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Sample records for vacar virginia-carolinas subregion

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp - FL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    06 Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp - FL 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corp. (FL.06 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to US EPA and State of Florida Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Conserv Corporation FL.06-1 Location: Nichols , Florida FL.06-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 FL.06-1 Site Operations: Process development studies and pilot plant testing of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid during the mid-1950s. Site Disposition:

  2. w. T. Thorntot-l, OR RADIOLOGICAL STATUS OF FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ()r' 2J ;3:7 . - w. T. Thorntot-l, OR RADIOLOGICAL STATUS OF FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA ... S U R N A M E REAllen: cav F . - DATE 111877 wj?77 L 1 Form ERDA-318 (S-76) E R D A M ...

  3. Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Greater Mekong Subregion Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion AgencyCompany Organization AIT-UNEP Regional...

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Subregion 3 Presentation 5-12-09.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southwest Power Pool Sub-Regional Planning Meeting Sub-Regional Area 3 David Sargent May 12, 2009 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 2 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 3 Five Year Construction Plan 2009 Bull Shoals Dam Bus Upgrade - from 600 to 1200/2000 amps The bus is a limiting element for the line going from Bull Shoals toward Harrison. New Madrid 161/69 kV Autotransformer Replacement New Madrid-Malden-Piggott-Kennett 69 kV Line Rebuild - 55 miles of line collapsed during an ice

  5. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of underflow into the

  6. Image subregion querying using color correlograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Jing; Kumar, Shanmugasundaram Ravi; Mitra, Mandar; Zhu, Wei-Jing

    2002-01-01

    A color correlogram (10) is a representation expressing the spatial correlation of color and distance between pixels in a stored image. The color correlogram (10) may be used to distinguish objects in an image as well as between images in a plurality of images. By intersecting a color correlogram of an image object with correlograms of images to be searched, those images which contain the objects are identified by the intersection correlogram.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Carlsen.ppt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOUTHERN COMPANY ELECTRIC PRODUCTION & TRANSMISSION FACILITIES LEGEND Southeastern Regional Transmission Planning Process TVA VACAR AEP Southern Entergy Florida 2400 1500 1000 2000 ...

  8. Electric mergers: Transmission pricing, market size, and effects on competition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legato, C.D.

    1996-06-01

    The prospect of deregulation has introducted a wave of mergers among electric utilities. Most of these mergers would fail an antitrust review because, by combining generation assets of interconnected utilities, they have substantially reduced potential competition in generation. In fact, one can predict that most mergers of utilities that operate within the same power pool or reliability region will be anticompetitive, even if they are not interconnected. Using an antitrust analysis, this article illustrates the potential anticompetitive effects of mergers between interconnected utilities. It concludes that the relevant geographic market will be an area in which a single, area-wide transmission price is charged. Moreover, it concludes that this area and, hence, the relevant market will likely span an area no larger than the Mid-American Interconnected Network or the Virginia/Carolina subregion of the Southeastern Reliability Council. Assuming markets of this size, the data on resulting concentration will show severe consequences for mergers of the sort that were announced in 1995 and 1996.

  9. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  10. Maintaining environmental quality while expanding biomass production: Sub-regional U.S. policy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

    2013-03-01

    This paper evaluates environmental policy effects on ligno-cellulosic biomass production and environ- mental outcomes using an integrated bioeconomic optimization model. The environmental policy integrated climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate crop yields and environmental indicators in current and future potential bioenergy cropping systems based on weather, topographic and soil data. The crop yield and environmental outcome parameters from EPIC are combined with biomass transport costs and economic parameters in a representative farmer profit-maximizing mathematical optimization model. The model is used to predict the impact of alternative policies on biomass production and environmental outcomes. We find that without environmental policy, rising biomass prices initially trigger production of annual crop residues, resulting in increased greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, and nutrient losses to surface and ground water. At higher biomass prices, perennial bioenergy crops replace annual crop residues as biomass sources, resulting in lower environmental impacts. Simulations of three environmental policies namely a carbon price, a no-till area subsidy, and a fertilizer tax reveal that only the carbon price policy systematically mitigates environmental impacts. The fertilizer tax is ineffectual and too costly to farmers. The no-till subsidy is effective only at low biomass prices and is too costly to government.

  11. NEW MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS COMPLEX AND AGES OF ITS SUB-REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, B.; Bessell, M. S.

    2012-07-15

    We have spectroscopically identified {approx}100 G-, K-, and M-type members of the Scorpius-Centaurus complex. To deduce the age of these young stars we compare their Li {lambda}6708 absorption line strengths against those of stars in the TW Hydrae association and {beta} Pictoris moving group. These line strengths indicate that Sco-Cen stars are younger than {beta} Pic stars whose ages of {approx}12 Myr have previously been derived from a kinematic traceback analysis. Our derived age, {approx}10 Myr, for stars in the Lower Centaurus Crux and Upper Centaurus Lupus subgroups of ScoCen is younger than previously published ages based on the moving cluster method and upper main-sequence fitting. The discrepant ages are likely due to an incorrect (or lack of) cross-calibration between model-dependent and model-independent age-dating methods.

  12. Impacts of climate change on sub-regional electricity demand and distribution in the southern United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allen, Melissa R.; Fernandez, Steven J.; Fu, Joshua S.; Olama, Mohammed M.

    2016-07-25

    New tools are employed to develop an electricity demand map for the southeastern United States at neighborhood resolution to serve as a baseline from which to project increases in electricity demand due to a rise in global and local temperature and to population shifts motivated by increases in extreme weather events due to climate change. We find that electricity demand increases due to temperature rise over the next 40 years have a much smaller impact than those due to large population influx. In addition, we find evidence that some, sections of the national electrical grid are more adaptable to thesemore » population shifts and changing demand than others are; and that detailed projections of changing local electricity demand patterns are viable and important for planning at the urban level.« less

  13. Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' DEC 5 1984 Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Mr. Wallo: The Divisfon of Remedial Action Projects staff has reviewed the authority review documents for Gardinler, Inc., Tampa, Florida; Conserv (formerly Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.), Nichols, Florida; and Blockson Chemical co., Joliet, Illinois. Based on the content therein and in consultation with Mr. Steve Miller, Office of General Counsel

  14. Mr. Harry S. Cohen

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    a50b Mr. Harry S. Cohen 2956 Hathaway Road Apartment 1105 ' Richmond, Virginia 23225 Dear Mr. Cohen: ..:: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on the former site of the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, located.at @I8 Perry Street in Richmond, Virginia, to determine whether It contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Manhattan Engineer District and the

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mobil Oil Corp - VA 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mobil Oil Corp - VA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mobil Oil Corp. (VA.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation VA.01-1 Location: 818 Perry Street , Richmond , Virginia VA.01-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 VA.01-2 VA.01-3 Site Operations: Research/Development to recover Uranium as a byproduct of phosphate production; preparatory process for pilot plant scale operation at Nichols, Florida.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reynolds Metals Co - VA 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Reynolds Metals Co - VA 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REYNOLDS METALS CO. (VA.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation VA.04-1 Location: 818 Perry Street , Richmond , Virginia VA.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 VA.04-2 VA.04-3 Site Operations: Preparatory process development involving only gram quantities of uranium performed in the 1950s. VA.04-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  17. DOE/EV-0005/18

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 w9-2/ Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program Radiological Survey of the Former Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation Uranium Recovery Pilot Plant, Nichols, Florida January 1980 Final Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview Division of Environmental Control Technology .-_.--l.."-.-.- .- ..I ._--, * "--. . . .__ DOE/EV-0005/18 UC-70 Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action

  18. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . CONTENTS INTROOUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History,and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES 9 1 1 2 2 2 4 ii ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA CHEMICAL CORPORATION RICHMOND. VIRGINIA INTROLJUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of ,Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Deconunissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions, has reviewed the past activities of

  19. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES ii Pa e -5 1 : 2 2 4 ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER VIRGINIA-CAROLINA CHEMICAL CORPORATION RICHMOND, VIRGINIA INTROUUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and divisions, has reviewed the past activities of

  20. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

  1. United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In June 1951, the Commission established the ECLAC subregional headquarters in Mexico City, which serves the needs of the Central American subregion, and in December...

  2. Residential Segmentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (PDF, 96 pages) Sub-regional overviews and segment personalizations, including demographics, attributes and other information specific to each sub-region. View the reports for...

  3. Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2006-11-01

    Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world; much work is going on to optimize engine and battery operations for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, there has generally been the expectation that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of the vehicles, because the recharging would only occur during offpeak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough that capacity planning will respond adequately. But this expectation does not incorporate that endusers will have control of the time of recharging and the inclination for people will be to plug in when convenient for them, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of introducing a number of plug-in hybrid vehicles onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require both the addition of new electric capacity along with an increase in the utilization of existing capacity. Local distribution grids will see a change in their utilization pattern, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to recharge the vehicles will be different depending on the region of the country and timing when the PHEVs recharge. We conducted an analysis of what the grid impact may be in 2018 with one million PHEVs added to the VACAR sub-region of the Southeast Electric Reliability Council, a region that includes South Carolina, North Carolina, and much of Virginia. To do this, we used the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch model, which simulates the hourly dispatch of power generators to meet demand for a region over a given year. Depending on the vehicle, its battery, the charger voltage level, amperage, and duration, the impact on regional electricity demand varied from 1,400 to 6,000 MW. If recharging

  4. UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Statistics Subregional activities for development Trade and Investment Transport Environment and sustainable development Information and Communications Technology and...

  5. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  6. Transmission Services WIST Task Force Dynamic Transfer Capability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ("WIST"), a Task Force of technical staff primarily from Northwest and California transmission providers and sub-regional entities, completed a report documenting Phase 1 of its...

  7. United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population,...

  8. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Western Wind and Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of integrating up to 35% wind and solar energy in the WestConnect subregion and, more ... Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets This report ...

  9. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  10. Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

  11. Automated Feature Generation in Large-Scale Geospatial Libraries for Content-Based Indexing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Cheriydat, Anil; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Palathingal, Paul J; Potok, Thomas E; Price, Jeffery R

    2006-05-01

    We describe a method for indexing and retrieving high-resolution image regions in large geospatial data libraries. An automated feature extraction method is used that generates a unique and specific structural description of each segment of a tessellated input image file. These tessellated regions are then merged into similar groups, or sub-regions, and indexed to provide flexible and varied retrieval in a query-by-example environment. The methods of tessellation, feature extraction, sub-region clustering, indexing, and retrieval are described and demonstrated using a geospatial library representing a 153 km2 region of land in East Tennessee at 0.5 m per pixel resolution.

  12. Microsoft Word - Document2

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    min, average, and max average CO 2 emissions by month for AZNM subregion (lbs CO 2 MWh load) 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 January 800 1,100 1,400 1,700 February 800 1,100 1,400 1,700...

  13. Form EIA-411 for 2006",,"WINTER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WINTER" ,"Released: February 7, 2008" ,"Next Update: October 2008" "Table 5j. Winter (FRCC) Historical and Projected Demand and Capacity, Calendar Year 2006 " "Region","FRCC" "Subregion", "Country","U" ,"WINTER",,"Actual","Projected"

  14. Robust Accurate Non-Invasive Analyte Monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-11-03

    An improved method and apparatus for determining noninvasively and in vivo one or more unknown values of a known characteristic, particularly the concentration of an analyte in human tissue. The method includes: (1) irradiating the tissue with infrared energy (400 nm-2400 nm) having at least several wavelengths in a given range of wavelengths so that there is differential absorption of at least some of the wavelengths by the tissue as a function of the wavelengths and the known characteristic, the differential absorption causeing intensity variations of the wavelengths incident from the tissue; (2) providing a first path through the tissue; (3) optimizing the first path for a first sub-region of the range of wavelengths to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the first sub-region; (4) providing a second path through the tissue; and (5) optimizing the second path for a second sub-region of the range, to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the second sub-region. In the preferred embodiment a third path through the tissue is provided for, which path is optimized for a third sub-region of the range. With this arrangement, spectral variations which are the result of tissue differences (e.g., melanin and temperature) can be reduced. At least one of the paths represents a partial transmission path through the tissue. This partial transmission path may pass through the nail of a finger once and, preferably, twice. Also included are apparatus for: (1) reducing the arterial pulsations within the tissue; and (2) maximizing the blood content i the tissue.

  15. US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves, 1977-1993 (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The diskette contains all data published in the reserves and production tables of each annual report of U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves from 1977 through 1991 listed in 15 separate ASCII files, one per report year. Within each annual file, the records are separated by hydrocarbon type into the following: Crude Oil, Associated Dissolved Natural Gas, Nonassociated Natural Gas, Total Natural Gas, Lease Condensate, Natural Gas Plant Liquids, and Natural Gas Liquids. During the 15 years collated here, the data items gathered and published have changed, with dry versus wet natural gas being the primary difference and the consequent separation of natural gas liquids. The records are also separated by State or State subregions and a few tabulated combinations of States and State subregions. The EIA requirement to hold confidential the data gathered during the annual surveys has driven changes in the States, subregions and combinations published and therefore included in the diskette over the years. Data given on the records are the following: Proved reserves, beginning-of-year; Net Adjustments; Revision increases; Revision decreases; Extensions; New field Discoveries; New reservoirs in old fields; Production; and Reserves, end-of-year.

  16. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8-000 Progress in modeling BWRs for PCI Challenge Problem Kevin Clarno 1 , Bob Salko 1 , Brendan Kochunas 2 , Scott Palmtag 3 1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 University of Michigan 3 Core Physics, LLC 2 CASL-U-2016-1088-000 Goal: Understand margin to PCI failure during a control blade maneuver * In 2018, demonstrate BWR PCI capabilities: - Utilizing VERA-CS with Bison(2D) coupled, complete BWR core subregion depletion with maneuver to identify PCI limiting fuel rods; - Utilizing Bison(3D)

  17. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    WINTER Table 5j . Winter (FRCC) Historical and Projected Demand and Capacity, Calendar Year 2007 Region FRCC Subregion Country U WINTER Actual Line# DESCRIPTION 2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 2010/2011 1 Unrestricted Non-coincident Peak Demand (Starting Point) = 2+1a+1b-1c-1d 41,701 49,601 50,463 51,606 1a New Conservation (Energy Efficiency) - - - 1b Estimated Diversity - - - - 1c Additions for non-member load (load served by non-registered LSE's in a region) - - - - 1d Stand-by Load Under

  18. Next Update: October 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Various) Country - with Total (T) for sub- regions NERC Region NERC Sub-region Type Operating (kV) Design (kV) Month Year From Terminal To Terminal Length (Miles) Type Pole Type Pole Material Size (MCM) Material Bundling Arrangement Present Ultimate Company Code Company Name Organizational Type US ERCOT - AC 121-150 138 245 5 2015 Allen Switch West Plano 3.5 OH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 44372 ONCOR I US ERCOT - AC 121-150 138 320 6 2012 Barney Davis Laguna 4.2 OH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3278 AEP/TCC I US ERCOT - AC

  19. Algorithm for Finding Similar Shapes in Large Molecular Structures Libraries

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-10-19

    The SHAPES software consists of methods and algorithms for representing and rapidly comparing molecular shapes. Molecular shapes algorithms are a class of algorithm derived and applied for recognizing when two three-dimensional shapes share common features. They proceed from the notion that the shapes to be compared are regions in three-dimensional space. The algorithms allow recognition of when localized subregions from two or more different shapes could never be superimposed by any rigid-body motion. Rigid-body motionsmore » are arbitrary combinations of translations and rotations.« less

  20. Form EIA-411 for 2006",,"SUMMER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SUMMER" ,"Released: February 7, 2008" ,"Next Update: October 2008" "Table 5a. Summer (FRCC) Historical and Projected Demand and Capacity, Calendar Year 2006 " "(Megawatts)" "Region","FRCC" "Subregion", "Country","U"," " ,"SUMMER",,"Actual","Projected" "Line#",,"DESCRIPTION",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016

  1. US Renewable Futures in the GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.J.; Mizrahi, A.H.; Karas, J.F.; Nathan, M.

    2011-10-01

    This report examines renewable energy deployment in the United States using a version of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) with a detailed representation of renewables; the GCAM-RE. Electricity generation was modeled in four generation segments and 12-subregions. This level of regional and sector detail allows a more explicit representation of renewable energy generation. Wind, solar thermal power, and central solar PV plants are implemented in explicit resource classes with new intermittency parameterizations appropriate for each technology. A scenario analysis examines a range of assumptions for technology characteristics, climate policy, and long distance transmission.

  2. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  3. Current Conditions Risk Assessment for the 300-FF-5 Groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Terri B.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Napier, Bruce A.; Peterson, Robert E.; Becker, James M.

    2007-11-01

    This report updates a baseline risk assessment for the 300 Area prepared in 1994. The update includes consideration of changes in contaminants of interest and in the environment that have occurred during the period of interim remedial action, i.e., 1996 to the present, as well as the sub-regions, for which no initial risk assessments have been conducted. In 1996, a record of decision (ROD) stipulated interim remedial action for groundwater affected by releases from 300 Area sources, as follows: (a) continued monitoring of groundwater that is contaminated above health-based levels to ensure that concentrations continue to decrease, and (b) institutional controls to ensure that groundwater use is restricted to prevent unacceptable exposure to groundwater contamination. In 2000, the groundwater beneath the two outlying sub-regions was added to the operable unit. In 2001, the first 5-year review of the ROD found that the interim remedy and remedial action objectives were still appropriate, although the review called for additional characterization activities. This report includes a current conditions baseline ecological and human health risk assessment using maximum concentrations in the environmental media of the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and downstream conditions at the City of Richland, Washington. The scope for this assessment includes only current measured environmental concentrations and current use scenarios. Future environmental concentrations and future land uses are not considered in this assessment.

  4. Bypass flow computations on the LOFA transient in a VHTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, Yu-Hsin; Johnson, Richard W.; Ferng, Yuh-Ming; Chieng, Ching-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Bypass flow in the prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is not intentionally designed to occur, but is present in the gaps between graphite blocks. Previous studies of the bypass flow in the core indicated that the cooling provided by flow in the bypass gaps had a significant effect on temperature and flow distributions for normal operating conditions. However, the flow and heat transports in the core are changed significantly after a Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA). This study aims to study the effect and role of the bypass flow after a LOFA in terms of the temperature and flow distributions and for the heat transport out of the core by natural convection of the coolant for a 1/12 symmetric section of the active core which is composed of images and mirror images of two sub-region models. The two sub-region models, 9 x 1/12 and 15 x 1/12 symmetric sectors of the active core, are employed as the CFD flow models using computational grid systems of 70.2 million and 117 million nodes, respectively. It is concluded that the effect of bypass flow is significant for the initial conditions and the beginning of LOFA, but the bypass flow has little effect after a long period of time in the transient computation of natural circulation.

  5. 3D liver segmentation using multiple region appearances and graph cuts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Jialin Zhang, Hongbo; Hu, Peijun; Lu, Fang; Kong, Dexing; Peng, Zhiyi

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Efficient and accurate 3D liver segmentations from contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images play an important role in therapeutic strategies for hepatic diseases. However, inhomogeneous appearances, ambiguous boundaries, and large variance in shape often make it a challenging task. The existence of liver abnormalities poses further difficulty. Despite the significant intensity difference, liver tumors should be segmented as part of the liver. This study aims to address these challenges, especially when the target livers contain subregions with distinct appearances. Methods: The authors propose a novel multiregion-appearance based approach with graph cuts to delineate the liver surface. For livers with multiple subregions, a geodesic distance based appearance selection scheme is introduced to utilize proper appearance constraint for each subregion. A special case of the proposed method, which uses only one appearance constraint to segment the liver, is also presented. The segmentation process is modeled with energy functions incorporating both boundary and region information. Rather than a simple fixed combination, an adaptive balancing weight is introduced and learned from training sets. The proposed method only calls initialization inside the liver surface. No additional constraints from user interaction are utilized. Results: The proposed method was validated on 50 3D CT images from three datasets, i.e., Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) training and testing set, and local dataset. On MICCAI testing set, the proposed method achieved a total score of 83.4 ± 3.1, outperforming nonexpert manual segmentation (average score of 75.0). When applying their method to MICCAI training set and local dataset, it yielded a mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 97.7% ± 0.5% and 97.5% ± 0.4%, respectively. These results demonstrated the accuracy of the method when applied to different computed tomography (CT) datasets

  6. SOLAR POLAR X-RAY JETS AND MULTIPLE BRIGHT POINTS: EVIDENCE FOR SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-02-15

    We present an analysis of X-ray bright points (BPs) and X-ray jets observed by Hinode/X-Ray Telescope on 2007 November 2-4, within the solar northern polar coronal hole. After selecting small subregions that include several BPs, we followed their brightness evolution over a time interval of a few hours, when several jets were observed. We find that most of the jets occurred in close temporal association with brightness maxima in multiple BPs: more precisely, most jets are closely correlated with the brightening of at least two BPs. We suggest that the jets result from magnetic connectivity changes that also induce the BP variability. We surmise that the jets and implied magnetic connectivity we describe are small-scale versions of the active-region-scale phenomenon, whereby flares and eruptions are triggered by interacting bipoles.

  7. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  9. US Renewable Futures in the GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.; Karas, Joseph F.; Nathan, Mayda

    2011-10-06

    This project examines renewable energy deployment in the United States using a version of the GCAM integrated assessment model with detailed a representation of renewables, the GCAM-RE. Electricity generation was modeled in four generation segments and 12-subregions. This level of regional and sectoral detail allows a more explicit representation of renewable energy generation. Wind, solar thermal power, and central solar PV plants are implemented in explicit resource classes with new intermittency parameterizations appropriate for each technology. A scenario analysis examines a range of assumptions for technology characteristics, climate policy, and long-distance transmission. We find that renewable generation levels grow over the century in all scenarios. As expected, renewable generation increases with lower renewable technology costs, more stringent climate policy, and if alternative low-carbon technology are not available. The availability of long distance transmission lowers policy costs and changes the renewable generation mix.

  10. WHAT DETERMINES THE DENSITY STRUCTURE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS? A CASE STUDY OF ORION B WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, N.; Andre, Ph.; Koenyves, V.; Motte, F.; Arzoumanian, D.; Didelon, P.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Roy, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Bressert, E.; Di Francesco, J.; Griffin, M.; and others

    2013-04-01

    A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this Letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel column density maps of Orion B, Aquila, and Polaris, obtained with the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS). We aim to understand which physical processes influence the PDF shape, and with which signatures. The PDFs of Orion B (Aquila) show a lognormal distribution for low column densities until A{sub V} {approx} 3 (6), and a power-law tail for high column densities, consistent with a {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -2} profile for the equivalent spherical density distribution. The PDF of Orion B is broadened by external compression due to the nearby OB stellar aggregates. The PDF of a quiescent subregion of the non-star-forming Polaris cloud is nearly lognormal, indicating that supersonic turbulence governs the density distribution. But we also observe a deviation from the lognormal shape at A{sub V} > 1 for a subregion in Polaris that includes a prominent filament. We conclude that (1) the point where the PDF deviates from the lognormal form does not trace a universal A{sub V} -threshold for star formation, (2) statistical density fluctuations, intermittency, and magnetic fields can cause excess from the lognormal PDF at an early cloud formation stage, (3) core formation and/or global collapse of filaments and a non-isothermal gas distribution lead to a power-law tail, and (4) external compression broadens the column density PDF, consistent with numerical simulations.

  11. The dense gas mass fraction of molecular clouds in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battisti, Andrew J.; Heyer, Mark H. E-mail: heyer@astro.umass.edu

    2014-01-10

    The mass fraction of dense gas within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) of the Milky Way is investigated using {sup 13}CO data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Plane Surveys and the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) of 1.1 mm dust continuum emission. A sample of 860 compact dust sources are selected from the BGPS catalog and kinematically linked to 344 clouds of extended (>3') {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission. Gas masses are tabulated for the full dust source and subregions within the dust sources with mass surface densities greater than 200 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}, which are assumed to be regions of enhanced volume density. Masses of the parent GMCs are calculated assuming optically thin {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The mean fractional mass of dust sources to host GMC mass is 0.11{sub −0.06}{sup +0.12}. The high column density subregions comprise 0.07{sub −0.05}{sup +0.13} of the mass of the cloud. Owing to our assumptions, these values are upper limits to the true mass fractions. The fractional mass of dense gas is independent of GMC mass and gas surface density. The low dense gas mass fraction suggests that the formation of dense structures within GMCs is the primary bottleneck for star formation. The distribution of velocity differences between the dense gas and the low density material along the line of sight is also examined. We find a strong, centrally peaked distribution centered on zero velocity displacement. This distribution of velocity differences is modeled with radially converging flows toward the dense gas position that are randomly oriented with respect to the observed line of sight. These models constrain the infall velocities to be 2-4 km s{sup –1} for various flow configurations.

  12. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di; Clemens, D. P.; Krco, Marko

    2011-11-01

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A{sub V} {approx} 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 {mu}G and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales ({approx}2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  13. An informative panel of somatic cell hybrids for physical mapping on human chromosome 19q

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachinski, L.L. ); Krahe, R.; White, B.F.; Siciliano, M.J. ); Wieringa, B. ); Shaw, D. ); Korneluk, R. ); Thompson, L.H. ); Johnson, K. )

    1993-02-01

    A panel of 22 somatic cell hybrids divides the q arm of human chromosome 19 into 22 ordered subregions. The panel was characterized with respect to 41 genetic markers. In most cases, a single fragment of chromosome 19 was present in each hybrid. In two cell lines the presence of multiple fragments of the chromosome was demonstrated by segregation of these fragments in subclones. On the basis of the results of marker analysis in this panel, the most likely order of the markers tested is MANB-D19S7-PEPD-D19S9-GPI-C/EBP-TGFB1-(CYP2A,BCKDHA,CGM2,NCA)-PSG1-(D19S8,XRCC1)-(ATP1A3,D19S19)-(D19S37,APOC2)-CKM-ERCC2-ERCC1-(D19S116,D19S117)-(D19S118,D19S119,D19S63,p36.1,D19S112,D19S62,D19S51,D19S54,D19S55)-pW39-D19S6-(D19S50,TNNT1)-D19S22-(HRC,CGB,FTL,PRKCG)-qter. This gene order is generally consistent with published physical and genetic mapping orders, although some discrepancies exist. By means of a mapping function that relates the frequency of cosegregation of markers to the distance between them, estimates were made of the sizes, in megabases, of the 19q subregions. The relative physical distances between reference markers were compared with published genetic distances for 19q. Excellent correlation was observed, suggesting that the physical distances calculated by this method are predictive of genetic distances in this region of the genome and, therefore, are just as useful in estimating relative positions of markers. 73 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

    2008-11-21

    Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

  15. Destined for indecision? A critical analysis of waste management practices in England from 1996 to 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, T.D.; Shaw, P.J.; Williams, I.D.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Critical analysis of municipal waste management practices and performance in England. • Trends visualised via innovative ternary plots and changes and reasons explored. • Performance 1996–2013 moved slowly away from landfill dominance. • Large variations in %s of waste landfilled, incinerated and recycled/composted. • Progress to resource efficiency slow; affected by poor planning and hostile disputes. - Abstract: European nations are compelled to reduce reliance on landfill as a destination for household waste, and should, in principle, achieve this goal with due recognition of the aims and principles of the waste hierarchy. Past research has predominantly focused on recycling, whilst interactions between changing waste destinies, causes and drivers of household waste management change, and potential consequences for the goal of the waste hierarchy are less well understood. This study analysed Local Authority Collected Waste (LACW) for England, at national, regional and sub-regional level, in terms of the destination of household waste to landfill, incineration and recycling. Information about waste partnerships, waste management infrastructure and collection systems was collected to help identify and explain changes in waste destinies. Since 1996, the proportion of waste landfilled in England has decreased, in tandem with increases in recycling and incineration. At the regional and sub-regional (Local Authority; LA) level, there have been large variations in the relative proportions of waste landfilled, incinerated and recycled or composted. Annual increases in the proportion of household waste incinerated were typically larger than increases in the proportion recycled. The observed changes took place in the context of legal and financial drivers, and the circumstances of individual LAs (e.g. landfill capacity) also explained the changes seen. Where observed, shifts from landfill towards incineration constitute an approach whereby waste

  16. Validation of attenuation models for ground motion applications in central and eastern North America

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2015-11-01

    Recently developed attenuation models are incorporated into standard one-dimensional (1-D) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), effectively making them two-dimensional (2-D) and eliminating the need to create different GMPEs for an increasing number of sub-regions. The model is tested against a data set of over 10,000 recordings from 81 earthquakes in North America. The use of attenuation models in GMPEs improves our ability to fit observed ground motions and should be incorporated into future national hazard maps. The improvement is most significant at higher frequencies and longer distances which have a greater number of wave cycles. This has implications for themore » rare high-magnitude earthquakes, which produce potentially damaging ground motions over wide areas, and drive the seismic hazards. Furthermore, the attenuation models can be created using weak ground motions, they could be developed for regions of low seismicity where empirical recordings of ground motions are uncommon and do not span the full range of magnitudes and distances.« less

  17. Quality analysis of the solution produced by dissection algorithms applied to the traveling salesman problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cesari, G.

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to analyze experimentally the quality of the solution obtained with dissection algorithms applied to the geometric Traveling Salesman Problem. Starting from Karp`s results. We apply a divide and conquer strategy, first dividing the plane into subregions where we calculate optimal subtours and then merging these subtours to obtain the final tour. The analysis is restricted to problem instances where points are uniformly distributed in the unit square. For relatively small sets of cities we analyze the quality of the solution by calculating the length of the optimal tour and by comparing it with our approximate solution. When the problem instance is too large we perform an asymptotical analysis estimating the length of the optimal tour. We apply the same dissection strategy also to classical heuristics by calculating approximate subtours and by comparing the results with the average quality of the heuristic. Our main result is the estimate of the rate of convergence of the approximate solution to the optimal solution as a function of the number of dissection steps, of the criterion used for the plane division and of the quality of the subtours. We have implemented our programs on MUSIC (MUlti Signal processor system with Intelligent Communication), a Single-Program-Multiple-Data parallel computer with distributed memory developed at the ETH Zurich.

  18. THE NORTH AMERICAN AND PELICAN NEBULAE. II. MIPS OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Carpenter, J. M.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Cole, D. M.; Strom, S. E.; Wolff, S. C.

    2011-04-01

    We present observations of {approx}7 deg{sup 2} of the North American and Pelican Nebulae region at 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m with the Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We incorporate the MIPS observations with earlier Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations, as well as archival near-infrared (IR) and optical data. We use the MIPS data to identify 1286 young stellar object (YSO) candidates. IRAC data alone can identify 806 more YSO candidates, for a total of 2076 YSO candidates. Prior to the Spitzer observations, there were only {approx}200 YSOs known in this region. Three subregions within the complex are highlighted as clusters: the Gulf of Mexico, the Pelican, and the Pelican's Hat. The Gulf of Mexico cluster is subject to the highest extinction (A{sub V} at least {approx}30) and has the widest range of infrared colors of the three clusters, including the largest excesses and by far the most point-source detections at 70 {mu}m. Just 3% of the cluster members were previously identified; we have redefined this cluster as about 10-100 times larger (in projected area) than was previously realized.

  19. Use of density equalizing map projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates of arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease-rates are constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be reliably calculated. The present report describes the first successful application of the DEMP technique to a sizeable ``real-world`` data set of epidemiologic interest. An improved DEMP algorithm [GUSE93, CLOS94] was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques [SATA90, REYN91]. The results from the DEMP analysis and a conventional analysis are compared.

  20. Density equalizing map projections (cartograms) in public health applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1998-05-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing some of the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP){copyright}. Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease risk is constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be calculated with validity. The DEMP algorithm was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques; namely, 401 childhood cancer cases in four counties of California. The distribution of cases on the transformed map was analyzed visually and statistically. To check the validity of the method, the identical analysis was performed on 401 artificial cases randomly generated under the assumption of uniform risk. No statistically significant evidence for geographic non-uniformity of rates was found, in agreement with the original analysis performed by the California Department of Health Services.

  1. An interactive grid generator for TOUGH family code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-09

    WinGridder has been developed for designing, generating, and visualizing (at various spatial scales) numerical grids used in reservoir simulations and groundwater modeling studies. It can save mesh files for TOUGH family codes and output additional grid information for various purposes in either graphic format or plain text format, many important features, such as inclined faults and offset, layering structure, local refinements, and embedded engineering structures, can be represented in the grid. The main advantages ofmore » this grid-generation software are its user friendly graphical interfaces, flexible grid design capabilities, efficient grid generation, and powerful searching and post-processing capability, especially for large size grid (e.g., a grid of million grid cells). The main improvements of the version 2.0 are (1) to add a capability of handling a repository with multiple sub-regions and specified drifts, (2) to use an interpolation method, instead of picking the nearest point, in calculating the geological data from the given digital geological model, and (3) enhanced searching and other capability.« less

  2. Karst subsidence in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Waste disposal site selection and facility design in regions dominated by carbonate bedrock must carefully consider karst development and the factors which contribute to subsidence activity. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory has completed a three phase study of karst subsidence in East Tennessee to quantify historical subsidence activity. The purpose of the study was to determine the principal factors which cause karst subsidence in the region. Techniques used and results obtained in this study form a basis for more detailed risk assessment at the local scale within the region. As development pressures diminish available land for various uses, risk-based land use decisions must be made to site critical facilities. To fulfill the study objectives a three phase study was designed including, (1) collection of subsidence data and compilation of a database, (2) performance of detailed studies of subsidence in three, two-to-five square-mile areas, and (3) synthesis of data obtained to; quantify the predominant sinkhole collapse dimensions, and identify events prior to subsidence or collapse events which may have caused the event, and estimate the intensity of subsidence as a function of geologic unit within subregional areas of higher and lower subsidence risk. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Comprehensive kinetic analysis of the plasma-wall transition layer in a strongly tilted magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tskhakaya, D. D.; Kos, L.

    2014-10-15

    The magnetized plasma-wall transition (MPWT) layer at the presence of the obliquity of the magnetic field to the wall consists of three sub-layers: the Debye sheath (DS), the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS), and the collisional pre-sheath (CPS) with characteristic lengths ?{sub D} (electron Debye length), ?{sub i} (ion gyro-radius), and ? (the smallest relevant collision length), respectively. Tokamak plasmas are usually assumed to have the ordering ?{sub D}??{sub i}??, when the above-mentioned sub-layers can be distinctly distinguished. In the limits of ?{sub Dm}(?{sub D}/?{sub i})?0 and ?{sub mc}(?{sub i}/?)?0 (asymptotic three-scale (A3S) limits), these sub-layers are precisely defined. Using the smallness of the tilting angle of the magnetic field to the wall, the ion distribution functions are found for three sub-regions in the analytic form. The equations and characteristic length-scales governing the transition (intermediate) regions between the neighboring sub-layers (CPS MPS and MPS DS) are derived, allowing to avoid the singularities arising from the ?{sub Dm}?0 and ?{sub mc}?0 approximations. The MPS entrance and the related kinetic form of the BohmChodura condition are successfully defined for the first time. At the DS entrance, the Bohm condition maintains its usual form. The results encourage further study and understanding of physics of the MPWT layers in the modern plasma facilities.

  4. Structural change in the coal industry: Coal industry concentration trends, 1970--1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, S.; Glover, W.

    1995-05-01

    This report evaluates the historical and current concentration of the US coal industry, with special consideration given to its potential impact on competitiveness and coal Prices. Four time periods are studied: 1970, 1980, 1990, and 1994. The report Presents data at various levels: nationwide, eastern US, western US, and subregions -- Powder River Basin, Rockies, Northern Appalachia, Central Appalachia, Southern Appalachia, Illinois Basin, and several smaller areas. The report presents data on mine size, number of mines, coal Prices, Production, and ownership. Herfindahl Hirschman indices (the surn of squares Of companies` market shares) were calculated on the coal Production and ownership data to represent concentration. Through these periods, the coal industry has been relatively unconcentrated aid highly competitive. However, in most parts of the country, concentration has increased dramatically since 1990, surpassing historical levels. Concentration is also expected to continue increasing. The effects of such concentration are felt unevenly, depending of factors unique to each coal buyer and each coal company merger, acquisition, or divestment. Generally, the population of potential suppliers for each buyer is limited quality constraints. Those buyers who are greatly limited by such factors can experience dramatic changes in the concentration of their supplier populations by mergers that may have little impact on other buyers.

  5. Measurement of fluid rotation, dilation, and displacement in particle image velocimetry using a Fourier–Mellin cross-correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giarra, Matthew N.; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2015-02-05

    Traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) uses discrete Cartesian cross correlations (CCs) to estimate the displacements of groups of tracer particles within small subregions of sequentially captured images. However, these CCs fail in regions with large velocity gradients or high rates of rotation. In this paper, we propose a new PIV correlation method based on the Fourier–Mellin transformation (FMT) that enables direct measurement of the rotation and dilation of particle image patterns. In previously unresolvable regions of large rotation, our algorithm significantly improves the velocity estimates compared to traditional correlations by aligning the rotated and stretched particle patterns prior to performing Cartesian correlations to estimate their displacements. Furthermore, our algorithm, which we term Fourier–Mellin correlation (FMC), reliably measures particle pattern displacement between pairs of interrogation regions with up to ±180° of angular misalignment, compared to 6–8° for traditional correlations, and dilation/compression factors of 0.5–2.0, compared to 0.9–1.1 for a single iteration of traditional correlations.

  6. Stream-reach Identification for New Run-of-River Hydropower Development through a Merit Matrix Based Geospatial Algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasha, M. Fayzul K.; Yeasmin, Dilruba; Kao, Shih-Chieh; Hadjerioua, Boualem; Wei, Yaxing; Smith, Brennan T

    2014-01-01

    Even after a century of development, the total hydropower potential from undeveloped rivers is still considered to be abundant in the United States. However, unlike evaluating hydropower potential at existing hydropower plants or non-powered dams, locating a feasible new hydropower plant involves many unknowns, and hence the total undeveloped potential is harder to quantify. In light of the rapid development of multiple national geospatial datasets for topography, hydrology, and environmental characteristics, a merit matrix based geospatial algorithm is proposed to help identify possible hydropower stream-reaches for future development. These hydropower stream-reaches sections of natural streams with suitable head, flow, and slope for possible future development are identified and compared using three different scenarios. A case study was conducted in the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) hydrologic subregions. It was found that a merit matrix based algorithm, which is based on the product of hydraulic head, annual mean flow, and average channel slope, can help effectively identify stream-reaches with high power density and small surface inundation. The identified stream-reaches can then be efficiently evaluated for their potential environmental impact, land development cost, and other competing water usage in detailed feasibility studies . Given that the selected datasets are available nationally (at least within the conterminous US), the proposed methodology will have wide applicability across the country.

  7. Measurement of fluid rotation, dilation, and displacement in particle image velocimetry using a Fourier–Mellin cross-correlation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giarra, Matthew N.; Charonko, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2015-02-05

    Traditional particle image velocimetry (PIV) uses discrete Cartesian cross correlations (CCs) to estimate the displacements of groups of tracer particles within small subregions of sequentially captured images. However, these CCs fail in regions with large velocity gradients or high rates of rotation. In this paper, we propose a new PIV correlation method based on the Fourier–Mellin transformation (FMT) that enables direct measurement of the rotation and dilation of particle image patterns. In previously unresolvable regions of large rotation, our algorithm significantly improves the velocity estimates compared to traditional correlations by aligning the rotated and stretched particle patterns prior to performingmore » Cartesian correlations to estimate their displacements. Furthermore, our algorithm, which we term Fourier–Mellin correlation (FMC), reliably measures particle pattern displacement between pairs of interrogation regions with up to ±180° of angular misalignment, compared to 6–8° for traditional correlations, and dilation/compression factors of 0.5–2.0, compared to 0.9–1.1 for a single iteration of traditional correlations.« less

  8. Aerosol Plume Detection Algorithm Based on Image Segmentation of Scanning Atmospheric Lidar Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weekley, R. Andrew; Goodrich, R. Kent; Cornman, Larry B.

    2016-04-06

    An image-processing algorithm has been developed to identify aerosol plumes in scanning lidar backscatter data. The images in this case consist of lidar data in a polar coordinate system. Each full lidar scan is taken as a fixed image in time, and sequences of such scans are considered functions of time. The data are analyzed in both the original backscatter polar coordinate system and a lagged coordinate system. The lagged coordinate system is a scatterplot of two datasets, such as subregions taken from the same lidar scan (spatial delay), or two sequential scans in time (time delay). The lagged coordinatemore » system processing allows for finding and classifying clusters of data. The classification step is important in determining which clusters are valid aerosol plumes and which are from artifacts such as noise, hard targets, or background fields. These cluster classification techniques have skill since both local and global properties are used. Furthermore, more information is available since both the original data and the lag data are used. Performance statistics are presented for a limited set of data processed by the algorithm, where results from the algorithm were compared to subjective truth data identified by a human.« less

  9. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-05-06

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  10. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  11. National Assessment of Energy Storage for Grid Balancing and Arbitrage: Phase 1, WECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Colella, Whitney G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Zhang, Yu

    2012-06-01

    To examine the role that energy storage could play in mitigating the impacts of the stochastic variability of wind generation on regional grid operation, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) examined a hypothetical 2020 grid scenario in which additional wind generation capacity is built to meet renewable portfolio standard targets in the Western Interconnection. PNNL developed a stochastic model for estimating the balancing requirements using historical wind statistics and forecasting error, a detailed engineering model to analyze the dispatch of energy storage and fast-ramping generation devices for estimating size requirements of energy storage and generation systems for meeting new balancing requirements, and financial models for estimating the life-cycle cost of storage and generation systems in addressing the future balancing requirements for sub-regions in the Western Interconnection. Evaluated technologies include combustion turbines, sodium sulfur (Na-S) batteries, lithium ion batteries, pumped-hydro energy storage, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, redox flow batteries, and demand response. Distinct power and energy capacity requirements were estimated for each technology option, and battery size was optimized to minimize costs. Modeling results indicate that in a future power grid with high-penetration of renewables, the most cost competitive technologies for meeting balancing requirements include Na-S batteries and flywheels.

  12. NEAR-INFRARED CIRCULAR POLARIZATION SURVEY IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS: CORRELATIONS AND TRENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Hough, James H.; Lucas, Phil W.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kandori, Ryo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2014-11-01

    We have conducted a systematic near-infrared circular polarization (CP) survey in star-forming regions, covering high-mass, intermediate-mass, and low-mass young stellar objects. All the observations were made using the SIRPOL imaging polarimeter on the Infrared Survey Facility 1.4m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory. We present the polarization properties of 10 sub-regions in 6 star-forming regions. The polarization patterns, extents, and maximum degrees of linear and circular polarizations are used to determine the prevalence and origin of CP in the star-forming regions. Our results show that the CP pattern is quadrupolar in general, the CP regions are extensive, up to 0.65pc, the CP degrees are high, up to 20%, and the CP degrees decrease systematically from high- to low-mass young stellar objects. The results are consistent with dichroic extinction mechanisms generating the high degrees of CP in star-forming regions.

  13. Validation of attenuation models for ground motion applications in central and eastern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2015-11-01

    Recently developed attenuation models are incorporated into standard one-dimensional (1-D) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), effectively making them two-dimensional (2-D) and eliminating the need to create different GMPEs for an increasing number of sub-regions. The model is tested against a data set of over 10,000 recordings from 81 earthquakes in North America. The use of attenuation models in GMPEs improves our ability to fit observed ground motions and should be incorporated into future national hazard maps. The improvement is most significant at higher frequencies and longer distances which have a greater number of wave cycles. This has implications for the rare high-magnitude earthquakes, which produce potentially damaging ground motions over wide areas, and drive the seismic hazards. Furthermore, the attenuation models can be created using weak ground motions, they could be developed for regions of low seismicity where empirical recordings of ground motions are uncommon and do not span the full range of magnitudes and distances.

  14. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M. Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Shen, Jincheng; Schipper, Matthew J.; Wilderman, Scott; Chun, Se Young

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results

  15. Final cost reduction study for the Geysers Recharge Alternative. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not cost reduction opportunities exist for the Geysers Recharge Alternative as defined in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-Term Wastewater Project EIR/EIS. The City of Santa Rosa has been directed to have a plan for reclaimed water disposal in place by 1999 which will meet future capacity needs under all weather conditions. A Draft EIR/EIS released in July 1996 and a Final EIR certified in June 1997 examine four primary alternatives plus the No Action Alternative. Two of the primary alternatives involve agricultural irrigation with reclaimed water, either in western or southern Sonoma County. Another involves increased discharge of reclaimed water into the Russian River. The fourth involves using reclaimed water to replenish the geothermal reservoir at the Geysers. The addition of this water source would enable the Geysers operators to produce more steam from the geothermal area and thereby prolong the life and economic production level of the steamfield and the geothermal power plants supplied by the steamfield. This study provides additional refined cost estimates for new scenarios which utilize an alternative pipeline alignment and a range of reclaimed water flows, which deliver less water to the Geysers than proposed in the EIR/EIS (by distributing flow to other project components). Also, electrical power rates were revised to reflect the recent changes in costs associated with deregulation of the power industry. In addition, this report provides information on sources of potential public and private funding available and future environmental documentation required if the cost reduction scenarios were to be selected by the City as part of their preferred alternative.

  16. A CORRELATION BETWEEN SURFACE DENSITIES OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND GAS IN EIGHT NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J. L.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S.; Myers, P. C.; Allen, L. E.

    2011-10-01

    We report the discovery and characterization of a power-law correlation between the local surface densities of Spitzer-identified, dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) and the column density of gas (as traced by near-IR extinction) in eight molecular clouds within 1 kpc and with 100 or more known YSOs. This correlation, which appears in data smoothed over size scales of {approx}1 pc, varies in quality from cloud to cloud; those clouds with tight correlations, MonR2 and Ophiuchus, are fit with power laws of slope 2.67 and 1.87, respectively. The spread in the correlation is attributed primarily to local gas disruption by stars that formed there or to the presence of very young subregions at the onset of star formation. We explore the ratio of the number of Class II to Class I sources, a proxy for the star formation age of a region, as a function of gas column density; this analysis reveals a declining Class II to Class I ratio with increasing column density. We show that the observed star-gas correlation is consistent with a star formation law where the star formation rate per area varies with the gas column density squared. We also propose a simple picture of thermal fragmentation of dense gas in an isothermal, self-gravitating layer as an explanation for the power law. Finally, we briefly compare the star-gas correlation and its implied star formation law with other recent proposed of star formation laws at similar and larger size scales from nearby star-forming regions.

  17. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  18. A novel deletion/insertion mutation in the mRNA transcribed from one {alpha}1(I) collagen allele in a family with dominant type III OI and germline mosaicism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, O.; Masters, C.; Lewis, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    In an 8-year-old girl and her father, both of whom have severe type III OI, we have previously used RNA/RNA hybrid analysis to demonstrate a mismatch in the region of {alpha}1(I) mRNA coding for aa 558-861. We used SSCP to further localize the abnormality to a subregion coding for aa 579-679. This region was subcloned and sequenced. Each patient`s cDNA has a deletion of the sequences coding for the last residue of exon 34, and all of exons 35 and 36 (aa 604-639), followed by an insertion of 156 nt from the 3{prime}-end of intron 36. PCR amplification of leukocyte DNA from the patients and the clinically normal paternal grandmother yielded two fragments: a 1007 bp fragment predicted from normal genomic sequences and a 445 bp fragment. Subcloning and sequencing of the shorter genomic PCR product confirmed the presence of a 565 bp genomic deletion from the end of exon 34 to the middle of intron 36. The abnormal protein is apparently synthesized and incorporated into helix. The inserted nucleotides are in frame with the collagenous sequence and contain no stop codons. They encode a 52 aa non-collagenous region. The fibroblast procollagen of the patients has both normal and electrophoretically delayed pro{alpha}(I) bands. The electrophoretically delayed procollagen is very sensitive to pepsin or trypsin digestion, as predicted by its non-collagenous sequence, and cannot be visualized as collagen. This unique OI collagen mutation is an excellent candidate for molecular targeting to {open_quotes}turn off{close_quotes} a dominant mutant allele.

  19. Use of tamarisk as a potential feedstock for biofuel production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Norman, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the energy and water use of saltcedar (or tamarisk) as biomass for biofuel production in a hypothetical sub-region in New Mexico. The baseline scenario consists of a rural stretch of the Middle Rio Grande River with 25% coverage of mature saltcedar that is removed and converted to biofuels. A manufacturing system life cycle consisting of harvesting, transportation, pyrolysis, and purification is constructed for calculating energy and water balances. On a dry short ton woody biomass basis, the total energy input is approximately 8.21 mmBTU/st. There is potential for 18.82 mmBTU/st of energy output from the baseline system. Of the extractable energy, approximately 61.1% consists of bio-oil, 20.3% bio-char, and 18.6% biogas. Water consumptive use by removal of tamarisk will not impact the existing rate of evapotranspiration. However, approximately 195 gal of water is needed per short ton of woody biomass for the conversion of biomass to biocrude, three-quarters of which is cooling water that can be recovered and recycled. The impact of salt presence is briefly assessed. Not accounted for in the baseline are high concentrations of Calcium, Sodium, and Sulfur ions in saltcedar woody biomass that can potentially shift the relative quantities of bio-char and bio-oil. This can be alleviated by a pre-wash step prior to the conversion step. More study is needed to account for the impact of salt presence on the overall energy and water balance.

  20. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  1. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  2. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Harmon, S; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  3. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Frweger, Christoph

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dosevolume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dosevolume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  4. Assessing the Feasibility of Using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chichester; J. W. Sterbentz

    2012-07-01

    Neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) is an active-interrogation nondestructive assay (NDA) technique capable of assaying spent nuclear fuel to determine plutonium content. Prior experimental work has definitively shown the technique capable of assaying plutonium isotope composition in spent-fuel pins to a precision of approximately 3%, with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. As a Grand Challenge to investigate NDA options for assaying spent fuel assemblies (SFAs) in the commercial fuel cycle, Idaho National Laboratory has explored the feasibility of using NRTA to assay plutonium in a whole SFA. The goal is to achieve a Pu assay precision of 1%. The NRTA technique uses low-energy neutrons from 0.1-40 eV, at the bottom end of the actinide-resonance range, in a time-of-flight arrangement. Isotopic composition is determined by relating absorption of the incident neutrons to the macroscopic cross-section of the actinides of interest in the material, and then using this information to determine the areal density of the isotopes in the SFA. The neutrons used for NRTA are produced using a pulsed, accelerator-based neutron source. Distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239,240,241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Based on extensive modeling of the problem using Monte Carlo-based simulation codes, our preliminary results suggest that by rotating an SFA to acquire four symmetric views, sufficient neutron transmission can be achieved to assay a SFA. In this approach multiple scan information for the same pins may also be unfolded to potentially allow the determination of plutonium for sub-regions of the assembly. For a 17 ? 17 pressurized water reactor SFA, a simplistic preliminary

  5. A DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SEARCH FOR ESCAPING LYMAN CONTINUUM FLUX AT z {approx} 1.3: EVIDENCE FOR AN EVOLVING IONIZING EMISSIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siana, Brian; Bridge, Carrie R.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Colbert, James W.; Scarlata, Claudia; Ferguson, Henry C.; Brown, Thomas M.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Dickinson, Mark; De Mello, Duilia F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2010-11-01

    We have obtained deep Hubble Space Telescope far-UV images of 15 starburst galaxies at z {approx} 1.3 in the GOODS fields to search for escaping Lyman continuum (LyC) photons. These are the deepest far-UV images (m{sub AB} = 28.7, 3{sigma}, 1'' diameter) over this large an area (4.83 arcmin{sup 2}) and provide some of the best escape fraction constraints for any galaxies at any redshift. We do not detect any individual galaxies, with 3{sigma} limits to the LyC ({approx}700 A) flux 50-149 times fainter (in f{sub {nu}}) than the rest-frame UV (1500 A) continuum fluxes. Correcting for the mean intergalactic medium (IGM) attenuation (factor {approx}2), as well as an intrinsic stellar Lyman break (factor {approx}3), these limits translate to relative escape fraction limits of f{sub esc,rel} < [0.03, 0.21]. The stacked limit is f{sub esc,rel}(3{sigma}) < 0.02. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to properly account for the expected distribution of line-of-sight IGM opacities. When including constraints from previous surveys at z {approx} 1.3 we find that, at the 95% confidence level, no more than 8% of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1.3 can have relative escape fractions greater than 0.50. Alternatively, if the majority of galaxies have low, but non-zero, escaping LyC, the escape fraction cannot be more than 0.04. In light of some evidence for strong LyC emission from UV-faint regions of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3, we also stack sub-regions of our galaxies with different surface brightnesses and detect no significant LyC flux at the f{sub esc,rel} < 0.03 level. Both the stacked limits and the limits from the Monte Carlo simulation suggest that the average ionizing emissivity (relative to non-ionizing UV emissivity) at z {approx} 1.3 is significantly lower than has been observed in LBGs at z {approx} 3. If the ionizing emissivity of star-forming galaxies is in fact increasing with redshift, it would help to explain the high photoionization rates seen in

  6. A survey of nuclear-related agreements and possibilities for nuclear cooperation in South Asia: Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAJEN,GAURAV

    2000-04-01

    Several existing nuclear-related agreements already require India and Pakistan, as members, to share information. The agreements are bilateral, regional, and international. Greater nuclear transparency between India and Pakistan could be promoted by first understanding the information flows required by existing agreements. This understanding is an essential step for developing projects that can incrementally advance the sensitivity of the information being shared. This paper provides a survey of existing nuclear-related agreements involving India and Pakistan, and suggests future confidence-building projects using the frameworks provided by these agreements. The Bilateral Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Facilities is discussed as a basis for creating further agreements on restricting the use and deployment of nuclear weapons. The author suggests options for enhancing the value of the list of nuclear facilities exchanged annually as a part of this agreement. The International Atomic Energy Agency's regional cooperation agreement among countries in the Asia-Pacific region is an opportunity for greater subregional nuclear cooperation in South Asia. Linking the regional agreement with South Asian environmental cooperation and marine pollution protection efforts could provide a framework for projects involving Indian and Pakistani coastal nuclear facilities. Programs of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations that use nuclear techniques to increase food and crop production and optimize water management in arid areas also provide similar opportunities for nuclear cooperation. Other frameworks for nuclear cooperation originate from international conventions related to nuclear safety, transportation of nuclear wastes, worker protection against ionizing radiation, and the nondeployment of nuclear weapons in certain areas. The information shared by existing frameworks includes: laws and regulations (including

  7. The W40 region in the gould belt: An embedded cluster and H II region at the junction of filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Samal, M. R.; Pirogov, L.

    2013-12-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the W40 star-forming region using infrared (IR) observations in the UKIRT JHK bands, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera bands, and Herschel PACS bands, 2.12 ?m H{sub 2} narrowband imaging, and radio continuum observations from GMRT (610 and 1280 MHz), in a field of view (FoV) of ?34' 40'. Archival Spitzer observations in conjunction with near-IR observations are used to identify 1162 Class II/III and 40 Class I sources in the FoV. The nearest-neighbor stellar surface density analysis shows that the majority of these young stellar objects (YSOs) constitute the embedded cluster centered on the high-mass source IRS 1A South. Some YSOs, predominantly the younger population, are distributed along and trace the filamentary structures at lower stellar surface density. The cluster radius is measured to be 0.44 pcmatching well with the extent of radio emissionwith a peak density of 650 pc{sup 2}. The JHK data are used to map the extinction in the region, which is subsequently used to compute the cloud mass126 M {sub ?} and 71 M {sub ?} for the central cluster and the northern IRS 5 region, respectively. H{sub 2} narrowband imaging shows significant emission, which prominently resembles fluorescent emission arising at the borders of dense regions. Radio continuum analysis shows that this region has a blister morphology, with the radio peak coinciding with a protostellar source. Free-free emission spectral energy distribution analysis is used to obtain physical parameters of the overall photoionized region and the IRS 5 sub-region. This multiwavelength scenario is suggestive of star formation having resulted from the merging of multiple filaments to form a hub. Star formation seems to have taken place in two successive epochs, with the first epoch traced by the central cluster and the high-mass star(s)followed by a second epoch that is spreading into the filaments as uncovered by the Class I sources and even younger protostellar sources

  8. Dose-Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Sabolch, Aaron; Chugh, Rashmi; Biermann, Janet Sybil; Feng, Mary

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V{sub d}) receiving specified doses ({>=}30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 {+-} 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 {+-} 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 {+-} 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 {+-} 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 {+-} 20.8 Gy, 4.8 {+-} 5.6 cc, 2.5 {+-} 3.9 cc, and 0.8 {+-} 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  9. Selection for Unequal Densities of Sigma70 Promoter-like Signalsin Different Regions of Large Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huerta, Araceli M.; Francino, M. Pilar; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2006-03-01

    The evolutionary processes operating in the DNA regions that participate in the regulation of gene expression are poorly understood. In Escherichia coli, we have established a sequence pattern that distinguishes regulatory from nonregulatory regions. The density of promoter-like sequences, that are recognizable by RNA polymerase and may function as potential promoters, is high within regulatory regions, in contrast to coding regions and regions located between convergently-transcribed genes. Moreover, functional promoter sites identified experimentally are often found in the subregions of highest density of promoter-like signals, even when individual sites with higher binding affinity for RNA polymerase exist elsewhere within the regulatory region. In order to investigate the generality of this pattern, we have used position weight matrices describing the -35 and -10 promoter boxes of E. coli to search for these motifs in 43 additional genomes belonging to most established bacterial phyla, after specific calibration of the matrices according to the base composition of the noncoding regions of each genome. We have found that all bacterial species analyzed contain similar promoter-like motifs, and that, in most cases, these motifs follow the same genomic distribution observed in E. coli. Differential densities between regulatory and nonregulatory regions are detectable in most bacterial genomes, with the exception of those that have experienced evolutionary extreme genome reduction. Thus, the phylogenetic distribution of this pattern mirrors that of genes and other genomic features that require weak selection to be effective in order to persist. On this basis, we suggest that the loss of differential densities in the reduced genomes of host-restricted pathogens and symbionts is the outcome of a process of genome degradation resulting from the decreased efficiency of purifying selection in highly structured small populations. This implies that the differential

  10. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining

  11. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only

  12. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish

  13. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within

  14. Dynamic heterogeneity of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cell populations captured by single-cell 3D high-content analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajbakhsh, Jian; Stefanovski, Darko; Tang, George; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H.

    2015-03-15

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a 10-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with 3D high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU/day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17: 0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, global DNA methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup −}, 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +}, and 5hmC{sup −}/5mC{sup +} cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +} cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably

  15. Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-08-01

    The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity

  16. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-12-01

    The studies summarized herein were conducted during 2009–2014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), a practice called CO2 sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy-funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional-scale and point-scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo-engineering information was developed through a small-scale test of CO2 injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial-scale flow rate of CO2 injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial-scale mass of CO2 (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO2 within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS-related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional-scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial-scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in