National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for vacar virginia-carolinas subregion

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp - FL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VA 03 VirginiaVapofier Corp -

  2. w. T. Thorntot-l, OR RADIOLOGICAL STATUS OF FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA CHEMICAL CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , cMarchW W()r' 2J ;3:7 . - w.

  3. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. (BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway))

    1996-01-01

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team's ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  4. Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMember CorpSunvie SASandBuildingCentralEnergy

  5. NEW MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS COMPLEX AND AGES OF ITS SUB-REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, B.; Bessell, M. S.

    2012-07-15

    We have spectroscopically identified {approx}100 G-, K-, and M-type members of the Scorpius-Centaurus complex. To deduce the age of these young stars we compare their Li {lambda}6708 absorption line strengths against those of stars in the TW Hydrae association and {beta} Pictoris moving group. These line strengths indicate that Sco-Cen stars are younger than {beta} Pic stars whose ages of {approx}12 Myr have previously been derived from a kinematic traceback analysis. Our derived age, {approx}10 Myr, for stars in the Lower Centaurus Crux and Upper Centaurus Lupus subgroups of ScoCen is younger than previously published ages based on the moving cluster method and upper main-sequence fitting. The discrepant ages are likely due to an incorrect (or lack of) cross-calibration between model-dependent and model-independent age-dating methods.

  6. Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Cropping pattern shifts in many aggregate linear programming (LP) models need to be constrained due to institutional, marketing machinery, and price uncertainty factors. The purpose of this study was to estimate constraints which are referred...

  7. Maintaining environmental quality while expanding biomass production: Sub-regional U.S. policy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

    2013-03-01

    This paper evaluates environmental policy effects on ligno-cellulosic biomass production and environ- mental outcomes using an integrated bioeconomic optimization model. The environmental policy integrated climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate crop yields and environmental indicators in current and future potential bioenergy cropping systems based on weather, topographic and soil data. The crop yield and environmental outcome parameters from EPIC are combined with biomass transport costs and economic parameters in a representative farmer profit-maximizing mathematical optimization model. The model is used to predict the impact of alternative policies on biomass production and environmental outcomes. We find that without environmental policy, rising biomass prices initially trigger production of annual crop residues, resulting in increased greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, and nutrient losses to surface and ground water. At higher biomass prices, perennial bioenergy crops replace annual crop residues as biomass sources, resulting in lower environmental impacts. Simulations of three environmental policies namely a carbon price, a no-till area subsidy, and a fertilizer tax reveal that only the carbon price policy systematically mitigates environmental impacts. The fertilizer tax is ineffectual and too costly to farmers. The no-till subsidy is effective only at low biomass prices and is too costly to government.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Subregion 3 Presentation 5-12-09.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    its capacity. Southwestern Power Administration Slide 4 2009 Projects Southwestern Power Administration Slide 5 Five Year Construction Plan 2010 Bull Shoals Dam Pothead...

  9. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  10. Commercial Fertilizers in 1921-22. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    ........................ Marshall Cotton Oil Company ......................... Mayfield-Alford Company ............................ Meridian Fertilizer Factory .................. - ........ Nitrate Agencies Company of Texas .................... Palestine Oil and Manufacturing... ................. Swift and Companv .................................. Terrell Oil and Refining Company ..................... Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company ................... Number Averaged . 6 8 70 1 4 1 2 13 5 13 3 2 1 5 9 2 76 1 5 14 16...

  11. Commercial Fertilizers in 1918-19. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1919-01-01

    Fertilizer Co ............................. 1 Houston County Cotton Oil Mill and Mfg . Co ..... 2 Houston Pack~ng Co ............................ 1 Longview Cotton Oil Co ........................ 3 Marshall Fertilizer Factory ...................... 3... &rings Acid and Fertilizer Co ............ 7 .................................... Swift&Co 84 Tennessee Coal . Iron and Railroad Co ............ 1 ............. ...... Union Seed and Feitilizer Co : 10 ................... Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co...

  12. Commercial Fertilizers in 1923-24. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1924-01-01

    Company .......................... Jefferson Oil Company .................. Kelly, Weber and Company, Ltd ................... Lonpiew Cotton Oil Company .................... Marshall Cotton Oil Company ...................... Meridian Fertilizer... Company ........ 1 33 ..................... Shreveport Fertilizer Works ............................. Swift and Company Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company ....... Van Zandt Cotton Oil Company ................... Virginia-Carolina Chemical...

  13. Severe depression is associated with increased microglial quinolinic acid in subregions of the anterior cingulate gyrus: Evidence for an immune-modulated glutamatergic neurotransmission?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Johann; Walter, Martin; Gos, Tomasz; Guillemin, Gilles J; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Mawrin, Christian; Brisch, Ralf; Bielau, Hendrik; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Louise; Bogerts, Bernhard; Myint, Aye-Mu

    2011-08-10

    of antidepressants. Meta-analysis of dose-effect relationships in randomised clinical trials. Br J Psychiatry 1999, 174:297-303. 32. Rey MJ, Schulz P, Costa C, Dick P, Tissot R: Guidelines for the dosage of neuroleptics. I: Chlorpromazine equivalents of orally... connectivity correlates of severity in major depression-the role of pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. Front Syst Neurosci 2010, 4:10. 52. Walter M, Henning A, Grimm S, Beck J, Schulte RF, Dydak U, Boeker H, Boesinger P, Northoff G...

  14. Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

    1987-01-01

    tsunami and slope stability studies at the site for the San Onofre Nucleartsunamis California, South Coast Region, Subregion VIII, Subregion IX San Onofre Nucleartsunamis, coastal structures, wave climate California, San Diego Region, Subregion X, Oceanside Cell San Onofre Nuclear

  15. TOUGH2 User's Guide Version 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Moridis, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    the Production of Superheated Steam from Fractured, Vapor-subcooled liquid or superheated steam) are temperature T and350 ‘C), subregion 2 (superheated steam), and subregion 6 (

  16. A novel 2- and 3-choice touchscreen-based continuous trialunique nonmatching-to-location task (cTUNL) sensitive to functional differences between dentate gyrus and CA3 subregions of the hippocampus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oomen, Charlotte; Hvoslef-Eide, Martha; Kofink, Daniel; Preusser, Friederike; Mar, Adam; Saksida, Lisa; Bussey, Timothy

    2015-07-13

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 2 TJB consults for Campden Instruments Ltd. LMS consults for Campden Instruments Ltd...

  17. Differential Responses of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (Pgrmc1) and the Classical Progesterone Receptor (Pgr) to 17?-Estradiol and Progesterone in Hippocampal Subregions that Support Synaptic Remodeling and Neurogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bali, Namrata; Arimoto, Jason M.; Iwata, Nahoko; Lin, Sharon W.; Zhao, Liqin; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Morgan, Todd E.; Finch, Caleb E.

    2011-01-01

    in ovarian granulosa cells after the preovu- latory luteinizing hormone surge. Mol Endocrinol 5:967–978 36. Morgan TE, Xie Z, Goldsmith S, Yoshida T, Lanzrein AS, Stone D, Rozovsky I, PerryG, SmithMA, FinchCE 1999Themosaic of brain glial hyperactivity during....I., S.W.L., T.E.M., C.E.F.), and School of Pharmacy (L.Z., R.D.B.), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0191 Progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) modulate neurogenesis and synaptic remodeling in the hip- pocampus during...

  18. Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2006-11-01

    Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world; much work is going on to optimize engine and battery operations for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, there has generally been the expectation that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of the vehicles, because the recharging would only occur during offpeak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough that capacity planning will respond adequately. But this expectation does not incorporate that endusers will have control of the time of recharging and the inclination for people will be to plug in when convenient for them, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of introducing a number of plug-in hybrid vehicles onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require both the addition of new electric capacity along with an increase in the utilization of existing capacity. Local distribution grids will see a change in their utilization pattern, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to recharge the vehicles will be different depending on the region of the country and timing when the PHEVs recharge. We conducted an analysis of what the grid impact may be in 2018 with one million PHEVs added to the VACAR sub-region of the Southeast Electric Reliability Council, a region that includes South Carolina, North Carolina, and much of Virginia. To do this, we used the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch model, which simulates the hourly dispatch of power generators to meet demand for a region over a given year. Depending on the vehicle, its battery, the charger voltage level, amperage, and duration, the impact on regional electricity demand varied from 1,400 to 6,000 MW. If recharging occurred in the early evening, then peak loads were raised and demands were met largely by combustion turbines and combined cycle plants. Nighttime recharging had less impact on peak loads and generation adequacy, but the increased use of coal-fired generation changed the relative amounts of air emissions. Costs of generation also fluctuated greatly depending on the timing. However, initial analysis shows that even charging at peak times may be less costly than using gasoline to operate the vehicles. Even if the overall region may have sufficient generating power, the region's transmission system or distribution lines to different areas may not be large enough to handle this new type of load. A largely residential feeder circuit may not be sized to have a significant proportion of its customers adding 1.4 to 6 kW loads that would operate continuously for two to six hours beginning in the early evening. On a broader scale, the transmission lines feeding the local substations may be similarly constrained if they are not sized to respond to this extra growth in demand. This initial analysis identifies some of the complexities in analyzing the integrated system of PHEVs and the grid. Depending on the power level, timing, and duration of the PHEV connection to the grid, there could be a wide variety of impacts on grid constraints, capacity needs, fuel types used, and emissions generated. This paper provides a brief description of plug-in hybrid vehicle characteristics in Chapter 2. Various charging strategies for vehicles are discussed, with a consequent impact on the grid. In Chapter 3 we describe the future electrical demand for a region of the country and the impact on this demand with a number of plug-in hybrids. We apply that demand to an inventory of power plants for the region using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to evaluate the change in power production and emissions. In Chapter 4 we discuss the impact of demand increases on local distribution systems. In Chapter 5 we conclude and provide insights into the impacts of plug-ins. Future

  19. Precedence of the Eye Region in Neural Processing of Faces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issa, Elias

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed multiple subregions in monkey inferior temporal cortex (IT) that are selective for images of faces over other objects. The earliest of these subregions, the posterior ...

  20. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  1. Transmission Services WIST Task Force Dynamic Transfer Capability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ("WIST"), a Task Force of technical staff primarily from Northwest and California transmission providers and sub-regional entities, completed a report documenting Phase 1 of its...

  2. Carbon flow and ecosystem dynamics in the Mississippi River plume described by inverse analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breed, Greg Allen

    2002-01-01

    excess organic carbon from autotrophic regions to heterotrophic regions. In contrast, the winter result indicated a plume that was net-heterotrophic in all 4 subregions with high aerobic bacterial respiration and relatively low primary production...

  3. A relocatable ocean model in support of environmental emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominicis, Michela De

    During the Costa Concordia emergency case, regional, subregional, and relocatable ocean models have been used together with the oil spill model, MEDSLIK-II, to provide ocean currents forecasts, possible oil spill scenarios, ...

  4. How different home styles are valued in the Salt Lake City market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Barrett, 1976-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis focuses on market valuation of attributes of single family housing in the Salt Lake City market. Using data from different sub-regions of Salt Lake County, this paper addresses the question of buyer demand with ...

  5. Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    and Gasoline Price Data Rates from utility companies foundutility company sub-regions had the same estimated gasolineGasoline by Time Period (AAA Data??U.S. Dollars) Region-­?Utility  Company  

  6. Use-wear analysis of the Clovis biface collection from the Gault site in central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smallwood, Ashley Michelle

    2009-05-15

    of North America. The site setting is on the easternmost boundary of the Oak-Mesquite-Juniper Park/Woods (Frye et al. 1984). Gault is situated in the physiographic subregion known as the Lampasses Cut Plain of the Edwards ____________ This thesis... follows the style and format of American Antiquity. 2 Plateau, which closely borders the Blackland Prairie to the east of the Balcones Escarpment (Amos and Gehlbach 1988). The subregion is characterized as an open- woodland of oaks, junipers...

  7. Hardwood Markets and Marketing AHEC American Hardwood in Europe Convention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convention Venice, Italy 20-22 October 2004 Hardwood chapter highlights · EU production and consumption of hardwood flooring rose once again in 2003 · Production, trade and consumption of sawn hardwood all grew in central and eastern Europe · CIS subregion production and consumption of sawn hardwoods are forecast

  8. Electrocorticography reveals the temporal dynamics of posterior parietal cortical activity during recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Anthony

    profile of high gamma power (HGP) in dorsal PPC subregions as participants made old/new recognition memory decisions. A double dissociation in memory-related HGP was observed, with activity in left intraparietal items (Hits) and correctly rejected novel items (CRs). Specifically, HGP in left IPS increased for Hits

  9. The Rockefeller University Press, 0021-9525/98/04/31/19 $2.00 The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 141, Number 1, April 6, 1998 3149

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    - tent state. We have then assessed our conclusions in the context of assembled nuclear pores themselves localization of nucleoporins to subregions of the nuclear pore and its associated structures as they traverse the nuclear pore. Ligand blotting and solution binding studies of isolated proteins have attempted

  10. The Central Valley: Changing Economic Structure and the Costs of Doing Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Cynthia A.; Goldman, George; Phelan, Maeve

    1990-01-01

    Kern Kings ‘Madera Merced Tulare TOTAL for Subregion: 19809,725 10,900 23.3% 18.4% 19.8% Tulare 94,300 107,100 108,3007,100 11,450 55,050 44,150 Tulare 29,900 3,700 11,175 4,375

  11. Functional neuroimaging has proven highly valuable in mapping human sensory regions, particularly visual areas in occipital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanwisher, Nancy

    consist of numerous specialized subregions similar to those reported in neurophysiological studies of nonMRI functional magnetic resonance imaging IPL inferior parietal lobule IPS intraparietal sulcus IPTO junction, and also mention some of the other tasks that have been reported to activate parietal cortex. To facilitate

  12. UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty-first session, 7-10 October 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the forest sector in Eastern Europe, (e.g. Russia) partly linked to illegal activities · Damages from forest within the CIS and Other Europe, as well as from export markets in Asia and elsewhere, has substantially increased removals in the two subregions. · Roundwood exports from the Russian Federation were 14% higher

  13. Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Mesoscale eddies northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago from satellite altimeter observations; published 16 March 2010. [1] Enhanced mesoscale eddy activity northeast of the Hawaiian archipelago by 5° longitude subregions revealed the dominant mesoscale periods ranging from 90 days near 18°N

  14. 2013 UEC Tokyo. Visual Event Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    " #12; 2013 UEC Tokyo. · Detect events from Twitter stream -Weather, natural events -Festivals, sport://mecab.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/mecab/doc/index.html) -TweetNLP(http://www.ark.cs.cmu.edu/TweetNLP/) · Divide target area into sub-regions -Grids by 1 degree, Times Times Times Square Carnival, Electric, Daisy Electric Electric Daisy Carnival #12; 2013 UEC Tokyo

  15. Explaining species distribution patterns through hierarchical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, Alan E.; Silander, John A., Jr.; Wu, Shanshan; Latimer, Andrew; Lewis, Paul O.; Rebelo, Anthony G.; Holder, Mark T.

    2006-01-01

    ; 000 cells total for the region). We report on results for 40 species of a owering plant family Proteaceae (of about 330 in the CFR) for a de ned subregion. Using a Bayesian framework, we develop a two stage, spatially explicit, hierar- chical logistic...

  16. Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization-resolution models proves difficult, and often requires expensive visualization or animation software. We therefore developed a convenient software toolkit that enables users to draw curves and label surface subregions

  17. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  18. Modelling the balanced transition to a sustainable economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) which is the major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The model emissions, CO2 intensity, ecological Department of Mathematical Engineering, ICTEAM, Universit´e catholique. We consider a world economy with two subregions that are endowed with greenhouse gas emissions

  19. Biharmonic Volumetric Mapping Using Fundamental Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xin "Shane"

    Biharmonic Volumetric Mapping Using Fundamental Solutions Huanhuan Xu, Wuyi Yu, Shiyuan Gu, and Xin Li, Member, IEEE Computer Society Abstract--We propose a biharmonic model for cross-object volumetric individually. The biharmonic volumetric mapping can be performed in each subregion separately. Unlike

  20. H A&S 220c Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 7 Dec. 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : There are 4 sub-regions in this course: 1. energy in nature, 2. the global environment 3. human energy use 4 reproduced in the H-bomb, and now are trying to tame to generate useful energy. Most of the energy used1 H A&S 220c Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 7 Dec. 2004 REVIEW

  1. H A&S 222a Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 25 May 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : There are 4 sub-regions in this course: 1. energy in nature, 2. the global environment 3. human energy use 4 useful energy. Most of the energy used on Earth comes from this source, with a bit extra welling up from1 H A&S 222a Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 25 May 2006 REVIEW

  2. Volume 5 - 1974: GEOSCIENCE INFORMATION - Proceedings of the 9th Meeting of the Geoscience Information Society 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GeoScience Information Society

    1974-01-01

    Subregions, (3) National Water Data Network Accounting Units and (4) Cataloging Units of the Catalog of Information on Water Data. Available maps have been unsatisfactory because of inadequate bases or scale&. The maps have undergone extensive field... - $10.00. Orders must be prepaid. Please make checks payable to Geoscience Information Society. DRAFT July 16, 1975 TABLE OF CONTENTS Uses of CRIB -- A GIPSY Formatted Mineral Resources Data File, James A. Calkins and Linda E. Deiter U. S...

  3. Filaments and ridges in Vela C revealed by Herschel: from low-mass to high-mass star-forming sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Tracey; Didelon, Pierre; Bontemps, Sylvain; Minier, Vincent; Hennemann, Martin; Schneider, Nicola; Andre, Philippe; Men'shchikov, Alexander; Anderson, Loren D; Arzoumanian, Doris; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; di Francesco, James; Elia, Davide; Giannini, Teresa; Griffin, Matt J; Kirk, Jason; Konyves, Vera; Marston, Anthony P; Martin, Peter; Molinari, Sergio; Luong, Quang Nguyen; Peretto, Nicolas; Pezzuto, Stefano; Roussel, Helene; Sauvage, Marc; Sousbie, Thierry; Testi, Leonardo; Ward-Thompson, Derek; White, Glenn J; Wilson, Christine D; Zavagno, Annie

    2011-01-01

    We present the first Herschel PACS and SPIRE results of the Vela C molecular complex in the far-infrared and submillimetre regimes at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 um, spanning the peak of emission of cold prestellar or protostellar cores. Column density and multi-resolution analysis (MRA) differentiates the Vela C complex into five distinct sub-regions. Each sub-region displays differences in their column density and temperature probability distribution functions (PDFs), in particular, the PDFs of the `Centre-Ridge' and `South-Nest' sub-regions appear in stark contrast to each other. The Centre-Ridge displays a bimodal temperature PDF representative of hot gas surrounding the HII region RCW 36 and the cold neighbouring filaments, whilst the South-Nest is dominated by cold filamentary structure. The column density PDF of the Centre-Ridge is flatter than the South-Nest, with a high column density tail, consistent with formation through large-scale flows, and regulation by self-gravity. At small to intermediate sc...

  4. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  5. DECIPHERING THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE MONTANE NEW GUINEA AVIFAUNA: COMPARATIVE PHYLOGEOGRAPHY AND INSIGHTS FROM PALEODISTRIBUTIONAL MODELING IN A DYNAMIC LANDSCAPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benz, Brett W.

    2011-12-31

    at various sites across the highlands of Papua New Guinea, and I look forward to further collaboration in the future. I thank Tim Laman for providing the opportunity to work in West Papua, Indonesia, in 2008, as well as helping to collect behavioral data... obscure for most taxonomic groups. Owing to its relatively complete alpha taxonomy, New Guinea’s avifauna has played a prominent role in the development of biogeographic hypotheses and speciation theory throughout the Papuan sub-region (Mayr, 1953; Schodde...

  6. US Renewable Futures in the GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.J.; Mizrahi, A.H.; Karas, J.F.; Nathan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This report examines renewable energy deployment in the United States using a version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) with a detailed representation of renewables; the GCAM-RE. Electricity generation was modeled in four generation segments and 12-subregions. This level of regional and sector detail allows a more explicit representation of renewable energy generation. Wind, solar thermal power, and central solar PV plants are implemented in explicit resource classes with new intermittency parameterizations appropriate for each technology. A scenario analysis examines a range of assumptions for technology characteristics, climate policy, and long distance transmission.

  7. What determines the density structure of molecular clouds ? A case study of Orion B with Herschel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, N; Konyves, V; Bontemps, S; Motte, F; Federrath, C; Ward-Thompson, D; Arzoumanian, D; Benedettini, M; Bressert, E; Didelon, P; Di Francesco, J; Griffin, M; Hennemann, M; Hill, T; Palmeirim, P; Pezzuto, S; Peretto, N; Roy, A; Rygl, K L J; Spinoglio, L; White, G; 10.1088/2041-8205/766/2/L17

    2013-01-01

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until Av 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a rho r^-2 profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at Av>1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We concl...

  8. Reasoning about Primes (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Oehlschlägel

    2014-11-20

    We prove a couple of related theorems including Legendre's and Andrica's conjecture. Key to the proofs is an algorithm that delivers the exact upper bound on the greatest gap that can occur in a combinatorial game with the set of $P$ primes $\\le p$ in their doubled primorial interval $0..p\\#..2p\\#$ where we relax a constraint that the primes usually follow: if the bound $g(P)=2p-5$ for maximizing the gap length applies with more degrees of freedom, it also applies in the more constrained prime game as $g(P)\\le2p-5$, at least in the subregion $[1,{p'}^2]$ where no other primes have influence ($p'$ notates the next other prime). From here proving the mentioned theorems is straightforward, for example Legendre's interval $]n^2,(n+1)^2[$ is located completely inside the valid subregion and is greater than the greatest possible gap. Another consequence is that there must be a prime within $n\\pm (\\sqrt{n}-1)$ for all $n>1$. For small numbers the proofs are verified using the R statistical language.

  9. Casting Shadows on Holographic Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Freivogel; Robert Alan Jefferson; Laurens Kabir; Benjamin Mosk; I-Sheng Yang

    2014-12-16

    In the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study several holographic probes that relate information about the bulk spacetime to CFT data. The best-known example is the relation between minimal surfaces in the bulk and entanglement entropy of a subregion in the CFT. Building on earlier work, we identify "shadows" in the bulk: regions that are not illuminated by any of the bulk probes we consider, in the sense that the bulk surfaces do not pass through these regions. We quantify the size of the shadow in the near horizon region of a black hole and in the vicinity of a sufficiently dense star. The existence of shadows motivates further study of the bulk-boundary dictionary in order to identify CFT quantities that encode information about the shadow regions in the bulk. We speculate on the interpretation of our results from a dual field theory perspective.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  11. Cooperativity flows and Shear-Bandings: a statistical field theory approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Benzi; M. Sbragaglia; M. Bernaschi; S. Succi; F. Toschi

    2015-07-27

    Cooperativity effects have been proposed to explain the non-local rheology in the dynamics of soft jammed systems. Based on the analysis of the double well free-energy model proposed by L. Bocquet, A. Colin \\& A. Ajdari ({\\em Phys. Rev. Lett.} {\\bf 103}, 036001 (2009)), we show that cooperativity effects resulting from the non-local nature of the fluidity (inverse viscosity), are intimately related to the emergence of shear-banding configurations. This connection materializes through the onset of inhomogeneous compact solutions (compactons), wherein the fluidity is confined to finite-support subregions of the flow and strictly zero elsewhere. Compactons coexistence with regions of zero fluidity ("non-flowing vacuum") is shown to be stabilized by the presence of mechanical noise, which ultimately shapes up the equilibrium distribution of the fluidity field, acting as an order parameter for the flow-noflow transitions occurring in the material.

  12. US Renewable Futures in the GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.; Karas, Joseph F.; Nathan, Mayda

    2011-10-06

    This project examines renewable energy deployment in the United States using a version of the GCAM integrated assessment model with detailed a representation of renewables, the GCAM-RE. Electricity generation was modeled in four generation segments and 12-subregions. This level of regional and sectoral detail allows a more explicit representation of renewable energy generation. Wind, solar thermal power, and central solar PV plants are implemented in explicit resource classes with new intermittency parameterizations appropriate for each technology. A scenario analysis examines a range of assumptions for technology characteristics, climate policy, and long-distance transmission. We find that renewable generation levels grow over the century in all scenarios. As expected, renewable generation increases with lower renewable technology costs, more stringent climate policy, and if alternative low-carbon technology are not available. The availability of long distance transmission lowers policy costs and changes the renewable generation mix.

  13. Results on light dark matter particles with a low-threshold CRESST-II detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angloher, G; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Defay, X; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Iachellini, N Ferreiro; Gorla, P; Gütlein, A; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Pagliarone, C; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Thi, H H Trinh; Türko?lu, C; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wüstrich, M; Zöller, A

    2015-01-01

    The CRESST-II experiment uses cryogenic detectors to search for nuclear recoil events induced by the elastic scattering of dark matter particles in CaWO$_4$ crystals. Given the low energy threshold of our detectors in combination with light target nuclei, low mass dark matter particles can be probed with high sensitivity. In this letter we present the results from data of a single detector module corresponding to 52 kg live days. A blind analysis is carried out. With an energy threshold for nuclear recoils of 307 eV we substantially enhance the sensitivity for light dark matter. Thereby, we extend the reach of direct dark matter experiments to the sub-region and demonstrate that the energy threshold is the key parameter in the search for low mass dark matter particles.

  14. Cooperativity flows and Shear-Bandings: a statistical field theory approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Benzi; M. Sbragaglia; M. Bernaschi; S. Succi; F. Toschi

    2015-10-14

    Cooperativity effects have been proposed to explain the non-local rheology in the dynamics of soft jammed systems. Based on the analysis of the free-energy model proposed by L. Bocquet, A. Colin \\& A. Ajdari ({\\em Phys. Rev. Lett.} {\\bf 103}, 036001 (2009)), we show that cooperativity effects resulting from the non-local nature of the fluidity (inverse viscosity), are intimately related to the emergence of shear-banding configurations. This connection materializes through the onset of inhomogeneous compact solutions (compactons), wherein the fluidity is confined to finite-support subregions of the flow and strictly zero elsewhere. Compactons coexistence with regions of zero fluidity ("non-flowing vacuum") is shown to be stabilized by the presence of mechanical noise, which ultimately shapes up the equilibrium distribution of the fluidity field, the latter acting as an order parameter for the flow-noflow transitions occurring in the material.

  15. SOLAR POLAR X-RAY JETS AND MULTIPLE BRIGHT POINTS: EVIDENCE FOR SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-02-15

    We present an analysis of X-ray bright points (BPs) and X-ray jets observed by Hinode/X-Ray Telescope on 2007 November 2-4, within the solar northern polar coronal hole. After selecting small subregions that include several BPs, we followed their brightness evolution over a time interval of a few hours, when several jets were observed. We find that most of the jets occurred in close temporal association with brightness maxima in multiple BPs: more precisely, most jets are closely correlated with the brightening of at least two BPs. We suggest that the jets result from magnetic connectivity changes that also induce the BP variability. We surmise that the jets and implied magnetic connectivity we describe are small-scale versions of the active-region-scale phenomenon, whereby flares and eruptions are triggered by interacting bipoles.

  16. Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

    2008-11-21

    Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

  17. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 301-429, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clemens, D. P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Krco, Marko, E-mail: nchapman@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A{sub V} {approx} 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 {mu}G and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales ({approx}2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  18. WHAT DETERMINES THE DENSITY STRUCTURE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS? A CASE STUDY OF ORION B WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, N.; Andre, Ph.; Koenyves, V.; Motte, F.; Arzoumanian, D.; Didelon, P.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Bressert, E.; Di Francesco, J.; Griffin, M.; and others

    2013-04-01

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A{sub V} {approx} 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -2} profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A{sub V} > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A{sub V} -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations.

  19. Use of density equalizing map projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Information and Computing Sciences Div.

    1995-01-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates of arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease-rates are constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be reliably calculated. The present report describes the first successful application of the DEMP technique to a sizeable ``real-world`` data set of epidemiologic interest. An improved DEMP algorithm [GUSE93, CLOS94] was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques [SATA90, REYN91]. The results from the DEMP analysis and a conventional analysis are compared.

  20. Use of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, D.W.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Selvin, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

    1995-10-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The present report describes the application of the DEMP technique to 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties, with the use of map files and population data for the 262 tracts of the 1980 Census. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis provides strong evidence for geographic non-uniformity in tract rates (p < 10{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Work is in progress to repeat the analysis with improved population estimates derived from both 1980 and 1990 Census data. Final epidemiologic conclusions will be reported when that analysis is complete.

  1. AB Blanket for Cities (for continual pleasant weather and protection from chemical, biological and radioactive weapons)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2009-02-04

    In a series of previous articles (see references) the author offered to cover a city or other important large installations or subregions by a transparent thin film supported by a small additional air overpressure under the form of an AB Dome. The building of a gigantic inflatable AB Dome over an empty flat surface is not difficult. However, if we want to cover a city, garden, forest or other obstacle course we cannot easily deploy the thin film over building or trees. In this article is suggested a new method which solves this problem. The idea is to design a double film blanket filled by light gas (for example, methane, hydrogen, or helium). Sections of this AB Blanket are lighter then air and fly in atmosphere. They can be made on a flat area (serving as an assembly area) and delivered by dirigible or helicopter to station at altitude over the city. Here they connect to the already assembled AB Blanket subassemblies, cover the city in an AB Dome and protect it from bad weather, chemical, biological and radioactive fallout or particulates. After finish of dome building the light gas can be changed by air. Two projects for Manhattan (NY, USA) and Moscow (Russia) are targets for a sample computation.

  2. Stream-reach Identification for New Run-of-River Hydropower Development through a Merit Matrix Based Geospatial Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K. [California State University, Fresno; Yeasmin, Dilruba [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Even after a century of development, the total hydropower potential from undeveloped rivers is still considered to be abundant in the United States. However, unlike evaluating hydropower potential at existing hydropower plants or non-powered dams, locating a feasible new hydropower plant involves many unknowns, and hence the total undeveloped potential is harder to quantify. In light of the rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets for topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics, a merit matrix based geospatial algorithm is proposed to help identify possible hydropower stream-reaches for future development. These hydropower stream-reaches sections of natural streams with suitable head, flow, and slope for possible future development are identified and compared using three different scenarios. A case study was conducted in the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) hydrologic subregions. It was found that a merit matrix based algorithm, which is based on the product of hydraulic head, annual mean flow, and average channel slope, can help effectively identify stream-reaches with high power density and small surface inundation. The identified stream-reaches can then be efficiently evaluated for their potential environmental impact, land development cost, and other competing water usage in detailed feasibility studies . Given that the selected datasets are available nationally (at least within the conterminous US), the proposed methodology will have wide applicability across the country.

  3. National Assessment of Energy Storage for Grid Balancing and Arbitrage: Phase 1, WECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Colella, Whitney G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Zhang, Yu

    2012-06-01

    To examine the role that energy storage could play in mitigating the impacts of the stochastic variability of wind generation on regional grid operation, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined a hypothetical 2020 grid scenario in which additional wind generation capacity is built to meet renewable portfolio standard targets in the Western Interconnection. PNNL developed a stochastic model for estimating the balancing requirements using historical wind statistics and forecasting error, a detailed engineering model to analyze the dispatch of energy storage and fast-ramping generation devices for estimating size requirements of energy storage and generation systems for meeting new balancing requirements, and financial models for estimating the life-cycle cost of storage and generation systems in addressing the future balancing requirements for sub-regions in the Western Interconnection. Evaluated technologies include combustion turbines, sodium sulfur (Na-S) batteries, lithium ion batteries, pumped-hydro energy storage, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, redox flow batteries, and demand response. Distinct power and energy capacity requirements were estimated for each technology option, and battery size was optimized to minimize costs. Modeling results indicate that in a future power grid with high-penetration of renewables, the most cost competitive technologies for meeting balancing requirements include Na-S batteries and flywheels.

  4. Quality analysis of the solution produced by dissection algorithms applied to the traveling salesman problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cesari, G.

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to analyze experimentally the quality of the solution obtained with dissection algorithms applied to the geometric Traveling Salesman Problem. Starting from Karp`s results. We apply a divide and conquer strategy, first dividing the plane into subregions where we calculate optimal subtours and then merging these subtours to obtain the final tour. The analysis is restricted to problem instances where points are uniformly distributed in the unit square. For relatively small sets of cities we analyze the quality of the solution by calculating the length of the optimal tour and by comparing it with our approximate solution. When the problem instance is too large we perform an asymptotical analysis estimating the length of the optimal tour. We apply the same dissection strategy also to classical heuristics by calculating approximate subtours and by comparing the results with the average quality of the heuristic. Our main result is the estimate of the rate of convergence of the approximate solution to the optimal solution as a function of the number of dissection steps, of the criterion used for the plane division and of the quality of the subtours. We have implemented our programs on MUSIC (MUlti Signal processor system with Intelligent Communication), a Single-Program-Multiple-Data parallel computer with distributed memory developed at the ETH Zurich.

  5. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of human chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrukhin, K.E.; Speer, M.C.; Vayanis, E.; Fatima Bonaldo, M. de; Soares, M.B.; Fischer, S.G.; Warburton, D. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Gilliam, C.; Ott, J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY (United States)); Tantravahi, U. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    We have characterized 21 polymorphic (CA), microsatellites for the development of a genetic map of chromosome 13. Fifteen markers were isolated from a flow- sorted chromosome 13 library, four CA repeats were derived from NotI-containing cosmid clones, and two polymorphic markers were described previously (J. L. Weber, A. E. Kwitek, and P. E. May, 1990, Nucleic Acids Res. IS: 4638; L. Warnich, 1. Groenwald, L. Laubscher, and A. E. Retief, 1991, Am. J. Hum. Genet. 49(Suppl.): 372 (Abstract)). Regional localization for all of the markers was performed by amplification of DNA from five somatic cell hybrids containing different deletions of chromosome 13. Genetic markers were shown to be distributed throughout 6 of the 11 resolvable chromosomal subregions. Using data from nine families provided by the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH), a framework map of 12 of these 21 markers was developed. Six of the 12 markers form three pairs, with each two members of a pair being tightly linked, such that nine systems of markers can be distinguished. The average heterozygosity of these 12 markers is 0.75. The total length of the sex-averaged map is 65.4 cM (Kosambi), with an average distance of 8.2 cM between systems of markers (eight intervals). Seven remaining markers were placed provisionally into the framework map. 41 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Mitotic recombination of chromosome 17 in astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, C.D.; Carlbom, E.; Nordenskjold, M.; Collins, V.P.; Cavenee, W.K. (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Montreal (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    Allelic combinations at seven loci on human chromosome 17 defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in tumor and normal tissues from 35 patients with gliomas. Loss of constitutional heterozygosity at one or more of these loci was observed in 8 of the 24 tumors displaying astrocytic differentiation and in the single primitive neuroectodermal tumor examined. The astrocytomas showing these losses included examples of each adult malignancy grade of the disease, including glioblastoma (malignancy grade IV), and seven of them demonstrated concurrent maintenance of heterozygosity for at least one chromosome 17 locus. Determination of allele dosage together with the genotypic data indicated that the tumor chromosomes 17 were derived by mitotic recombination in 7 of the 9 cases with shared homozygosity of the region 17p11.2-ptr in all cases. In contrast, tumors of oligodendrocytic, ependymal, or mixed cellular differentiation did not exhibit loss of alleles at any of the loci examined. These data suggest that the somatic attainment of homozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p is frequently associated with the oncogenesis of central nervous system tumors, particularly those showing solely astrocytic differentiation, and that mitotic recombination mapping is a useful approach towards the subregional localization of a locus whose rearrangement is involved in this disease.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF INELASTIC NEUTRINO REACTIONS WITH LIGHT NUCLEI ON THE STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). The time evolution of shock waves is calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions, and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations. In addition, the effects of ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons is addressed in the simulations. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as {approx}10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles are heated near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and the density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei evolve differently in the non-linear phase of SASI than do models that lack heating by light nuclei. This result is because matter in the gain region has a varying density and temperature and therefore sub-regions appear that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. Although the light nuclei are never dominant heating sources and they work favorably for shock revival in some cases and unfavorably in other cases, they are non-negligible and warrant further investigation.

  8. Cluster-formation in the Rosette molecular cloud at the junctions of filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, N; Hennemann, M; Motte, F; Didelon, P; Federrath, C; Bontemps, S; Di Francesco, J; Arzoumanian, D; Minier, V; André, Ph; Hill, T; Zavagno, A; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Attard, M; Bernard, J -Ph; Elia, D; Fallscheer, C; Griffin, M; Kirk, J; Klessen, R; Könyves, V; Martin, P; Men'shchikov, A; Palmeirim, P; Peretto, N; Pestalozzi, M; Russeil, D; Sadavoy, S; Sousbie, T; Testi, L; Tremblin, P; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G

    2012-01-01

    For many years feedback processes generated by OB-stars in molecular clouds, including expanding ionization fronts, stellar winds, or UV-radiation, have been proposed to trigger subsequent star formation. However, hydrodynamic models including radiation and gravity show that UV-illumination has little or no impact on the global dynamical evolution of the cloud. The Rosette molecular cloud, irradiated by the NGC2244 cluster, is a template region for triggered star-formation, and we investigated its spatial and density structure by applying a curvelet analysis, a filament-tracing algorithm (DisPerSE), and probability density functions (PDFs) on Herschel column density maps, obtained within the HOBYS key program. The analysis reveals not only the filamentary structure of the cloud but also that all known infrared clusters except one lie at junctions of filaments, as predicted by turbulence simulations. The PDFs of sub-regions in the cloud show systematic differences. The two UV-exposed regions have a double-peak...

  9. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  10. NEAR-INFRARED CIRCULAR POLARIZATION SURVEY IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS: CORRELATIONS AND TRENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Hough, James H.; Lucas, Phil W.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kandori, Ryo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2014-11-01

    We have conducted a systematic near-infrared circular polarization (CP) survey in star-forming regions, covering high-mass, intermediate-mass, and low-mass young stellar objects. All the observations were made using the SIRPOL imaging polarimeter on the Infrared Survey Facility 1.4 m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory. We present the polarization properties of 10 sub-regions in 6 star-forming regions. The polarization patterns, extents, and maximum degrees of linear and circular polarizations are used to determine the prevalence and origin of CP in the star-forming regions. Our results show that the CP pattern is quadrupolar in general, the CP regions are extensive, up to 0.65 pc, the CP degrees are high, up to 20%, and the CP degrees decrease systematically from high- to low-mass young stellar objects. The results are consistent with dichroic extinction mechanisms generating the high degrees of CP in star-forming regions.

  11. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at Dense Cores in Orion B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, H; Johnstone, D; Duarte-Cabral, A; Sadavoy, S; Hatchell, J; Mottram, J C; Buckle, J; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Nutter, D; Pattle, K; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Bastien, P; Bresnahan, D; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Mowat, C; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Rumble, D; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 micron map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 micron peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1-2 x 10^23 cm^-2, most of ...

  12. Density equalizing map projections (cartograms) in public health applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1998-05-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing some of the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP){copyright}. Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease risk is constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be calculated with validity. The DEMP algorithm was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques; namely, 401 childhood cancer cases in four counties of California. The distribution of cases on the transformed map was analyzed visually and statistically. To check the validity of the method, the identical analysis was performed on 401 artificial cases randomly generated under the assumption of uniform risk. No statistically significant evidence for geographic non-uniformity of rates was found, in agreement with the original analysis performed by the California Department of Health Services.

  13. Multi-Scale Gradient Expansion of the Turbulent Stress Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory L. Eyink

    2005-12-10

    We develop an expansion of the turbulent stress tensor into a double series of contributions from different scales of motion and different orders of space-derivatives of velocity, a Multi-Scale Gradient (MSG) expansion. The expansion is proved to converge to the exact stress, as a consequence of the locality of cascade both in scale and in space. Simple estimates show, however, that the convergence rate may be slow for the expansion in spatial gradients of very small scales. Therefore, we develop an approximate expansion, based upon an assumption that similar or `coherent' contributions to turbulent stress are obtained from disjoint subgrid regions. This Coherent-Subregions Approximation (CSA) yields an MSG expansion that can be proved to converge rapidly at all scales and is hopefully still reasonably accurate. As an application, we consider the cascades of energy and helicity in three-dimensional turbulence. To first order in velocity-gradients, the stress has three contributions: a tensile stress along principal directions of strain, a contractile stress along vortex lines, and a shear stress proportional to `skew-strain.' While vortex-stretching plays the major role in energy cascade, there is a second, less scale-local contribution from `skew-strain'. For helicity cascade the situation is reversed, and it arises scale-locally from `skew-strain' while the stress along vortex-lines gives a secondary, less scale-local contribution. These conclusions are illustrated with simple exact solutions of 3D Euler equations. In the first, energy cascade occurs by Taylor's mechanism of stretching and spin-up of small-scale vortices due to large-scale strain. In the second, helicity cascade occurs by `twisting' of small-scale vortex filaments due to a large-scale screw.

  14. Use of density equalizing map projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, D.W. Selvin, S.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H.

    1995-04-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates of arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The density equalized map portrays both individual cases and rates, and can be understood by untrained observers. Simple statistical techniques can be used to test the uniformity of the transformed map. This report describes application of the DEMP technique to a sizeable `real-world` data set: 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties. In an earlier analysis of the same data, the California Department of Health Services (DHS) calculated rates for 101 communities and found no significant geographic variability. The DDS 1980--88 population estimates are no longer available, so in this analysis 1980 Census data were used; geographic units were 262 census tracts. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis, corrected for boundary effects and for within-tract variability, provides strong evidence for geographic nonuniformity in tract rates ({rho} < l0{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Pending reanalysis with 1980-88 population estimates, no epidemiologic conclusions can be drawn at this time.

  15. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  16. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  17. Thermodynamics and kinetics of vapor bubbles nucleation in one-component liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolay V. Alekseechkin

    2012-05-01

    The multivariable theory of nucleation [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124512 (2006)] is applied to the problem of vapor bubbles formation in pure liquids. The presented self-consistent macroscopic theory of this process employs thermodynamics (classical, statistical and linear non-equilibrium), hydrodynamics and interfacial kinetics. As a result of thermodynamic study of the problem, the work of formation of a bubble is obtained and parameters of the critical bubble are determined. The variables V (the bubble volume), \\rho (the vapor density), and T (the vapor temperature) are shown to be natural for the given task. An algorithm of writing the equations of motion of a bubble in the space {V, \\rho, T} - equations for V, \\rho, and T - is offered. This algorithm ensures symmetry of the matrix of kinetic coefficients. The equation for written on the basis of this algorithm is shown to represent the first law of thermodynamics for a bubble. The negative eigenvalue of the motion equations which alongside with the work of the critical bubble formation determines the stationary nucleation rate of bubbles is obtained. Various kinetic limits are considered. One of the kinetic constraints leads to the fact that the nucleation cannot occur in the whole metastable region; it occurs only in some subregion of the latter. Zeldovich theory of cavitation is shown to be a limiting case of the theory presented. The limiting effects of various kinetic processes on the nucleation rate of bubbles are shown analytically. These are the inertial motion of a liquid as well as the processes of particles exchange and heat exchange between a bubble and surrounding liquid. The nucleation rate is shown to be determined by the slowest kinetic process at positive and moderately negative pressures in a liquid. The limiting effect vanishes at high negative pressures.

  18. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  19. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  20. Use of tamarisk as a potential feedstock for biofuel production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Norman, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the energy and water use of saltcedar (or tamarisk) as biomass for biofuel production in a hypothetical sub-region in New Mexico. The baseline scenario consists of a rural stretch of the Middle Rio Grande River with 25% coverage of mature saltcedar that is removed and converted to biofuels. A manufacturing system life cycle consisting of harvesting, transportation, pyrolysis, and purification is constructed for calculating energy and water balances. On a dry short ton woody biomass basis, the total energy input is approximately 8.21 mmBTU/st. There is potential for 18.82 mmBTU/st of energy output from the baseline system. Of the extractable energy, approximately 61.1% consists of bio-oil, 20.3% bio-char, and 18.6% biogas. Water consumptive use by removal of tamarisk will not impact the existing rate of evapotranspiration. However, approximately 195 gal of water is needed per short ton of woody biomass for the conversion of biomass to biocrude, three-quarters of which is cooling water that can be recovered and recycled. The impact of salt presence is briefly assessed. Not accounted for in the baseline are high concentrations of Calcium, Sodium, and Sulfur ions in saltcedar woody biomass that can potentially shift the relative quantities of bio-char and bio-oil. This can be alleviated by a pre-wash step prior to the conversion step. More study is needed to account for the impact of salt presence on the overall energy and water balance.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of a lithium-glass-based composite neutron detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. Rich; K. Kazkaz; H. P. Martinez; T. Gushue

    2015-05-25

    A novel composite, scintillating material intended for neutron detection and composed of small (1.5 mm) cubes of KG2-type lithium glass embedded in a matrix of scintillating plastic has been developed in the form of a 2.2 in.-diameter, 3.1 in.-tall cylindrical prototype loaded with $\\left( 5.82 \\pm 0.02 \\right)\\%$ lithium glass by mass. The response of the material when exposed to ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutrons and various $\\gamma$-ray sources has been studied; using the charge-integration method for pulse shape discrimination, good separation between neutron and $\\gamma$-ray events is observed and intrinsic efficiencies of $\\left( 1.15 \\pm 0.16 \\right)\\times 10^{-2}$ and $\\left( 2.28 \\pm 0.21 \\right)\\times 10^{-4}$ for ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutrons and ${}^{60}$Co $\\gamma$ rays are obtained; an upper limit for the sensitivity to ${}^{137}$Cs $\\gamma$ rays is determined to be $lithium glass can be detected in coincidence with a preceding elastic scattering event in the plastic scintillator; with this coincidence requirement, the intrinsic efficiency of the prototype detector for ${}^{60}$Co $\\gamma$ rays is $\\left( 2.42 \\pm 0.61 \\right)\\times 10^{-6}$ while its intrinsic efficiency for unmoderated ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutrons is $\\left( 4.31 \\pm 0.59 \\right)\\times 10^{-3}$. Through use of subregion-integration ratios in addition to the coincidence requirement, the efficiency for $\\gamma$ rays from ${}^{60}$Co is reduced to $\\left( 7.15 \\pm 4.10 \\right) \\times 10^{-7}$ while the ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutron efficiency becomes $\\left( 2.78 \\pm 0.38 \\right) \\times 10^{-3}$.

  2. Regional Modeling of Dust Mass Balance and Radiative Forcing over East Asia using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, J.; Huang, Zhongwei; Bi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wu; Shi, Jinsen; Yang, Lei; Li, Deshuai; Li, Jinxin

    2014-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the seasonal and annual variations of mineral dust over East Asia during 2007-2011, with a focus on the dust mass balance and radiative forcing. A variety of measurements from in-stu and satellite observations have been used to evaluate simulation results. Generally, WRF-Chem reproduces not only the column variability but also the vertical profile and size distribution of mineral dust over and near the dust source regions of East Asia. We investigate the dust lifecycle and the factors that control the seasonal and spatial variations of dust mass balance and radiative forcing over the seven sub-regions of East Asia, i.e. source regions, the Tibetan Plateau, Northern China, Southern China, the ocean outflow region, and Korea-Japan regions. Results show that, over the source regions, transport and dry deposition are the two dominant sinks. Transport contributes to ~30% of the dust sink over the source regions. Dust results in a surface cooling of up to -14 and -10 W m-2, atmospheric warming of up to 20 and 15 W m-2, and TOA cooling of -5 and -8 W m-2 over the two major dust source regions of East Asia, respectively. Over the Tibetan Plateau, transport is the dominant source with a peak in summer. Over identified outflow regions, maximum dust mass loading in spring is contributed by the transport. Dry and wet depositions are the comparably dominant sinks, but wet deposition is larger than dry deposition over the Korea-Japan region, particularly in spring (70% versus 30%). The WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of dust aerosols and its radaitve properties and dust mass balance over East Asia, which provides confidence for use in further investigation of dust impact on climate over East Asia.

  3. A survey of nuclear-related agreements and possibilities for nuclear cooperation in South Asia: Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV

    2000-04-01

    Several existing nuclear-related agreements already require India and Pakistan, as members, to share information. The agreements are bilateral, regional, and international. Greater nuclear transparency between India and Pakistan could be promoted by first understanding the information flows required by existing agreements. This understanding is an essential step for developing projects that can incrementally advance the sensitivity of the information being shared. This paper provides a survey of existing nuclear-related agreements involving India and Pakistan, and suggests future confidence-building projects using the frameworks provided by these agreements. The Bilateral Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Facilities is discussed as a basis for creating further agreements on restricting the use and deployment of nuclear weapons. The author suggests options for enhancing the value of the list of nuclear facilities exchanged annually as a part of this agreement. The International Atomic Energy Agency's regional cooperation agreement among countries in the Asia-Pacific region is an opportunity for greater subregional nuclear cooperation in South Asia. Linking the regional agreement with South Asian environmental cooperation and marine pollution protection efforts could provide a framework for projects involving Indian and Pakistani coastal nuclear facilities. Programs of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations that use nuclear techniques to increase food and crop production and optimize water management in arid areas also provide similar opportunities for nuclear cooperation. Other frameworks for nuclear cooperation originate from international conventions related to nuclear safety, transportation of nuclear wastes, worker protection against ionizing radiation, and the nondeployment of nuclear weapons in certain areas. The information shared by existing frameworks includes: laws and regulations (including internal inspection procedures that enforce compliance); lists of nuclear facilities; emergency response procedures and available resources; information related to the transportation of nuclear wastes (particularly via shipping); understanding and notification of accidental releases; and radionuclide release data from select coastal facilities. Incremental increases in the sensitivity of the information being shared could strengthen norms for Indian and Pakistani nuclear transparency. This paper suggests seven technology-based Indian and Pakistani nuclear transparency projects for consideration. Existing nuclear-related agreements provide an information-sharing framework within which the projects could occur. Eventually, as confidence increases and new agreements are negotiated, future projects could begin to deal with the accounting of fissile materials and nuclear weapons disposition and control.

  4. The W40 region in the gould belt: An embedded cluster and H II region at the junction of filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Samal, M. R.; Pirogov, L.

    2013-12-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the W40 star-forming region using infrared (IR) observations in the UKIRT JHK bands, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera bands, and Herschel PACS bands, 2.12 ?m H{sub 2} narrowband imaging, and radio continuum observations from GMRT (610 and 1280 MHz), in a field of view (FoV) of ?34' × 40'. Archival Spitzer observations in conjunction with near-IR observations are used to identify 1162 Class II/III and 40 Class I sources in the FoV. The nearest-neighbor stellar surface density analysis shows that the majority of these young stellar objects (YSOs) constitute the embedded cluster centered on the high-mass source IRS 1A South. Some YSOs, predominantly the younger population, are distributed along and trace the filamentary structures at lower stellar surface density. The cluster radius is measured to be 0.44 pc—matching well with the extent of radio emission—with a peak density of 650 pc{sup –2}. The JHK data are used to map the extinction in the region, which is subsequently used to compute the cloud mass—126 M {sub ?} and 71 M {sub ?} for the central cluster and the northern IRS 5 region, respectively. H{sub 2} narrowband imaging shows significant emission, which prominently resembles fluorescent emission arising at the borders of dense regions. Radio continuum analysis shows that this region has a blister morphology, with the radio peak coinciding with a protostellar source. Free-free emission spectral energy distribution analysis is used to obtain physical parameters of the overall photoionized region and the IRS 5 sub-region. This multiwavelength scenario is suggestive of star formation having resulted from the merging of multiple filaments to form a hub. Star formation seems to have taken place in two successive epochs, with the first epoch traced by the central cluster and the high-mass star(s)—followed by a second epoch that is spreading into the filaments as uncovered by the Class I sources and even younger protostellar sources along the filaments. The IRS 5 H II region displays indications of swept-up material that has possibly led to the formation of protostars.

  5. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  6. Assessing the Feasibility of Using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chichester; J. W. Sterbentz

    2012-07-01

    Neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) is an active-interrogation nondestructive assay (NDA) technique capable of assaying spent nuclear fuel to determine plutonium content. Prior experimental work has definitively shown the technique capable of assaying plutonium isotope composition in spent-fuel pins to a precision of approximately 3%, with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. As a Grand Challenge to investigate NDA options for assaying spent fuel assemblies (SFAs) in the commercial fuel cycle, Idaho National Laboratory has explored the feasibility of using NRTA to assay plutonium in a whole SFA. The goal is to achieve a Pu assay precision of 1%. The NRTA technique uses low-energy neutrons from 0.1-40 eV, at the bottom end of the actinide-resonance range, in a time-of-flight arrangement. Isotopic composition is determined by relating absorption of the incident neutrons to the macroscopic cross-section of the actinides of interest in the material, and then using this information to determine the areal density of the isotopes in the SFA. The neutrons used for NRTA are produced using a pulsed, accelerator-based neutron source. Distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239,240,241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Based on extensive modeling of the problem using Monte Carlo-based simulation codes, our preliminary results suggest that by rotating an SFA to acquire four symmetric views, sufficient neutron transmission can be achieved to assay a SFA. In this approach multiple scan information for the same pins may also be unfolded to potentially allow the determination of plutonium for sub-regions of the assembly. For a 17 ? 17 pressurized water reactor SFA, a simplistic preliminary analysis indicates the mass of 239Pu may be determined with a precision on the order of 5%, without the need for operator-supplied fuel information or operational histories. This paper will present our work to date on this topic, indicate our preliminary findings for a conceptual assay approach, discuss resilience against spoofing, and outline our future plans for evaluating the NRTA technique for SFA plutonium determination.

  7. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

  8. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

  9. Dose-Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sabolch, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chugh, Rashmi [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, Janet Sybil [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V{sub d}) receiving specified doses ({>=}30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 {+-} 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 {+-} 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 {+-} 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 {+-} 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 {+-} 20.8 Gy, 4.8 {+-} 5.6 cc, 2.5 {+-} 3.9 cc, and 0.8 {+-} 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  10. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-12-01

    The studies summarized herein were conducted during 2009–2014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), a practice called CO2 sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy-funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional-scale and point-scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo-engineering information was developed through a small-scale test of CO2 injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial-scale flow rate of CO2 injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial-scale mass of CO2 (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO2 within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS-related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional-scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial-scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in this report. Another group of studies report the results of reservoir flow simulations that estimate the progress and outcomes of hypothetical CCS projects carried out within the Knox (particularly within the Potosi Dolomite subunit, which, in places, is highly permeable) and within the overlying St. Peter Sandstone. In these studies, the regional-scale information and a limited amount of detailed data from specific boreholes is used as the basis for modeling the CO2 injection process (dynamic modeling). The simulation studies were conducted progressively, with each successive study designed to refine the conclusions of the preceding one or to answer additional questions. The simulation studies conclude that at Decatur, Illinois or a geologically similar site, the Potosi Dolomite reservoir may provide adequate injectivity and capacity for commercial-scale injection through a single injection well. This conclusion depends on inferences from seismic-data attributes that certain highly permeable horizons observed in the wells represent laterally persistent, porous vuggy zones that are vertically more common than initially evident from wellbore data. Lateral persistence of vuggy zones is supported by isotopic evidence that the conditions that caused vug development (near-surface processes) were of regional rather than local scale. Other studies address aspects of executing and managing a CCS project that targets a Knox reservoir. These studies cover well drilling, public interactions, representation of datasets and conclusions using geographic information system (GIS) platforms, and risk management.

  11. Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-08-01

    The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.