactive transport model for the ambient unsaturated hydrogeochemical system at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist a technical review of a potential application for a geologic repository, a reactive transport model is presented for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain (YM). The model simulates two-phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive ... Keywords: Yucca mountain, geochemistry, groundwater chemistry, groundwater flow and transport, hydrology, reactive transport model, unsaturated zone

Lauren Browning; William M. Murphy; Chandrika Manepally; Randall Fedors

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evolution of the unsaturated zone testing at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTO DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN." JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANTFRACTURES AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN." JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANTPneumatic Testing at Yucca Mountain." International Journal

Wang, J.S.Y.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF ARID REGIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on thm Properties of Tuff, Sandia National Laboratory Reportthe Properties of Tuff, Sandia Nat. Lab. Rpfc. SANDtO-1464 (the Properties of Toff, sandia Hat. Lab. Rapt. SANDSO-1464 (

Wollenberg, H.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Numerical simulation of unsaturated soil behaviour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils is one of the challenging topics in the field of geotechnical engineering. The use of finite element techniques is considered to be a promising method to solve settlement and heave problems, which are associated ... Keywords: FEM, constitutive modelling, finite element method, geotechnical engineering, mechanical behaviour, shallow foundation, shallow foundations, soil behaviour, suction variation, unsaturated soils

Ayman A. Abed; Pieter A. Vermeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in FY03. As of December 2003, we have accomplished the following: (1) We conducted a more detailed evaluation of the preliminary experiments used to develop our investigative approach. In those experiments, water was invaded at a variety of flow rates into an air-filled, two dimensional analog fracture network. Results demonstrated the critical control that fracture intersections place on two-phase flow in fracture networks. At low flows, capillary and gravitational forces combined to create a narrow pulsing flow structure that spanned the system vertically. At higher flows, viscous forces acted to remove the pulsation; however, the flow structure remained narrow. The intersections acted to impose a narrow ''slender ladder'' structure on the flowing phase that did not expand with depth, but instead remained focused. A manuscript documenting this effort has been published in Water Resources Research [Glass et al., 2003a]. (2) We initiated a collaborative relationship with a research group at Seoul National University. This group, which is led by Dr. Kang-Kun Lee is also using a combined experimental numerical approach to consider DNAPL migration in fracture networks. They are particularly interested in the influence of ambient groundwater flows, making their work complementary to ours. The first fruit of that collaboration is an article demonstrating that modification of an Invasion Percolation algorithm to include gravity and the first-order effects of viscous forces shows good agreement with physical experiments in a simplistic fracture network. Results were published in Geophysical Research Letters [Ji et al., 2003a]. (3) We carried out an extensive review of models for fracture networks. These include models developed from observations of networks on outcrops at several scales and stochastic models that are prevalent in the literature from the 1980s to very recent developments. The results of this review were included as par t of a review paper co-authored by Rajaram, which was submitted to Reviews in Geophysics [Molz et al., in press]. (4) We prepared a manuscript based on previous work that will be used to support the development of our new conceptual model(s) for transport in fractured rock. Eight experiments were conducted to evaluate the repeatability of flow under nearly identical conditions and to characterize general patterns in flow behavior. Collected data revealed that flow generally converged to a single fracture in the bottom row of blocks. Periods of pathway switching were observed to be more common than periods with steady, constant flow pathways. We noted the importance of fracture intersections for integrating uniform flow and discharging a ''fluid cascade'', where water advances rapidly to the next capillary barrier creating a stop and start advance of water through the network. The results of this simple experiment suggest that the interaction of multiple fracture intersections in a network creates flow behavior not generally recognized in popular conceptual and numerical models. A manuscript documenting this effort has been accepted for publication in Vadose Zone Journal [Wood et al., 2003]. (5) Slender transport pathways have been found in laboratory and field experiments within unsaturated fractured rock. We considered the simulation of such structures with a Modified form of Invasion Percolation (MIP). Results show that slender pathways form in fracture networks for a wide range of expected conditions, can be maintained when subsequent matrix imbibition is imposed, and may arise even in the context of primarily matrix flow due to the action of fractures as barriers to inter-matrix block transport. A manuscript documenting this effort has been submitted to Geophysical Research Letters [Glass et al., 2003b].

Rajaram, Harihar

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Behavior of spent fuel under unsaturated conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the performance of spent fuel in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, spent fuel fragments are being exposed to small and intermittent amounts of simulated groundwater under unsaturated conditions. Both the leachate and the visual appearance of the spent fuel have been characterized for 581 days of testing. The amount of Am and Cm measured in the leachates was one to two orders of magnitude greater than that released from spent fuel under saturated conditions. The cause of this difference has not been firmly identified but may be attributable to the presence of large amounts of actinide-containing colloids in the leachate of the unsaturated tests.

Finn, P.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Wolf, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns inFractured Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated zones hasposed a greater challenge to numerical modeling investigations thancomparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature ofunsaturated media as well as the great number of variables impactingunsaturated zone flow. This paper presents an integrated modelingmethodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in theunsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed undergroundrepository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. It takes intoaccount the multiple coupled processes of air, water, heat flow andchemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain s highly heterogeneous,unsaturated fractured tuffs. The modeling approach integrates a widevariety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical fielddata into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modelinganalyses. Modeling results are examined against different types offield-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeologicalconceptual models and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturatedzone. In particular, this integration model provides a much clearerunderstanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through theunsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repositoryperformance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain sflow system is also demonstrated to provide a comprehensive modeling toolfor characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurfacesystems.

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

174

Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regulations for radiation releases from the planned permanent U.S. nuclear-waste repository in Yucca Mountain releases from the proposed U.S. nuclear-waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada.1 E.P.A. recommended these guarantees for Yucca Mountain. Instead E.P.A. recommends changes both in the exposure-limits and in how

Holliday, Vance T.

175

MODELING LONG-TERM PLUTONIUM TRANSPORT IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE VADOSE ZONE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The natural climate created a dynamic hydrologic system for the lysimeter experiments. Thus, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of flow dynamics on Pu… (more)

Demirkanli, Deniz

176

Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone Sediments for Uranium Remediation  

SciTech Connect

NH3 gas treatment of low water content sediments resulted in a significant decrease in aqueous and adsorbed uranium, which is attributed to incorporation into precipitates. Uranium associated with carbonates showed little change. Uranium associated with hydrous silicates such as Na-boltwoodite showed a significant decrease in mobility but no change in Na-boltwoodite concentration (by EXAFS/XANES), so is most likely caused by non-U precipitate coatings. Complex resistivity changes occurred in the sediment during NH3 and subsequent N2 gas injection, indicating ERT/IP could be used at field scale for injection monitoring.

Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Johnson, Timothy C.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Mark D.; Greenwood, William J.; Wallin, Erin L.; Bargar, John R.; Faurie, Danielle K.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

SPECIAL SECTION: HANFORD SITE Hanford Site Vadose Zone Studies: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sparsely populated area in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains, adjacent to the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State (Fig. 1). The Hanford Site was set aside in the early 1940s by the U.S. Government to perform a top-secret mission, the Manhattan Project, for production of plutonium for atomic weapons used to end World War II and later to support the Cold War with the Soviet Union. Starting in 1943– 1945, Hanford employed thousands of workers on the largest construction project in the world at that time. The workers built a series of nuclear reactors along with large monolithic concrete buildings used to reprocess wastes. Plutonium production continued at Hanford for over 40 yr. During the late 1980s, in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, plutonium production was suspended at Hanford (Gephart, 2003). Since then, efforts at

G. W. Gee; M. Oostrom; M. D. Freshley; M. L. Rockhold; J. M. Zachara

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport in the hanford sediments under hyperalkalinethe Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site, WA. A centralThe Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site and elsewhere (

Wu, Y.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Tensiometer for shallow or deep measurements including vadose zone and aquifers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two cell tensiometer is described in which water level in the lower cell is maintained at a relatively constant height, and in equilibrium with the water pressure of materials that surround the tensiometer. An isolated volume of air in the lower cell changes pressure proportionately to the changing water pressure of the materials that surround the tensiometer. The air pressure is measured remotely. The tensiometer can be used in drying as well as wetting cycles above and below the water table.

Faybishenko, Boris (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Geophysical monitoring of foam used to deliver remediation treatments within the vadose zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long electrode electrical resistivity. Journal of Applied1991. Hysteresis in the electrical resistivity of partiallyG.E. 1942. The electrical resistivity log as an aid in

Wu, Y.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

INTRODUCTION The remediation of organic chemicals in the vadose zone has been  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

program entitled KU Mix, (2) free-shrinkage tests to evaluate potential LC-HPC mixtures developed for use.......................................................................68 CHAPTER 2: EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM....................................................69 2.1 GENERAL.....................................................................................................81 #12;vii 2.8 FREE SHRINKAGE TEST PROGRAMS................................................82 2

Hazen, Terry

183

Deep vadose zone hydrology demonstrates fate of nitrate in eastern San Joaquin Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the experimental site. Sandy loam is the most fre­ quentare: SL1 — recent Hanford sandy loam C — clay, very thinVar2 — various textures, sandy loam to clay loam S — medium

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Vadose Zone Monitoring System Installation Report for McClellan AFB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 ft but the cuttings indicated sandy sediment. The mostwas the predominance of sandy silt in the top 30 ft ofat 0942 • in field: 0 ppm SANDY SILT (ML), with interlayered

Zawislanski, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Bladon Lysimeter: An Innovative Environmental Characterization Technology  

SciTech Connect

Chemical analysis of groundwater samples is the baseline method of characterizing and monitoring groundwater contamination in the vadose (unsaturated) zone at most waste sites. Contamination moving from the surface to the water table passes through an unsaturated zone that can range in thickness from a few inches to hundreds of feet at a give site. Lysimeters are samplers that are designed to apply suction to the subsurface and are typically used to collect groundwater in the unsaturated zone.

Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ionic strength and unit hydraulic head gradient. Figure 7.of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity on matricYork. Durner, W. (1994), Hydraulic conductivity estimation

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Characterizing unsaturated diffusion in porous tuff gravel  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of solute diffusion in unsaturated porous gravel is very important for investigations of contaminant transport and remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (for example, the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). For a porous aggregate medium such as granular tuff, the total water content is comprised of surface water and interior water. The surface water component (water film around grains and pendular water between the grain contacts) could serve as a predominant diffusion pathway. To investigate the extent to which surface water films and contact points affect solute diffusion in unsaturated gravel, we examined the configuration of water using x-ray computed tomography in partially saturated gravel, and made quantitative measurements of diffusion at multiple water contents using two different techniques. In the first, diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride in 2-4 mm granular tuff at multiple water contents were calculated from electrical conductivity measurements using the Nernst-Einstein equation. In the second, we used laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to perform micro-scale mapping, allowing the measurement of diffusion coefficients for a mixture of chemical tracers for tuff cubes and tetrahedrons having two contact geometries (cube-cube and cube-tetrahedron). The x-ray computed tomography images show limited contact between grains, and this could hinder the pathways for diffusive transport. Experimental results show the critical role of surface water in controlling transport pathways and hence the magnitude of diffusion. Even with a bulk volumetric water content of 1.5%, the measured solute diffusion coefficient is as low as 1.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s for tuff gravel. Currently used diffusion models relating diffusion coefficients to total volumetric water content inadequately describe unsaturated diffusion behavior in porous gravel at very low water contents.

Hu, Qinhong; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Wang, Joseph, S.Y.

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Soil characterization methods for unsaturated low-level waste sites  

SciTech Connect

To support a license application for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), applicants must characterize the unsaturated zone and demonstrate that waste will not migrate from the facility boundary. This document provides a strategy for developing this characterization plan. It describes principles of contaminant flow and transport, site characterization and monitoring strategies, and data management. It also discusses methods and practices that are currently used to monitor properties and conditions in the soil profile, how these properties influence water and waste migration, and why they are important to the license application. The methods part of the document is divided into sections on laboratory and field-based properties, then further subdivided into the description of methods for determining 18 physical, flow, and transport properties. Because of the availability of detailed procedures in many texts and journal articles, the reader is often directed for details to the available literature. References are made to experiments performed at the Las Cruces Trench site, New Mexico, that support LLW site characterization activities. A major contribution from the Las Cruces study is the experience gained in handling data sets for site characterization and the subsequent use of these data sets in modeling studies.

Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Soil and Water Science); Gee, G.W.; Kincaid, C.T. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Hills, R.G. (New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Nicholson, T.J.; Cady, R.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Unsaturated hydraulic parameters determined from direct and indirect methods  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic parameters are required for numerical simulations of unsaturated flow at Yucca Mountain, a vertically heterogeneous volcanic site for a potential high-level waste repository in the desert southwest. In this paper, direct measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using a centrifuge with a specialized rotor are compared to those estimated using a predictive conductivity equation and two methods of measuring moisture retention.

Flint, Lorraine E.; Hudson, David B.; Flint, Alan L.

1997-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effects of dry fractures on matrix diffusion in unsaturated fractured rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symposium on Multiphase Transport in Porous Media, ASMEmultiphase heat and mass flow in unsaturated fractured porous

Seol, Yongkoo; Liu, Hui Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Temperature and Humidity Profiles in Mesoscale Unsaturated Downdrafts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of temperature and humidity beneath precipitating anvil clouds in tropical convective systems suggest the presence of a mesoscale unsaturated downdraft there. In this paper, a one-dimensional, steady-state, hydrostatic model of a ...

Colleen A. Leary

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Boundary integral methods for unsaturated flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many large simulations may be required to assess the performance of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for the nations first high level nuclear waste repository. A boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is described for numerical analysis of quasilinear steady unsaturated flow in homogeneous material. The applicability of the exponential model for the dependence of hydraulic conductivity on pressure head is discussed briefly. This constitutive assumption is at the heart of the quasilinear transformation. Materials which display a wide distribution in pore-size are described reasonably well by the exponential. For materials with a narrow range in pore-size, the exponential is suitable over more limited ranges in pressure head. The numerical implementation of the BIEM is used to investigate the infiltration from a strip source to a water table. The net infiltration of moisture into a finite-depth layer is well-described by results for a semi-infinite layer if {alpha}D > 4, where {alpha} is the sorptive number and D is the depth to the water table. the distribution of moisture exhibits a similar dependence on {alpha}D. 11 refs., 4 figs.,

Martinez, M.J.; McTigue, D.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Dorchester County- Renewable Zoning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dorchester County zoning codes specifically permit solar arrays and small wind turbines in many zoning districts.

195

Colloid Transport and Deposition in Water-Saturated and Unsaturated Sand and Yucca Mountain Tuff: Effect of Ionic Strength and Moisture Saturation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colloid-aided radionuclide transport has been considered a potentially important mechanism for the candidate spent fuel and high level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain. This mechanism, however, has not been treated in Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs) until recently. Even then there has been little discussion of possible colloid retention in the unsaturated zone. This report summarizes investigations of potential colloid retention in sand and Yucca Mountain tuff as a fun...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media  

SciTech Connect

Adsorbed water films strongly influence residual water saturations and hydraulic conductivities in porous media at low saturations. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media were investigated through combining Langmuir's film model with scaling analysis, without use of any adjustable parameters. Diffuse double layer influences are predicted to be important through the strong dependence of adsorbed water film thickness (f) on matric potential ({Psi}) and ion charge (z). Film thickness, film velocity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are predicted to vary with z{sup -1}, z{sup -2}, and z{sup -3}, respectively. In monodisperse granular media, the characteristic grain size ({lambda}) controls film hydraulics through {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of (1) the perimeter length per unit cross sectional area over which films occur, (2) the critical matric potential ({Psi}{sub c}) below which films control flow, and (3) the magnitude of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity when {Psi} < {Psi}{sub c}. While it is recognized that finer textured sediments have higher unsaturated hydraulic conductivities than coarser sands at intermediate {Psi}, the {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of hydraulic conductivity predicted here extends this understanding to very low saturations where all pores are drained. Extremely low unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are predicted under adsorbed film-controlled conditions (generally < 0.1 mm y{sup -1}). On flat surfaces, the film hydraulic diffusivity is shown to be constant (invariant with respect to {Psi}).

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Student Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Zone Student Zone Homework Helpers All About Atoms - Learn about the parts of the atom! Virginia State Standards of Learning Practice Tests - Practice taking the SOL tests! Subjects currently include algebra, math, science and technology. Table of Elements - Basic physical and historical information about the elements! [Printable Version] Questions and Answers - Have a question? Need an answer? Check here first! Glossary of Science Terms - Definitions of some of the terms used on this site. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour - How do scientists explore inside atoms? Video Resources Frostbite Theater - Short science experiments using liquid nitrogen, static electricity and more! Physics Out Loud - Jefferson Lab scientists and other experts explain some of the common words and terms used in nuclear physics research.

198

Revisiting the thermodynamics of hardening plasticity for unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamically consistent extension of the constitutive equations of saturated soils to unsaturated conditions is often worked out through the use a unique 'effective' interstitial pressure, accounting equivalently for the pressures of the saturating fluids acting separately on the internal solid walls of the pore network. The natural candidate for this effective interstitial pressure is the space averaged interstitial pressure. In contrast experimental observations have revealed that, at least, a pair of stress state variables was needed for a suitable framework to describe stress-strain-strength behaviour of unsaturated soils. The thermodynamics analysis presented here shows that the most general approach to the behaviour of unsaturated soils actually requires three stress state variables: the suction, which is required to describe the invasion of the soil by the liquid water phase through the retention curve; two effective stresses, which are required to describe the soil deformation at water saturati...

Coussy, Olivier; Vaunat, Jean; 10.1016/j.compgeo.2009.09.003

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Numerical evaluation of effective unsaturated hydraulic properties for fractured rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To represent a heterogeneous unsaturated fractured rock by its homogeneous equivalent, Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain upscaled (effective) flow properties. In this study, we present a numerical procedure for upscaling the van Genuchten parameters of unsaturated fractured rocks by conducting Monte Carlo simulations of the unsaturated flow in a domain under gravity-dominated regime. The simulation domain can be chosen as the scale of block size in the field-scale modeling. The effective conductivity is computed from the steady-state flux at the lower boundary and plotted as a function of the averaging pressure head or saturation over the domain. The scatter plot is then fitted using van Genuchten model and three parameters, i.e., the saturated conductivity K{sub s}, the air-entry parameter {alpha}, the pore-size distribution parameter n, corresponding to this model are considered as the effective K{sub s}, effective {alpha}, and effective n, respectively.

Lu, Zhiming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwicklis, Edward M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference Center (NCC) Lansdowne, Virginia Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) This work Hanford IFRC--Zachara ..................................................................................................101 Hanford IFRC

Flury, Markus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

editors, Dense Gas Dispersion, Chemical EngineeringResearch Forum (PERF) Dense Gas Dispersion Modeling Project,on the problem of dense gas dispersion in the surface layer.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Physical and chemical heterogeneities are inherent in subsurface environments due to varying: mineralogy, pore geometry, solution saturation, and solute concentration. The goals of this research… (more)

[No author

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Treatability Test Report: Characterization of Vadose Zone Carbon Tetrachloride Source Strength Using Tomographic Methods at the 216-Z-9 Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A treatability test was conducted in 2011 at the 216-Z-9 Trench to evaluate methods for collecting characterization information that supports refined assessment of SVE performance goals based on impact to groundwater. The characterization information can also provide input to operational strategies for continued SVE operation and decisions regarding closure of the SVE system or transition to other remedies, if necessary.

Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Rohay, Virginia J.; Mackley, Rob D.; Parker, Kyle R.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

1981-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Horn, William H. (Brookhaven, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

207

Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Radionuclide Transport Model for the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain Bruce A. Robinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Geological Survey #12;Yucca Mountain (arrow) in its regional setting. From lower left to upper right (toward southeast), Forty-Mile Wash (trending south), and Jackass Flat (JF, sandy-colored area east ofYucca Mountain). Between Yucca Mountain and theAmargosa River lie Crater Flat (CF) with its young volcanic centers (red

Lu, Zhiming

209

Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flows of multiphase, multicomponents in porous and fracturedmultiphase flow and multicomponent transport in porous and

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Massively parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Yucca Mountain. Sandia National Laboratories Milestone3672. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.Computing Research Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories,

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A multiphase constitutive modeling framework for unsaturated soil behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a framework for constitutive modeling of unsaturated soils that has the embedded elements of lower scale grain to grain contacts. Continuum models developed from this framework will possess two different phases idealizing the solid grains and their interactions. As a consequence, two different constitutive relationships, corresponding to the grain to grain contact and bulk behavior, co-exist in a constitutive model and govern the response of the model. To be specific, grain to grain sliding under dry or wet condition is idealized and appears as a simple contact law embedded in a continuum framework. There is no need to define plastic strain, as this quantity naturally emerges at the continuum scale as the consequence of frictional sliding at the lower scale. In addition, the effective stress can be naturally worked out from the grain to grain contact law embedded in the model without being subjected to any interpretation. This, in our opinion, is a closer representation of unsaturated soil behavior, compared to existing continuum approaches that map everything onto a single stress-strain relationship. In this paper, the framework is presented in its simplest form that takes into account sliding on a single orientation. Grain to grain contact law with capillary effects is used for the demonstration of the concept, and the technical details behind it. Generalization of the framework for better representation of unsaturated soil behavior will also be sketched out.

Giang D. Nguyen; Yixiang Gan

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

213

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Technology Zones (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Virginia’s 26 designated Technology Zones offer tax relief in the form of abatements, credits, deductions, deferrals, exemptions, or rebates. Local governments may designate technology zones to...

215

Effects of dry fractures on matrix diffusion in unsaturated fractured rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moridis, G. and Q. Hu, Radionuclide transport models underAn important factor in radionuclide retardation? J. Geophys.and G. Y. Bussod, Radionuclide transport in the unsaturated

Seol, Yongkoo; Liu, Hui Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of compacted sand-kaolin mixtures containing 0, 5, 10, and 30% kaolin (by dry weight) is measured for matric suctions, {psi}{sub m} < {approximately} 6.0 m. The measured unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub m}) values are compared with predicted unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub p}) values using the Brooks-Corey-Burdine and van Genuchten-Mualem relative hydraulic conductivity functions. In general, the accuracy of k{sub p} decreases with an increase in kaolin content or an increase in {psi}{sub m}. In addition, k{sub m} tends to be underpredicted for kaolin contents of 10 and 30% at relatively high suctions (1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m) and overpredicted for kaolin contents of 0 and 5% at relatively low suctions (0.1 m {le} {psi}{sub m} < 1.0 m). For a given kaolin content and {psi}{sub m}, k{sub p} based on the Brooks-Corey-Burdine function tends to be more accurate than k{sub m} based on the van Genuchten-Mualem function. Finally, for 1.0 m {le} {psi}{sub m} {le} 6.0 m, k{sub p} based on analysis using the maximum volumetric water content ({theta}{sub m}) attained under steady-state flow conditions typically is more accurate than k{sub p} based on analysis using the saturated volumetric water content, {theta}{sub s}, where {theta}{sub m} {approximately} 84--90% of {theta}{sub s} in this study.

Chiu, T.F. [Genesis Group, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Shackelford, C.D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Reaction-Transport Model for Calcite Precipitation andEvaluation of Infiltration Fluxes in unsaturated fractured rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The percolation flux in the unsaturated zone (UZ) is an important parameter addressed in site characterization and flow and transport modeling of the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, USA. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has documented hydrogenic calcite abundances in fractures and lithophysal cavities at Yucca Mountain to provide constraints on percolation fluxes in the UZ. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between percolation flux and measured calcite abundances using reactive transport modeling. Our model considers the following essential factors affecting calcite precipitation: (1) infiltration, (2) the ambient geothermal gradient, (3) gaseous CO2 diffusive transport and partitioning in liquid and gas phases, (4) fracture matrix interaction for water flow and chemical constituents, and (5) water rock interaction. Over a bounding range of 2 20 mm/year infiltration rate, the simulated calcite distributions capture the trend in calcite abundances measured in a deep borehole (WT-24) by the USGS. The calcite is found predominantly in fractures in the welded tuffs, which is also captured by the model simulations. Simulations showed that from about 2 to 6 mm/year, the amount of calcite precipitated in the welded Topopah Spring tuff is sensitive to the infiltration rate. This dependence decreases at higher infiltration rates owing to a modification of the geothermal gradient from the increased percolation flux. The model also confirms the conceptual model for higher percolation fluxes in the fractures compared to the matrix in the welded units, and the significant contribution of Ca from water rock interaction. This study indicates that reactive transport modeling of calcite deposition can yield important constraints on the unsaturated zone infiltration-percolation flux and provide useful insight into processes such as fracture matrix interaction as well as conditions and parameters controlling calcite deposition.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Lessons learned from reactive transport modeling of a low-activity waste glass disposal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of reactive chemical transport calculations were conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal ... Keywords: chemical transport, low-level waste, numerical model, unsaturated flow, vadose zone

Diana H. Bacon; B. Peter McGrail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

Su, G. W.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Solute spreading in nonstationary flows in bounded, heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three cases: transport in a mean gravity-dominated flow, in an unsaturated flow with a water table in nonstationary flows in bounded, heterogeneous unsaturated-saturated media, Water Resour. Res., 39(3), 1049, doi et al., 1991; Jury and Scotter, 1994; Harter and Yeh, 1996a, 1996b]. [3] In most of these models

Lu, Zhiming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Enterprise Zone Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone Program provides eligible businesses that relocate or expand to a designated zone with tax incentives such as: 1) an investment tax credit; 2) a job tax credit for each job...

222

MODIFIED ZONE METHOD CALCULATOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone Method is recommended for R-value calculations in steel stud walls by the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals ASHRAE 1997. The Modified Zone Method is similar to the...

223

Reinvestment Zones (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reinvestment Zones a local economic development tool used by municipalities and counties throughout the state of Texas. These zones can be created for the purpose of granting local businesses ad...

224

Two Dimensional Polyamides Prepared From Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids And Amines.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polyamide and a process for preparing the polyamide are disclosed. The process comprises reacting in a reaction mixture a monomer selected from unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of unsaturated carboxylic acids, anhydrides of unsaturated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof, and a first amine to form an intermediate reaction product in the reaction mixture, wherein the first amine is selected from RR.sub.1 NH, RNH.sub.2, RR.sub.1 NH.sub.2.sup.+, RNH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof, wherein R and R.sub.1 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, and reacting the intermediate reaction product and a second amine to form a polyamide, wherein the second amine is selected from R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH, R.sub.2 NH.sub.2, R.sub.2 R.sub.3 NH.sub.2.sup.+, R.sub.2 NH.sub.3.sup.+ and mixtures thereof wherein R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 can be the same or different and each contain between about 1 and 50 carbon atoms and are optionally substituted with heteroatoms oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof, wherein multiple of the R, R.sub.1, R.sub.2, and R.sub.3 are in vertically aligned spaced relationship along a backbone formed by the polyamide. In one version of the invention, the monomer is selected from maleic anhydride, maleic acid esters, and mixtures thereof. In another version of the invention, the first amine is an alkylamine, such as tetradecylamine, and the second amine is a polyalkylene polyamine, such as pentaethylenehexamine. In yet another version of the invention, the first amine and the second amine are olefinic or acetylenic amines, such as the reaction products of an alkyldiamine and an acetylenic carboxylic acid. The first amine and the second amine may be the same or different depending on the desired polyamide polymer structure.

McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi Heng (East Lansing, MI); Wright, Stacy C. (Lansing, MI); Danzig, Morris (Northbrook, IL); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Subtype A Subtype B Subtype C Climate Zone Number 1 Zone 1A Zone 1B NA Climate Zone Number 2 Zone 2A Zone 2B NA Climate Zone...

226

Elements present in leach solutions from unsaturated spent fuel tests  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results for the composition of the leachate from unsaturated tests at 90{degrees}C with spent fuel for 55--134 days with J-13 groundwater are reported. The pH of the leachate solutions was found to be acidic, ranging from 4 to 7. The actinide concentrations were 10{sup 5} greater than those reported for saturated spent fuel tests in which the leachate pH was 8. We also found that most species in the leachate were present as colloids containing both americium and curium. The presence of actinides in a form not currently included in repository radionuclide transport models provides information that can be used in spent fuel reaction modeling, the performance assessment of the repository and the design of the engineering barrier system. This report was prepared as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

UNSAT-H Version 3.0: Unsaturated Soil Water and Heat Flow Model Theory, User Manual, and Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UNSAT-H model was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the water dynamics of arid sites and, in particular, estimate recharge fluxes for scenarios pertinent to waste disposal facilities. During the last 4 years, the UNSAT-H model received support from the Immobilized Waste Program (IWP) of the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This program is designing and assessing the performance of on-site disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (LMHC 1999). The IWP is interested in estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the vadose zone disposal of tank wastes. Simulation modeling with UNSAT-H is one of the methods being used to provide those estimates (e.g., Rockhold et al. 1995; Fayer et al. 1999). To achieve the above goals for assessing water dynamics and estimating recharge rates, the UNSAT-H model addresses soil water infiltration, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, deep drainage, and soil heat flow as one-dimensional processes. The UNSAT-H model simulates liquid water flow using Richards' equation (Richards 1931), water vapor diffusion using Fick's law, and sensible heat flow using the Fourier equation. This report documents UNSAT-H .Version 3.0. The report includes the bases for the conceptual model and its numerical implementation, benchmark test cases, example simulations involving layered soils and plants, and the code manual. Version 3.0 is an, enhanced-capability update of UNSAT-H Version 2.0 (Fayer and Jones 1990). New features include hysteresis, an iterative solution of head and temperature, an energy balance check, the modified Picard solution technique, additional hydraulic functions, multiple-year simulation capability, and general enhancements.

MJ Fayer

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Structure and electronic properties of saturated and unsaturated gallium nitride nanotubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atomic and electronic structures of saturated and unsaturated GaN nanotubes along the [001] direction with (100) lateral facets are studied using first-principles calculations. Atomic relaxation of nanotubes shows that appreciable distortion occurs in the unsaturated nanotubes. All the nanotubes considered, including saturated and unsaturated ones, exhibit semiconducting, with a direct band gap. Surface states arisen from the threefold-coordinated N and Ga atoms at the lateral facets exist inside the bulk-like band gap. When the nanotubes saturated with hydrogen, these dangling bond bands are removed from the band gap, but the band gap decreases with increasing the wall thickness of the nanotubes.

Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Shengjie; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geothermal: Educational Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Educational Zone Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

230

Renaissance Zones (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Renaissance Zones allow qualifying businesses and individuals to claim one or more tax incentives for purchasing, leasing, or making improvements to real property located in a North Dakota...

231

Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath a perennial river  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the period over which water can be produced at a particulardesaturated and water could no longer be produced at a rateis unsaturated, but water can still be produced at a rate of

Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.; Zhou, Q.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electrokinetic removal of uranium from contaminated, unsaturated soils  

SciTech Connect

Electrokinetic remediation of uranium-contaminated soil was studied in a series of laboratory-scale experiments in test cells with identical geometry using quartz sand at approximately 10 percent moisture content. Uranium, when present in the soil system as an anionic complex, could be migrated through unsaturated soil using electrokinetics. The distance that the uranium migrated in the test cell was dependent upon the initial molar ratio of citrate to uranium used. Over 50 percent of the uranium was recovered from the test cells using the citrate and carbonate complexing agents over of period of 15 days. Soil analyses showed that the uranium remaining in the test cells had been mobilized and ultimately would have been extracted. Uranium extraction exceeded 90 percent in an experiment that was operated for 37 days. Over 70 percent of the uranium was removed from a Hanford waste sample over a 55 day operating period. Citrate and carbonate ligand utilization ratios required for removing 50 percent of the uranium from the uranium-contaminated sand systems were approximately 230 moles ligand per mole uranium and 1320 moles ligand per mole uranium for the waste. Modifying the operating conditions to increasing the residence time of the complexants is expected to improved the utilization efficiency of the complexing agent.

Booher, W.F. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The effect of fuel type in unsaturated spent fuel tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were tested under simulated unsaturated conditions with simulated groundwater at 90{degree}C. The actinides present in the leachate were measured after periods of approximately 60, 120, and 275 days. The vessels were acid stripped after 120 and 275 days. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. Alpha spectroscopy studies of filtered and unfiltered leachates showed that large amounts of actinides may be bound in colloids. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. The actinide release behavior of the two fuels appears to be different. The ATM-106 fuel began to release actinides later than the ATM-103 fuel, but after 275 days, it had released more. The amount of americium released from the two fuels was a higher percentage of the maximum amount of americium present than was the percentage of the simultaneous amount of uranium released.

Finn, P.A.; Gong, M.; Bates, J.K.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Estimation of field-scale soil hydraulic and dielectric parameters through joint inversion of GPR and hydrological data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zone Hydraulic Properties for the Hanford Site, Report PNNL-Percolation Theory: Tests of Hanford Site Soils, Vadose Zone200 East Vadose Test Site Hanford, Washington, Electrical

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22]. Fluid flow and heat-transfer processes in a two-phase,processes associated with multiphase flow and heat transferprocesses has also motivated development of fluid flow and heat transfer

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transort in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on colloid facilitated radionuclide transport in porouscontaminants in groundwater: Radionuclide migration at theK. , 2000. Modeling studies of radionuclide transport in the

Moridis, G.J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

239

Keystone Opportunity Zones (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Keystone Opportunity Zones allows businesses located within designated areas to qualify for a tax exemption, deduction, credit, or abatement of state and local taxes such as sales and use tax,...

240

Queen Anne's County- Solar Zoning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Queen Anne's County zoning code allows for ground mounted solar arrays in areas zoned as "open space," "agricultural," and "countryside" districts.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A New Definition of the Virtual Temperature, Valid for the Atmosphere and the CO2-Rich Air of the Vadose Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In speleological environments, partial pressures of carbon dioxide (CO2) are often large enough to affect overall air density. Excluding this gas when defining the gas constant for air, a new definition is proposed for the virtual temperature T? ...

Andrew S. Kowalski; Enrique Pérez Sánchez-Cañete

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hydraulic properties of the vadose zone at two typical sites in the Western Cape for the assessment of groundwater vulnerability to pollution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Aquifer vulnerability assessment is increasingly becoming a very significant basis in order to fulfill the water demands in South Africa. Knowledge of soil hydraulic… (more)

Samuels, Donovan.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seepage at the Nopal I Uranium mine, Chihuahua, Mexico. In:mine adit are composed of welded tuffs that host the uraniumuranium isotopic systematics, we have made additional measurements of U concentrations and 234 U/ 238 U ratios in waters from the mine

Ku, T. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Technology 2006, 40, Sandia National Laboratories,Technol. 2004, 38, 5591-5597. Sandia National Laboratories,

Wan, Jiamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

DE FG02-06ER64193: Final Technical Report Nucleation and Precipitation Processes in the Vadose Zone during Contaminant Transport  

SciTech Connect

The report describes results of experiments to synthesize and characterize uranium(VI)-silicates from solutions containing dissolved U(VI), Si, Na, and nitrate as a function of solution pH and Si:U ratio under ambient conditions. Solids characterization was accomplished by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) analysis. The purpose was to develop a framework for describing the formation of U(VI)-silicate solids that might form in contaminated soils and sediments under oxidizing conditions in the presence of aqueous uranium, and are known to exist naturally in geologic uranium deposits.

Kathryn L. Nagy

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

246

IN-SITU ASSAY OF TRANSURANIC RADIONUCLIDES IN THE VADOSE ZONE USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRAL GAMMA LOGGING - A HANFORD CASE STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

ROHAY VJ; HENWOOD P; MCCAIN R

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Spatially resolved U(VI) partitioning and speciation: Implications for plume scale behavior of contaminant U in the Hanford vadose zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B-BX-BY waste management area. PNNL-14083; Pacific NorthwestNorthwest National Laboratory, PNNL- Jones, T. E. ; Simpson,Fate of Fission Products. PNNL-14120, Pacific Northwest

Wan, Jiamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Modeling non-steady state radioisotope transport in the vadose zone--A case study using uranium isotopes at Pena Blanca, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T.L. (2000) In-situ radionuclide transport and preferentialseries constraints on radionuclide transport and groundwater1998) Assessing in-situ radionuclide migration from natural

Ku, T. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A Conductivity Relationship for Steady-state Unsaturated Flow Processes under Optimal Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Optimality principles have been used for investigating physical processes in different areas. This work attempts to apply an optimal principle (that water flow resistance is minimized on global scale) to steady-state unsaturated flow processes. Based on the calculus of variations, we show that under optimal conditions, hydraulic conductivity for steady-state unsaturated flow is proportional to a power function of the magnitude of water flux. This relationship is consistent with an intuitive expectation that for an optimal water flow system, locations where relatively large water fluxes occur should correspond to relatively small resistance (or large conductance). Similar results were also obtained for hydraulic structures in river basins and tree leaves, as reported in other studies. Consistence of this theoretical result with observed fingering-flow behavior in unsaturated soils and an existing model is also demonstrated.

Liu, H. H.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Recent developments in the techniques of controlling and measuring suction in unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difficulty of measuring and controlling suction in unsaturated soils is one of the reasons why the development of the mechanics of unsaturated soils has not been as advanced as that of saturated soils. However, significant developments have been carried out in the last decade in this regard. In this paper, a re-view of some developments carried out in the techniques of controlling suction by using the axis translation, the osmotic method and the vapour control technique is presented. The paper also deals with some recent de-velopments in the direct measurement of suction by using high capacity tensiometers and in the measurement of high suction by using high range psychrometers. The recent progresses made in these techniques have been significant and will certainly help further experimental investigation of the hydromechanical behaviour of un-saturated soils.

Delage, Pierre; Tarantino, Alessandro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Subduction Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subduction Zone Subduction Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Subduction Zone Dictionary.png Subduction Zone: A tectonic process in which one tectonic plate is forced beneath another and sinks into the mantle as the plates converge Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip A classic cartoon illustrating a typical simplified subduction zone. http://www.columbia.edu/~vjd1/subd_zone_basic.htm Subduction zones occur where one tectonic plate is pulled under another. Most often the subducting plate is oceanic crust and contains many hydrous minerals. As the oceanic plate subducts it dewaters into the mantle,

252

Lithium Ion Solvation: Amine and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Solvates of Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Ion Solvation: Amine and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Solvates of Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide, and 13C NMR spectroscopic studies of 6Li-15N labeled lithium hexamethyldisilazide ([6Li,15N]- Li ligand structure and lithium amide aggregation state is a complex and sensitive function of amine alkyl

Collum, David B.

253

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Reactions of Imines, Unsaturated Esters, Epoxides, and Aryl Carbamates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Reactions of Imines, Unsaturated Esters, Epoxides, and Aryl: Several reactions mediated by lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) with added hexamethylphos- phoramide (HMPA, and selectivities of organolithium reactions.1 A preponderance of what is known about solvation of lithium ions

Collum, David B.

254

Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of fluid motion through an unsaturated fracture and fracture junction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphase fluid motion in unsaturated fractures and fracture networks involves complicated fluid dynamics, which is difficult to model using grid-based continuum methods. In this paper, the application of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), a relatively ... Keywords: Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), Fracture, Fracture flow, Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), Weight functions

Moubin Liu; Paul Meakin; Hai Huang

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Accommodation Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Accommodation Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Accommodation Zone Dictionary.png Accommodation Zone: Accommodation zones occur at fault intersections consisting of belts of interlocking, oppositely dipping normal faults. Multiple subsurface fault intersections in these zones are a favorable host for geothermal activity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones

256

Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Zones to Climate Zones to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

257

Rift Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rift Zone Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rift Zone Dictionary.png Rift Zone: A divergent plate boundary within a continent Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip The Rio Grande Rift exemplifies rift zone tectonics - increased volcanic activity and the formation of graben structures (reference: science-art.com) Rift valleys occur at divergent plate boundaries, resulting in large graben structures and increased volcanism. The East African Rift is an example of a continental rift zone with increased volcanism, while the Atlantic's spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge is host to an enormous amount of geothermal

258

The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new...

259

Radiant zone heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

260

On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CO2 Emissions - Panama Canal Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Canal Zone Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone...

262

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Transition Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details...

263

Liquid zone seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam  

SciTech Connect

A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

265

Lipid Oxidation PathwaysChapter 3 Competitive Oxidation between a-Tocopherol and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at Thermoxidation Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways Chapter 3 Competitive Oxidation between a-Tocopherol and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at Thermoxidation Conditions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pd

266

Models for Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity Based on Truncated Lognormal Pore-size Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a closed-form three-parameter model for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated with a three-parameter lognormal model of moisture retention, which is based on lognormal grainsize distribution. The derivation of the model is made possible by a slight modification to the theory of Mualem. We extend the three-parameter lognormal distribution to a four-parameter model that also truncates the pore size distribution at a minimum pore radius. We then develop the corresponding four-parameter model for moisture retention and the associated closed-form expression for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The four-parameter model is fitted to experimental data, similar to the models of Kosugi and van Genuchten. The proposed four-parameter model retains the physical basis of Kosugi's model, while improving fit to observed data especially when simultaneously fitting pressure-saturation and pressure-conductivity data.

Malama, Bwalya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

Ababou, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Climate Zone 5C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 5C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone...

269

Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

Liu, H.H.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

Conservation Laws for Coupled Hydro-mechanical Processes in Unsaturated Porous Media: Theory and Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop conservation laws for coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media using three-phase continuum mixture theory. From the first law of thermodynamics, we identify energy-conjugate variables for constitutive modeling at macroscopic scale. Energy conjugate expressions identified relate a certain measure of effective stress to the deformation of the solid matrix, the degree of saturation to the matrix suction, the pressure in each constituent phase to the corresponding intrinsic volume change of this phase, and the seepage forces to the corresponding pressure gradients. We then develop strong and weak forms of boundary-value problems relevant for 3D finite element modeling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media. The paper highlights a 3D numerical example illustrating the advances in the solution of large-scale coupled finite element systems, as well as the challenges in developing more predictive tools satisfying the basic conservation laws and the observed constitutive responses for unsaturated porous materials.

Borja, R I; White, J A

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

Breathing zone air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

Tobin, John (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Western Renewable Energy Zones (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes recent developments and trends pertaining to competitive renewable energy zones, transmission planning and the integration of renewable generation resources.

Hein, J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Solar Decathlon: Comfort Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon Comfort Zone Contest, teams design their houses to keep temperature and humidity steady, uniform, and comfortable. Full points are awarded for maintaining narrow...

274

Interfacial Transition Zone Bibliography Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Saito, M., and Kawamura, M., Effect of Fly Ash and Slag on the Interfacial Zone Between Cement and Aggregate , in ACI SP 114: Fly Ash, Silica ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

Zone refining of plutonium metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

Blau, M.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

TOUGH: a numerical model for nonisothermal unsaturated flow to study waste canister heating effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical processes modeled and the mathematical and numerical methods employed in a simulator for non-isothermal flow of water, vapor, and air in permeable media are briefly summarized. The simulator has been applied to study thermo-hydrological conditions in the near vicinity of high-level nuclear waste packages emplaced in unsaturated rocks. The studies reported here specifically address the question whether or not the waste canister environment will dry up in the thermal phase. 13 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

Pruess, K.; Wang, J.S.Y.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Impact of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone architecture on mass removal mechanisms in strongly layered heterogeneous porous media during soil vapor extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An existing multiphase flow simulator was modified in order to determine the effects of four mechanisms on NAPL mass removal in a strongly layered heterogeneous vadose zone during soil vapor extraction (SVE): a) NAPL flow, b) diffusion and dispersion from low permeability zones, c) slow desorption from sediment grains, and d) rate-limited dissolution of trapped NAPL. The impact of water and NAPL saturation distribution, NAPL type (i.e., free, residual, or trapped) distribution, and spatial heterogeneity of the permeability field on these mechanisms were evaluated. Two different initial source zone architectures (one with and one without trapped NAPL) were considered and these architectures were used to evaluate seven different SVE scenarios. For all runs, slow diffusion from low permeability zones that gas flow bypassed was a dominant factor for diminished SVE effectiveness at later times. This effect was more significant at high water saturation due to the decrease of gas-phase relative permeability. Transverse dispersion contributed to fast NAPL mass removal from the low permeability layer in both source zone architectures, but longitudinal dispersion did not affect overall mass removal time. Both slow desorption from sediment grains and rate-limited mass transfer from trapped NAPL only marginally affected removal times. However, mass transfer from trapped NAPL did affect mass removal at late time, as well as the NAPL distribution. NAPL flow from low to high permeability zones contributed to faster mass removal from the low permeability layer, and this effect increased when water infiltration was eliminated. These simulations indicate that if trapped NAPL exists in heterogeneous porous media, mass transfer can be improved by delivering gas directly to zones with trapped NAPL and by lowering the water content, which increases the gas relative permeability and changes trapped NAPL to free NAPL.

Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Valocchi, Albert J.; Oostrom, Martinus

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock related to high-level waste repositories; Final report, Phase 3  

SciTech Connect

Research results are summarized for a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission contract with the University of Arizona focusing on field and laboratory methods for characterizing unsaturated fluid flow and solute transport related to high-level radioactive waste repositories. Characterization activities are presented for the Apache Leap Tuff field site. The field site is located in unsaturated, fractured tuff in central Arizona. Hydraulic, pneumatic, and thermal characteristics of the tuff are summarized, along with methodologies employed to monitor and sample hydrologic and geochemical processes at the field site. Thermohydrologic experiments are reported which provide laboratory and field data related to the effects conditions and flow and transport in unsaturated, fractured rock. 29 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs.

Evans, D.D.; Rasmussen, T.C. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone transport model of Yucca Mountain, Las Alamos Nationalisotope distributions at Yucca Mountain, Las Alamos Nationalpneumatic response of at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal of

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain using an integrated modeling approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone site-scale model, Yucca Mountain Site Characterizationzone site- scale model, Yucca Mountain Project Milestonelateral diversion at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow in geologic heat pipes, Journal of Contaminantwhat could be called “heat-pipe” signatures, a flat zone (atpervasive evidence of these heat-pipe signatures [Birkholzer

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Climate Zone 1B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 1 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 1B is defined as Dry with...

284

Climate Zone 8B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 8 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 8B is defined as Subarctic...

285

Investigation of Episodic Flow from Unsaturated Porous Media into a Macropore  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Th e recent literature contains numerous observations of episodic or intermittent fl ow in unsaturated flow systems under both constant fl ux and ponded boundary conditions. Flow systems composed of a heterogeneous porous media, as well as discrete fracture networks, have been cited as examples of systems that can exhibit episodic fl ow. Episodic outfl ow events are significant because relatively large volumes of water can move rapidly through an unsaturated system, carrying water and contaminants to depth greatly ahead of a wetting front predicted by a one-dimensional, gravity-driven diff usive infiltration model. In this study, we model the behavior of water flow through a sand column underlain by an impermeable-walled macropore. Relative permeability and capillary pressure relationships were developed that capture the complex interrelationships between the macropore and the overlying porous media that control fl ow out of the system. The potential for episodic flow is assessed and compared to results of conventional modeling approaches and experimental data from the literature. Model results using coupled matrix–macropore relative permeability and capillary pressure relationships capture the behavior observed in laboratory experiments remarkably well, while simulations using conventional relative permeability and capillary pressure functions fail to capture some of the observed fl ow dynamics. Capturing the rapid downward movement of water suggests that the matrix-macropore capillary pressure and relative permeability functions developed have the potential to improve descriptions of fl ow and transport processes in heterogeneous, variably saturated media.

R. K. Podgorney; J. P. Fairley

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Validation studies for assessing unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock  

SciTech Connect

*The objectives of this contract are to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through heterogeneous fractured rock and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models. Important new information is presented such as the application and evaluation of procedures for estimating hydraulic, pneumatic, and solute transport coefficients for a range of thermal regimes. A field heater experiment was designed that focused on identifying the suitability of existing monitoring equipment to obtain required data. A reliable method was developed for conducting and interpreting tests for air permeability using a straddle-packer arrangement. Detailed studies of fracture flow from Queen Creek into the Magina Copper Company ore haulage tunnel have been initiated. These studies will provide data on travel time for transport of water and solute in unsaturated tuff. The collection of rainfall runoff, and infiltration data at two small watersheds at the Apache Leap Tuff Site enabled us to evaluate the quantity and rate of water infiltrating into the subsurface via either fractures or matrix. Characterization methods for hydraulic parameters relevant to Weigh-level waste transport, including fracture apertures, transmissivity, matrix porosity, and fracture wetting front propagation velocities, were developed.

Bassett, R.L.; Neuman, S.P.; Rasmussen, T.C.; Guzman, A.; Davidson, G.R.; Lohrstorfer, C.F. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Climate Zones | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Climate Zones Building America determines building practices based on climate zones to achieve the most energy savings in a home. This page offers some general guidelines on the definitions of the various climate regions based on heating degree-days, average temperatures, and precipitation. You can also view the Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County. Hot-Humid A hot-humid climate is generally defined as a region that receives more than 20 in. (50 cm) of annual precipitation and where one or both of the following occur: A 67°F (19.5°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 3,000 or more hours during the warmest 6 consecutive months of the year; or A 73°F (23°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 1,500 or more

288

Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Local Government StateProvincial Govt Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home...

289

Transition Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transition Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Transition Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (5) Power Plants (0) Projects...

290

Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zone ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings ..... 1,086 1,929 1,243 1,386 879 11,529 ...

291

Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE Climate Zones ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Climate Zones defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standards. Pages in category "ASHRAE Climate Zones" The following 30 pages are in this category, out of 30 total. C Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C C cont. Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Climate Zone Number 1 C cont. Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 8 Climate Zone Subtype A Climate Zone Subtype B Climate Zone Subtype C Retrieved from

292

1,4-Addition of Lithium Diisopropylamide to Unsaturated Esters: Role of Rate-Limiting Deaggregation, Autocatalysis,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1,4-Addition of Lithium Diisopropylamide to Unsaturated Esters: Role of Rate-Limiting Deaggregation, Autocatalysis, Lithium Chloride Catalysis, and Other Mixed Aggregation Effects Yun Ma, Alexander C. Hoepker.edu Abstract: Lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in tetrahydrofuran at -78 °C undergoes 1,4-addition

Collum, David B.

293

Explicit analytical solutions for one-dimensional steady state flow in layered, heterogeneous unsaturated soils under random  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the statistics of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and the effective water content. These first soils under random boundary conditions, Water Resour. Res., 43, W09413, doi:10.1029/2005WR004795. 1 in the literature [e.g., Warrick, 1974; Srivastava and Yeh, 1991; Tracy, 1995; Basha, 1999]. In these solutions

Lu, Zhiming

294

Seasonal thermal energy storage in unsaturated soils: Model development and field validation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes ten years of activity carried out at the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBI) in the subject of seasonal storage of thermal energy in unsaturated soils. The objectives of the work were to make a conceptual study of this type of storage, to offer guidelines for planning and evaluation of the method, to produce models and simulation for an actual field experiment, to participate in an on-line data analysis of experimental results. and to evaluate the results in terms of the validation of the concept, models and the experimental techniques. The actual field experiments were performed in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Details of engineering and field operations are not included in this report.

Doughty, C.; Nir, Aharon, Tsang, Chin-Fu

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-destructive methods of measuring water content in soils have been extensively developed in the last decades, especially in soil science. Among these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus. The probe is composed of two-pair of electrodes, and an electrical current is induced through the soil at the vicinity of the contact between the probe and the specimen. Some experimental data on the changes in resistivity with the degree of saturation were obtained in specimens of a natural unsaturated loess from Northern France. Two theoretical models of resistivity were also used to analyze the obtained data. Results are finally discussed with respect to the loess's water retention properties.

Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Process for the generation of .alpha., .beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acids and esters using niobium catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process using a niobium catalyst includes the step of reacting an ester or carboxylic acid with oxygen and an alcohol in the presence a niobium catalyst to respectively produce an .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated ester or carboxylic acid. Methanol may be used as the alcohol, and the ester or carboxylic acid may be passed over the niobium catalyst in a vapor stream containing oxygen and methanol. Alternatively, the process using a niobium catalyst may involve the step of reacting an ester and oxygen in the presence the niobium catalyst to produce an .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carboxylic acid. In this case the ester may be a methyl ester. In either case, niobium oxide may be used as the niobium catalyst with the niobium oxide being present on a support. The support may be an oxide selected from the group consisting of silicon oxide, aluminum oxide, titanium oxide and mixtures thereof. The catalyst may be formed by reacting niobium fluoride with the oxide serving as the support. The niobium catalyst may contain elemental niobium within the range of 1 wt % to 70 wt %, and more preferably within the range of 10 wt % to 30 wt %. The process may be operated at a temperature from 150 to 450.degree. C. and preferably from 250 to 350.degree. C. The process may be operated at a pressure from 0.1 to 15 atm. absolute and preferably from 0.5-5 atm. absolute. The flow rate of reactants may be from 10 to 10,000 L/kg.sub.(cat) /h, and preferably from 100 to 1,000 L/kg.sub.(cat) /h.

Gogate, Makarand Ratnakav (Durham, NC); Spivey, James Jerome (Cary, NC); Zoeller, Joseph Robert (Kingsport, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Zone refining of plutonium metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Overlap zoned electrically heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one, and wherein the N zones and the M sub-zones are arranged in P layers, where P is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Chapman, Mark R [Brighton, MI

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

ch_4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

47 47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 4.8.2 SUBSURFACE WATER Subsurface water at INEEL occurs in the under- lying Snake River Plain Aquifer and the vadose zone (area of unsaturated soil and material above the aquifer). This section describes the regional and local hydrogeology, vadose zone hydrology, perched water, and subsurface water quality. 4.8.2.1 Regional Hydrogeology INEEL overlies the Snake River Plain Aquifer as shown in Figure 4-12. This aquifer is the major source of drinking water for southeast- ern Idaho and has been desig- nated a Sole Source Aquifer by EPA. The aquifer flows to the south and southwest and covers an area of 9,611 square miles. Water storage in the aquifer is estimated at 2 billion acre-feet, and irrigation wells can yield 7,000 gallons per minute (DOE 1995). Depth to the

300

Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Louisiana Economic Development The Enterprise Zone Program is a jobs incentive program providing Louisiana income and franchise tax credits to businesses hiring at least 35% of net, new jobs from targeted groups. Enterprise Zones (EZs) are areas with high unemployment, low income, or a high percentage of residents receiving some

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Enterprise Zone Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama) Alabama) Enterprise Zone Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs The Enterprise Zone Program provides certain tax incentives to corporations, partnerships and proprietorships that locate or expand within designated Enterprise Zones. In addition to state-level tax incentives, businesses may also receive local tax and non-tax incentives for locating or expanding within a designated Enterprise Zone. Section 5 of the Alabama Enterprise Zone Program offers the following tax incentives: Credit based

302

Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Heating & Cooling Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Wind Maximum Rebate None Program Info Start Date 07/12/2006 State Michigan Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount 100% abatement of Michigan Business Tax, state education tax, personal and real property taxes, and local income taxes Provider Michigan Economic Development Corporation In 2006, Michigan enacted legislation allowing for the creation of Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones (RERZ). Renaissance zones -- renewable energy renaissance zones are just one type -- offer significant tax

303

The hydroxyl radical initiated oxidation of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere: a theoretical and experimental approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isoprene is the dominant non-methane organic compound emitted by vegetation into the atmosphere, with a global emission rate of ~ 500 Tg yr-1. Its oxidation serves as a major source of ground level ozone in North America during the summer months. Despite the significant impact on tropospheric chemistry, questions remain concerning the detailed oxidation mechanism. The initial step in the mechanism is the addition of OH to form four distinct isomers. The relative branching between these isomers influences the distribution of the final products. I present a comprehensive investigation into the mechanistic details of early steps in the oxidation mechanism of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and employ theoretical and experimental techniques. To understand the detailed kinetics of the initial OH addition to unsaturated hydrocarbons, I first present a model developed for the ethylene-OH system. I present the details of a robust two-transition state model. I extend the developed two-transition state model to the case of OH addition to isoprene. Excellent agreement with observed temperature and pressure dependent rate constants affords a high confidence level in understanding of the kinetics and in the calculated branching ratio of the initial OH addition step. I then focus attention on the subsequent reactivity of the OH-isoprene adducts. Until recently, all four of the OH-isoprene adducts were supposed to have reacted with O2 via addition to form alkylperoxy radicals. Previous computational results suggest that two of the OH-isoprene adducts undergo an intramolecular cyclic isomerization followed by hydrogen abstraction by O2 to form stable carbonyl compounds. I have synthesized photolytic precursors, presenting a novel approach to probe the subsequent reactivity of individual hydroxyalkyl radicals. Initial verification of the cyclic isomerization pathway involved synthesis of the photolytic precursor corresponding to the 1,3-butadiene-OH adduct. A culmination of theoretical and experimental techniques allowed verification of the cyclic isomerization pathway. I synthesized the photolytic precursor, which provided a single isoprene-OH adduct. Employing laser photolysis/laser induced fluorescence, time-dependent multiplexed mass spectrometry, velocity map ion imaging, and theoretical techniques, we present the full characterization of the reactivity of the single isoprene-OH adduct in the presence of O2.

Tullos, Erin Elizabeth

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application-Ch 6Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Isomers with Acetonitrile Covalent Adduct Chemical Ionization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application-Ch 6 Structural Analysis of Unsaturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Isomers with Acetonitrile Covalent Adduct Chemical Ionization Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Book

305

The Border Cities Enterprise Zone Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Border Cities Enterprise Zone Program provides business tax credits to businesses that invest, develop, expand, and create jobs in identified Border-Cities Enterprise Zones. Companies may be...

306

Enterprise Zone Real Property Investment Grant (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone Real Property Investment Grant provides qualified zone investors with cash grants for industrial, commercial or mixed use property. The grant is equal to 20% of the excess...

307

Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption offers businesses located in such economic development zones a 100 percent sales tax exemption on the purchase of labor and materials to construct or remodel...

308

Reaction progress pathways for glass and spent fuel under unsaturated conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The source term for the release of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository is the waste form. In order to assess the performance of the repository and the engineered barrier system (EBS) compared to regulations established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency it is necessary (1) to use available data to place bounding limits on release rates from the EBS, and (2) to develop a mechanistic predictive model of the radionuclide release and validate the model against tests done under a variety of different potential reaction conditions. The problem with (1) is that there is little experience to use when evaluating waste form reaction under unsaturated conditions such that errors in applying expert judgment to the problem may be significant. The second approach, to test and model the waste form reaction, is a more defensible means of providing input to the prediction of radionuclide release. In this approach, information related to the source term has a technical basis and provides a starting point to make reasonable assumptions for long-term behavior. Key aspects of this approach are an understanding of the reaction progress mechanism and the ability to model the tests using a geochemical code such as EQ3/6. Current knowledge of glass, UO{sub 2}, and spent fuel reactions under different conditions are described below.

Bates, J.; Finn, P.; Bourcier, W.; Stout, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling of Unsaturated Salt-cake Dissolution for S-109 Simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Simulation Program (V7.0, OLI Systems, Inc.) with V7DBLSLT, the latest version of the double salt database developed by the Institute of Clean Energy Technology (ICET), was used to predict effluent stream compositions and densities, residual salt-cake composition, and salt-cake heights for an unsaturated salt-cake dissolution test with a simulant representative of waste contained in Hanford tank 241-S-109. Predictions for major cation and anion concentrations were in excellent agreement with the experimental data obtained at the Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU). The utility of ESP as a means to predict effluent stream compositions and effluent stream properties, such as density and column salt-cake height, is demonstrated through the agreement between experimental and predicted values. These, and previous calculations, validate the use of thermodynamic models (with proper chemistry representations) for HLW pretreatment and retrievals. A powerful and useful tool is the result. Cost reductions are possible as the amount of sampling and subsequent laboratory analysis can be reduced. Additionally, overall processing risk is reduced through the ability to rapidly evaluate different processing and retrieval scenarios. The application of appropriate models can thus lead to more efficient operations and campaign cost savings while also evaluating parameters pertinent to safety. (authors)

Toghiani, R.K.; Lindner, J.S. [Institute for Clean Energy Technology, Mississippi State Univ., Starkville, MS (United States); Toghiani, R.K. [Dave C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State Univ., Starkville, MS (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region (Redirected from Gulf of California Rift Zone) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Gulf of California Rift Zone...

311

Allegan County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Allegan County, Michigan ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Allegan County, Michigan ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

312

Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Becker County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

313

Anchorage Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anchorage Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anchorage Borough, Alaska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

314

Benton County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Tennessee ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

315

Arapahoe County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arapahoe County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Arapahoe County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

316

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

317

Augusta County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Augusta County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

318

Benton County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

319

Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barron County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

320

Bedford County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bedford County, Tennessee ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bedford County, Tennessee ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Audrain County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Audrain County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Audrain County, Missouri ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

322

Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

323

Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Adams County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

324

Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

325

Ashland County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashland County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ashland County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

326

Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

327

Benton County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Benton County, Washington ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number Climate...

328

Asotin County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asotin County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Asotin County, Washington ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

329

Enterprise Zones (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zones (Iowa) Zones (Iowa) Enterprise Zones (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Enterprise Zone Industry Recruitment/Support Training/Technical Assistance Provider Iowa Economic Development Authority The Enterprise Zones Program is an incentive for business expansion designed to stimulate development by targeting economically distressed areas in Iowa. Through state and local tax incentives, businesses and developers are encouraged to make new investments, and create or retain

330

Enterprise Zone Program (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia) Georgia) Enterprise Zone Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Enterprise Zone Personal Tax Incentives Property Tax Incentive Provider Georgia Department of Community Affairs The Enterprise Zone Program provides various tax incentives to businesses within designated underdeveloped zones in rural or urban areas. The State Enterprise Zone program intends to improve geographic areas within cities

331

Geothermal Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is an expensive and often encountered problem when drilling into geothermal formations. A method is needed to more accurately describe loss zones encountered during geothermal drilling to allow for more realistic testing since present testing techniques are inadequate. A Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool (LCZMT) is being developed that will quickly locate a loss zone and then provide a visual image of this zone as it intersects the wellbore. A modified Sandia high temperature Acoustic Borehole Televiewer should allow modeling of geothermal loss zones, which would in turn lead to testing that can be performed to evaluate lost circulation materials under simulated downhole conditions. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Bauman, T.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flow in porous media, heat pipe, reservoir simulation,and vapor often leads to “heat-pipe” conditions, the steadytwo-phase zone, is the heat-pipe (i.e. , a zone of constant

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 2 + Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 +

334

Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype B + Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A +

335

Rate-limited U(VI) desorption during a small-scale tracer test in a hetereogeneous uranium contaminated aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone, Vadose Zone J. ,transport in a contaminated Hanford sediment, Environ. Sci.of U(VI) observed in Hanford sediment column experiments. A

Fox, P.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Zoned heating and air conditioning system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a zoned heating and air conditioning system comprising: a central air handling system with an air heating means and an air cooling means and a blower connected to an air duct system; thermostats each have heating and cooling set points, respectively associated with and located in different zones of a building; dampers respectively associated with each building zone positioned in the air duct system. Each damper has an open position allowing air into the respective zone from the duct system and a closed position; relay means for connecting one thermostat to the air handling system upon a call for heating or cooling by one thermostat and disconnecting all other thermostats by connecting one thermostat's connections between the thermostat and air handling system. Only one thermostat is connected to the air handling system at a time and the relay means disconnects one thermostat from the air handling system after one thermostat is satisified; and damper actuating means for unlocking each damper in one building zone responsive actuated by a respective zone thermostat connected to the air handling system by the relay means. The damper actuates means including a damper solenoid for each damper located adjacent each damper and connected to a respective zone thermostat. It unlocks each damper in one building zone responsive to being actuated by the respective zone thermostat and unlocks the dampers in one building zone when one thermostat is actuated while preventing the dampers in another thermostat's building zone from unlocking.

Beachboard, S.A.

1987-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Overview: Zoning for Small Wind Turbines  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Overview: Overview: Zoning for Small Wind Turbines Jim Green NREL ASES Small Wind Division Webinar January 17, 2008 2 Zoning Basics * Zoning is one form of land use law * Based on legal principle of "police power:" the power to regulate in order to promote the health, morals, safety, and general welfare of the community * Zoning authority originates from state laws called "zoning enabling legislation" - Standard Zoning Enabling Act, Dept. of Commerce, 1920s * Enabling legislation delegates land use authority to local jurisdictions, "Home Rule" - counties, parishes, boroughs, townships, municipalities, cities, villages, etc. 3 Zoning is Daunting * 3,034 counties (National Association of Counties) * 16,504 townships * 19,429 municipalities (National League of Cities)

338

Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) Enhanced Enterprise Zones (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Enterprise Zone Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development Enhanced Enterprise Zones aim at attracting new businesses or promoting an expansion of existing business in Missouri Enhanced Enterprise Zone. Tax credits will be an amount authorized by DED, based on the state economic benefit, supported by the number of new jobs, wages and new capital investment that the project will create. To qualify, individual business eligibility will be determined by the zone, based on creation of

339

U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Past Climate Zones U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: climate zone map Return to Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS Return to CBECS Home Page Note:Map updated with corrections,...

340

U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Climate Zone U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: climate zones map Note:Map updated with corrections, February 2012 Further Explanation on How Climate Zones are Defined...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModelClimateZone ModelClimateZone Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. It links to pages that use the form Buildings Model. The allowed values for this property are: Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A +

342

TOUGH +: Modeling Fluid and Heat Flow in Porous and Fractured ...  

geologic carbon sequestration sites; saline and freshwater aquifers (including the vadose zone) sites contaminated by radionuclides or volatile organic compounds;

343

Available at www.sciencedirect.com journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/watres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and by the need of controlling biogas migration into the vadose zone. Recent advances involving the use

344

Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Installation of UPR-100-N-17 Bioremediation Wells and Performance of Bioventing Pilot Tests  

SciTech Connect

Sampling and analytical requirements for in situ bioremediation pilot study for remediation of vadose zone petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

W. S. Thompson

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

V12-0159.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VadoseZoneJournal.org VadoseZoneJournal.org Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in vadose zone environments pose a long-term source and threat to groundwater resources, human health, and the environment. A number of technical, regulatory, and policy challenges and opportuni es are associated with contamina on in vadose zone environments, par cularly in remedia on. In this special sec on, 12 papers present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments. Abbrevia ons: LNAPL, light nonaqueous phase liquid. Vadose zone contamina on is a signifi cant global issue for protection of ground- water resources. While much of the focus is generally on arid and semiarid regions, vadose

346

Climate Zone 3B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 3B is defined as Dry with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3B climate zones: Andrews County, Texas Baylor County, Texas Borden County, Texas Brewster County, Texas Butte County, California Callahan County, Texas Chaves County, New Mexico Childress County, Texas Clark County, Nevada Cochise County, Arizona Coke County, Texas Coleman County, Texas Collingsworth County, Texas Colusa County, California Concho County, Texas Contra Costa County, California Cottle County, Texas Crane County, Texas Crockett County, Texas

347

Displacement Transfer Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Displacement Transfer Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Displacement Transfer Zone Dictionary.png Displacement Transfer Zone: Displacement transfer zones facilitate the transfer of strain between normal and strike-slip faults. Intersections between strike-slip faults in the Walker Lane and N- to NNE-striking normal faults commonly host geothermal systems, focused along the normal faults proximal to their dilational intersections with nearby strike-slip faults. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault

348

Climate Zone 5A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone 5A Zone 5A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 5A is defined as Cool- Humid with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5A climate zones: Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Allen County, Indiana Allen County, Ohio Andrew County, Missouri Antelope County, Nebraska Appanoose County, Iowa Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Arthur County, Nebraska

349

Climate Zone 5B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 5B is defined as Dry with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5B climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Washington Apache County, Arizona Arapahoe County, Colorado Asotin County, Washington Baker County, Oregon Beaver County, Utah Benewah County, Idaho Bent County, Colorado Benton County, Washington Boulder County, Colorado Broomfield County, Colorado Canyon County, Idaho Carson City County, Nevada Cassia County, Idaho Catron County, New Mexico Chelan County, Washington Cheyenne County, Colorado

350

Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 1 Climate Zone Number 1 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC . The following places are categorized as class 1 climate zones: Broward County, Florida Hawaii County, Hawaii Honolulu County, Hawaii Kalawao County, Hawaii Kauai County, Hawaii Maui County, Hawaii Miami-Dade County, Florida Monroe County, Florida Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_Number_1&oldid=21604" Category: ASHRAE Climate Zones What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

351

Climate Zone 2A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 2A is defined as Hot - Humid with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2A climate zones: Acadia Parish, Louisiana Alachua County, Florida Allen Parish, Louisiana Anderson County, Texas Angelina County, Texas Appling County, Georgia Aransas County, Texas Ascension Parish, Louisiana Assumption Parish, Louisiana Atascosa County, Texas Atkinson County, Georgia Austin County, Texas Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana Bacon County, Georgia Baker County, Florida Baker County, Georgia Baldwin County, Alabama Bastrop County, Texas

352

Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) Enterprise Zone Program (Texas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Texas Wide Open for Business The Enterprise Zone Program eligible projects to apply for state sales and use tax refunds on purchases of all taxable items purchased for use at qualified business sites related to the project or activity. The level and amount of refund is related to the capital investment and jobs created at the qualified business site. In addition, local communities must offer incentives to participants under the enterprise zone program, such as tax

353

Coastal Zone Management Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Management Act Zone Management Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Zone Management Act Year 1972 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (CZMA; Pub.L. 92-583, 86 Stat. 1280, enacted October 27, 1972, 16 U.S.C. §§ 1451-1464, Chapter 33) is an Act of Congress passed in 1972 to encourage coastal states to develop and implement coastal zone management plans (CZMPs). This act was established as a United States National policy to preserve, protect, develop, and where possible, restore or enhance, the resources of the Nation's coastal zone for this and succeeding generations. References Wikipedia[1] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration[2] The U.S. Congress recognized the importance of meeting the challenge of

354

Streamside Management Zones (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Streamside Management Zones (Montana) Streamside Management Zones (Montana) Streamside Management Zones (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This chapter sets streamside management zones as encompassing a strip at

355

Enterprise Zone Incentives (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives (Florida) Incentives (Florida) Enterprise Zone Incentives (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Florida Department of Economic Opportunity Enterprise Zone Incentives encourage business growth within certain geographic areas targeted for economic revitalization. Businesses which create jobs within a designated zone are eligible for several tax incentives, including sales and use tax credit, tax refunds for machinery or equipment, sales tax refund for building materials, and a sales tax exemption for electrical energy

356

Auxiliary analyses in support of performance assessment of a hypothetical low-level waste facility: Two-phase flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils with application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model of multiphase air-water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone is presented. The multiphase flow equations are solved using the two-pressure, mixed form of the equations with a modified Picard linearization of the equations and a finite element spatial approximation. A volatile contaminant is assumed to be transported in either phase, or in both phases simultaneously. The contaminant partitions between phases with an equilibrium distribution given by Henry`s Law or via kinetic mass transfer. The transport equations are solved using a Galerkin finite element method with reduced integration to lump the resultant matrices. The numerical model is applied to published experimental studies to examine the behavior of the air phase and associated contaminant movement under water infiltration. The model is also used to evaluate a hypothetical design for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The model has been developed in both one and two dimensions; documentation and computer codes are available for the one-dimensional flow and transport model.

Binning, P. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia); Celia, M.A.; Johnson, J.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Operations Research

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Spherical diffusion of tritium from a point of release in a uniform unsaturated soil. A deterministic model for tritium migration in an arid disposal site  

SciTech Connect

Tritium (Tr), when released as tritiated water at a point in a uniform and relatively dry soil, redistributes in both the liquid and vapor phases. The flux density of Tr in the liquid will exceed that in the vapor phase provided the water content is greater than approximately 15% of the total soil porosity. Thus Tr redistribution must be modeled recognizing transfer ``in parallel`` in both phases. The authors use the diffusion equation cast in spherical coordinates to analyze this problem in order to provide a basis for design of field experiments, and to offer observations on the long term behavior of such systems. The solution of the diffusion equation permits calculation of the evolution of profiles of Tr concentration, within and external to the sphere of released solution, assuming the initial concentration within this sphere to be uniform. The authors also predict the rate of advance of the maximum of Tr as it advances, and attenuates, in the soil. Calculations for the case of 1 million Curies of Tr diluted in 1 liter of water and released at a depth of 20 meters, and 200 meters above the water table, are demonstrated. If the soil has an initial water volume fraction of 0.06 and total porosity of 0.3 they show, for example, that at 5 meters from the point of discharge, the Tr concentration increases to a maximum in 24 years and then slowly declines. That maximum is 1 Curie/liter. The concentration in the gas phase will be 5 orders-of-magnitude less than this. At 60 meters the maximum ever reached in the liquid phase is ca 10{sup {minus}21} Ci/liter; that maximum will be achieved after 408 years. The authors discuss the effects of variation in the volume fractions of water and air originally present in the soil on the effective diffusion coefficient of Tr in soil, consider the effects of a net flux of water in the system, and identify questions to be answered to achieve safe systematic disposal of tritium in the deep unsaturated zone of desert soil.

Smiles, D.E.; Gardner, W.R.; Schulz, R.K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy and Management

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A Prognostic Relationship for Entrainment Zone Thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thickness of the entrainment zone at the top of the atmospheric mixed layer is analyzed using measurements made with a ground-based lidar during the BLX83 and CIRCE field programs. When the entrainment-zone depth normalized by mixed-layer ...

Eric Nelson; Roland Stull; Edwin Eloranta

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Climate Zone 7B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 7 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 7A is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7B climate zones: Clear Creek County, Colorado Grand County, Colorado Gunnison County, Colorado Hinsdale County, Colorado Jackson County, Colorado Lake County, Colorado Lincoln County, Wyoming Mineral County, Colorado Park County, Colorado Pitkin County, Colorado Rio Grande County, Colorado Routt County, Colorado San Juan County, Colorado Sublette County, Wyoming Summit County, Colorado Teton County, Wyoming Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_7B&oldid=2161

360

Climate Zone 6B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Zone 6B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 6 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 6B is defined as Dry with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6B climate zones: Adams County, Idaho Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alpine County, California Archuleta County, Colorado Bannock County, Idaho Bear Lake County, Idaho Beaverhead County, Montana Big Horn County, Montana Big Horn County, Wyoming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Climate Zone 4C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Zone 4C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone 4C is defined as Mixed - Marine with IP Units 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units 2000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4C climate zones: Benton County, Oregon Clackamas County, Oregon Clallam County, Washington Clark County, Washington Clatsop County, Oregon Columbia County, Oregon Coos County, Oregon Cowlitz County, Washington Curry County, Oregon Douglas County, Oregon

362

A Measurement System for Systematic Hydrological Characterization of Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff in a Mined Underground Tunnel  

SciTech Connect

A field investigation of unsaturated flow through a lithophysal unit of fractured welded tuff containing lithophysal cavities has been initiated. To characterize flow in this spatially heterogeneous medium, a systematic approach has been developed to perform tests in boreholes drilled at regular intervals in an underground tunnel (drift). In this paper, we describe the test equipment system that has been built for this purpose. Since the field-scale measurements, of liquid flow in the unsaturated, fractured rocks, require continuous testing for periods of days to weeks, the control of test equipment has been fully automated, allowing operation with no human presence at the field site. Preliminary results from the first set of tests are described. These tests give insight into the role of the matrix (perhaps also lithophysal cavities) as potential storage during the initial transient flow prior to the breakthrough of water at the drift crown, as well as the role of connected fractures that provide the subsequent quasi-steady flow. These tests also reveal the impact of evaporation on seepage into the drift.

R. J. Cook; R. Salve; B.M. Freifeld; Y.W. Tsang

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

Category:County Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Climate Zones County Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search This category contains county climate zone information in the United States of America. Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pages in category "County Climate Zones" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 3,141 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone

364

Observing Surf-Zone Dispersion with Drifters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surf-zone dispersion is studied using drifter observations collected within about 200 m of the shoreline (at depths of less than about 5 m) on a beach with approximately alongshore uniform bathymetry and waves. There were about 70 individual ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen; R. T. Guza; W. E. Schmidt

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Climate Zone Number 7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 7 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 7 is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7 climate zones: Aitkin County, Minnesota Aleutians East Borough, Alaska Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska Anchorage Borough, Alaska Aroostook County, Maine Ashland County, Wisconsin Baraga County, Michigan Barnes County, North Dakota Bayfield County, Wisconsin Becker County, Minnesota Beltrami County, Minnesota Benson County, North Dakota Bottineau County, North Dakota Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Burke County, North Dakota Burnett County, Wisconsin Carlton County, Minnesota Cass County, Minnesota

366

Climate Zone 2B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 2B is defined as Dry with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2B climate zones: Bandera County, Texas Dimmit County, Texas Edwards County, Texas Frio County, Texas Imperial County, California Kinney County, Texas La Paz County, Arizona La Salle County, Texas Maricopa County, Arizona Maverick County, Texas Medina County, Texas Pima County, Arizona Pinal County, Arizona Real County, Texas Uvalde County, Texas Val Verde County, Texas Webb County, Texas Yuma County, Arizona Zapata County, Texas Zavala County, Texas Retrieved from

367

Climate Zone 4A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 4A is defined as Mixed - Humid with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4A climate zones: Accomack County, Virginia Adair County, Kentucky Adams County, Ohio Alamance County, North Carolina Albemarle County, Virginia Alexander County, Illinois Alexander County, North Carolina Alexandria County, Virginia Allegany County, Maryland Alleghany County, Virginia Allen County, Kansas Allen County, Kentucky Amelia County, Virginia Amherst County, Virginia Anderson County, Kansas Anderson County, Kentucky

368

Climate Zone 4B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 4B is defined as Dry with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4B climate zones: Amador County, California Armstrong County, Texas Baca County, Colorado Bailey County, Texas Beaver County, Oklahoma Bernalillo County, New Mexico Briscoe County, Texas Calaveras County, California Carson County, Texas Castro County, Texas Cibola County, New Mexico Cimarron County, Oklahoma Cochran County, Texas Curry County, New Mexico Dallam County, Texas De Baca County, New Mexico Deaf Smith County, Texas

369

Climate Zone 6A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 6 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 6A is defined as Cold - Humid with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6A climate zones: Adams County, North Dakota Adams County, Wisconsin Addison County, Vermont Alcona County, Michigan Alger County, Michigan Allamakee County, Iowa Allegany County, New York Alpena County, Michigan Androscoggin County, Maine Anoka County, Minnesota Antrim County, Michigan Arenac County, Michigan Aurora County, South Dakota Barron County, Wisconsin Beadle County, South Dakota Belknap County, New Hampshire Bennington County, Vermont

370

Pine Tree Development Zones Program (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pine Tree Development Zones program offers eligible businesses the chance to reduce, and sometimes eliminate, state taxes for up to ten years. There is a statutory requirement of hiring a...

371

Climate Zone Number 8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Climate Zone Number 8 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE...

372

Climate Zone 1A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Climate Zone 1A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE...

373

Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

Ulloa, Osvaldo

374

Seismic imaging of the mantle transition zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we developed a generalized Radon transform of SS precursors for large-scale, high-resolution seismo-stratigraphy of the upper mantle transition zone. The generalized Radon transform (GRT) is based on the ...

Cao, Qin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Climate Zone 3C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone 3C is defined as Warm - Marine with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3C climate zones: Alameda County, California Marin County, California Mendocino County, California Monterey County, California Napa County, California San Benito County, California San Francisco County, California San Luis Obispo County, California San Mateo County, California Santa Barbara County, California Santa Clara County, California Santa Cruz County, California Sonoma County, California Ventura County, California

376

Climate Zone 3A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 3A is defined as Warm - Humid with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3A climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina Anson County, North Carolina Archer County, Texas Arkansas County, Arkansas Ashley County, Arkansas Atoka County, Oklahoma Attala County, Mississippi Autauga County, Alabama Baldwin County, Georgia

377

Definition: Accommodation Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Accommodation Zone Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Accommodation Zone Accommodation zones occur at fault intersections consisting of belts of interlocking, oppositely dipping normal faults. Multiple subsurface fault intersections in these zones are a favorable host for geothermal activity.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ James E. Faulds,Nicholas H. Hinz,Mark F. Coolbaugh,Patricia H. Cashman,Christopher Kratt,Gregory Dering,Joel Edwards,Brett Mayhew,Holly McLachlan. 2011. Assessment of Favorable Structural Settings of Geothermal Systems in the Great Basin, Western USA. In: Transactions. GRC Anual Meeting; 2011/10/23; San Diego, CA. Davis, CA: Geothermal Resources

378

Zone control system for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

A zone control system adapted to control temperatures in a building is described having a temperature modifying plant to modify the temperature of a heat exchange medium, circulator means to circulate the medium, and flow control means to regulate the flow of the medium. The system includes zone thermostats with one thermostat per controlled zone, and with each thermostat including temperature responsive means and heat anticipator means to modify the temperature of the temperature responsive means; at least one of the flow control means per controlled zone, and each of the flow control means being capable of energizing the circulator means when the flow control means operates to permit circulation of the heat exchange medium; each zone thermostat including on-off timer means having normally open switch means, and further including intermediate on timer means having normally open switch means; first zone control circuit means including a temperature responsive means of the first thermostat, a heat anticipator means of the first thermostat, and circuit means with normally closed switch means capable of energizing a first flow control means to an open position upon the first thermostat calling for operation of the temperature modifying plant. The timer means of the first thermostat is actuated by the first thermostat calling for operation of the temperature modifying plant; a first of the on-off timer means operating its switch means to an on state after a fixed time interval to latch the first flow control means into an open condition; a first of the intermediate on timer means operating its switch means to an on state after a second fixed time interval to energize the modifying plant and complete a circuit to a secondary anticipation heater of a second zone thermostat capable of adding heat to the second zone thermostat; and the first on-off timer means maintaining its switch means closed.

Nelson, L.W.

1986-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

U-PLANT GEOGRAPHIC ZONE CLEANUP PROTOTYPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U Plant geographic zone (UPZ) occupies 0.83 square kilometers on the Hanford Site Central Plateau (200 Area). It encompasses the U Plant canyon (221-U Facility), ancillary facilities that supported the canyon, soil waste sites, and underground pipelines. The UPZ cleanup initiative coordinates the cleanup of the major facilities, ancillary facilities, waste sites, and contaminated pipelines (collectively identified as ''cleanup items'') within the geographic zone. The UPZ was selected as a geographic cleanup zone prototype for resolving regulatory, technical, and stakeholder issues and demonstrating cleanup methods for several reasons: most of the area is inactive, sufficient characterization information is available to support decisions, cleanup of the high-risk waste sites will help protect the groundwater, and the zone contains a representative cross-section of the types of cleanup actions that will be required in other geographic zones. The UPZ cleanup demonstrates the first of 22 integrated zone cleanup actions on the Hanford Site Central Plateau to address threats to groundwater, the environment, and human health. The UPZ contains more than 100 individual cleanup items. Cleanup actions in the zone will be undertaken using multiple regulatory processes and decision documents. Cleanup actions will include building demolition, waste site and pipeline excavation, and the construction of multiple, large engineered barriers. In some cases, different cleanup actions may be taken at item locations that are immediately adjacent to each other. The cleanup planning and field activities for each cleanup item must be undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive manner to ensure effective execution of the UPZ cleanup initiative. The UPZ zone cleanup implementation plan (ZCIP) was developed to address the need for a fundamental integration tool for UPZ cleanup. As UPZ cleanup planning and implementation moves forward, the ZCIP is intended to be a living document that will provide a focal point for integrating UPZ actions, including field cleanup activities, waste staging and handling, and post-cleanup monitoring and institutional controls.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones: The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA climate division is placed into one of five CBECS climate zones based on its 30-year average heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the period 1971 through 2000. (These climate zones have been updated for the 2003 CBECS. All previous CBECS used averages for the 45-year period from 1931 through 1975.) A HDD is a measure of how cold a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature (in CBECS, 65 degrees Fahrenheit). The heating degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is less than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is greater than or equal to 65. For example, if the average temperature for a given day is 40 degrees, then the heating degree-days for that single day equal 25. Heating degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily heating degree-days that year.

383

HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region edit Details Areas (15)...

385

Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Anderson County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

386

Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Androscoggin County, Maine ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

387

Bennington County, Vermont ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bennington County, Vermont ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bennington County, Vermont ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

388

Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

389

Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baltimore County, Maryland ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

390

Barnwell County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barnwell County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barnwell County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

391

Berkshire County, Massachusetts ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berkshire County, Massachusetts ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkshire County, Massachusetts ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

392

Aleutians East Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aleutians East Borough, Alaska ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Aleutians East Borough, Alaska ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

393

Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alexander County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

394

Albemarle County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albemarle County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Albemarle County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

395

Berks County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berks County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berks County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

396

Bayfield County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bayfield County, Wisconsin ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bayfield County, Wisconsin ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

397

Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alamance County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

398

Archuleta County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Archuleta County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Archuleta County, Colorado ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

399

Beauregard Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beauregard Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beauregard Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

400

Allendale County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Allendale County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Allendale County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Baltimore City County, Maryland ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

402

Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Berkeley County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

403

Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Alameda County, California ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alameda County,...

404

Bedford City County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bedford City County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bedford City County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

405

Beaufort County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Facebook icon Twitter icon Beaufort County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beaufort County, North...

406

Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alleghany County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

407

Aitkin County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Aitkin County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Aitkin County, Minnesota...

408

Barbour County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barbour County, West Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Barbour County, West Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

409

Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

410

Beltrami County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beltrami County, Minnesota ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beltrami County, Minnesota ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

411

Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Belknap County, New Hampshire ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

412

Bertie County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bertie County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bertie County, North Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

413

Arlington County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arlington County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Arlington County, Virginia ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate...

414

Bamberg County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bamberg County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Bamberg County, South Carolina ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006...

415

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration...

416

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal...

417

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small Hotel Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

418

Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBaodingHighTechIndustryDevelopmentZone&oldid342524" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

419

Pages that link to "Baoding High Tech Industry Development Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwikiSpecial:WhatLinksHereBaodingHighTechIndustryDevelopmentZone" Special pages About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Developer...

420

Variation in sericite composition from fracture zones within...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

zones of the crystalline basement contain coarse-grained relict muscovite, whereas rock alteration near fracture zones at temperatures > 150C is characterized by abundant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Renewable Energy Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement Renewable Energy Generation Zone Property Tax Abatement Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel...

422

U-Sr isotopic speedometer: Fluid flow and chemical weathering rates inaquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone sediment from the Hanford Reservation—RCRA boreholecontamination at the Hanford Site in Washington using high-vadose zone pore fluids at Hanford, Washington: implications

Maher, Kate; DePaolo, Donald J.; Christensen, John N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

TOUGH2 Software Qualification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Proceedings ofthe Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, RadioactiveSite-Scale Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Report LBL-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Transport of Bottom Water in the Romanche Fracture Zone and the Chain Fracture Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two moored arrays deployed in the Romanche Fracture Zone and Chain Fracture Zone in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean provide two-year-long time series of current and temperature in the Lower North Atlantic Deep Water and the Antarctic Bottom Water. ...

Herlé Mercier; Kevin G. Speer

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Earthquake Patterns in Diverse Tectonic Zones of the Globe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast ridge. * ‘‘western Aleutians’’ orogen: (4) Trench. * ‘‘geographic name like ‘‘Aleutian;’’ instead, each zone has a

Kagan, Y. Y.; Bird, P.; Jackson, D. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Definition: Displacement Transfer Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Displacement Transfer Zone Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Displacement Transfer Zone Displacement transfer zones facilitate the transfer of strain between normal and strike-slip faults. Intersections between strike-slip faults in the Walker Lane and N- to NNE-striking normal faults commonly host geothermal systems, focused along the normal faults proximal to their dilational intersections with nearby strike-slip faults.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ James E. Faulds,Nicholas H. Hinz,Mark F. Coolbaugh,Patricia H. Cashman,Christopher Kratt,Gregory Dering,Joel Edwards,Brett Mayhew,Holly McLachlan. 2011. Assessment of Favorable Structural Settings of Geothermal

428

Zoned electrical heater arranged in spaced relationship from particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Oklahoma Department of Commerce Opportunity and Enterprise Zones provide enhanced financial incentives for businesses located in such zones aimed at stimulating economic expansion in rural and disadvantaged communities Opportunity Zones are those census

430

Infrared absorption measurements of the kinetics of Cl atom reactions with C{sub 3}H{sub n} (n=4,6) unsaturated hydrocarbons between 300-850 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reaction of chlorine (Cl) atoms with the unsaturated C{sub 3}H{sub n} where n=4,6, hydrocarbons propylene, allene, and methyl acetylene have been uninvestigated as a function of temperature and pressure.

Farrell, J.T.; Pilgrim, J.S.; Taatjes, C.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Origin of the South Pacific Convergence Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of the presence of South America and Australia to the existence and orientation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) during January is explored using the ECMWF T21 model. Each of the continents is removed from the model and ...

George N. Kiladis; Hans von Storch; Harryvan Loon

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Mixing in the Romanche Fracture Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Romanche Fracture Zone is a major gap in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at the equator, which is deep enough to allow significant eastward flows of Antarctic Bottom Water from the Brazil Basin to the Sierra Leone and Guinea Abyssal Plains. While ...

Bruno Ferron; Herlé Mercier; Kevin Speer; Ann Gargett; Kurt Polzin

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A GPS-Tracked Surf Zone Drifter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A drifter designed to measure surf zone circulation has been developed and field tested. Drifter positions accurate to within a few meters are estimated in real time at 0.1 Hz using the global positioning system (GPS) and a shore-to-drifter radio ...

W. E. Schmidt; B. T. Woodward; K. S. Millikan; R. T. Guza; B. Raubenheimer; Steve Elgar

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

FREE ZONE Rb-276 Chiller Monitoring Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulations prohibiting the production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have spurred the development of alternative refrigerants with similar thermodynamic properties and operating characteristics for use in large chiller systems. This study evaluates refrigerant FREE ZONE RB-276, a "drop in" replacement for R-12, which has been out of production since January 1, 1996.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

GEOCENTRIFUGE STUDIES OF FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA, FINAL REPORT FOR GRANT NUMBER DE-FG02-03ER63567 TO THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO (RW SMITH), ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 86598, COUPLED FLOW AND REACTIVITY IN VARIABLY SATURATED POROUS MEDIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved models of contaminant migration in heterogeneous, variably saturated porous media are required to better define the long-term stewardship requirements for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands and to assist in the design of effective vadose-zone barriers to contaminant migrations. The development of these improved models requires field and laboratory results to evaluate their efficacy. However, controlled laboratory experiments simulating vadose conditions can require extensive period of time, and often are conducted at condition near saturation rather than the much drier conditions common in many contaminated arid vadose zone sites. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the University of Idaho as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project focused on the development and evaluation of geocentrifuge techniques and equipment that allows vadose zone experiments to be conducted for relevant conditions in time frames not possible in conventional bench top experiments. A key and novel aspect of the research was the use of the 2-meter radius geocentrifuge capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory to conduct unsaturated transport experiments. Specifically, the following activities were conducted ** Reviewing of the theory of unsaturated flow in the geocentrifuge to establish the range of centrifuge accelerations/experimental conditions and the translation of centrifuge results to 1 gravity applications. ** Designing, constructing, and testing of in-flight experimental apparatus allowing the replication of traditional bench top unsaturated transport experiments on the geocentrifuge. ** Performing unsaturated 1-dimenstional column geocentrifuge experiments using conservative tracers to evaluate the effects of increased centrifugal acceleration on derived transport properties and assessing the scaling relationships for these properties. Because the application of geocentrifuge techniques to vadose transport is in its infancy experimental apparatus such as pumps, flow meters, columns, fraction collectors, etc. that would reliably function under the increased self weight experienced on the centrifuge had to be developed and tested as part of this project. Although, we initially planed to conduct experiments using reactive tracer and 2-dimensional heterogeneities, the cost and time associated with designing, building, and testing of experimental apparatus limited our experimental program to conservative tracer experiments using 1-dimensional columns. The results we obtained in this study indicate that the geocentrifuge technique is a viable experimental method for the study of subsurface processes where gravitational acceleration is important. The geocentrifuge allows experiments to be completed more quickly than tests conducted at 1-g, can be used to experimentally address important scaling issues, and permits experiments under a range of conditions that would be difficult or impossible using conventional approaches. The application of the geocentrifuge approaches and associated models developed in this project allows more meaningful investigation of DOE relevant vadose-zone issues under scalable conditions in time frames previously not obtainable.

Robert W. Smith; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Oil price, mean reversion and zone readjustments  

SciTech Connect

Observing OPEC`s short-term price-output ceiling behavior during the late 1980s and 1990s, one can conclude that it attempts to stabilize the market price within a range of its announced target price by controlling the output ceiling. If the price moves within four to five dollars below the target price, it usually reduces the output ceiling and assigns new quotas to its member countries to keep the price close to the target price. In reality, OPEC established a band for the market price positioned round the target price by basically choosing suitable upper and lower limits for the output or, at least in soft markets, it places tolerance zone below the target price in order to restrict the discrepancy between the market price and the target price. The lower limit is particularly needed because it sets a price floor and ensures that the market price stays above the significantly lower marginal cost of oil production. If the limits of these zones are backed by a perfectly credible intervention policy, they can generate an expectations process that should turn the market prices around even before any intervention takes place. While OPEC in some sense observes the target zones for its prices, those zones are neither well defined nor vigorously defended. It can not always or may not be willing to maintain the price within the limits of the desired zone by cutting the output ceiling; it must sometimes readjust the target price and output ceiling, and thus create a new target zone to reflect the market`s new fundamentals. This is particularly true now because OPEC is losing market share to the other oil producers and is contemplating to shift the current band. Actual readjustments in the target price can be so large, as in 1980 and 1985, that the newmarket price must jump as well. They can occur when both the market price is near the limits of the band as well as when it is inside the band but still further away from those limits.

Hammoudeh, S. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Problem of Vain Energy Consumption in a VAV Air Conditioning System Shared By an Inner Zone and Exterior Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In northern China, there are a large number of space buildings divided in inner zone and exterior zone based on usage requirements. The exterior zone needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer, while the inner zone needs to be cooled both in winter and summer. Taking a practical project as example, this paper analyzes the energy consumption of a VAV air conditioning system that is shared by inner zone and exterior zone. The paper also points out the serious problem of useless energy consumption for this kind of system.

Wenji, G.; Ling, C.; Dongdong, L.; Mei, S.; Li, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Dry(5B) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Marine(5C) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5 climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Washington Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina

440

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vadose unsaturated zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

Beckham County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBeckham...

443

Adams County, Mississippi ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype A Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAdamsC...

444

Adams County, Washington ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Subtype Climate Zone Subtype B Start Date 2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAdamsC...