Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vacar virginia-carolinas subregion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp - FL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp - Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp - FL 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp. (FL.06 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to US EPA and State of Florida Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Conserv Corporation FL.06-1 Location: Nichols , Florida FL.06-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 FL.06-1 Site Operations: Process development studies and pilot plant testing of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid during the mid-1950s. Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority FL.06-1 FL.06-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Radiological Survey(s): Yes FL.06-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to US EPA and State of Florida FL.06-1

2

Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mekong Subregion Mekong Subregion Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion Agency/Company /Organization AIT-UNEP Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific Sector Energy, Land Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.rrcap.unep.org/nsds Country Cambodia, China, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion[1] Overview "This document is expected to provide the strategic direction for the pursuit of sustainable development in the GMS. It is important to note that this document addresses the issues at the sub-regional level, building upon

3

ACM ICPC 2014-2015, Moscow Subregional Russia, Moscow, October 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACM ICPC 2014-2015, Moscow Subregional Russia, Moscow, October 2014 Problem A. Advanced 2048 Input Subregional Russia, Moscow, October 2014 Examples standard input standard output 6 5 2 1 2 2 1 3 4 1 5 4 1 6 2 #12;ACM ICPC 2014-2015, Moscow Subregional Russia, Moscow, October 2014 Problem B. Bring Your Own

Kaplan, Alexander

4

Microsoft PowerPoint - Subregion 3 Presentation 5-12-09.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Pool Power Pool Sub-Regional Planning Meeting Sub-Regional Area 3 David Sargent May 12, 2009 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 2 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 3 Five Year Construction Plan 2009 Bull Shoals Dam Bus Upgrade - from 600 to 1200/2000 amps The bus is a limiting element for the line going from Bull Shoals toward Harrison. New Madrid 161/69 kV Autotransformer Replacement New Madrid-Malden-Piggott-Kennett 69 kV Line Rebuild - 55 miles of line collapsed during an ice storm. We are completely rebuilding the line and doubling its capacity. Southwestern Power Administration Slide 4 2009 Projects Southwestern Power Administration Slide 5 Five Year Construction Plan 2010 Bull Shoals Dam Pothead/Cable Replacement - Potheads on cable from GSUs to substation are old and leaking. Potential for outage of

5

Evaluating the Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Electricity Supplies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) have the potential to increase the use of electricity to fuel the U.S. transportation needs. The effect of this additional demand on the electric system will depend on the amount and timing of the vehicles' periodic recharging on the grid. We used the ORCED (Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch) model to evaluate the impact of PHEVs on the Virginia-Carolinas (VACAR) electric grid in 2018. An inventory of one million PHEVs was used and charging was begun in early evening and later at night for comparison. Different connection power levels of 1.4 kW, 2 kW, and 6 kW were used. The results include the impact on capacity requirements, fuel types, generation technologies, and emissions. Cost information such as added cost of generation and cost savings versus use of gasoline were calculated. Preliminary results of the expansion of the study to all regions of the country are also presented. The results show distinct differences in fuels and generating technologies when charging times are changed. At low specific power and late in the evening, coal was the major fuel used, while charging more heavily during peak times led to more use of combustion turbines and combined cycle plants.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Utility concepts applied to the socio-economic subregionization analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cluster Analysis Gs ral ~Desa ' t'on In factor analysis, data profiles of different variables with identical patterns will be grouped together into a common factor. But cluster analysis is concen-' trated in the analysis of the absolute 'distances...

Hsieh, Joseph Ching-Huei

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Quantifying the semantics of search behavior before stock market moves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA 2 Warwick...ohio, virginia, carolina, massachusetts, pennsylvania...energy, water, power, gas, solar, system, nuclear, light...launch, mars, satellites, solar, agk, telescope, observatory...

Chester Curme; Tobias Preis; H. Eugene Stanley; Helen Susannah Moat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Establishing Crop Acreage Flexibility Restraints for Subregions of the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and estimated did not provide satisfactory results. However, as in many of the earlier studies the simpler models did provide acceptable performance. From among the simpler models one was selected based on statistical measures and a prioria expectations...

Condra, G. D.; Lacewell, R. D.

9

Maintaining environmental quality while expanding biomass production: Sub-regional U.S. policy simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates environmental policy effects on ligno-cellulosic biomass production and environ- mental outcomes using an integrated bioeconomic optimization model. The environmental policy integrated climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate crop yields and environmental indicators in current and future potential bioenergy cropping systems based on weather, topographic and soil data. The crop yield and environmental outcome parameters from EPIC are combined with biomass transport costs and economic parameters in a representative farmer profit-maximizing mathematical optimization model. The model is used to predict the impact of alternative policies on biomass production and environmental outcomes. We find that without environmental policy, rising biomass prices initially trigger production of annual crop residues, resulting in increased greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, and nutrient losses to surface and ground water. At higher biomass prices, perennial bioenergy crops replace annual crop residues as biomass sources, resulting in lower environmental impacts. Simulations of three environmental policies namely a carbon price, a no-till area subsidy, and a fertilizer tax reveal that only the carbon price policy systematically mitigates environmental impacts. The fertilizer tax is ineffectual and too costly to farmers. The no-till subsidy is effective only at low biomass prices and is too costly to government.

Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia-Carolina Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

12

Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeast United States-Southern Piedmont subregion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature study was conducted on the geology of the Southern Piedmont province in the states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The purpose was to identify geologic areas potentially suitable for containment of a repository for the long-term isolation of solidified radioactive waste. The crystalline rocks of the Southern Piedmont province range in age from Precambrian to Paleozoic, and are predominantly slates, phyllites, argillites, schists, metavolcanics, gneisses, gabbros, and granites. These rock units were classified as either favorable, potentially favorable, or unfavorable as potential study areas based on an evaluation of the geologic, hydrologic, and geotechnical characteristics. No socio-economic factors were considered. Rocks subjected to multiple periods of deformation and metamorphism, or described as highly fractured, or of limited areal extent were generally ranked as unfavorable. Potentially favorable rocks are primarily the high-grade metamorphic gneisses and granites. Sixteen areas were classified as being favorable for additional study. These areas are primarily large igneous granite plutons as follows: the Petersburg granite in Virginia; the Rolesville-Castallia, Churchland, and Landis plutons in North Carolina; the Liberty Hill, Winnsboro, and Ogden plutons in South Carolina; and the Siloam, Elberton, and six unnamed granite plutons in Georgia.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reed, of the Illinois Geological Survey...Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond...Board of Health, Madison, Wis. Division...Pennsylvania. Division of Chemical Education: Chairman...the University of Illinois; on execu-tive...from 10 or more plants were macerated...

1939-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

14

INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CONTENTS CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii Pa e -5 1 : 2 2 4 ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA CHEMICAL CORPORATION RICHMOND, VIRGINIA INTROUUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions, has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) at the former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia. On the basis of historical information, DOE has determined that any radioactive material potentially remaining from these activities would be insignificant in terms of both its quantity and the hazard it would

16

DOE/EV-0005/18  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 8 w9-2/ Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program Radiological Survey of the Former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation Uranium Recovery Pilot Plant, Nichols, Florida January 1980 Final Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview Division of Environmental Control Technology .-_.--l.."-.-.- .- ..I ._--, * "--. . . .__ DOE/EV-0005/18 UC-70 Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program Radiological. Survey of the Former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation Uranium Recovery Pilot Want, Nichols, Florida January 1980 Final Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview

17

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. . CONTENTS INTROOUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History,and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 9 1 1 2 2 2 4 ii ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA CHEMICAL CORPORATION RICHMOND. VIRGINIA INTROLJUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of ,Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Deconunissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions, has reviewed the past activities of the Atomic Energy Carmission (AEC) at the former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia. On the basis of historical information, DOE has determined that any radioactive material potentially remaining from these activities would oe insignificant in terms of both its quantity and the hazard it would

18

ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 88, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Electric power projections Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

19

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

229 229 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. 12 11 10 19 22 21 20 15 14 9 13 7 5 6 1 2 3 4 16 17 8 18 1. ERCT ERCOT All 2. FRCC FRCC All 3. MROE MRO East 4. MROW MRO West 5. NEWE NPCC New England 6. NYCW NPCC NYC/Westchester 7. NYLI NPCC Long Island 8. NYUP NPCC Upstate NY 9. RFCE RFC East 10. RFCM RFC Michigan 11. RFCW RFC West 12. SRDA SERC Delta 13. SRGW SERC Gateway 14. SRSE SERC Southeastern 15. SRCE SERC Central 16. SRVC SERC VACAR 17. SPNO SPP North 18. SPSO SPP South 19. AZNM WECC Southwest 20. CAMX WECC California 21. NWPP WECC Northwest 22. RMPA WECC Rockies U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011

20

Carolina | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carolina Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 88, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Electric power projections Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vacar virginia-carolinas subregion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' 'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' DEC 5 1984 Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Mr. Wallo: The Divisfon of Remedial Action Projects staff has reviewed the authority review documents for Gardinler, Inc., Tampa, Florida; Conserv (formerly Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.), Nichols, Florida; and Blockson Chemical co., Joliet, Illinois. Based on the content therein and in consultation with Mr. Steve Miller, Office of General Counsel (C&11), Departamt of Energy, It has been determined that the Department has no authority, through the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, to conduct remedial action at the aforementioned sites, Therefore, please prepare the document packages necessary to notify the appropriate state authorities and the

22

Mr. Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Harold Snyder Harold Snyder Chief, Discovery and Investigations Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U. S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 70460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DDE) has conducted a radiological survey at the Conserv Corporation (The former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation), Nichols, Florida. This survey indicated that levels of residual radioactive material and associated radiation levels at the sfte are in excess c?f those used by DOE to determine if a site requires remedial actfon. The data did not indicate that, under the current use of the site, there was any hazard to the workers or the general public. However, changes fn site use or modifications to the facility could'possibly result

23

Analysis of the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Appendix C: Map of NEMS Electricity Market Module Regions 1 Texas Regional Entity (ERCT) 12 SERC / Delta (SRDA) 2 Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FRCC) 13 SERC / Gateway (SRGW) 3 Midwest Reliability Organization / East (MROE) 14 SERC / Southeastern (SRSE) 4 Midwest Reliability Organization / West (MROW) 15 SERC / Central (SRCE) 5 NPCC / Northeast (NEWE) 16 SERC / Virginia-Carolina (SRVC) 6 NPCC / NYC-Westchester (NYCW) 17 Southwest Power Pool / North (SPNO) 7 NPCC / Long Island (NYLI) 18 Southwest Power Pool / South (SPSO) 8 NPCC / Upstate New York (NYUP) 19 WECC / Southwest (AZNM) 9 Reliability First Corporation / East (RFCE) 20 WECC / California (CAMX) 10 Reliability First Corporation / Michigan (RFCM) 21 WECC / Northwest Power Pool Area (NWPP)

24

SERC Reliability Corporation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SERC Reliability Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

25

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reynolds Metals Co - VA 04  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reynolds Metals Co - VA 04 Reynolds Metals Co - VA 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REYNOLDS METALS CO. (VA.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation VA.04-1 Location: 818 Perry Street , Richmond , Virginia VA.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 VA.04-2 VA.04-3 Site Operations: Preparatory process development involving only gram quantities of uranium performed in the 1950s. VA.04-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited materials handled VA.04-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium VA.04-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated VA.04-1 VA.04-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

26

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mobil Oil Corp - VA 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mobil Oil Corp - VA 01 Mobil Oil Corp - VA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mobil Oil Corp. (VA.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation VA.01-1 Location: 818 Perry Street , Richmond , Virginia VA.01-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 VA.01-2 VA.01-3 Site Operations: Research/Development to recover Uranium as a byproduct of phosphate production; preparatory process for pilot plant scale operation at Nichols, Florida. VA.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination from small quantities of material used at the site is considered remote VA.01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium VA.01-1

27

Mr. Harry S. Cohen  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

a50b a50b Mr. Harry S. Cohen 2956 Hathaway Road Apartment 1105 ' Richmond, Virginia 23225 Dear Mr. Cohen: ..:: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on the former site of the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, located.at @I8 Perry Street in Richmond, Virginia, to determine whether It contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Conar.ission (predecessors to DOE). Based on this review, DOE has concluded that there are no quantities of radioactive material above current guidelines remaining at the site. Therefore, no remedial action is required, and DOE is eliminating the site

28

Electric power projections | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power projections power projections Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 88, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Electric power projections Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

29

Virginia | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia Virginia Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 88, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Electric power projections Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon ASEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

30

Transmission Services WIST Task Force Dynamic Transfer Capability...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Team ("WIST"), a Task Force of technical staff primarily from Northwest and California transmission providers and sub-regional entities, completed a report documenting Phase 1...

31

REVIEW Open Access Land cover, land use and malaria in the Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, France (French Guiana), Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The subregion in the Americas [3]. The three Guyanas (Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana) have the highest annual parasite index (Bolivia, Ecuador, French Guiana and Suriname) in this subregion have seen malaria incidence rates re

Boyer, Edmond

32

Microsoft PowerPoint - Kondziolka.ppt  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Robert E. Kondziolka Robert E. Kondziolka Salt River Project March 25-26, 2009 Chicago, Illinois Western Interconnection Subregional Planning and Development U.S. Department Of Energy U.S. Department Of Energy 2009 National Congestion Study Technical Workshop 2009 National Congestion Study Technical Workshop DOE Congestion Workshop 3/25-26/2009 West Subregional Development - RE Kondziolka 2 Southwest Area Transmission SWAT SWAT SWAT Footprint One of the WestConnect Sub-Regional Planning Groups SWAT Footprint One of the WestConnect Sub-Regional Planning Groups http://www.westconnect.com DOE Congestion Workshop 3/25-26/2009 West Subregional Development - RE Kondziolka BUCKLEY SUNDANCE FT. PECK PEACE CANYON MICA VANCOUVER SEATTLE PRINCE RUPERT AREA AREA COLSTRIP BOISE PORTLAND AREA MALIN TABLE MTN ROUND MTN

33

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, working through the subregional planning groups, to have a high likelihood of completion. Jeff Miller Sienkiewicz Shelly Richardson and Jim Miller­ Ed Sienkiewicz, Shelly Richardson, and Jim Miller · Anyone can

34

Surface Wind Regionalization in Complex Terrain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Daily wind variability in the Comunidad Foral de Navarra in northern Spain was studied using wind observations at 35 locations to derive subregions with homogeneous temporal variability. Two different methodologies based on principal component ...

P. A. Jimnez; E. Garca-Bustamante; J. F. Gonzlez-Rouco; F. Valero; J. P. Montvez; J. Navarro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Provides current and historical information on primary and secondary hardwood products,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Provides current and historical information on primary and secondary hardwood products, production, prices, international trade, and employment. Introduction Data contained in price data for specific subregions of the domestic hardwood market are encouraged to contact state

36

Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Physiological mechanisms of hippocampal memory processing : experiments and applied adaptive filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hippocampus is necessary for the formation and storage of episodic memory, however, the computations within and between hippocampal subregions (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus) that mediate these memory processing functions ...

Nguyen, David P., 1977-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR...analytically for a multiregional nuclear reactor whose subregions are of arbitrary...Operational Analysis of Multiregional Nuclear Reactor Kinetics NASSAU H. S. HAIDAR......

NASSAR H. S. HAIDAR

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrological Processes in Regional Climate Model Simulations of the Central United States Flood of JuneJuly 1993  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thirteen regional climate model (RCM) simulations of JuneJuly 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 10 10 subregion of the upper ...

Christopher J. Anderson; Raymond W. Arritt; Zaitao Pan; Eugene S. Takle; William J. Gutowski Jr.; Francis O. Otieno; Renato da Silva; Daniel Caya; Jens H. Christensen; Daniel Lthi; Miguel A. Gaertner; Clemente Gallardo; Filippo Giorgi; Ren Laprise; Song-You Hong; Colin Jones; H-M. H. Juang; J. J. Katzfey; John L. McGregor; William M. Lapenta; Jay W. Larson; John A. Taylor; Glen E. Liston; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; John O. Roads

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vacar virginia-carolinas subregion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

Ahmad, Sajjad

42

Journal of Statistical Physics ( C 2006 ) DOI: 10.1007/s10955-005-8016-8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station, TX 77843-3143, USA; e-mail: fliang@stat.tamu.edu 0022-4715 C 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. #12;Liang algorithm on a simple example with a comparison study with the multicanonical and WL subregions are as follows: E1 = {x : H(x) h1}, E2 = {x : h1 Em-1 = {x : hm-2

Liang, Faming

43

H A&S 222a Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines, Marcela Ewert 1 June 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 H A&S 222a Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines, Marcela Ewert 1 June 2009 REVIEW: There are 4 sub-regions in this course: 1. energy in nature, 2. the global environment 3. human energy use 4. life and energy at the rim of the Arctic Introduction. This review is not meant to describe

44

Improving Extraseasonal Summer Rainfall Prediction by Merging Information from GCMs and Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(December­February). The Huang-Huai Valley, two subregions of the Jiang-Huai Valley, the southern Yangtze, and the GCM predictions added additional prediction skill in the western Jiang-Huai Valley and southeastern question. The territory of China consists of arid desert areas in the west, semiarid loess plateau

45

Motion Planning with Gamma-Harmonic Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Petroleum and Minerals This paper extends the capabilities of the harmonic potential field (HPF into geometrical subregions where each region has an attribute of its own. The suggested approach uses a task) regions and to converge to the goal are provided. The capabilities of the planner are demonstrated using

Masoud, Ahmad A.

46

H A&S 222a Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 25 May 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At the same time we introduced energy, we started reading environmental/cultural history (J1 H A&S 222a Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 25 May 2006 REVIEW: There are 4 sub-regions in this course: 1. energy in nature, 2. the global environment 3. human energy use 4

47

Modelling the balanced transition to a sustainable economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon and low capital intensive activities and a combined green-low growth option that focuses. We consider a world economy with two subregions that are endowed with greenhouse gas emissions of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) which is the major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The model

Nesterov, Yurii

48

CARBON FLOW AND ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER PLUME DESCRIBED BY INVERSE ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into four subregions connected by water flow to discretize the gradient of ecosystem properties as river with mid-salinity waters (15-29 psu), surrounded by a larger region of net heterotrophic waters where- salinity regions of the plume, with strongest sedimentation from the productive mid- salinity regions

Breed, Greg A.

49

Space Exploration and Global Optimization for Computationally Intensive Design Problems: A Rough Set Based Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and transparent. This work proposes a rough set based approach that can identify multip,le sub-regions in a design than a given level. The rough set method is applied iteratively on a growing sample set. A novel with a few well-known global optimization algorithms. Keywords: rough set, design optimization, space

Wang, Gaofeng Gary

50

Robust Accurate Non-Invasive Analyte Monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and apparatus for determining noninvasively and in vivo one or more unknown values of a known characteristic, particularly the concentration of an analyte in human tissue. The method includes: (1) irradiating the tissue with infrared energy (400 nm-2400 nm) having at least several wavelengths in a given range of wavelengths so that there is differential absorption of at least some of the wavelengths by the tissue as a function of the wavelengths and the known characteristic, the differential absorption causeing intensity variations of the wavelengths incident from the tissue; (2) providing a first path through the tissue; (3) optimizing the first path for a first sub-region of the range of wavelengths to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the first sub-region; (4) providing a second path through the tissue; and (5) optimizing the second path for a second sub-region of the range, to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the second sub-region. In the preferred embodiment a third path through the tissue is provided for, which path is optimized for a third sub-region of the range. With this arrangement, spectral variations which are the result of tissue differences (e.g., melanin and temperature) can be reduced. At least one of the paths represents a partial transmission path through the tissue. This partial transmission path may pass through the nail of a finger once and, preferably, twice. Also included are apparatus for: (1) reducing the arterial pulsations within the tissue; and (2) maximizing the blood content i the tissue.

Robinson, Mark R. (1603 Solano NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110)

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

Capacity Building on Promoting Sustainable Development in the GMS | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Promoting Sustainable Development in the GMS Promoting Sustainable Development in the GMS Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Building on Promoting Sustainable Development in the GMS Agency/Company /Organization AIT-UNEP Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific Sector Energy, Land Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.rrcap.unep.org/nsds Country Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Capacity Building in GMS[1] Summary "The study assesses the state of sustainable development strategies (SDS) in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) - within each of the six member-countries and in the subregion as a whole - with a view towards identifying appropriate improvements that would bring about strong national

52

Appendix E Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling Supporting Information for Ground Water Modeling This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Geologic Map of Site Area ........................................................................................................ E1.O Stream Flow Measurements ...................................................................................................... E2.0 Estimates of Ground Water Flow .............................................................................................. E3.0 .......................................... MODFLOW Flow Budget Analysis for OU 1 1 1 Model Subregions E4.0 ............................................................................ Burro Canyon Aquifer Ground Water Model E5.0 This page intentionally left blank

53

H A&S 220c Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 7 Dec. 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 H A&S 220c Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun P.B. Rhines 7 Dec. 2004 REVIEW: There are 4 sub-regions in this course: 1. energy in nature, 2. the global environment 3. human energy use 4 that lie at the basis of life on Earth, energy, as it is described in physics and chemistry, is a strong

54

First records of 10 bat species in Guyana and comments on diversity of bats in Iwokrama Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., Eisenberg, 1989) from mammals reported in Venezuela (e.g ., Handley, 1976) and Suriname (e.g., Husson, 1978). Two recent publications (Parker et al., 1993; Smith and Kerry, 1996) reported on separate, small single-site collections from Guyana.... In the Guianan subregion, this species was known by one specimen from Venezuela (McCarthy and Ochoa, 1991), two from Suriname (Husson, 1962; Williams et a/., 1983), and one from French Guiana (Simmons and Handley, 1998). Previously, the genus was considered...

Lim, Burton K.; Engstrom, Mark D.; Timm, Robert M.; Anderson, Robert P.; Watson, L. Cynthia

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LRH: WETLANDS, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2002 RRH: Barbiéro et al., GEOCHEMISTRY OF WATER AND GROUND WATER of the Nhecolândia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland in Brazil, is the presence of both saline and freshwater manuscript, published in "Wetlands 22, 3 (2002) 528-540" DOI : 10.1672/0277-5212(2002)022[0528:GOWAGW]2.0.CO

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

56

de Sitter Extremal Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study extremal surfaces in de Sitter space in the Poincare slicing in the upper patch, anchored on spatial subregions at the future boundary ${\\cal I}^+$, restricted to constant boundary Euclidean time slices (focussing on strip subregions). We find real extremal surfaces of minimal area as the boundaries of past lightcone wedges of the subregions in question: these are null surfaces with vanishing area. We find also complex extremal surfaces as complex extrema of the area functional, and the area is not always real-valued. In $dS_4$ the area is real and has some structural resemblance with entanglement entropy in a dual $CFT_3$. There are parallels with analytic continuation from the Ryu-Takayanagi expressions for holographic entanglement entropy in $AdS$. We also discuss extremal surfaces in the $dS$ black brane and the de Sitter "bluewall" studied previously. The $dS_4$ black brane complex surfaces exhibit a real finite cutoff-independent extensive piece. In the bluewall geometry, there are real surface...

Narayan, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Investigation of Variations and Impacts of Tropical Cyclone Precipitation in Texas (1950-2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(100?W to 2.5?W, 0?N to 30?N), regional domain ATP Air Temperature at the surface, local predictor (?C) CAR Caribbean sea (87?W to 61?W, 9.5?N to 21.5?N), regional domain CST Central Standard Time CV Cross Validation ECA Eastern Caribbean Sea... on dividing the MDR into these two sub-regions at 52?W, regional domain ENSO El Ni?o-Southern Oscillation GMX Gulf of Mexico (95?W to 80?W, 20?N to 30?N) regional domain HURDAT Atlantic basin hurricane database IDW Inverse Distance Weighting ITCZ Inter...

Zhu, Laiyin

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

The moment problem and its relation to statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution. Definition: If the xi's (1= 1, 2, 3, . . . n) are independently distributed random variables such that: n f(xl, xZ. . . , , xn) g dxi i =1 (a) f(xl, xz, . . . , xn) = 0 for all xi (1 =1, 2, . . . , n), n (b) f . . . f f(xja xzs r xn) n 1... =1 n () f . . . / ftg, g, . . . , ?) TT dx& 1t f v n 1 =1 subregion of our n-dimensional space, then the function xn Xl F(xj g xz ~ ~ xn) / / oa n J-oo will be called the multivariant distribution function. As a simple example for the two...

Wood, Sam Madeley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

California/Transmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California/Transmission California/Transmission < California Jump to: navigation, search CaliforniaTransmissionHeader.png Roadmap Agency Links Local Regulations State Regulations Summary General Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database The electrical grid in California is part of the WestConnect Transmission Planning area and the California Transmission Planning Group. The desert southwest region of California belongs to the Southwest Area Transmission power grid and the northern region of the state belongs to the Sierra Subregional Planning Group. The SWAT provides the technical forum required to complete reliability assessments, develop joint business opportunities and accomplish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vacar virginia-carolinas subregion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bypass flow computations on the LOFA transient in a VHTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bypass flow in the prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is not intentionally designed to occur, but is present in the gaps between graphite blocks. Previous studies of the bypass flow in the core indicated that the cooling provided by flow in the bypass gaps had a significant effect on temperature and flow distributions for normal operating conditions. However, the flow and heat transports in the core are changed significantly after a Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA). This study aims to study the effect and role of the bypass flow after a LOFA in terms of the temperature and flow distributions and for the heat transport out of the core by natural convection of the coolant for a 1/12 symmetric section of the active core which is composed of images and mirror images of two sub-region models. The two sub-region models, 9 x 1/12 and 15 x 1/12 symmetric sectors of the active core, are employed as the CFD flow models using computational grid systems of 70.2 million and 117 million nodes, respectively. It is concluded that the effect of bypass flow is significant for the initial conditions and the beginning of LOFA, but the bypass flow has little effect after a long period of time in the transient computation of natural circulation.

Yu-Hsin Tung [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science; Richard W. Johnson [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yuh-Ming Ferng [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science; Ching-Chang Chieng [City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Dept. of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ON THE ANTI-CORRELATION BETWEEN SPECTRAL LINE BROADENING AND INTENSITY IN CORONAL STRUCTURES OBSERVED WITH EIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advance in spectral resolution of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging (EIS) spectrometer on board Hinode has allowed for more detailed analysis of coronal spectral lines. Large line broadening and blueshifted velocities have been found in the periphery of active region (AR) cores and near the footpoints of coronal loops. This line broadening is yet to be understood. We study the correlation of intensity and line width for entire ARs and sub-regions selected to include coronal features. The results show that although a slight positive correlation can be found when considering whole images, many sub-regions have a negative correlation between intensity and line width. Sections of a coronal loop display some of the largest anti-correlations found for this study with the increased line broadening occurring directly adjacent to the footpoint section of the loop structure, not at the footpoint itself. The broadened lines may be due to a second Doppler-shifted component that is separate from the main emitting feature such as a coronal loop, but related in their excitation. The small size of these features forces the considerations of investigator and instrumental effects. Preliminary analyses are shown that indicate the possibility of a point-spread function that is not azimuthally symmetric and may affect velocity and line profile measurements.

Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H. [Deptartment of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Regional groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Iterative Performance Assessment, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of groundwater modeling of the saturated zone in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain are presented. Both a regional (200 {times} 200 km) and subregional (50 {times} 50 km) model were used in the analyses. Simulations were conducted to determine the impact of various disruptive that might take place over the life span of a proposed Yucca Mountain geologic conditions repository on the groundwater flow field, as well as changes in the water-table elevations. These conditions included increases in precipitation and groundwater recharge within the regional model, changes in permeability of existing hydrogeologic barriers, a:nd the vertical intrusion of volcanic dikes at various orientations through the saturated zone. Based on the regional analysis, the rise in the water-table under Yucca Mountain due to various postulated conditions ranged from only a few meters to 275 meters. Results of the subregional model analysis, which was used to simulate intrusive dikes approximately 4 kilometers in length in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, showed water-table rises ranging from a few meters to as much as 103 meters. Dikes oriented approximately north-south beneath Yucca Mountain produced the highest water-table rises. The conclusions drawn from this analysis are likely to change as more site-specific data become available and as the assumptions in the model are improved.

Ahola, M.; Sagar, B. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8) 8) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. All data in this set are classified as UK National Statistics. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

65

Meters | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meters Meters Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 25th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption gas Meters regional

66

United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: geodata.grid.unep.ch/ United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Screenshot References: UNEP Data[1] Overview "The GEO Data Portal is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global

67

NPP Grassland: Tumentsogt, Mongolia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tumentsogt, Mongolia, 1982-1990 Tumentsogt, Mongolia, 1982-1990 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Togtohyn, C., and D. Ojima. 1996. NPP Grassland: Tumentsogt, Mongolia, 1982-1990. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a steppe grassland was studied at the Tumentsogt Research Station of the Mongolian Academy of Science from 1982 to 1990. Measurements were made of peak above-ground live biomass for each year. The study site is located on the Eastern Mongolian Plains of the Tumentsogt sub-region (47.4 N 112.5 E), in Sukhbaatar administrative region. The Mongolian steppe occupies a major part of eastern Mongolia and northern China, characterized by an arid continental climate with most rain falling

68

State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities | Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State and Regional Policy Assistance - State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities Providing Technical Assistance to States and Regions The Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program responds to both immediate and long-terms needs of states, regions, and other organizations to implement policy and market solutions that bring about improved demand response, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and transmission utilization. Examples include: Supporting efforts by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), its subsidiary Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB), and related ad-hoc subregional groups in the West as they work toward greater regional coordination and planning of regional electric infrastructure. (see Sample Products and Related Links or FY2003 Grants for details.)

69

The Energy Information Administration is proposing the following revisions to their electricity survey forms in 2011:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration proposed the following revisions to their electricity Energy Information Administration proposed the following revisions to their electricity survey forms in 2011: F or m E I A -411, " C oor dinated B ulk Power Supply Pr ogr am R epor t." * Change form name to "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply & Demand Program Report;" return to collecting projected reliability data on a 10-year basis as opposed to 5 years. Change "Council" to "Regional Entity" and add submission of Sub-regional level breakout of data. * Return to reporting on capacity and transmission planning for a 10-year horizon, rather than a 5-year horizon. * Adopt the current NERC 2009 Schedule 3 for summer and winter aggregated demand and supply information. Changes are as follows: Demand category additions include

70

regional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

regional regional Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption gas regional UK Data application/zip icon Guidance document for interpreting data (zip, 1.2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Excel file: 2005 MLSOA and IGZ gas and electricity (xls, 10 MiB)

71

Selection of 1998-2003 Technical Assistance Work Products | Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Selection of 1998-2003 Technical Assistance Work Products Selection of 1998-2003 Technical Assistance Work Products The following are some Technical Assistance Work Products from 1998-2003. Sponsored Sample Products DOE co-funded report examines the current status of the U.S. Electric Transmission System. Report finds transmission capacity continues to be added at a slower rate than consumer demand is growing. Additional Program-Sponsored Sample Products The Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program is supporting efforts by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), its subsidiary Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB), and related ad-hoc subregional groups in the West as they work toward greater regional coordination and planning of regional electric infrastructure. See November 2003 presentation for more

72

Appendix B Sierra Nevada Region Customer Groups and Economic Regions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A- Not available electronically. A- Not available electronically. Appendix B Sierra Nevada Region Customer Groups and Economic Regions The list included in this appendix shows the Sierra Nevada Region customers with contracts expiring in the year 2004. The list indicates which customer group each customer is considered a part of for purposes of analysis. The list also shows which economic region each customer is located in. Some customers are not included in a subregion of the central and northern California region. Further discussion of the economic regions is included in Section 4.9.4 and in Appendix L. Appendix C Renewable Technology Cost Information Matrix The development of the renewable technology matrix (RTM) was undertaken to determine the primary cost and performance characteristics of renewable technologies in

73

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

74

Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 1km resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eastern China from NREL eastern China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): PDF maps of Eastern China wind mapping. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Includes maps of full mapping region, and 15 sub-regions. (Supplemental Information): The modeling regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERT_AZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Z-units METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis 6370997.00000 Minor Axis 0.00000 Parameters: radius of the sphere of reference 6370997.00000 Continue? longitude of center of projection 119 0 0.00 latitude of center of projection 33 30 0.000 false easting (meters) 0.00000 false northing (meters) 0.00000 Spatial Information Raster: Number of Columns: 2658 Number of Rows: 3926

75

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cauchois.ppt  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expansion Planning Expansion Planning Policy Committee Spring 2009 Technical Workshop U.S. DOE 2009 Congestion Study Scott Cauchois, TEPPC Chair March 25, 2009 2 TEPPC ● Committee of the WECC Board (2006) ● WECC footprint - Western Interconnection ● 2 board incl. chair/16 stakeholder members ● Dedicated WECC staff ● Regular quarterly meetings ● Western coordination call 2 nd Tuesday each month 3 TEPPC Charter ● Oversee production cost & other data management ● Develop & implement interconnection- wide expansion planning policies and processes in coordination with the Planning Coordination Committee and subregional planning groups (SPGs) ● Guiding/improving economic analysis & modeling of interconnection 4 Organizational Structure Notes Notes : : 1. TEPPC has a balanced governance whose members represent: the

76

An empirical analysis on prospects and challenges of BIMSTEC-Japan trade integration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seven-nation Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multisectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC), comprising Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand is emerging as one of the major subregional groups in Asia. Japan is the second largest trading partner for BIMSTEC countries. The paper discusses prospects and challenges for strengthening BIMSTEC countries and Japan's trade integration. It analyzes the trends and patterns of BIMSTEC-Japan trade. Further, it examines empirically whether BIMSTEC-Japan economic cooperation will increase intraregional trade using a gravity model. Japan-BIMSTEC cooperation will increase intraregional trade but not uniformly for all countries. The potential losses on trade for some countries will be compensated by gains in other areas, such as, stepped-up resource transfer, foreign direct investment flows, technology transfer, and market access to services. This integration will strengthen the trade link between South Asian and Southeast Asian countries and will contribute towards a pan-Asian integration.

Swapan K. Bhattacharya; Biswa N. Bhattacharyay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The distribution characteristics of additional extracted oil displaced by surfactantpolymer flooding and its genetic mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The pilot test of surfactantpolymer flooding (SP flooding) in the western part of Gudong 7th reservoir has achieved good development effect. In this work, the distribution characteristics of additional extracted oil (AEO) displaced by SP flooding were firstly studied using the reservoir numerical simulation method, to improve the understanding of the complicated mechanism during the SP flooding process. Based on the performance of the components in SP flooding system, AEO regions were distinguished into three sub-regions, including one enhancing displacement efficiency (S region), one improving sweep efficiency (P region), and one integrating the two mechanisms mentioned above (PS region). S region which had a dam-like distribution and low AEO saturation was located in layers with high permeability around the injection well. PS region that obtained higher AEO saturation was located close to the S region. P region which achieved the highest AEO saturation was located in layers with low permeability furthest away from the injection well. It was vertically distributed in the upper parts of the fining upward sequence reservoir and took on the shape of ellipse between wells. Compared with water flooding, the flux increased in some parts of the reservoir during the SP flooding process. In order to quantitatively characterize the flux difference between water flooding and SP flooding in the same area of the reservoir, a new characterization parameter named increased flux percentage (IFP) was defined and then IFP region in the reservoir was established. There was a very good correlation between the AEO region and the IFP region, which revealed the formation mechanisms of the three AEO sub-regions. The formation of S region was mainly due to the low interfacial tension contribution of surfactant in improving displacement efficiency. The polymer in SP flooding system can improve the injection profile and increase the viscosity of the SP flooding system. These mechanisms were the main reasons for the formation of P region. The formation of PS region was due to the synergistic effect between surfactant and polymer in the SP flooding system. This synergistic effect was considered as the key mechanism to achieving good performance in the SP flooding pilot test. Some characterization parameters were defined, including area of the sub-region, degree of the circularity and position of the centroid. Some sensitivity studies were conducted to find out the influence of surfactant and polymer concentration on the distribution characteristics of AEO and IFP. The results showed that the increased extent of PS region area reduced and the cross flow phenomenon caused by low interfacial tension of surfactant became serious when surfactant concentration was higher than 0.45%. Within a certain range, the areas of three sub-regions all increased as the polymer concentration increased. However, when the polymer concentration increased from 2000mg/L to 2500mg/L, the effect of increasing IFP and improving sweep efficiency was significantly decreased. Moreover, the increased extent of PS region area also reduced.

Jian Hou; Guangming Pan; Xuejiao Lu; Cuihua Wei; Maoxin Qiu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

Duncan, Joanne P.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Workshop report - Bridging the Climate Information held at Argonne National Laboratory September 29, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a recent report entitled The Regional Impacts of Climate Change it was concluded that the technological capacity to adapt to climate change is likely to be readily available in North America, but its application will be realized only if the necessary information is available (sufficiently far in advance in relation to the planning horizons and lifetimes of investments) and the institutional and financial capacity to manage change exists. The report also acknowledged that one of the key factors that limit the ability to understand the vulnerability of subregions of North America to climate change, and to develop and implement adaptive strategies to reduce that vulnerability, is the lack of accurate regional projections of climate change, including extreme events. In particular, scientists need to account for the physical-geographic characteristics (e.g., the Great Lakes, coastlines, and mountain ranges) that play a significant role in the North America climate and also need to consider the feedback between the biosphere and atmosphere.

Taylor, J.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sustainable Development Strategy for South Asia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Sustainable Development Strategy for South Asia Agency/Company /Organization AIT-UNEP Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific Sector Energy, Land Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.rrcap.unep.org/nsds Country Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Maldives, Pakistan, Sri Lanka UN Region South-Eastern Asia References AIT-UNEP RRC.AP[1] Purpose "This document is expected to provide the strategic direction for the pursuit of sustainable development in the SAS. It is important to note that this document addresses the issues at the sub-regional level, building upon national level issues and policies but particularly addressing those transcending and common to the countries in the SAS. It is expected that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vacar virginia-carolinas subregion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft Word - Document2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly min, average, and max average CO Hourly min, average, and max average CO 2 emissions by month for AZNM subregion (lbs CO 2 /MWh load) 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 January 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 February 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 March 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 April 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 May 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 June 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 July 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 August 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 September 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 October 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 November 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 December Hourly min, average, and max average CO 2 emissions by month for CAMX subregion (lbs CO 2 /MWh load) 500 700 900 1,100 January 500 700 900 1,100 February 500 700 900 1,100 March 500 700 900 1,100 April 500 700 900 1,100 May 500 700 900 1,100 June 500 700 900 1,100 July 500 700 900 1,100 August 500 700 900 1,100 September 500 700 900 1,100 October 500 700 900 1,100 November 500 700 900 1,100 December Hourly min, average, and max average CO

82

Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Gulf of Alaska (including Lower Cook Inlt) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Gulf of Alaska subregion of the Alaska leasing region began in 1967, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. Two lease sales have been held in the subregion. Lease Sale 39, for the Northern Gulf of Alaska, was held on April 13, 1976, and resulted in the leasing of 76 tracts. Lease Sale CI, for Lower Cook Inlet, was held on October 27, 1977, and resulted in the leasing of 87 tracts. Exploratory drilling on the tracts leased in Sale 39 began in September 1976, and exploratory drilling on tracts leased in Sale CI began in July 1978. Commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in any of the wells drilled in either sale area. Seventy-four of the leases issued in the Northern Gulf of Alaska have been relinquished. As of June 1980, exploratory drilling in both areas had ceased, and none was planned for the near future. The next lease sale in the Gulf of Alaska, Sale 55, is scheduled for October 1980. Lease Sale 60 (Lower Cook Inlet and Shelikof Strait) is scheduled for September 1981, and Lease Sale 61 (OCS off Kodiak Island) is scheduled for April 1983. Sale 60 will be coordinated with a State lease sale in adjacent State-owned waters. The most recent estimates (June 1980) by the US Geological Survey of risked, economically recoverable resources for the 2 tracts currently under lease in the Northern Gulf of Alaska are negligible. For the 87 tracts currently under lease in Lower Cook Inlet, the USGS has produced risked, economically recoverable resource estimates of 35 million barrels of oil and 26 billion cubic feet of gas. These resource estimates for the leased tracts in both areas are short of commercially producible amounts. Onshore impacts from OCS exploration have been minimal. Two communities - Yakutat and Seward - served as support bases for the Northern Gulf of Alaska.

Jackson, J.B.; Dorrier, R.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

WHAT DETERMINES THE DENSITY STRUCTURE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS? A CASE STUDY OF ORION B WITH HERSCHEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A{sub V} {approx} 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -2} profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A{sub V} > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A{sub V} -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations.

Schneider, N.; Andre, Ph.; Koenyves, V.; Motte, F.; Arzoumanian, D.; Didelon, P.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A. [IRFU/SAp CEA/DSM, Laboratoire AIM CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bontemps, S. [OASU/LAB-UMR5804, CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, F-33270 Floirac (France); Federrath, C. [MoCA, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Ward-Thompson, D. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, UCLAN, Preston, Lancashire PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J. [IAPS-INAF, Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bressert, E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping (Australia); Di Francesco, J. [NRCC, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, University of Victoria (Canada); Griffin, M. [University School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff (United Kingdom); and others

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy balance in peridynamics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The peridynamic model of solid mechanics treats internal forces within a continuum through interactions across finite distances. These forces are determined through a constitutive model that, in the case of an elastic material, permits the strain energy density at a point to depend on the collective deformation of all the material within some finite distance of it. The forces between points are evaluated from the Frechet derivative of this strain energy density with respect to the deformation map. The resulting equation of motion is an integro-differential equation written in terms of these interparticle forces, rather than the traditional stress tensor field. Recent work on peridynamics has elucidated the energy balance in the presence of these long-range forces. We have derived the appropriate analogue of stress power, called absorbed power, that leads to a satisfactory definition of internal energy. This internal energy is additive, allowing us to meaningfully define an internal energy density field in the body. An expression for the local first law of thermodynamics within peridynamics combines this mechanical component, the absorbed power, with heat transport. The global statement of the energy balance over a subregion can be expressed in a form in which the mechanical and thermal terms contain only interactions between the interior of the subregion and the exterior, in a form anticipated by Noll in 1955. The local form of this first law within peridynamics, coupled with the second law as expressed in the Clausius-Duhem inequality, is amenable to the Coleman-Noll procedure for deriving restrictions on the constitutive model for thermomechanical response. Using an idea suggested by Fried in the context of systems of discrete particles, this procedure leads to a dissipation inequality for peridynamics that has a surprising form. It also leads to a thermodynamically consistent way to treat damage within the theory, shedding light on how damage, including the nucleation and advance of cracks, should be incorporated into a constitutive model.

Lehoucq, Richard B.; Silling, Stewart Andrew

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2005 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 - 5 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The domestic electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. These data are classified as UK National Statistics. Note about spreadsheets: separate tabs exist for each local authority (LA), but the tabs are hidden. To view data, simply 'unhide' the appropriate tab(s). You do not need to "enable macros" to view the data. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

87

eGRID2007 Version 1.1 - All Files | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eGRID2007 Version 1.1 - All Files eGRID2007 Version 1.1 - All Files Dataset Summary Description The Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) is a comprehensive inventory of environmental attributes of electric power systems. The preeminent source of air emissions data for the electric power sector, eGRID is based on available plant-specific data for all U.S. electricity generating plants that provide power to the electric grid and report data to the U.S. government. eGRID integrates many different federal data sources on power plants and power companies, from three different federal agencies: EPA, the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Emissions data from EPA are carefully integrated with generation data from EIA to produce useful values like pounds per megawatt-hour (lb/MWh) of emissions, which allows direct comparison of the environmental attributes of electricity generation. eGRID also provides aggregated data by state, U.S. total, company, and by three different sets of electric grid boundaries.This particular distribution consists of a single zip file that contains all available eGrid 2007 spreadsheet files, state import-export files, Technical Support Documents, Summary Tables, GHG output emission rates, the EUEC2010 paper, and graphical representations of eGRID subregions and NERC regions maps.

88

Advanced computational simulation of flow phenomena associated with orifice meters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of fluid flow phenomena associated with orifice meters. These simulations were performed using a new, state-of-the-art CFD code developed at Southwest Research Institute. This code is based on new techniques designed to take advantage of parallel computers to increase computational performance and fidelity of simulation results. This algorithm uses a domain decomposition strategy to create grid systems for very complex geometries composed of simpler geometric subregions, allowing for the accurate representation of the fluid flow domain. The domain decomposition technique maps naturally to parallel computer architectures. Here, the concept of message-passing is used to create a parallel algorithm, using the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) library. This code is then used to simulate the flow through an orifice meter run consisting of an orifice with a beta ratio of 0.5 and air flowing at a Reynolds number of 91,100. The work discussed in this paper is but the first step in developing a Virtual Metering Research Facility to support research, analysis, and formulation of new standards for metering.

Freitas, C.J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

AB Blanket for Cities (for continual pleasant weather and protection from chemical, biological and radioactive weapons)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a series of previous articles (see references) the author offered to cover a city or other important large installations or subregions by a transparent thin film supported by a small additional air overpressure under the form of an AB Dome. The building of a gigantic inflatable AB Dome over an empty flat surface is not difficult. However, if we want to cover a city, garden, forest or other obstacle course we cannot easily deploy the thin film over building or trees. In this article is suggested a new method which solves this problem. The idea is to design a double film blanket filled by light gas (for example, methane, hydrogen, or helium). Sections of this AB Blanket are lighter then air and fly in atmosphere. They can be made on a flat area (serving as an assembly area) and delivered by dirigible or helicopter to station at altitude over the city. Here they connect to the already assembled AB Blanket subassemblies, cover the city in an AB Dome and protect it from bad weather, chemical, biological and rad...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

AB Blanket for Cities (for continual pleasant weather and protection from chemical, biological and radioactive weapons)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a series of previous articles (see references) the author offered to cover a city or other important large installations or subregions by a transparent thin film supported by a small additional air overpressure under the form of an AB Dome. The building of a gigantic inflatable AB Dome over an empty flat surface is not difficult. However, if we want to cover a city, garden, forest or other obstacle course we cannot easily deploy the thin film over building or trees. In this article is suggested a new method which solves this problem. The idea is to design a double film blanket filled by light gas (for example, methane, hydrogen, or helium). Sections of this AB Blanket are lighter then air and fly in atmosphere. They can be made on a flat area (serving as an assembly area) and delivered by dirigible or helicopter to station at altitude over the city. Here they connect to the already assembled AB Blanket subassemblies, cover the city in an AB Dome and protect it from bad weather, chemical, biological and radioactive fallout or particulates. After finish of dome building the light gas can be changed by air. Two projects for Manhattan (NY, USA) and Moscow (Russia) are targets for a sample computation.

Alexander Bolonkin

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

Stream-reach Identification for New Run-of-River Hydropower Development through a Merit Matrix Based Geospatial Algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even after a century of development, the total hydropower potential from undeveloped rivers is still considered to be abundant in the United States. However, unlike evaluating hydropower potential at existing hydropower plants or non-powered dams, locating a feasible new hydropower plant involves many unknowns, and hence the total undeveloped potential is harder to quantify. In light of the rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets for topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics, a merit matrix based geospatial algorithm is proposed to help identify possible hydropower stream-reaches for future development. These hydropower stream-reaches sections of natural streams with suitable head, flow, and slope for possible future development are identified and compared using three different scenarios. A case study was conducted in the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) hydrologic subregions. It was found that a merit matrix based algorithm, which is based on the product of hydraulic head, annual mean flow, and average channel slope, can help effectively identify stream-reaches with high power density and small surface inundation. The identified stream-reaches can then be efficiently evaluated for their potential environmental impact, land development cost, and other competing water usage in detailed feasibility studies . Given that the selected datasets are available nationally (at least within the conterminous US), the proposed methodology will have wide applicability across the country.

Pasha, M. Fayzul K. [California State University, Fresno; Yeasmin, Dilruba [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Simultaneous SOHO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present new results from observations of a small active region taken with the SUMER spectrograph and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on SOHO and with the Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. The SUMER study features line and continuum emission covering a wide range of temperatures and includes the density-sensitive O IV] ?1400 multiplet. A more extensive analysis of quiet Sun data presented in a previous paper is also included. The presence of a power-law relationship between emission-line power and electron density is confirmed, although the exponents in the active region are slightly higher than those found in the quiet Sun. These power-law relationships suggest that the volume filling factor decreases with increasing density and indicate possible differences between emitting material in active regions and the quiet Sun. We study active-region emission measures from both the SUMER and SXT data sets. For the active region as a whole, SXT temperatures and emission measures appear to fit smoothly onto the emission-measure distribution determined from cooler transition region and coronal lines in the SUMER spectra. We find no significant variation in the shape of the lower transition region emission-measure distribution for different subregions of the data set. This reinforces the conclusion from the original quiet Sun paper that ensembles of "cool loops" are unlikely to be the source of this emission unless the structures are considerably smaller than the 1'' spatial resolution of SUMER.

N. W. Griffiths; G. H. Fisher; D. T. Woods; L. W. Acton; O. H. W. Siegmund

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Density equalizing map projections (cartograms) in public health applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing some of the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP){copyright}. Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease risk is constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be calculated with validity. The DEMP algorithm was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques; namely, 401 childhood cancer cases in four counties of California. The distribution of cases on the transformed map was analyzed visually and statistically. To check the validity of the method, the identical analysis was performed on 401 artificial cases randomly generated under the assumption of uniform risk. No statistically significant evidence for geographic non-uniformity of rates was found, in agreement with the original analysis performed by the California Department of Health Services.

Merrill, D.W.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Institutions in European and Asian energy markets: A methodological overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article introduces a methodological framework to study institutions in European and Asian energy markets with a comparative case study on the EU and east Asia. A distinction is made between informal and three types of formal institutions; and their transaction cost reducing, order creating and ecological/climatic functions. The operation of energy markets is explained through the structure of institutions, their types and functions. It is found that order-creating institutions guarantee enough stability, (mutual) trust and solidarity among EU Member States to support the competitive markets institution and supranational formal institutions as the underpinnings of trade in the internal energy market, which nevertheless retains some corporatist features. In the east Asian markets the nature of order-creating institutions sovereignty, energy diplomacy and great power management prevents the emergence of supranational formal institutions and a shared idea of trade. The prevailing structure has a large number of sub-regional organisations with overlapping tasks and few powers. In both markets the functions of institutions signify more than their number; transaction cost reducing institutions are dependent on order-creating institutions, while both of these functions are better realised on the regional level than ecological/climatic functions; ultimately informal institutions are most influential.

Pami Aalto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Measurements of springtime Antarctic ozone depletion and development of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described herein consists of two parts. The first part is a description of the design of a balloon borne ultraviolet photometer to measure ozone and the results of a flight using this instrument. The second part describes modifications made on the standard commercially available electrochemical ozonesonde and the results of some experiments performed both in the laboratory and during stratospheric balloon flights. Using this modified ECC system, 33 successful balloon flights were made at McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the austral spring of 1986 to study the temporal and vertical development of the so-called Antarctic Ozone Hole. Photometric measurements of ozone in the atmosphere can be accomplished by exploiting 253.65 nanometer absorption feature of ozone. Using a single light source and beam splitting optics, matched optical paths can be generated through two absorption cells. The ozonesonde data gave a very clear picture of the development of the Ozone Hole. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) Depletion occurs between about 12 and 20 km. (2) The most efficient region of ozone depletion decreases in altitude with time. Height profiles show subregions where ozone removal is highly efficient. (3) At 18 km, the ozone mixing ratio decays with a half-life of 25 days.

Harder, J.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN STARBURSTS DERIVED FROM BAYESIAN FITTING OF MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION MODELS: 30 DORADUS AS A TEMPLATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To understand and interpret the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of starbursts, theoretical or semi-empirical SED models are necessary. Yet, while they are well founded in theory, independent verification and calibration of these models, including the exploration of possible degeneracies between their parameters, are rarely made. As a consequence, a robust fitting method that leads to unique and reproducible results has been lacking. Here we introduce a novel approach based on Bayesian analysis to fit the Spitzer-Infrared Spectrometer spectra of starbursts using the SED models proposed by Groves et al.. We demonstrate its capabilities and verify the agreement between the derived best-fit parameters and actual physical conditions by modeling the nearby, well-studied, giant H II region 30 Doradus in the LMC. The derived physical parameters, such as cluster mass, cluster age, interstellar medium pressure, and covering fraction of photodissociation regions, are representative of the 30 Doradus region. The inclusion of the emission lines in the modeling is crucial to break degeneracies. We investigate the limitations and uncertainties by modeling subregions, which are dominated by single components, within 30 Doradus. A remarkable result for 30 Doradus in particular is a considerable contribution to its mid-infrared spectrum from hot ({approx}300 K) dust. The demonstrated success of our approach will allow us to derive the physical conditions in more distant, spatially unresolved starbursts.

MartInez-Galarza, J. R.; Groves, B.; Brandl, B. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 CA Leiden (Netherlands); De Messieres, G. E.; Indebetouw, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Dopita, M. A. [Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

The VMC Survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star-formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJKs filters, covering 14 sqrdeg (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour--magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68% confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39 deg, although deviations of up to 3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disk. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation ...

Rubele, Stefano; Kerber, Leandro; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Piatti, Andres E; Zaggia, Simone; Bekki, Kenji; Bressan, Alessandro; Clementini, Gisella; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim P; Groenewegen, Martin A T; Ivanov, Valentin D; Marconi, Marcella; Marigo, Paola; Moretti, Maria-Ida; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Smitha; Tatton, Benjamin L; van Loon, Jacco Th

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

THE INFLUENCE OF INELASTIC NEUTRINO REACTIONS WITH LIGHT NUCLEI ON THE STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). The time evolution of shock waves is calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions, and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations. In addition, the effects of ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons is addressed in the simulations. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as {approx}10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hand, alpha particles are heated near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and the density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei evolve differently in the non-linear phase of SASI than do models that lack heating by light nuclei. This result is because matter in the gain region has a varying density and temperature and therefore sub-regions appear that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. Although the light nuclei are never dominant heating sources and they work favorably for shock revival in some cases and unfavorably in other cases, they are non-negligible and warrant further investigation.

Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Regional flood hydrology in a semi-arid catchment using a GLS regression model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The regional flood frequency hydrology of the 86,000km2 and semi-arid Ebro catchment is investigated using an extended generalised least square model that includes separate descriptions for sampling errors and model errors. The Ebro catchment is characterised by large hydro-climatic heterogeneities among sub-regions. However, differences in flood processes among sites are better explained by a set of new catchment descriptors introduced into hydrological regression models, such as new characteristics derived from the slope of flow duration curves, the ratio of mean annual precipitation to extreme precipitations and the aridity index. These additions enabled a more direct link to be established between the general flow regime and the extreme flood characteristics through-out the entire catchment. The new regression models developed in this study were compared to a set of existing models recommended for flood frequency estimation in Spain. It was found that the generalised least squares model developed in this study improves the existing ordinary least squares models both at regional and trans-regional scales. An adequate description of flood processes is obtained and, as a direct consequence, more reliable flood predictions in ungauged catchments are achieved.

Luis Mediero; Thomas R. Kjeldsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vacar virginia-carolinas subregion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Trigger Algorithm for the Burst Alert Telescope on Swift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is a huge (5200 cm2) coded aperture imager that will detect gamma-ray bursts in real time and provide a location that the Swift satellite will use to slew the optical and x-ray telescopes. The huge size of BAT is a challenge for the on-board triggering: a change as small as 1% is equivalent to a 1 sigma statistical variation in 1 second. There will be three types of triggers, two based on rates and one based on images. The first type of trigger is for short time scales (4 msec to 64 msec). These will be traditional triggers (single background) and we check about 25,000 combinations of time-energy-focal plane subregions per second. The second type of trigger will be similar to what is used on HETE: fits to multiple background regions to remove trends for time scales between 64 msec and 64 seconds. About 500 triggers will be checked per second. For these rate triggers, false triggers and variable non-GRB sources will be rejected by requiring a new source to be present in an...

Fenimore, E; Galassi, M; Gehrels, N; Palmer, D; Parsons, A; Tavenner, T; Tller, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The W43-MM1 mini-starburst ridge, a test for star formation efficiency models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context: Star formation efficiency (SFE) theories are currently based on statistical distributions of turbulent cloud structures and a simple model of star formation from cores. They remain poorly tested, especially at the highest densities. Aims: We investigate the effects of gas density on the SFE through measurements of the core formation efficiency (CFE). With a total mass of $\\sim2\\times10^4$ M$_\\odot$, the W43-MM1 ridge is one of the most convincing candidate precursor of starburst clusters and thus one of the best place to investigate star formation. Methods: We used high-angular resolution maps obtained at 3 mm and 1 mm within W43-MM1 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer to reveal a cluster of 11 massive dense cores (MDCs), and, one of the most massive protostellar cores known. An Herschel column density image provided the mass distribution of the cloud gas. We then measured the 'instantaneous' CFE and estimated the SFE and the star formation rate (SFR) within subregions of the W43-MM1 ridge. ...

Louvet, Fabien; Hennebelle, Patrick; Bonnell, Ian; Bontemps, Sylvain; Gusdorf, Antoine; Hill, Tracey; Gueth, Frdric; Peretto, Nicolas; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Stephan, Gwendoline; Schilke, Peter; Csengeri, Tima; Luong, Quang Nguyen; Lis, Darek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (?17 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 2, and 3 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.21.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.31.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.61.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 3 segmented subregions were 2.32.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 0.25. Results for external calibrations exhibited much larger RMS errors than size matched internal calibration. Use of an average body size external-to-internal calibration correction factor reduced the errors to closer to those for internal calibration. RMS errors of less than 30% or about 0.01 for the bone and 0.1 for the red marrow volume fractions would likely be satisfactory for human studies. Such accuracies were achieved for 3 3 segmentation of 5 mm slice images for: (a) internal calibration with 4 times dose for all size body phantoms, (b) internal calibration with 2 times dose for the small and medium size body phantoms, and (c) corrected external calibration with 4 times dose and all size body phantoms. Conclusions: Phantom studies are promising and demonstrate the potential to use dual energy quantitative CT to estimate the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone within the vertebral spongiosa.

Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. VII. CHARACTERIZING THE PROPERTIES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a Green Bank Telescope survey of NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), (3,3) lines toward 631 Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) sources at a range of Galactic longitudes in the inner Galaxy. We have detected the NH{sub 3}(1,1) line toward 72% of our targets (456), demonstrating that the high column density features identified in the BGPS and other continuum surveys accurately predict the presence of dense gas. We have determined kinematic distances and resolved the distance ambiguity for all BGPS sources detected in NH{sub 3}. The BGPS sources trace the locations of the Scutum and Sagittarius spiral arms, with the number of sources. We measure the physical properties of each source and find that depending on the distance, BGPS sources are primarily clumps, with some cores and clouds. We have examined the physical properties as a function of Galactocentric distance, and find a mean gas kinetic temperature of 15.6 K, and that the NH{sub 3} column density and abundance decrease by nearly an order of magnitude. Comparing sources at similar distances demonstrates that the physical properties are indistinguishable, which suggests a similarity in clump structure across the Galactic disk. We have also compared the BGPS sources to criteria for efficient star formation presented independently by Heiderman et al. and Lada et al., and for massive star formation presented by Kauffmann et al. Forty-eight percent of our sample should be forming stars (including massive stars) with high efficiency, and 87% contain subregions that should be efficiently forming stars. Indeed, we find that 67% of the sample exhibit signs of star formation activity based on an association with a mid-infrared source.

Dunham, Miranda K. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Evans II, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0259 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Urquhart, James S., E-mail: miranda.dunham@yale.edu [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

Resource targets for advanced underground coal-extraction systems. [Identification of location and geology of deposit for which greatest savings can be realized by advanced mining systems in 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies resource targets appropriate for federal sponsorship of research and development of advanced underground coal mining systems. In contrast to previous research, which focused on a particular resource type, this study made a comprehensive examination of both conventional and unconventional coals, with particular attention to exceptionally thin and thick seams, steeply dipping beds, and multiple seam geometry. The major thrust of the targeting analysis was forecasting which coals would be of clear commercial significance at the beginning of the 21st century under three widely different scenarios for coal demand. The primary measure of commercial importance was an estimate of the aggregate dollar savings realized by consumers if advanced technology were available to mine coal at prices at or below the price projected for conventional technology in the year 2000. Both deterministic and probabilistic savings estimates were prepared for each demand scenario. The results indicate that the resource of primary importance is flat-lying bituminous coal of moderate thickness, under moderate cover, and located within the lower 48 states. Resources of secondary importance are the flat-lying multiple seams and thin seams (especially those in Appalachia). The rather substantial deposits of bituminous coal in North Alaska and the deeply buried lignites of the Gulf Coast present transportation and ground control problems which appear to postpone their commercial importance well beyond 2000. Steeply dipping coals, abandoned pillars, and exceptionally thick western coals may be important in some regions or sub-regions, but the limited tonnage available places them in a position of tertiary importance.

Hoag, J.H.; Whipple, D.W.; Habib-Agahi, H.; Lavin, M.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fabrication and characterization of a lithium-glass-based composite neutron detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel composite, scintillating material intended for neutron detection and composed of small (1.5 mm) cubes of KG2-type lithium glass embedded in a matrix of scintillating plastic has been developed in the form of a 2.2"-diameter, 3.1"-tall cylindrical prototype loaded with $(5.82 \\pm 0.02)%$ lithium glass by mass. The response of the material when exposed to ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutrons and various $\\gamma$-ray sources has been studied; using the charge-integration method for pulse shape discrimination, good separation between neutron and $\\gamma$-ray events is observed and intrinsic efficiencies of $(5.88 \\pm 0.78)\\times 10^{-3}$ and $(7.80 \\pm 0.77)\\times 10^{-5}$ for ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutrons and ${}^{60}$Co $\\gamma$ rays are obtained; an upper limit for the sensitivity to ${}^{137}$Cs $\\gamma$ rays is determined to be $lithium glass can be detected in coincidence with a preceding elastic scattering event in the plastic scintillator; with this coincidence requirement, the intrinsic efficiency of the prototype detector for ${}^{60}$Co $\\gamma$ rays is $(9.65 \\pm 4.07)\\times 10^{-7}$ while its intrinsic efficiency for unmoderated ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutrons is $(2.21 \\pm 0.29)\\times 10^{-3}$. Through use of subregion-integration ratios in addition to the coincidence requirement, the efficiency for $\\gamma$ rays from ${}^{60}$Co is reduced to $(2.56 \\pm 3.15) \\times 10^{-7}$ while the ${}^{252}$Cf fission neutron efficiency becomes $(1.63 \\pm 0.22) \\times 10^{-3}$.

G. C. Rich; K. Kazkaz; H. P. Martinez; T. Gushue

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Changes in the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter system in the rat brain following subchronic inhalation exposure to 1-bromopropane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1-Bromopropane (1-BP) has been widely used as a cleaning agent and a solvent in industries, but the central neurotoxicity of 1-BP remains to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated the effects of subchronic inhalation exposure to 1-BP vapor on the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter system mediated by ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 1-BP vapor for 12 weeks (6h/day, 5 days/week) at a concentration of 400ppm, and, in order to investigate the expression and function of brain GABA type A (GABAA) receptors, total/messenger RNA was prepared from the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the control and 1-BP-exposed rats. Moreover, hippocampal slices were prepared, and the population spike (PS) amplitude and the slope of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) were investigated in the paired-pulse configuration of the extracellular recording technique. Using the Xenopus oocyte expression system, we compared GABA concentrationresponse curves obtained from oocytes injected with brain subregional mRNAs of control and 1-BP exposed rats, and observed no significant differences in apparent GABA affinity. On the other hand, paired-pulse inhibition of PS amplitude was significantly decreased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) by exposure to 1-BP, without any effect on the paired-pulse ratio of the fEPSP slopes, suggesting neuronal disinhibition in the DG. Moreover, RT-PCR analysis indicated decreased levels of GABAA receptor ?3 and ? subunit mRNAs in the hippocampus of 1-BP-exposed rats. These results demonstrate that subchronic inhalation exposure to 1-BP vapor reduces the function of the hippocampal \\{GABAergic\\} system, which could be due to changes in the expression and function of GABAA receptors, especially the ? subunit-containing GABAA receptors.

Susumu Ueno; Yasuhiro Yoshida; Yukiko Fueta; Toru Ishidao; Jiqin Liu; Naoki Kunugita; Nobuyuki Yanagihara; Hajime Hori

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

WIDE-FIELD SURVEY OF EMISSION-LINE STARS IN IC 1396  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made an extensive survey of emission-line stars in the IC 1396 H II region to investigate the low-mass population of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. A total of 639 H{alpha} emission-line stars were detected in an area of 4.2 deg{sup 2} and their i' photometry was measured. Their spatial distribution exhibits several aggregates near the elephant trunk globule (Rim A) and bright-rimmed clouds at the edge of the H II region (Rim B and SFO 37, 38, 39, 41), and near HD 206267, which is the main exciting star of the H II region. Based on the extinction estimated from the near-infrared color-color diagram, we have selected PMS star candidates associated with IC 1396. The age and mass were derived from the extinction-corrected color-magnitude diagram and theoretical PMS tracks. Most of our PMS candidates have ages of <3 Myr and masses of 0.2-0.6 M{sub Sun }. Although it appears that only a few stars were formed in the last 1 Myr in the east region of the exciting star, the age difference among subregions in our surveyed area is not clear from the statistical test. Our results may suggest that massive stars were born after the continuous formation of low-mass stars for 10 Myr. The birth of the exciting star could be the late stage of slow but contiguous star formation in the natal molecular cloud. It may have triggered the formation of many low-mass stars at the dense inhomogeneity in and around the H II region by a radiation-driven implosion.

Nakano, M. [Faculty of Education and Welfare Science, Oita University, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Sugitani, K. [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Watanabe, M. [Department of Cosmosciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Fukuda, N. [Department of Computer Simulation, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Ishihara, D. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Ueno, M., E-mail: mnakano@oita-u.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Unreasonable Success of Quantum Probability I: Quantum Measurements as Uniform Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a 'uniform tension-reduction' (UTR) model, which allows to represent the probabilities associated with an arbitrary measurement situation and use it to explain the emergence of quantum probabilities (the Born rule) as 'uniform' fluctuations on this measurement situation. The model exploits the geometry of simplexes to represent the states, in a way that the measurement probabilities can be derived as the 'Lebesgue measure' of suitably defined convex subregions of the simplexes. We consider a very simple and evocative physical realization of the abstract model, using a material point particle which is acted upon by elastic membranes, which by breaking and collapsing produce the different possible outcomes. This easy to visualize mechanical realization allows one to gain considerable insight into the possible hidden structure of an arbitrary measurement process. We also show that the UTR-model can be further generalized into a 'general tension-reduction' (GTR) model, describing conditions of lack of knowledge generated by 'non-uniform' fluctuations. In this ampler framework, particularly suitable to describe experiments in cognitive science, we define and motivate a notion of 'universal measurement', describing the most general possible condition of lack of knowledge in a measurement, emphasizing that the uniform fluctuations characterizing quantum measurements can also be understood as an average over all possible forms of non-uniform fluctuations which can be actualized in a measurement context. This means that the Born rule of quantum mechanics can be understood as a first order approximation of a more general non-uniform theory, thus explaining part of the great success of quantum probability in the description of different domains of reality. This is the first part of a two-part article.

Diederik Aerts; Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION IN DISK GALAXIES: CHARACTERIZING SIMULATED VERSUS OBSERVED CLOUD CATALOGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a study of simulated giant molecular clouds (GMCs) formed in a Milky Way-type galactic disk with a flat rotation curve. This simulation, which does not include star formation or feedback, produces clouds with masses ranging between 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} and 10{sup 7} M{sub ?}. We compare our simulated cloud population to two observational surveys: the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey and the BIMA All-Disk Survey of M33. An analysis of the global cloud properties as well as a comparison of Larson's scaling relations is carried out. We find that simulated cloud properties agree well with the observed cloud properties, with the closest agreement occurring between the clouds at comparable resolution in M33. Our clouds are highly filamentarya property that derives both from their formation due to gravitational instability in the sheared galactic environment, as well as to cloud-cloud gravitational encounters. We also find that the rate at which potentially star-forming gas accumulates within dense regionswherein n{sub thresh} ? 10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}is 3% per 10 Myr, in clouds of roughly 10{sup 6} M{sub ?}. This suggests that star formation rates in observed clouds are related to the rates at which gas can be accumulated into dense subregions within GMCs via filamentary flows. The most internally well-resolved clouds are chosen for listing in a catalog of simulated GMCsthe first of its kind. The cataloged clouds are available as an extracted data set from the global simulation.

Benincasa, Samantha M.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Tasker, Elizabeth J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dosevolume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dosevolume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

Schlaefer, Alexander [Medical Robotics Group, Universitt zu Lbeck, Lbeck 23562, Germany and Institute of Medical Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany)] [Medical Robotics Group, Universitt zu Lbeck, Lbeck 23562, Germany and Institute of Medical Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany); Viulet, Tiberiu [Medical Robotics Group, Universitt zu Lbeck, Lbeck 23562 (Germany)] [Medical Robotics Group, Universitt zu Lbeck, Lbeck 23562 (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander; Frweger, Christoph [European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany)] [European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) Pharmacokinetics in FaDu Xenograft Tumors and Correlation With Microscopic Markers of Hypoxia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The behavior of copper-64-diacetyl-bis(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 64}Cu-ATSM) in hypoxic tumors was examined through a combination of in vivo dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiographic and histologic evaluation using a xenograft model of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: {sup 64}Cu-ATSM was administered during dynamic PET imaging, and temporal changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution within tumors were evaluated for at least 1 hour and up to 18 hours. Animals were sacrificed at either 1 hour (cohort A) or after 18 hours (cohort B) postinjection of radiotracer and autoradiography performed. Ex vivo analysis of microenvironment subregions was conducted by immunohistochemical staining for markers of hypoxia (pimonidazole hydrochloride) and blood flow (Hoechst-33342). Results: Kinetic analysis revealed rapid uptake of radiotracer by tumors. The net influx (K{sub i}) constant was 12-fold that of muscle, whereas the distribution volume (V{sub d}) was 5-fold. PET images showed large tumor-to-muscle ratios, which continually increased over the entire 18-hour course of imaging. However, no spatial changes in {sup 64}Cu-ATSM distribution occurred in PET imaging at 20 minutes postinjection. Microscopic intratumoral distribution of {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole were not correlated at 1 hour or after 18 hours postinjection, nor was {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and Hoechst-33342. Conclusions: The oxygen partial pressures at which {sup 64}Cu-ATSM and pimonidazole are reduced and bound in cells are theorized to be distinct and separable. However, this study demonstrated that microscopic distributions of these tracers within tumors are independent. Researchers have shown {sup 64}Cu-ATSM uptake to be specific to malignant expression, and this work has also demonstrated clear tumor targeting by the radiotracer.

McCall, Keisha C.; Humm, John L.; Bartlett, Rachel [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Reese, Megan [Radiochemistry and Imaging Sciences Service, Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Radiochemistry and Imaging Sciences Service, Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Carlin, Sean, E-mail: carlins@mskcc.org [Radiochemistry and Imaging Sciences Service, Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Radiochemistry and Imaging Sciences Service, Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SHOCKS AND THERMAL CONDUCTION FRONTS IN RETRACTING RECONNECTED FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a model for plasma heating produced by time-dependent, spatially localized reconnection within a flare current sheet separating skewed magnetic fields. The reconnection creates flux tubes of new connectivity which subsequently retract at Alfvenic speeds from the reconnection site. Heating occurs in gas-dynamic shocks (GDSs) which develop inside these tubes. Here we present generalized thin flux tube equations for the dynamics of reconnected flux tubes, including pressure-driven parallel dynamics as well as temperature-dependent, anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity. The evolution of tubes embedded in a uniform, skewed magnetic field, following reconnection in a patch, is studied through numerical solutions of these equations, for solar coronal conditions. Even though viscosity and thermal conductivity are negligible in the quiet solar corona, the strong GDSs generated by compressing plasma inside reconnected flux tubes generate large velocity and temperature gradients along the tube, rendering the diffusive processes dominant. They determine the thickness of the shock that evolves up to a steady state value, although this condition may not be reached in the short times involved in a flare. For realistic solar coronal parameters, this steady state shock thickness might be as long as the entire flux tube. For strong shocks at low Prandtl numbers, typical of the solar corona, the GDS consists of an isothermal sub-shock where all the compression and cooling occur, preceded by a thermal front where the temperature increases and most of the heating occurs. We estimate the length of each of these sub-regions and the speed of their propagation.

Guidoni, S. E.; Longcope, D. W., E-mail: guidoni@physics.montana.ed [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Final cost reduction study for the Geysers Recharge Alternative. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not cost reduction opportunities exist for the Geysers Recharge Alternative as defined in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-Term Wastewater Project EIR/EIS. The City of Santa Rosa has been directed to have a plan for reclaimed water disposal in place by 1999 which will meet future capacity needs under all weather conditions. A Draft EIR/EIS released in July 1996 and a Final EIR certified in June 1997 examine four primary alternatives plus the No Action Alternative. Two of the primary alternatives involve agricultural irrigation with reclaimed water, either in western or southern Sonoma County. Another involves increased discharge of reclaimed water into the Russian River. The fourth involves using reclaimed water to replenish the geothermal reservoir at the Geysers. The addition of this water source would enable the Geysers operators to produce more steam from the geothermal area and thereby prolong the life and economic production level of the steamfield and the geothermal power plants supplied by the steamfield. This study provides additional refined cost estimates for new scenarios which utilize an alternative pipeline alignment and a range of reclaimed water flows, which deliver less water to the Geysers than proposed in the EIR/EIS (by distributing flow to other project components). Also, electrical power rates were revised to reflect the recent changes in costs associated with deregulation of the power industry. In addition, this report provides information on sources of potential public and private funding available and future environmental documentation required if the cost reduction scenarios were to be selected by the City as part of their preferred alternative.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Drought and flood monitoring for a large karst plateau in Southwest China using extended GRACE data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Droughts and floods alternately occur over a large karst plateau (YunGui Plateau) in Southwest China. Here we show that both the frequency and severity of droughts and floods over the plateau are intensified during the recent decade from three-decade total water storage anomalies (TWSA) generated by Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data and artificial neural network (ANN) models. The developed ANN models performed well in hindcasting TWSA for the plateau and its three sub-regions (i.e., the upper Mekong River, Pearl River, and Wujiang River basins), showing coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.91, 0.83, 0.76, and 0.57, respectively. The intensified climate extremes are indicative of large changes in the hydrological cycle and brought great challenges in water resource management there. The TWSA of the plateau remained fairly stable during the 1980s, and featured an increasing trend at a rate of 5.90.5mm/a in the 1990s interspersed extreme flooding in 1991 and during the second half of the 1990s. Since 2000, the TWSA fluctuated drastically, featuring severe spring droughts from 2003 to 2006, the most extreme spring drought on record in 2010, and severe flooding in 2008. The TWSA of the upper Mekong has decreased by ~100mm (~15km3) compared with that at the end of the 1990s. In addition to hindcasting TWSA, the developed approach could be effective in generating future TWSA and potentially bridge the gap between the current GRACE satellites and the GRACE Follow-On Mission expected to launch in 2017.

Di Long; Yanjun Shen; Alexander Sun; Yang Hong; Laurent Longuevergne; Yuting Yang; Bin Li; Lu Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Deriving long term snow cover extent dataset from AVHRR and MODIS data: Central Asia case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We computed the daily AVHRR snow cover from all available AVHRR level1b raw data over central Asia (CA) with an aggregated rating based snow identification scheme. The daily AVHRR snow cover was further processed into an 8-day maximum-snow-extent data, and then went through a set of spatial and temporal filters to fill cloud or gap pixels. A correction method based on known long term snow probability in small sub-regions has been developed for computing corrected 8-day AVHRR snow cover, which is comparable to 8-day MODIS snow data. Validation of the daily AVHRR snow product against ground snow survey suggested a high accuracy of the snow identification scheme. Comparison of the daily AVHRR snow cover with the daily MODIS snow cover in Amu Dar'ya River basin within CA showed high accuracy of daily AVHRR snow, with a general accuracy of 99.60% and Kappa Coefficient of 0.92 in the basin. Comparison of the corrected 8-day AVHRR snow cover with 8-day MODIS cloud/gap free snow cover in the same basin also showed high comparability between both data, with a general accuracy of 95.61% and Kappa Coefficient of 0.84. Seasonal snow cover analysis in Amu Dar'ya River basin revealed the spatial and temporal patterns of snow distribution and negative trends in snow cover duration in 1986 to 2008 due to earlier snow melting dates. The newly developed long-term snow dataset from AVHRR and MODIS data over CA, with its high accuracy and internal comparability, is suitable for seasonal snow cover studies in mountainous regions over CA.

Hang Zhou; Elena Aizen; Vladimir Aizen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Assessing the Feasibility of Using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) is an active-interrogation nondestructive assay (NDA) technique capable of assaying spent nuclear fuel to determine plutonium content. Prior experimental work has definitively shown the technique capable of assaying plutonium isotope composition in spent-fuel pins to a precision of approximately 3%, with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. As a Grand Challenge to investigate NDA options for assaying spent fuel assemblies (SFAs) in the commercial fuel cycle, Idaho National Laboratory has explored the feasibility of using NRTA to assay plutonium in a whole SFA. The goal is to achieve a Pu assay precision of 1%. The NRTA technique uses low-energy neutrons from 0.1-40 eV, at the bottom end of the actinide-resonance range, in a time-of-flight arrangement. Isotopic composition is determined by relating absorption of the incident neutrons to the macroscopic cross-section of the actinides of interest in the material, and then using this information to determine the areal density of the isotopes in the SFA. The neutrons used for NRTA are produced using a pulsed, accelerator-based neutron source. Distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239,240,241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Based on extensive modeling of the problem using Monte Carlo-based simulation codes, our preliminary results suggest that by rotating an SFA to acquire four symmetric views, sufficient neutron transmission can be achieved to assay a SFA. In this approach multiple scan information for the same pins may also be unfolded to potentially allow the determination of plutonium for sub-regions of the assembly. For a 17 ? 17 pressurized water reactor SFA, a simplistic preliminary analysis indicates the mass of 239Pu may be determined with a precision on the order of 5%, without the need for operator-supplied fuel information or operational histories. This paper will present our work to date on this topic, indicate our preliminary findings for a conceptual assay approach, discuss resilience against spoofing, and outline our future plans for evaluating the NRTA technique for SFA plutonium determination.

D. L. Chichester; J. W. Sterbentz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SEARCH FOR ESCAPING LYMAN CONTINUUM FLUX AT z {approx} 1.3: EVIDENCE FOR AN EVOLVING IONIZING EMISSIVITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have obtained deep Hubble Space Telescope far-UV images of 15 starburst galaxies at z {approx} 1.3 in the GOODS fields to search for escaping Lyman continuum (LyC) photons. These are the deepest far-UV images (m{sub AB} = 28.7, 3{sigma}, 1'' diameter) over this large an area (4.83 arcmin{sup 2}) and provide some of the best escape fraction constraints for any galaxies at any redshift. We do not detect any individual galaxies, with 3{sigma} limits to the LyC ({approx}700 A) flux 50-149 times fainter (in f{sub {nu}}) than the rest-frame UV (1500 A) continuum fluxes. Correcting for the mean intergalactic medium (IGM) attenuation (factor {approx}2), as well as an intrinsic stellar Lyman break (factor {approx}3), these limits translate to relative escape fraction limits of f{sub esc,rel} < [0.03, 0.21]. The stacked limit is f{sub esc,rel}(3{sigma}) < 0.02. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to properly account for the expected distribution of line-of-sight IGM opacities. When including constraints from previous surveys at z {approx} 1.3 we find that, at the 95% confidence level, no more than 8% of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1.3 can have relative escape fractions greater than 0.50. Alternatively, if the majority of galaxies have low, but non-zero, escaping LyC, the escape fraction cannot be more than 0.04. In light of some evidence for strong LyC emission from UV-faint regions of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3, we also stack sub-regions of our galaxies with different surface brightnesses and detect no significant LyC flux at the f{sub esc,rel} < 0.03 level. Both the stacked limits and the limits from the Monte Carlo simulation suggest that the average ionizing emissivity (relative to non-ionizing UV emissivity) at z {approx} 1.3 is significantly lower than has been observed in LBGs at z {approx} 3. If the ionizing emissivity of star-forming galaxies is in fact increasing with redshift, it would help to explain the high photoionization rates seen in the IGM at z>4 and reionization of the IGM at z>6.

Siana, Brian; Bridge, Carrie R. [California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I.; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Colbert, James W.; Scarlata, Claudia [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ferguson, Henry C.; Brown, Thomas M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); De Mello, Duilia F. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Conselice, Christopher J. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Gardner, Jonathan P. [Astrophysics Science Division, Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Work Element B: 157. Sampling in Fish-Bearing Reaches [Variation in Productivity in Headwater Reaches of the Wenatchee Subbasin], Final Report for PNW Research Station.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied variation in productivity in headwater reaches of the Wenatchee subbasin for multiple field seasons with the objective that we could develop methods for monitoring headwater stream conditions at the subcatchment and stream levels, assign a landscape-scale context via the effects of geoclimatic parameters on biological productivity (macroinvertebrates and fish) and use this information to identify how variability in productivity measured in fishless headwaters is transmitted to fish communities in downstream habitats. In 2008, we addressed this final objective. In collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks we found some broad differences in the production of aquatic macroinvertebrates and in fish abundance across categories that combine the effects of climate and management intensity within the subbasin (ecoregions). From a monitoring standpoint, production of benthic macroinvertebrates was not a good predictor of drifting macroinvertebrates and therefore might be a poor predictor of food resources available to fish. Indeed, there is occasionally a correlation between drifting macroinvertebrate abundance and fish abundance which suggests that headwater-derived resources are important. However, fish in the headwaters appeared to be strongly food-limited and there was no evidence that fishless headwaters provided a consistent subsidy to fish in reaches downstream. Fish abundance and population dynamics in first order headwaters may be linked with similar metrics further down the watershed. The relative strength of local dynamics and inputs into productivity may be constrained or augmented by large-scale biogeoclimatic control. Headwater streams are nested within watersheds, which are in turn nested within ecological subregions; thus, we hypothesized that local effects would not necessarily be mutually exclusive from large-scale influence. To test this we examined the density of primarily salmonid fishes at several spatial and temporal scales within a major sub-basin of the Columbia River and associations of density with ecoregion and individuals drainages within the sub-basin. We further examined habitat metrics that show positive associations with fish abundance to see if these relationships varied at larger spatial scales. We examined the extent to which headwater fish density and temporal variation in density were correlated between the headwaters and the main tributaries of the sub-basin, and the influence of ecoregion influence on density differences, particularly at wider temporal scales. Finally, we examined demographic parameters such as growth and emigration to determine whether density-dependence differs among ecoregions or whether responses were more strongly influenced by the demography of the local fish population.

Polivka, Karl; Bennett, Rita L. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Wenatchee, WA

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vacar virginia-carolinas subregion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

122

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro?Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The studies summarized herein were conducted during 20092014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), a practice called CO2 sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy?funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional?scale and point?scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo?engineering information was developed through a small?scale test of CO2 injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial?scale flow rate of CO2 injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial?scale mass of CO2 (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO2 within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS?related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional?scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial?scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in this report. Another group of studies report the results of reservoir flow simulations that estimate the progress and outcomes of hypothetical CCS projects carried out within the Knox (particularly within the Potosi Dolomite subunit, which, in places, is highly permeable) and within the overlying St. Peter Sandstone. In these studies, the regional?scale information and a limited amount of detailed data from specific boreholes is used as the basis for modeling the CO2 injection process (dynamic modeling). The simulation studies were conducted progressively, with each successive study designed to refine the conclusions of the preceding one or to answer additional questions. The simulation studies conclude that at Decatur, Illinois or a geologically similar site, the Potosi Dolomite reservoir may provide adequate injectivity and capacity for commercial?scale injection through a single injection well. This conclusion depends on inferences from seismic?data attributes that certain highly permeable horizons observed in the wells represent laterally persistent, porous vuggy zones that are vertically more common than initially evident from wellbore data. Lateral persistence of vuggy zones is supported by isotopic evidence that the conditions that caused vug development (near?surface processes) were of regional rather than local scale. Other studies address aspects of executing and managing a CCS project that targets a Knox reservoir. These studies cover well drilling, public interactions, representation of datasets and conclusions using geographic information system (GIS) platforms, and risk management.

Leetaru, Hannes

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z