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1

TO J. A. QuigUy, M.D. NATIONALLPADCW~  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J. A. QuigUy, M.D. J. A. QuigUy, M.D. NATIONALLPADCW~ OF oliI0 Cincbnati 39, Ohio September 23, 1960 TRIP RBPCRT TO PIONRBR DIVISION, BENDIX AVI4TIONC~ ION, DAVBNPQRT, SOWA,oNSEPTEMBR6-9,196O F. J. Klein CENTRAL FILE The purpose of this trip was tot (1) determine if a Bendix ronic energy cleaning system can clean uranium-contaminated drums to the extent of rcduciug the @ha ccmtazuinatiou level belav that required for sale as %oa-contaminatecl** by AEC Manual Chapter 5182-0s UOOO a dMlOO& average and at peak not more than 25,OOO a d~lOOcm2, and (2) observe . the health and safety aspects of the wotk and insure the adequate decontauimtiou of the machinery, tools, equi~t, aud teat area. This waa a wet operation Md the tauk waa not ventilated; hawever, should

2

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Extracting and Applying SV-SV...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extracting and Applying SV-SV Shear Modes from Vertical Vibrator Data Across Geothermal Prospects Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

3

Uruguay: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uruguay: Energy Resources Uruguay: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-33,"lon":-56,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Silicon Valley Solar Inc SV Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silicon Valley Solar Inc SV Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name Silicon Valley Solar Inc (SV Solar) Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95051 Sector Solar Product A US-based...

5

Uruguay - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Production: 0.0000 , 0.0000 , 0.0000 , 0.0000 ... Central & South America World. Rank . Uruguay: Total from Consumption of Fossil Fuels

6

El Nio-Southern Oscillation Impact on Rainfall in Uruguay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between rainfall over Uruguay (in southeastern South America) and the El Nio-Southern Oscillation phenomenon are investigated. Long time series of data from a dense network of rainfall stations are analyzed using an empirical ...

Gabriel Pisciottano; Alvaro Daz; Gabriel Cazess; Carlos R. Mechoso

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Spodnje Gameljne SV_Lenart.qxd 19/07/2002 09:00 Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strani trona je sv. Valentin, ob levi strani pa sv. Gregor s sodom v roki. Na obhodnih lokih sta na desni

Silc, Jurij

8

Srednje Gameljne SV_Andrej.qxd 19/07/2002 08:58 Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kri`em v ozadju. Slike za zapiranje trona ni. Desno ob tronu je sv. Jakob starejsi in levo apostol sv

Silc, Jurij

9

Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Uruguay-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

10

An assessment of the impact of decommissioning the Cray SV1 systems at NERSC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Cray SV1 Systems at NERSC Jonathan T. Carter Nationalthe current SV1 systems. NERSC users have had continuousfrequent comparison to the NERSC IBM SP system. This system

Carter, Jonathan T.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

SV_Jurij.qxd 19/07/2002 08:59 Page 1 Podru`ni~na cerkev v Tacnu je posve~ena sv. Juriju, mu~encu.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tronu je cerkveni zavetnik sv. Jurij, rimski vojak, ki s sulico prebada zmaja. Slike za zapiranje trona ni. Ob stenah trona so stirje evangelisti: desno ob njem sv. Marko, na obhodnem loku sv. Matej, levo

Silc, Jurij

12

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Name Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Website http://www.iadb.org/en/news/ne Program Start 2011 Country Uruguay South America References IDB, FONTAGRO, Government of New Zealand sign agreement on climate change mitigation and agriculture in Latin America and the Caribbean[1]

13

Uruguay-Enhancing Low-carbon Development by Greening the Economy: Policy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uruguay-Enhancing Low-carbon Development by Greening the Economy: Policy Uruguay-Enhancing Low-carbon Development by Greening the Economy: Policy Dialogue, Advisory Services, Benchmarking Jump to: navigation, search Name Uruguay-Enhancing Low-carbon Development by Greening the Economy: Policy Dialogue, Advisory Services, Benchmarking Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country Uruguay South America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The project will promote Green Economy in developing countries and emerging economies as a realistic approach towards low-carbon development. It will

14

Atmospheric Circulation Anomalies during Episodes of Enhanced and Reduced Convective Cloudiness over Uruguay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional and large-scale circulation anomalies associated with periods of enhanced and reduced convective cloudiness over Uruguay are studied for austral spring and summer, when rainfall associated with deep convection is more frequent in this ...

Alvaro Daz; Patricio Aceituno

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Research Article TMV ( Sv) 7 A high yielding cosmopolitan sesame variety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sesame culture TVS 0039 is a hybrid derivative of Si 250 x ES 22. It is an high yielding sesame variety with brown colour seed. It matures in 85- 90 days. TVS 0039 has recorded a mean yield of 737 kg/ha which is 12.8, 26.9 and 14.0 % superior to TMV 3, VRI (Sv) 1 and VRI(Sv 2), respectively under rainfed condition. During summer season, the culture registered an average yield of 781 kg/ha which is 25.6, 20.5, 34.3 and 27.8 % increase over VRI (Sv) 1, VRI (Sv 2), TMV 4 and TMV 6 respectively. The seeds are brown coloured with an oil content of 51.0 per cent. The culture is also tolerant to root rot disease.

V. Manoharan; M. Vaithiyalingan; M. Sudha; G. Rangaraju; R. Vishnupriya; P. Renugadevi; S. Jebaraj

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Seasonal Dependence of ENSO Teleconnections over South America and Relationships with Precipitation in Uruguay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) has an established impact on precipitation in Uruguay during austral spring (OctoberDecember). This impact is absent in peak summer (JanuaryFebruary), and returns weakly in fallwinter (MarchJuly). ...

Gabriel Cazes-Boezio; Andrew W. Robertson; Carlos R. Mechoso

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Miscellaneous: Uruguay energy supply options study assessing the market for natural gas - executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

Uruguay is in the midst of making critical decisions affecting the design of its future energy supply system. Momentum for change is expected to come from several directions, including recent and foreseeable upgrades and modifications to energy conversion facilities, the importation of natural gas from Argentina, the possibility for a stronger interconnection of regional electricity systems, the country's membership in MERCOSUR, and the potential for energy sector reforms by the Government of Uruguay. The objective of this study is to analyze the effects of several fuel diversification strategies on Uruguay's energy supply system. The analysis pays special attention to fuel substitution trends due to potential imports of natural gas via a gas pipeline from Argentina and increasing electricity ties with neighboring countries. The Government of Uruguay has contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to study several energy development scenarios with the support of several Uruguayan institutions. Specifically, ANL was asked to conduct a detailed energy supply and demand analysis, develop energy demand projections based on an analysis of past energy demand patterns with support from local institutions, evaluate the effects of potential natural gas imports and electricity exchanges, and determine the market penetration of natural gas under various scenarios.

Conzelmann, G.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

Relationships between Precipitation Anomalies in Uruguay and Southern Brazil and Sea Surface Temperature in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on precipitation in Uruguay and the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, which extend along the Atlantic coast of southern South America. The present paper has two principal goals: 1) to describe the annual cycle of ...

Alvaro F. Diaz; Caarem D. Studzinski; Carlos R. Mechoso

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

I L S-V I I I J* I LI  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L L - S-V I I I J* I LI 11. LI L - OAK RlDGE NATBONAL LABORATORY "J :-: ,rj _ .- ORNLnM- 12225 I: ?, .,I Radiological Survey Results at the Former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility Seymour, Connecticut R. D. Foley R. F . Carrier c MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTERlS, INC. - FOR TRE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY / l- _I. _ --..--.- This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Cffice of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37631; prices available from (615) 5764401, FTS 626-6401, Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5265 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161.

20

SEI uruguay project: Technical specifications. Turn-key' contract for La Tablada repowering. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study, conducted by Southern Electric International (SEI), was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of U.T.E., the Government of Uruguay's electric power company. It is an assessment of three potential projects under consideration by U.T.E. The changes resulting from these projects would add 120 to 360 megawatts capacity to the current system. The first option would involve repowering Jose Batlle y Ordonez Units 3 and 4. As an alternate to this plan, U.T.E. is considering a new combined cycle plant at a Greenfield site. The third project would increase capacity at La Tablada.

Not Available

1994-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Joint inversion of P-and SV-wave traveltime error to esimate anisotropy: a CFP approach Robert J. Ferguson, Jackson School of Geosciences, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint inversion of P- and SV-wave traveltime error to esimate anisotropy: a CFP approach Robert J. For stability, joint inversion P- and SV-data is employed and, as pure SV-data are relatively rare, the use of mode-converted (PSV) data to represent SV in the joint inversion is suggested. Analytic and synthetic

Ferguson, Robert J.

22

IO6264 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY POST OFFICE BOX 2008 WEMTED Sv MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SVPEUS. INC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IO6264 IO6264 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY POST OFFICE BOX 2008 - WEMTED Sv MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SVPEUS. INC OAK RIDGE. TENNESSEE 37031 July 16, 1993 Dr. W. A Williams Department of Energy Trevion II Building EM-421 Washington, D. C. 205850002 Dear Dr. Williams: IndcperrdentVerihiatianoftbc~ConditioDofthtOId~~B~gOwnedbytht Gmnite city steel c2ltpmatiw, Gr8nite city, Illinois A team from the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an independent verification of the radiological condition of the old betatron building owned by the Granite City Steel Corporation. The uranium contamination present resulted from the handling of uranium slabs of

23

Animal Driven Gear Box and Prof. S.K. Saha (Prof. V.K. Vijay and Dr. S.V. Modak)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Driven Gear Box and Pump Prof. S.K. Saha (Prof. V.K. Vijay and Dr. S.V. Modak) Naren Gupta Chair Professor Dept. of Mech. Eng. IIT Delhi Sept.08,'11@RDL722: rural Energy Systems (Prof. V.K. Vijay) #12;Existing ADGB (Panchal Pumps, Kanpur) with Water Pump Water discharge (from 30 feet deep): 7

Saha, Subir Kumar

24

POLARIZED NEUTRONS AND STUDY OF MAGNETIC MATERIALS S.V. Maleyev, A.I. Okorokov, G.P. Gordeyev, V.V. Runov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of exploration of the Research Nuclear Reactors. So, after the decision of the construction of the WWR-M Reactor of nuclear theory" edited in Russia in 1950 1]. Then in fties S.V. Maleyev initiated by A.I. Akhiezer and I scattering theory in PNPI. On this theoretical background in the end of 1950s G.M. Drabkin, then a young

Titov, Anatoly

25

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical geologic condition in a more optimal way than do the other modes. A conclusion of the study is that 9-C seismic data contain more rock and fluid information and more sequence and facies information than do 3-C seismic data; 9-C data should therefore be acquired in multicomponent seismic programs whenever possible.

John Beecherl; Bob A. Hardage

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

Fan, H.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Displacement by SV Waves in Fluid Saturated Medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dihydroxy benzenes are of considerable interest because the stabilities of the molecular H-bond as well as the interaction between the ? charges of the benzene ring and the OH group[1]. The three isomers of di-hydroxy benzene namely, catechol, resorcinol, ... Keywords: diffusion, density, insoluble and soluble mediums

Dennis Ling Chuan Ching; Zainal Abdul Aziz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Simulating the helicase motor of sv40 large tumor antigen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Helicases are motor protein that utilize the energy derived from NTP binding and hydrolysis to translocate and unwind DNA/RNA during the replication. Understanding the energy coupling of NTP hydrolysis cycle to the DNA movement is the key to understand ...

Yemin Shi / Xiaojiang Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Uruguay - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

31

Eficiencia energtica y energas renovables en los hoteles de Uruguay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Mashaqbah, S., Mashal, K., & Mohsen, M. (2008). Potential of energy savings in the hotel sector in Jordan identifying energy consumption, attitudes, willingness and practices of certain classified hotels. The data classified hotels had installed energy saving tools, and only (2 -5) higher starred hotels managers were

Escolano, Francisco

32

Ver. SV2011-06-16 Subject study plan at doctoral level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at international accelerator facilities, with the use of large gamma-ray and particle detector system. Detector of phase transitions, critical phenomena and strongly correlated systems. The research aims to provide phase transitions, exotic quantum fluids, complex systems, nano-systems, disordered systems, soft matter

Haviland, David

33

Structure of the replicative helicase of the oncoprotein SV40 large tumour antigen.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oncoprotein large tumour antigen (LTag) is encoded by the DNA tumour virus simian virus 40. LTag transforms cells and induces tumours in animals by altering the functions of tumour suppressors (including pRB and p53) and other key cellular proteins. LTag is also a molecular machine that distorts/melts the replication origin of the viral genome and unwinds duplex DNA. LTag therefore seems to be a functional homologue of the eukaryotic minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex. Here we present the X-ray structure of a hexameric LTag with DNA helicase activity. The structure identifies the p53-binding surface and reveals the structural basis of hexamerization. The hexamer contains a long, positively charged channel with an unusually large central chamber that binds both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA. The hexamer organizes into two tiers that can potentially rotate relative to each other through connecting alpha-helices to expand/constrict the channel, producing an 'iris' effect that could be used for distorting or melting the origin and unwinding DNA at the replication fork.

Li, D.; Zhao, R.; Lilyestrom, W.; Gai, D.; Zhang, R.; DeCaprio, J. A.; Fanning, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Szakonyi, G.; Chen, X. S.; Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center; Dana-Farber Cancer Ins.; Vanderbilt Univ.

2003-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effects of S/V on secondary phase formation on waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

Simulated West Valley high-level nuclear waste glass, WV205, was leached with and without buffered media in both deuterated and ordinary water at glass surface area to solution volumes (S/N) of 200--6000 m{sup {minus}1}. Examination of the glass surface after testing for 14 days indicated that the S/V-induced pH change plays a dominant role in the development of the altered surface layer and the secondary phases formed. The changes due to SN-induced pH determine the rate of surface layer formation, the element distribution in the surface layer, and possibly, the identities of the secondary phases. Changes due to SN-induced elemental concentration also influence glass reaction rate in terms of the layer thickness and the elemental distribution in the surface layers.

Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Bates, J.K.; Gong, M.; Dietz, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Pegg, I.L. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

(Sv/h) 2011.5 30 ( Sudan 4.57 )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The highest level of background radiation is in the state of Kerala and city

Obayashi, Shigeru

36

The competing roles of SV(O) and VS(O) word orders in Xodenie igumena Daniila  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work together and word order alone does not determine therelatively free word order, as does Modern Russian. However,

McAnallen, Julia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

German Politics and the Burden of Kultur. Mann, Meinecke and the Psychology of the Vernunftrepublikaner in Early Weimar Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neither the state nor the Volk [people] had lived up to hiswould more fuUy integrate the Volk and conflict, become he

Parsons, Gregory S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Topography of the salar de Uyuni, Bolivia from kinematic GPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site UY04 using Geodetic Inc. s RTD package, with double-Bock et al. , 2000). RTD solves for antenna positionas evaluated from RTD processing) when estimating the

Borsa, Adrian A.; Fricker, Helen A.; Bills, Bruce G.; Minster, Jean-Bernard; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Quinn, Katherine J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Real exchange rate and international reserves in an era of growing financial and trade integration*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turkey Uganda Uruguay Venezuela Zambia First Year Last YearParaguay Peru Uruguay Venezuela Export Composition: The twoAlgeria Russia Norway Venezuela Chile Australia Canada South

Aizenman, Joshua; Riera-Crichton, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Attempts to undermine tobacco control: tobacco industry "youth smoking prevention" programs to undermine meaningful tobacco control in Latin America.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 20, 2006. 56. Venezuela No-Smoking Program for Youth.Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela) had ratified the World Healthespecially Puerto Rico, Venezuela and Uruguay, are pressing

Sebri, Ernesto M; Glantz, Stanton A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radial-Transverse (SV-SH) Coordinates for 9-C 3-D Seismic Reflection Data Analysis James L. Simmons, Jr.* and Milo M. Backus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Jr.* and Milo M. Backus Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin Summary Nine energy on the crossterms and are likely more prevalent causes of crossterm energy than is fracture

Texas at Austin, University of

42

Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

45 UY 2 9 1987 Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Installations Pentagon Washington, D.C. 20301 Dear Mr....

43

reports_checksum reports_type visitreports_visitid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

reports_checksum reports_type visitreports_visitid 20071324DS-d4/Ax6NRs3Xg- 667-197519321 DS //63UyTXzfnK 20070825DS-jgQRNybtb3mT ...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Compendium of Radiocarbon Dates for Southern Idaho Archaeological Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaeology of the Shoup Rockshelters in East Central Idaho.PocateUo: Idaho State UniversUy Museum Occasional Papers No.Snake River Region of Idaho ca. 4150 B.P. - 1300 B.P.

Plew, Mark G; Pavesic, Max G

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

MANUFACTURING IN AMERICA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 17 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Post-Uruguay Round Tariff Regimes: Achievements and Outlook (Paris: OECD, 1999 ...

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

Manufacturing in America; A Comprehensive Strategy to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 17 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Post-Uruguay Round Tariff Regimes: Achievements and Outlook (Paris: OECD, 1999 ...

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Currents' Physical Components (CPC) In Circuits with Nonsinusoidal Voltages and Currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

voltages and currents. It is true only for balanced loads supplied with a symmetrical voltage. However{ || || || || || || }P u u uY Y Y+ + . (20) The supply voltage is sinusoidal and symmetrical, thus RS ST TR R for energy permanent conversion in the load with power P. The remaining part of the supply current, i ­ ia

Czarnecki, Leszek S.

48

Export.gov - UR_Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

y turistas uruguayos y turistas uruguayos Register | Manage Account Search Our Site Click to Search Our Site Export.gov Home Opportunities By Industry By Country Market Research Trade Events Trade Leads Free Trade Agreements Solutions International Sales & Marketing International Financing International Logistics Licenses & Regulations Trade Data & Analysis Trade Problems Locations Domestic Offices International Offices FAQ Blog Connect Home > Uruguay Local Time: Print | E-mail Page Uruguay Uruguay Home Doing Business in Uruguay Market Research on Uruguay Services for U.S. Companies Trade Events Business Service Providers Links Frequently Asked Questions Contact Us Our Worldwide Network About Us Press Room Other American Markets Other Worldwide Markets Welcome to U.S. Commercial Service Uruguay!

49

cctoday_spring_2007web.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and environmental impacts, to help Uruguay's energy planning and diversify its energy mix. The Springerville facility has three 400-MW units. Unit 3, which was completed in...

50

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0380-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Transport and Storage of High-Activity Sealed Sources From Uruguay and Other Locations http:energy.govnepadownloads...

51

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bangladesh Brazil Chile Colombia Greece Indonesia Iran Jamaica Malaysia Mexico Pakistan Peru Philippines Portugal Romania Slovenia South Africa South Korea Thailand Turkey Uruguay...

52

Download workshop PDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

is the most advanced country in this respect, but countries like Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, Peru, Argentina,. Venezuela, Chile and Uruguay are taking up the issue...

53

Cycles of Electoral Democracy in Latin America, 1900-2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paraguay Peru Uruguay Venezuela non-democratic democratic1946), Brazil (1946), Venezuela (1946), and Ecuador (1948)Colombia, Costa Rica, Venezuela, and the Dominican Republic.

Smith, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sistem Eco | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Sistem Eco Place Uruguay Sector Solar Product Installs solar panels. References Sistem Eco1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

55

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part Engineering Center of Columbia University investigated the waste management system of Montevideo, Uruguay

Columbia University

56

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

V W X Y Z V W X Y Z Uitz, Julia (Julia Uitz) - Marine Optics and Remote Sensing Lab,, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche Underwood, Nora (Nora Underwood) - Department of Biological Science, Florida State University Upchurch, Gary (Gary Upchurch) - Department of Biology, Texas State University - San Marcos Uppsala Universitet, Department of Animal Ecolog(ppsala Universitet, Department of Animal Ecolo)gy Urabe, Jotaro (Jotaro Urabe) - Department of Environmental Life Sciences, Tohoku University Uriarte, Maria (Maria Uriarte) - Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology, Columbia University Uy, J. Albert C. (J. Albert C. Uy) - Department of Biology, University of Miami Uyenoyama, Marcy K (Marcy K Uyenoyama) - Department of Biology, Duke University

57

Khesbn no. 87-88 - April 1977 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plg; lrrr ptbl jrt i! -rtD)i-,i.if :.Nn\\D -,\\N i!! rlJljyr .n))n l'tD J'tD ll'uy)'rtD''lN '''1 u$ tlrri2lr)p l15$b -)ytu''lyl uU/',t t DtJ rtD JIN b12r13';r' D}J,1,1 ,.i. -

Admin, LAYCC

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Combining CMORPH and Rain Gauges Observations over the Rio Negro Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several algorithms that combine daily precipitation surface data and satellite Climate Prediction Center Morphing Technique (CMORPH) estimations were implemented and tested for the Rio Negro basin in northeastern Uruguay. Bias removal of satellite ...

Alejandra De Vera; Rafael Terra

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

REVIEWS AND BRIEF NOTICES History, Philosophy & Ethics ............................111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reference sites: ANWR, Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge; BOLV, Bolivar Flats Shorebird Sanctuary; KISS LAWR KONZ ANWR CROS BOLV Argentina Brazil Paraguay Uruguay AGRI JOAQ ROCH CHIQ ASUN 0 300 600150 KM C

60

Interannual and Decadal Cycles in River Flows of Southeastern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time series of annual streamflow of four rivers in southeastern and south-central South America (the Negro, Paraguay, Paran, and Uruguay Rivers) for the period 191193 are analyzed. Application of the multitaper method shows that the ...

Andrew W. Robertson; Carlos R. Mechoso

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Simulations of the Hydrological Cycle over Southern South America Using the CPTEC/COLA AGCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The La Plata River basin is the second largest basin of South America after the Amazon basin, and it is located in an international area that occupies territories of Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia, areas of great economic ...

Daniel Andrs Rodriguez; Iracema F. Albuquerque Cavalcanti

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Assessing the Emerging Global Financial Architecture: Measuring the Trilemma's Configurations over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kingdom Uruguay Vanuatu Venezuela, RB (E) (C) Vietnam (C)Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. Center is at 0 Note:d'Ivoire Trinidad and Tobago Venezuela, RB Argentina Ecuador

Aizenman, Joshua; Chinn, Menzie David; Ito, Hiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Residual Seminal Vesicle Displacement in Marker-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer and the Impact on Margin Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantify residual interfraction displacement of seminal vesicles (SV) and investigate the efficacy of rotation correction on SV displacement in marker-based prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We also determined the effect of marker registration on the measured SV displacement and its impact on margin design. Methods and Materials: SV displacement was determined relative to marker registration by using 296 cone beam computed tomography scans of 13 prostate cancer patients with implanted markers. SV were individually registered in the transverse plane, based on gray-value information. The target registration error (TRE) for the SV due to marker registration inaccuracies was estimated. Correlations between prostate gland rotations and SV displacement and between individual SV displacements were determined. Results: The SV registration success rate was 99%. Displacement amounts of both SVs were comparable. Systematic and random residual SV displacements were 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm in the left-right direction, respectively, and 2.8 mm and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. Rotation correction did not reduce residual SV displacement. Prostate gland rotation around the left-right axis correlated with SV AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 42%); a correlation existed between both SVs for AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 62%); considerable correlation existed between random errors of SV displacement and TRE (R{sup 2} = 34%). Conclusions: Considerable residual SV displacement exists in marker-based IGRT. Rotation correction barely reduced SV displacement, rather, a larger SV displacement was shown relative to the prostate gland that was not captured by the marker position. Marker registration error partly explains SV displacement when correcting for rotations. Correcting for rotations, therefore, is not advisable when SV are part of the target volume. Margin design for SVs should take these uncertainties into account.

Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Physics, Toronto (Canada); Lebesque, Joos V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van, E-mail: portal@nki.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, May 2005, p. 25302538 Vol. 71, No. 5 0099-2240/05/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.71.5.25302538.2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Fanning, E, Joachimiak A, Szakonyi G, Chen X. Structure of the replicative helicase of the oncoprotein SV

Lovley, Derek

65

Geophysical Prospecting, 2004, 52, 547557 Estimating the elastic parameters of anisotropic media using a joint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using a joint inversion of P-wave and SV-wave traveltime error R.J. Ferguson1 and M.K. Sen1,2 1, joint inversion of P and SV data is employed and, as pure SV data are relatively rare, the use of mode-converted (PSV) data to represent SV in the joint inversion is proposed. Analytic and synthetic examples are used

Ferguson, Robert J.

66

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kwon, SW; Liapi, KA; Haas, CT; Sreenivasan, SV; McLaughlin, JT; Human Behavior and Fire Emergencies: An Annotated Bibliography. ...

67

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Automation. (212 K) Kwon, SW; Liapi, KA; Haas, CT; Sreenivasan, SV; McLaughlin, JT. NIST SP 989; September 2002. ...

68

Volume, Freshwater, and Heat Fluxes through Davis Strait, 200405  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Davis Strait volume [?2.3 0.7 Sv (1 Sv ? 106 m3 s?1); negative sign indicates southward transport], freshwater (?116 41 mSv), and heat (20 9 TW) fluxes estimated from objectively mapped 200405 moored array data do not differ significantly ...

B. Curry; C. M. Lee; B. Petrie

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Safety Issues for High Temperature Gas Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Issues for High Temperature Gas Reactors Andrew C. Kadak Professor of the Practice #12;Major regulation) 50mSv/a (Could be exceeded for rear recovery events) 50 mSv/a 20 mSv/a (average 5 y) (5 m performance of safety systems - natural circulation - heat conduction and convection. #12;Issues · Fuel

70

Wideband Nonlinear Optics Paul Kinsler & Geoff New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cycle optical pulses" , Title; Motive; Bands: (Narrow, Wide); Overlap; Soliton; OPO: (SV-GF, ORP, SM); Conclude; OPO: (SV-GF, ORP, SM); Conclude. Also: (Links, GFEA, Notes); #12;ECLEO 2003: Wideband NLO/ Near; OPO: (SV-GF, ORP, SM); Conclude. Also: (Links, GFEA, Notes); #12;ECLEO 2003: Wideband NLO/ Near

Kinsler, Paul

71

A Recent Increasing Trend in the Streamflow of Rivers in Southeastern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the records of streamflow during the period 190195 corresponding to four major rivers in southeastern South America: Uruguay, Negro, Paran, and Paraguay. The emphasis is on the detection of long-term trends in the records. ...

JosL. Genta; Gonzalo Perez-Iribarren; Carlos R. Mechoso

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Case Study of the 9 August 1988 South Atlantic Storm: Numerical Simulations of the Wave Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 911 August 1988, a cyclone developed over Uruguay in the Ice of the Andes Mountains and moved over the South Atlantic Ocean, where it redeveloped into an intense storm. This storm was responsible for unusual wave activity along the ...

Valdir Innocentini; Ernesto Dos Santos Caetano Neto

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Nominal Filter for Web Search Snippets: Using the Web to Identify Members of Latin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Nominal Filter for Web Search Snippets: Using the Web to Identify Members of Latin America. This paper presents efforts aimed at using Natural Language Engineering (NLE) techniques to solve of three Latin American countries: Uruguay, Argentina and Colombia. An NLE system is under construction

Turner, William

74

A Nominal Filter for Web Search Snippets: Using the Web to Identify Members of Latin America's Highly Qualified Diaspora  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents efforts aimed at using Natural Language Engineering (NLE) techniques for evaluating the impact of talent mobility on the development of three Latin American countries: Argentina, Colombia and Uruguay. We explain the different steps ... Keywords: person disambiguation, semantic filtering, web people search, computer assisted sociology, highly skilled diaspora, mobility

Jorge Garcia-Flores; William Turner

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Plenary Session, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, January 29-30, 1998, San Diego, California THE ELECTRIC MARKET RESTRUCTURING IN SOUTH AMERICA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japan US Figure 1 Per capita electricity consumption (kWh, 1996) In most countries, however, the state with increasing economic growth. Geopolitic reasons are making the USA and Europe look with increasing interest, Paraguay, Uruguay plus Bolivia and Chile. The electric energy industry in Latin America has faced

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

76

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Greensleeves LLC Greensleeves Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

edificaciones en el sector servicios que más energía consumen (Hotel Energy Solutions Magazine, 2010). Se proyecto Hotel Energy Solutions, entre tantos #12;Mª Victoria Lucarelli 9 proyectos, asociaciones Eficiencia energética y energías renovables en los hoteles de Uruguay María Victoria

78

DPI403 NORRIS FALL 2009 8/13/2009 12:31 PM DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SALVADOR HONDURAS NICARAGUA COSTA RICA PANAMÁ COLOMBIA VENEZUELA ECUADOR PER? BRASIL BOLIVIA PARAGUAY CHILE NICARAGUA VENEZUELA BRASIL BOLIVIA URUGUAY ARGENTINA JAMAICA HAITÍ REP. DOMINICANA TRINIDAD Y TOBAGO (incluyendoa Venezuela)seconcentrael25%dela biodiversidaddelplaneta. EnlosAndes estánpresentes84delas114zonasde

Milchberg, Howard

79

Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Electric Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip SW19 8UY Product Developed a technology named 'tidal lagoons' to build tidal electric projects. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i'lnai 'I'echnical i'lnai 'I'echnical ^^2^ lSoa/e:t\ I r » "Superacid Catalyzed Depolymerization and Conversion of Coals D O E : / E R / 1 0 3 4 0 - 1 DE83 013036 We were interested in applying superacid catalyzed cleavage-depolymerization and ionic hydrogenation for significantly improved low temperature conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbon, as well as obtaining information about involved reactions and the structure of intermediates of the coal-liquefaction process. In order to show the feasibility of our proposed research we have carried out preliminary investigation in these areas and obtained the following results. Hydrogenation of coals producing liquefied products generaUy follows two main courses: solvent assisted hydrogenation at 300 to 400° C and at 1000-4000 psi or higher-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

45 45 UY 2 9 1987 Mr. Carl Schafer Director of Environmental Policy Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Installations Pentagon Washington, D.C. 20301 Dear Mr. Schafer: As you know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing, a program to identify sites that may be radiologically contaminated as a result of.DOE predecessor operations and to correct any problems associated with this contamination if there is DOE authority to do so. Reviews of historical materials from the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) era conducted in support of this program have identified a number of active and former Department of Defense (DOD) installations and DOD contractor sites involved in activities related to the MED/AEC

82

TIlE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO OFFICE OF FACILITIES PLANNING & MANAGEMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TIlE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO TIlE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO OFFICE OF FACILITIES PLANNING & MANAGEMENT * 5555 SOUTIi EU..IS AVENUE CHICAGO, D..LINOIS 60637 (312) 702-1700 April 20, 1989 Mr. David Adler c/o FUSRAP Bechtel National P.O. Box 350 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831·350 RE: KE1\7 HALL - Re.r.pQvat of basement drainlines Dear Mr. AdJer: Per our phone conversation on April 12, 1989 I am writing this letter to confirm the fact that the contaminated drainlines and surrounding soil, in the basement of Kent Hall, wer excavated and legaUy disposed of in 1983. This work was carried out in conjunction with the total gutting and renovation of the building. If you need additional infonnation please conta<:t me. incerely, * ~l('~~d~ I !:ynn C. Bender Director LCB:bg

83

U.S. DI!PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA Dl1TImfiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARThlENT OF ENERGY PARThlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA Dl1TImfiNATION RECIPIENT: BeIi Geospace, Inc Page 1 of2 STATE: TX PROJECT TITLE: Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. Funding OpportunUy Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE·FQA'()()()()S22 OE-EEOOO5515 GF0-0005515-001 G05515 Bued on my review oftbe information concerning the proposro action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordtr 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits. and audits), data analysis

84

A Novel Superstring in Four Dimensions and Grand Unification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A string in four dimensions is constructed by supplementing it with forty four Majorana fermions. The central charge is 26. The fermions are grouped in such a way that the resulting action is supersymmetric. The energy momentum and current generators satisfy the super-Virasoro algebra. The tachyonic ground state decouples from the physical states. GSO projections are necessary for proving modular invariance. Space-time supersymmetry provides reasons to discard the tachyons and is substantiated for modes of zero mass. The symmetry group of the model descends to the low energy standard model group $SU (3) \\times SU_L (2) \\times U_Y (1)$ through the Pati-Salam group. Left right symmetry is broken spontaneously and the mass of the tau neutrino is calculated to be about 1/25 electron volt.

B. B. Deo

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

The bosonic Fock representation and a generalized Shale theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We detail a new approach to the bosonic Fock representation of a complex Hilbert space V: our account places the bosonic Fock space S[V] between the symmetric algebra SV and its full antidual SV'; in addition to providing a context in which arbitrary (not necessarily restricted) real symplectic automorphisms of V are implemented, it offers simplified proofs of many standard results of the theory.

Robinson, P L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The bosonic Fock representation and a generalized Shale theorem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We detail a new approach to the bosonic Fock representation of a complex Hilbert space V: our account places the bosonic Fock space S[V] between the symmetric algebra SV and its full antidual SV'; in addition to providing a context in which arbitrary (not necessarily restricted) real symplectic automorphisms of V are implemented, it offers simplified proofs of many standard results of the theory.

P. L. Robinson

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

49.00 mSv as a result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plantreactive protein (CRP) in Chernobyl radiation victims within

Straume, Tore

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Satellite altimeterderived monthly discharge of the GangaBrahmaputra River and its seasonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ QHg Cp SH Vair + QHw Cp SV Vair (8) q t TEB = QER + QEr + QEg SH Vair (9) with QHR , QHr , and QHg

89

ApacheHTTPD2.2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... anonymously shared. STIG ID: WG210 W22 Rule ID: SV-33109r1_rule Vuln ID: V-2226 Severity: CAT II Class: Unclass, 5, CCE ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kwon, SW; Liapi, KA; Haas, CT; Sreenivasan, SV; McLaughlin, JT; Rapid Human-Assisted Creation of Bounding Models for Obstacle Avoidance in ...

91

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2002. Kwon, SW; Liapi, KA; Haas, CT; Sreenivasan, SV; McLaughlin, JT; In-Situ Gas Concentration Measurements for Fires. ...

92

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kwon, SW; Liapi, KA; Haas, CT; Sreenivasan, SV; McLaughlin, JT; Immersive Virtual Reality for Steel Structures. Referenced Paper No. ...

93

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... McLaughlin, JT. ... September 23-25, 2002, 495-500 pp, 2002. McLaughlin, JT; Haas, CT; Kuaoum, J.; Sreenivasan, SV; Kwon, S. ...

94

The Force Balance of the Southern Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean (SO) limb of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is characterized by three vertically stacked cells, each with a transport of about 10 Sv (Sv ? 106 m3 s?1). The buoyancy transport in the SO is dominated by the upper and ...

Matthew R. Mazloff; Raffaele Ferrari; Tapio Schneider

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Virginia's Strategic Plan for Virginia Cooperative Extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Computing Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada. 15 Department of Psychiatry discovery methods into a pipeline (Fig. 1a, b), with the goal of ascertaining different SV types28,29 ; the AS approach assembles SVs30­32 . b, Integrated pipeline for SV discovery, validation

Senger, Ryan S.

96

Water Mass Export from Drake Passage to the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans: A Lagrangian Model Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The northward export of intermediate water from Drake Passage is investigated in two global ocean general circulation models (GCMs) by means of quantitative particle tracing diagnostics. This study shows that a total of about 23 Sv (Sv ? 106 m3?s?...

Yann Friocourt; Sybren Drijfhout; Bruno Blanke; Sabrina Speich

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Speaker verification under degraded condition: a perceptual study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the effect of degradation on human and automatic speaker verification (SV) tasks. The perceptual test is conducted by the subjects having knowledge about speaker verification. An automatic SV system is developed using the Mel-frequency ... Keywords: Degraded condition, Human vs automatic, Speaker information, Speaker verification

Gayadhar Pradhan; S. R. Prasanna

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

"!$ #&%(') 0214 351(768')9@ 1(AB DCEF 'HG I) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Qyivghthr SVWRivgh'2 ivu apURg tgeju{'h {SYtyt@ tpejQyiuW j}{ ayURgH ) {SYt tySVYgte g( Wtpgh' 'RSaTS WQpg ...

2001-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

99

ENSO and Short-Term Variability of the South Equatorial Current Entering the Coral Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical section data extending to 1985 are used to estimate the interannual variability of transport entering the Coral Sea between New Caledonia and the Solomon Islands. Typical magnitudes of this variability are 58 Sv (Sv ? 106 m3 s?1) in ...

William S. Kessler; Sophie Cravatte

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Global Teleconnections in Response to Freshening over the Antarctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, coupled oceanatmosphere responses to freshening over the Antarctic Ocean are investigated in a fully coupled model with a series of sensitivity experiments. In the model, 1.0 Sv (1 Sv ? 106 m3 s?1) of freshwater flux is uniformly ...

Hao Ma; Lixin Wu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Deconvolution of Three-Component Teleseismic Data from Southern Tibet Using the SVA Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and distant Earth wavelet from the autocorrelation of the SV component and using this to deconvolve the data constructing an estimate of the incident source and distant Earth wavelet from the SV component of the P made for P to P scattering for predictive deconvolution in exploration geophysics. Systematic

Nowack, Robert L.

102

UNCORRECTED CAMWA: 4402 Model 3G pp. 113 (col. fig: nil)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to end of year 1, sv2 = survival to end of year 2, flrs = total number of flowers produced, sds1 = total of year 1, sv2 = survival to end of year 2, flrs = total number of flowers produced, sds1 = total seeds

Logan, David

103

High Energy Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Hebbeker Radiation Exposure of Humans Natural sources: ~ 1 m Sv / year ~ 1 m Gy / year ~ 0,1 J / year Technical sources: ~ 1 m Sv / Jahr ~ natural exposure Air (Radon) internal radioactivity (K-40) cosmics Increased of Cosmic Radiation Nobel 1936 1912 Viktor Hess 1912 #12;T.Hebbeker Electrometer Measurements V. Hess

Hebbeker, Thomas

104

The Global Subduction/Obduction Rates: Their Interannual and Decadal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation, including subduction and obduction, for the global oceans was examined using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) outputs. The global subduction rate averaged over the period from 1959 to 2006 is estimated at 505.8 Sv (1 Sv ? 106 m3 ...

Ling Ling Liu; Rui Xin Huang

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Web Service Composition for Deductive Web Mining: A Knowledge Modelling Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Morgan Kaufmann, 1995. 16. Sv´atek, V., Kosek, J., Labsk´y, M., Br´aza, J., Kavalec, M., Vacura, M., V Workshop on Web Semantics (WebS03), IEEE Computer Society 2003. 17. Sv´atek, V., Kosek, J., Vacura, M

ten Teije, Annette

106

Mean Flow in the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several independent data sources suggest that there is a net upper-layer mass flux O(3 Sv) (Sv ? 106 m3 s?1) to the west in the central Gulf of Mexico, even though the western gulf is a closed basin. A plausible explanation is that this net flux ...

Wilton Sturges; Kern E. Kenyon

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evolution of the Deep Water in the Canadian Basin in the Arctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overflow of magnitude 0.25 Sv (Sv ? 106 m?3 s?1) has been predicted to enter the Makarov Basin (part of the Canadian Basin in the Arctic Ocean) from the Eurasian Basin via a deep gap in the dividing Lomonosov ridge. The authors argue that this ...

M-L. Timmermans; Chris Garrett

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

New River Light & Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Light & Power Co New River Light & Power Co Place North Carolina Utility Id 13482 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 Watt SV TOB Lighting 150 Watt SV TOB Lighting 150 Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting 175 Watt MV TOB Lighting 175 Watt Mercury Vapor Lighting 250 Watt Metal Halide Lighting 250 Watt SV TOB Lighting 250 Watt Sodium Vapor Lighting 400 Watt MV TOB Lighting 400 Watt Mercury Vapor Lighting 400 Watt Metal Halide Lighting 400 Watt SV TOB Lighting 750 Watt SV TOB Lighting

109

Radiation dose from cigarette tobacco  

SciTech Connect

The radioactivity in tobacco leaves collected from 15 different regions of Greece before cigarette production was studied in order to estimate the effective dose from cigarette tobacco due to the naturally occurring primordial radionuclides, such as {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb of the uranium series and {sup 228}Ra of the thorium series and/or man-made produced radionuclides, such as {sup 137}Cs of Chernobyl origin. Gamma-ray spectrometry was applied using Ge planar and coaxial type detectors of high resolution and high efficiency. It was concluded that the annual effective dose due to inhalation for adults (smokers) for {sup 226}Ra varied from 42.5 to 178.6 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 79.7 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}), while for {sup 228}Ra from 19.3 to 116.0 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 67.1 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}) and for {sup 210}Pb from 47.0 to 134.9 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 104.7 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}), that is the same order of magnitude for each radionuclide. The sum of the effective dose of the three natural radionuclides varied from 151.9 to 401.3 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (average 251.5 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}). The annual effective dose from {sup 137}Cs of Chernobyl origin was three orders of magnitude lower as it varied from 70.4 to 410.4 nSv y{sup -1} (average 199.3 nSv y{sup -1})

Papastefanou, C. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by {gamma}-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10 Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment.

Tateishi, Yoshihisa [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Kohasu, Oko-cho, Nankoku-city, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: tateishi@kochi-u.ac.jp; Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Kohasu, Oko-cho, Nankoku-city, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer: Low LET radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error ({sigma}=0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V Report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from {minus}15% to {minus}30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative project model was {minus}37.1% for males and {minus}23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased {minus}27.1% for males and {minus}43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 65 (DRREF=2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.92%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risk increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for US nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors.

Peterson, L.E.; Schull, W.J.; Davis, B.R. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center; Buffler, P.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Gateway:América Latina | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latina Latina Jump to: navigation, search Banner vertical.jpg Energías Renovables Energia_solar Solar Eolica Eólica Geotermica Geotérmica Hidráulica Hidráulica Biomasa Biomasa Marina Marina Centros Latinoamericanos Desarrollo de Proyectos Marco Regulatorio Países Latinoamericanos Argentina Argentina Bolivia Bolivia Brazil Brazil Chile Chile Colombia Colombia Costa Rica Costa Rica Cuba Cuba Ecuador Ecuador El Salvador El Salvador Guatemala Guatemala Haiti Haiti Honduras Honduras Mexico Mexico Nicaragua Nicaragua Panama Panama Paraguay Paraguay Peru Peru Republica Dominicana Dominican Republic Uruguay Uruguay Venezuela Venezuela Otros sitios de interés Reegle, el motor de búsqueda de energías renovables y eficiencia energética Power Technologies Energy Data Book Asociación Latinoaméricana de Energía Eólica

113

Unmarried cohabitation among deprived families in Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% 80% 90% 100% Chile Uruguay Mexico Costa Rica Argentina Bolivia Paraguay Brazil Ecuador Guatemala Belize Cuba Peru Venezuela Nicaragua El Salvador Colombia Panama Honduras Dominican Republic Unmarried Cohabitation Marriage Data sources: For all... of all unions. This group is formed by Venezuela, Peru, Cuba, Belize, Guatemala. Finally, the countries where unmarried cohabitation represents no more than one third of total unions are geographically located in the outer circle.2 Thus, the countries...

Ramm Santelices, Alejandra Margarita

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microsoft Word - S07409_2010_SER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5-1 5-1 Results in Brief: 2010 Estimated Doses Direct Radiation-The estimated 2010 effective dose equivalent at the southeastern boundary of the site was 10 mrem/yr (0.10 mSv/yr). This is 10 percent of the 100-mrem/yr (1-mSv/yr) DOE limit. Dose to the MEI-The dose to the MEI for 2010 was estimated to be 10 mrem/yr (0.10 mSv/yr) at the southeastern boundary of the site. This is 10 percent of the 100-mrem/yr (1-mSv/yr) DOE limit. 5.0 Direct Radiation Pathway and Radiation Dose This section provides the 2010 results for direct radiation monitoring and the estimated dose to the public from the direct radiation pathway. It also addresses biotic dose to aquatic organisms from remedial actions associated with the groundwater restoration program. In the past, the Fernald Preserve demonstrated

117

SHORT COMMUNICATION D. Nikezic B. M. F. Lau K. N. Yu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and uranium miners, gives a value of approximately 4 mSv WLM?1 dose per unit radon exposure. All other elements of the human respiratory tract from the reports

Yu, K.N.

118

An evaluation of theories concerning the health effects of low-dose radiation exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The danger of high, acute doses of radiation is well documented, but the effects of low-dose radiation below 100 mSv is still heavily debated. Four theories concerning the effects of lowdose radiation are presented here: ...

Wei, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jay)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

NIST Special Publication 250-39 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For gases, the fluid surface tension is zero and the ... or the volume changers are loaded from the gas tank ... pumps are known to be leak-tight, SV1 and ...

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory, Mixed Waste Site Treatment Plan, Wastein Reducing Routine Mixed Waste 4- 1. Summary of AnnualSheet mSv millisievert MW Mixed Waste ND non-detectable NEPA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Slide: 1 July 2006, v.01.3 Monitoring Weather, Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organization (WMO). #12;Slide: 6 July 2006, v.01.3 20 Member States & 10 Cooperating States Member States EUMETSAT HQ, Mission Control Centre, Darmstadt EPS Ground Station Sv

Kuligowski, Bob

122

On Some Aspects of the Definition of Initial Conditions for Ensemble Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four methods for initialization of ensemble forecasts are systematically compared, namely the methods of singular vectors (SV) and bred modes (BM), as well as the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF). The ...

L. Descamps; O. Talagrand

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Dissecting the Operating Mechanism of a Biological Motor One Molecule at a Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

replicative hexameric helicase of SV40 large tumor antigen.Activation of the MCM2-7 helicase by association with Cdc45site architecture and helicase mechanism of an archaeal MCM.

Chistol, Gheorghe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Wang et al 2011.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SV, Pavlostathis SG, Rozzi A, Sanders WTM, Siegrist H, Vavilin VA (2001) The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). IWA Publishing, London, U.K. Burrell PC,...

125

Available Technologies: Conducting Domain Walls in Insulating ...  

He, Q. Zhan, Y.-H. Chu, A. Rother, M.E. Hawkridge, P. Maksymovych, P. Yu, M. Gajek, N. Balke, S.V. Kalinin, S. Gemming, F. Wang, G. Catalan, J.F. Scott, ...

126

Conducting Domain Walls in Insulating Oxides - Energy ...  

He, Q. Zhan, Y.-H. Chu, A. Rother, M.E. Hawkridge, P. Maksymovych, P. Yu, M. Gajek, N. Balke, S.V. Kalinin, S. Gemming, F. Wang, G. Catalan, J.F. Scott, ...

127

AOCS Official Method Cd 3a-94  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculated Saponification Value AOCS Official Method Cd 3a-94 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The saponification value (SV) is the amount of alka

128

Data:6d4220f5-d14b-4d5c-bd9e-9508ecd7ea28 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Effective date: 20120701 End date if known: Rate name: L-SV 400 watt...

129

Data:8f0a9c39-838a-4ffa-852a-520df41dc562 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Effective date: 20120701 End date if known: Rate name: L-SV 70 Watt 344...

130

Data:A2909528-8e64-4f66-a72e-43bde8731642 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Effective date: 20120701 End date if known: Rate name: L-SV 150 Watt 720...

131

Data:5c2844f9-f4b2-4943-b60d-b7e2b6f58b92 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Effective date: 20120701 End date if known: Rate name: L-SV 250 Watt...

132

Sensitivity Properties of a Biosphere Model Based on BATS and a Statistical-Dynamical Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A biosphere model based on the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) and the Saltzman-Vernekar (SV) statistical-dynamical climate model is developed. Some equations of BATS are adopted either intact or with modifications, some are ...

Taiping Zhang

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Forecasts as Revealed by Singular Vectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Singular vector (SV) sensitivity, calculated using the adjoint model of the U.S. Navy Operation Global Atmosphere Prediction System (NOGAPS), is used to study the dynamics associated with tropical cyclone evolution. For each model-predicted ...

Melinda S. Peng; Carolyn A. Reynolds

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Blind multiuser detection based on kernel approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A kernel based multiuser detection (MUD) scheme in code-division multiple-access (CDMA) system is proposed. In this scheme, the support vector (SV) under support vector (SVM) framework is obtained through a kernel sparsity approximation, which regulates ...

Tao Yang; Bo Hu

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

NERSC Users Group Meeting Nov. 15, 1999 Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and its proposed charter will be discussed. Agenda: 08:30 Breakfast served 08:45 Welcome Bas Braams & Horst Simon 09:00 State of NERSC - Interactive SV1 response and New Priority...

136

ISOTOPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Klein and S.V. Peterson, May 9-ll, 1973, Argonne NationalLaboratory, Argonne, Illinois (1973). 97. R.A. Muller,S.V. Peterson, May 9-11, 1973, Argonne National Laboratory,

Lederer, C. Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Optimal Perturbations in the Eady Model: Resonance versus PV Unshielding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a nonmodal decomposition technique based on the potential vorticity (PV) perspective, the optimal perturbation or singular vector (SV) of the Eady model without upper rigid lid is studied for a kinetic energy norm. Special emphasis is put ...

H. de Vries; J. D. Opsteegh

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Empirical Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Model by Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stochastic volatility model is one of volatility models which infer latent volatility of asset returns. The Bayesian inference of the stochastic volatility (SV) model is performed by the hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm which is superior to other Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in sampling volatility variables. We perform the HMC simulations of the SV model for two liquid stock returns traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and measure the volatilities of those stock returns. Then we calculate the accuracy of the volatility measurement using the realized volatility as a proxy of the true volatility and compare the SV model with the GARCH model which is one of other volatility models. Using the accuracy calculated with the realized volatility we find that empirically the SV model performs better than the GARCH model.

Takaishi, Tetsuya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The role of the Atlantic freshwater balance in the hysteresis of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

becomes less saline because of the import of 80 Sv year of freshwater by ...... Change Action Fund, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Re- search Council of ... culation response to greenhouse gas forcing in a non-flux-ad- justed coupled...

140

A sequence-based survey of the complex structural organization of tumor genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimental validation of ESP breakpoints. BJR, SV, and CC1045. Library Preparation for ESP [http://shark.ucsf.edu/~http://shark.ucsf.edu/~stas/ESP_GB/index.html] Database of

Raphael, Benjamin J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

JOM Table of Contents: March 1995 - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R.V. Raman, S.V. Rele, S. Poland, J. Lasalvia, M.A. Meyers, and A.R. Niiler. Research Summary: Interconnected Metal-Ceramic Composites by Chemical Means...

142

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEquinixASH(DC2)fabricupgradedonJan14th · 10GEquinixSJ(SV1)fabricupgradedonJan19th · OC12betweenDENVHUBandPantex

143

Julian Szekely Memorial Symposium on Materials Processing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Treatment in a Plasma Vitrification Reactor [pp. 551-569] D.F. McLaughlin, S.V. Dighe, and D.L. Keairns. Formation of Plasma-Sprayed Oxide Coatings...

144

Final Report - High-Order Spectral Volume Method for the Navier-Stokes Equations On Unstructured Tetrahedral Grids  

SciTech Connect

The overriding objective for this project is to develop an efficient and accurate method for capturing strong discontinuities and fine smooth flow structures of disparate length scales with unstructured grids, and demonstrate its potentials for problems relevant to DOE. More specifically, we plan to achieve the following objectives: 1. Extend the SV method to three dimensions, and develop a fourth-order accurate SV scheme for tetrahedral grids. Optimize the SV partition by minimizing a form of the Lebesgue constant. Verify the order of accuracy using the scalar conservation laws with an analytical solution; 2. Extend the SV method to Navier-Stokes equations for the simulation of viscous flow problems. Two promising approaches to compute the viscous fluxes will be tested and analyzed; 3. Parallelize the 3D viscous SV flow solver using domain decomposition and message passing. Optimize the cache performance of the flow solver by designing data structures minimizing data access times; 4. Demonstrate the SV method with a wide range of flow problems including both discontinuities and complex smooth structures. The objectives remain the same as those outlines in the original proposal. We anticipate no technical obstacles in meeting these objectives.

Wang, Z J

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington, 0 C Washington, 0 C Housing Characteristics 1984 i if I ^^^PVrjuV 9861 wo suoiidu.)sqns ot ,< iou Xq sn oj it ujnpj jsnui no^ - via ^Mi uo 3-ic no^ JI ')si -uoo si (VI3) uoiiBJisiuiuipv uoiieuuojui 3DI1ON meuoduii UB noX Suipuas sir jo -986! ' J '9861 uoos [((.w a Xq pwmbw sy (202) jo 0098-2SZ (202) S8S02 0 0 'uoi8u!M«eM 6uip|ing J0| soi aq XSLU si jepjo uy «0|eq jesdde sjaqainu auot|de|a] ptie sessaippv 'QI3N ^Ml oi uo suoqsano '(OI3N) J9iueo uoijeiujojui ASjeug IBUOIIBN S.VI3 aiJi JO Od9 (VI3) uoiiejisiunupy uot;6tux>|ui Xfijaug jat»o pue snji jo aseqajnd pue uorieauofui lueuiuWAOQ 5 Tl 'sjuauunooQ jo luepueiuiJ&dng &LJJ 0104 8iqet!*AB si uoiieoitqnd DOE/EiA-0314(84) Distribution Category UC-98 Residential Energy Consumption v^-^s--. Survey: Housing Characteristics 1984

146

$2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July 2001 August 2001 JUly 20, $2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S .Friday ~1 2 1234567 1234 Friday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13141516 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 2122 23 24 25 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 -- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ T a sk P a d 7 am1 D 1 lTaskPad .8 00 9 00 _ I 100, 12 pm6 Notes 2 00 3 00 4 00 I - 5 00 Kelliler, Joseph 5 3/23/2002 26326 Jll~ I 7~ 23~ 200uy J uly 2001 August 2001 July 23,, 2001$ S M T W T F S SM TW T F S Mnl~ondawy 8 ~ 23 4 s 6 1 345 7 1234 Nionday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 1718 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

147

L.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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148

A NEW CEMP-s RR LYRAE STAR  

SciTech Connect

We show that SDSS J170733.93+585059.7 (hereafter SDSS J1707+58), previously identified by Aoki and collaborators as a carbon-enhanced metal-poor star (with s-process-element enhancements, CEMP-s), on the assumption that it is a main-sequence turnoff star, is the RR Lyrae star VIII-14 identified by the Lick Astrograph Survey. Revised abundances for SDSS J1707+58 are [Fe/H] = -2.92, [C/Fe] = +2.79, and [Ba/Fe] = +2.83. It is thus one of the most metal-poor RR Lyrae stars known, and has more extreme [C/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] than the only other RR Lyrae star known to have a CEMP-s spectrum (TY Gru). Both stars are Oosterhoff II stars with prograde kinematics, in contrast to stars with [C/Fe] < + 0.7, such as KP Cyg and UY CrB, which are disk stars. Twelve other RR Lyrae stars with [C/Fe] {>=}+0.7 are presented as CEMP candidates for further study.

Kinman, T. D.; Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Aoki, Wako [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Brown, Warren R. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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150

Thailand-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

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151

Dominican Republic-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) |  

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152

Costa Rica-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open  

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153

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154

Mexico-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

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155

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156

Observatory of Renewable Energy for Latin America and the Caribbean | Open  

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157

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158

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159

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160

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162

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163

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164

Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

165

Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

166

The Separation of powers in the WTO: how to avoid judicial activism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Nuclear Weapons, when it stated that: [I]n view of the current state of international law, and of the elements at its The Separation of Powers in the WTO 873 Ecuador, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Switzerland, Uruguay and Venezuela... definitively whether the threat or use of nuclear weapons would be lawful or unlawful in an extreme circumstance of self-defence, in which the very survival of a State would be at stake.68 There are a number of justifications for a prohibition on declarations...

Bartels, Lorand

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Feasibility study of units 3 and 4. Batlle y Ordonez Power Station and expansion of La Tablada Power Station. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The study, conducted by Southern Electric International (SEI), was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of U.T.E., the Government of Uruguay's electric power company. It is an assessment of three potential projects under consideration by U.T.E. The changes resulting from these projects would add 120 to 360 megawatts capacity to the current system. The first option would involve repowering Jose Batlle y Ordonex Units 3 and 4. As an alternate to this plan, U.T.E. is considering a new combined cycle plant at a Greenfield site. The third project would increase capacity at La Tablada.

Not Available

1994-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Brazil and the electrical interconnections in the Mercosul Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the state of relations among the four countries that form Mercosul, the common market that is being formed by Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay, and the prospects for expansion of international electric energy commerce and exchanges in that region. The first part presents the main supply facilities already available, including hydroelectric power plants, power stations, frequency conversion stations, and transmission lines. The second part focuses on the status of the Brazilian electric power sector and analyzes some of its features that are considered to be an incentive to the expansion of the electric energy international commerce in the Mercosul region.

Alqueres, J.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name India-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

170

Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Agency/Company /Organization Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) Partner ICI, Environment Canada, BP, World Bank Institute, Thailand, Ministry of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Philippines, Climate Change Commission Philippines, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Vietnam, Ministry of Planning and Investment Vietnam, Sub-Institute of Hydrometeorology and Environment of South Vietnam, Ministry of Industry and Trade Vietnam, Ministry of Finance Indonesia, Ministry of Public Works Indonesia, Ministry of Transport Indonesia, Dept. of Clean & Efficient Energy Technology Implementation Indonesia, National Council on Climate Change Malaysia, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Malaysia, Dept. of Economic Planning Malaysia, Ministry of Green Technology, Energy and Water Malaysia, Land Public Transport Commission India, Central Electricity Regulatory Commission Pakistan, Dept. of Planning & Development Pakistan, Ministry of Finance Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Pakistan, Ministry of Water and Power Germany, Federal Environment Ministry Argentina, Ministry of Energy Argentina, Ministry of Industry Chile, Ministry of Environment Chile, Ministry of Energy Chile, Ministry of Transport Chile, Ministry of Finance Colombia, Ministry of Environment Colombia, Ministry of Transport Colombia, Department of National Planning Colombia, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Climate Change Direction Costa Rica, Ministry of Agriculture Costa Rica, Ministry of Housing Costa Rica, Ministry of Energy Dominican Republic, National Climate Change Commission Dominican Republic, National Energy Commission Dominican Republic, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources Dominican Republic, Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development Dominican Republic, Technical Office for Land Transport (OTTT) Panama Canal Authority Panama Maritime Authority Peru, Ministry of Environment Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Peru, Ministry of Transport and Communications Peru, Ministry of Energy and Mines Uruguay, Ministry of the Environment Uruguay, National Transport Directorate Uruguay, Ministry of Industry, Energy and Minerals Uruguay, Ministry of Agriculture Canada, Ministry of the Environment Norway, Ministry of the Environment Sweden, Department of the Environment UK, Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC), Danish Government

171

Impact of reduced dose limits on NRC licensed activities. Major issues in the implementation of ICRP/NCRP dose limit recommendations: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes information required to estimate, at least qualitatively, the potential impacts of reducing occupational dose limits below those given in 10 CFR 20 (Revised). For this study, a questionnaire was developed and widely distributed to the radiation protection community. The resulting data together with data from existing surveys and sources were used to estimate the impact of three dose-limit options; 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (1 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), 20 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (2 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), and a combination of an annual limit of 50 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (5 rem yr{sup {minus}1}) coupled with a cumulative limit, in rem, equal to age in years. Due to the somewhat small number of responses and the lack of data in some specific areas, a working committee of radiation protection experts from a variety of licensees was employed to ensure the exposure data were representative. The following overall conclusions were reached: (1) although 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} is a reasonable limit for many licensees, such a limit could be extraordinarily difficult to achieve and potentially destructive to the continued operation of some licensees, such as nuclear power, fuel fabrication, and medicine; (2) twenty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} as a limit is possible for some of these groups, but for others it would prove difficult. (3) fifty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} and age in 10s of mSv appear reasonable for all licensees, both in terms of the lifetime risk of cancer and severe genetic effects to the most highly exposed workers, and the practicality of operation.

Meinhold, C.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department  

SciTech Connect

Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico) and Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico) and Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando No.22 C.P. 4080 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

T-552: Cisco Nexus 1000V VEM updates address denial of service in VMware  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

52: Cisco Nexus 1000V VEM updates address denial of service in 52: Cisco Nexus 1000V VEM updates address denial of service in VMware ESX/ESXi T-552: Cisco Nexus 1000V VEM updates address denial of service in VMware ESX/ESXi February 8, 2011 - 7:49am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco Nexus 1000V VEM updates address denial of service in VMware ESX/ESXi. PLATFORM: ESXi 4.1, ESXi 4.0, ESX 4.1, ESX 4.0 The following Cisco products have the vulnerability: - Cisco Nexus 1000V Virtual Ethernet Module Release 4.0(4) SV1(3b) - Cisco Nexus 1000V Virtual Ethernet Module Release 4.0(4) SV1(3a) - Cisco Nexus 1000V Virtual Ethernet Module Release 4.0(4) SV1(3) - Cisco Nexus 1000V Virtual Ethernet Module Release 4.0(4) SV1(2) - Cisco Nexus 1000V Virtual Ethernet Module Release 4.0(4) SV1(1) ABSTRACT: The Cisco Nexus 1000V Virtual Ethernet Module (VEM) is a virtual switch for

174

City of Rocky Mount, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mount, North Carolina (Utility Company) Mount, North Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Rocky Mount Place North Carolina Utility Id 16226 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lighting - 1000W MH Lighting Area Lighting - 1000W MV Lighting Area Lighting - 100W MH Lighting Area Lighting - 100W MH (SE) Lighting Area Lighting - 100W SV Lighting Area Lighting - 100W SV (SE) Lighting Area Lighting - 1500W MH Lighting Area Lighting - 150W SV Lighting Area Lighting - 175W MH Lighting

175

Microsoft Word - Chap6 - 5-15-05.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Six May 2005 Six May 2005 2004 Site Environmental Report 6-1 Results in Brief: 2004 Estimated Doses Airborne Emissions - The estimated maximum effective dose equivalent at the site fenceline from 2004 airborne emissions (excluding radon) was calculated to be 0.65 mrem (6.5E-03 millSievert [mSv]), which is 6.5 percent of the EPA NESHAP 10-mrem annual dose limit. Direct Radiation - The estimated 2004 effective dose equivalent at an off-site receptor location near the north-northeastern fenceline of the site was 10.4 mrem (1.04E-01 mSv). Dose to the Maximally Exposed Individual - The dose to the maximally exposed individual for 2004 was estimated to be 11.1 mrem (1.11E-01 mSv) at an off-site receptor location near the north-northeastern fenceline of the site.

176

Microsoft PowerPoint - Dose Ranges 24Jan 05.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 40 60 20 40 60 80 100 rem NRC Dose Limit for Public 100 mrem/yr = 1 mSv/yr (DOE, ICRP, NCRP) ANSI standard N43.17 Personnel scanner, max = 25 mrem/yr Cleanup criteria for site decommissioning/ license termination 25 mrem/yr NCRP "Negligible Dose" Medical Diagnostics (A-J) A C D E G B Temporary "Special Case" annual Public Limit (NRC, DOE) NRC Dose Limit for Workers = 5 rem/yr = 50 mSv/yr Cancer Epidemiology Life Span Study (A-bomb survivors) ( Chart compiled by NF Metting, Office of Science DOE/BER; 24Jan2005,"Orders of Magnitude") Absorbed dose: 100 rad = 1 Gray Dose equivalent: 100 rem = 1 Sievert 100 mrem = 1 mSv (1 rem = 1 rad for x- and gamma- rays) Estimated dose for

177

NERSC Users Group Meeting Nov. 15, 1999 Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes Notes ERSUG Meeting Summary Notes, November 15, 1999 Here are some highlights from the discussions (excepting the items contributed by ERSUG Chair, Bas Bramms below): During the state of NERSC presentation by Jim Craw a primary topic of discussion was the issue of the processing capabilities of the PVP cluster. Since the upgrade of the batch system processors to SV1s, some concern has been expressed about the relatively poorer processing capabilities of the J90SE processors on the interactive Killeen system. Naturally everybody would prefer having all the processors on Killeen also upgraded to SV1s. This would both make the system more uniform (upcoming compiler releases are expected to diverge with more optimization in place for the SV1s) and performance would be improved (especially important to 2-3 groups).

178

City of Gaffney, South Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gaffney, South Carolina (Utility Company) Gaffney, South Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Gaffney Place South Carolina Utility Id 6894 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service Commercial Industrial Service Industrial Outdoor Lighting Rate- (1000W MH) Lighting Outdoor Lighting Rate- (1000W SV) Lighting Outdoor Lighting Rate- (100W SV Lucalox) Lighting Outdoor Lighting Rate- (100W SV Lucalox) Lighting

179

Software Verification and Validation Plan Activities, 2011 -- SAPHIRE 8 Quality Assurance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SV&V Updates through FY11 An official update was released in February 2011. This update was to add a new automated test, to revise the SV&V wording to indicate the operational life cycle that SAPHIRE 8 has entered, and to provide design documentation for Inspection Planning Reports (which evolved into the Plant Risk Information e-Book (PRIB)) and Analysis Speed Improvements. Another update to the SV&V will be released in conjunction with this report in September 2011 to include the following: two new automated tests, the inclusion of metrics into the testing regime and references to the addition of the Preliminary Design Review and Critical Design Review processes.

Kurt G. Vedros; Curtis L. Smith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Lens of Eye Dose Limit Changes: Current Status of the Potential Regulatory Changes and Possible Effects on Radiation Protection Programs at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research suggests that the threshold for cataract formation as a result of exposure to radiation could be lower than previously considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is now recommending a dose limit for the lens of the eye of an average of 20 mSv (2 rem) per year, equivalent to their current recommendation for Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering reducing the lens of the eye dose limit to 50 mSv/yr ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

ELASTIC-WAVEFIELD SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A NEW SEISMIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy research shifted from onshore prospects to marine environments during this report period. Four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4-C OBC) seismic data acquired in water depths of 2400 to 2500 feet across Green Canyon Block 237 in the Gulf of Mexico were processed and analyzed. The P-P and P-SV images of strata immediately below the seafloor exhibit amazing differences in P-P and P-SV seismic facies. These data may be one of the classic examples of the basic concepts of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy.

Bob A. Hardage

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Radiological consequences of a hypothetical disruption of a maximally loaded FFTF fuel cask  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiological consequences at the site boundary were estimated for non-mechanistic disruption of an Interim Storage Cask (ISC) loaded with 7 assemblies at the maximum available burnup. The hypothetical disruption consisted of a crushing/shearing of the Core Component Container (CCC) along with all 7 assemblies and the creation of a large escape path out of the cask. The resulting site boundary dose of 1.6 mSv is far below the 250 mSv risk guidelines for highly unlikely events.

Scott, P.A.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electron thermal effect on linear and nonlinear coupled Shukla-Varma and convective cell modes in dust-contaminated magnetoplasma  

SciTech Connect

Linear and nonlinear properties of coupled Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell modes in the presence of electron thermal effects are studied in a nonuniform magnetoplasma composed of electrons, ions, and extremely massive and negatively charged immobile dust grains. In the linear case, the modified dispersion relation is given and, in the nonlinear case, stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations that govern the dynamics of coupled SV and convective cell modes are obtained. It is found that electrostatic dipolar and vortex street type solutions can appear in such a plasma. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to the Earth's mesosphere as well as in ionospheric plasmas is also pointed out.

Masood, W. [TPPD, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and National Center for Physics (NCP), Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Measurement of Indoor Radon-222 and Radon-220 Concentrations in Central Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A passive-type radon/thoron detector was used for measuring indoor radon and thoron concentrations at 90 dwellings in Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central Japan during 90 days from December, 2006 to March, 2007. The radon and thoron concentrations were 21.1 Bq/m3 and 25.1 Bq/m3, respectively. The dose due to radon and thoron in dwellings was roughly evaluated as 0.7 mSv/y and 2.4 mSv/y, respectively. The examination of the geological factor and house condition having an effect on indoor radon concentration was performed.

Oka, Mitsuaki; Shimo, Michikuni [Graduate School of Health Science, Fujita Health University 1-98, Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Tyoake, Aichi, 470-1192 (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

I. Review of the information problem and black hole complementarity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;I. Review of the information problem and black hole complementarity II. The firewall argument-th/9306083): Red: Scoarse (= SBekenstein-Hawking) of evaporating black hole. Blue: (SvN of radiation the black hole is still large (green). Asides: RS = M in Planck units, remnants, A vs. A3/4 S O(RS 3

186

EditorialnReviewsandCommentaRy 330 radiology.rsna.org n Radiology: Volume 265: Number 2--November 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Medicine (5) states the follow- ing: "Risks of medical imaging at effective doses below 50 mSv for single of exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors (8). Clearly, there are many differences between a CT scan and an atomic bomb exposure; however, about 30000 atomic bomb survivors who were located several miles from

Brenner, David Jonathan

187

Physica A 274 (1999) 6066 www.elsevier.com/locate/physa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is by displacement. Either water or a miscible gas is injected into wells, to push the oil to production wells to the oil industry: predicting oil recovery using percolation theory P.R. Kinga; , S.V. Buldyrevb , N.V. Dokholyanb , S. Havlinc , Y. Leeb , G. Paulb , H.E. Stanleyb aBP Amoco Exploration, Sunbury-on-Thames, Middx

Stanley, H. Eugene

188

ACEEE International Journal on Electrical and Power Engineering, Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan 2010 2010 ACEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACEEE DOI: 01.ijepe.01.01.06 Direct Model Reference Adaptive Internal Model Controller for DFIG Wind internal model Controller, MIT Rule, DFIG, wind farms. NOMENCLATURE sV =stator voltage [V] sR =stator-third of China's vast landmass is suffering from acid rain caused by its rapid industrial growth. DFIG

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

189

To appear in Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Quality Software (QSIC 2011), IEEE Computer Society Press, Los Alamitos, CA (2011)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-DNA ternary complex. Nature 422, 534-539. PMID: 12660736. 36. J. Yoon, B. Oh, K. Kim, J.E. Park, J. Wang, H.K.D. Smith, S.V. Lipchock, T.D. Ames, J. Wang, R.R. Breaker, S.A. Strobel (2009) Structural basis of ligand

190

TANGENT CUT LOCI ON SURFACES A. FIGALLI, L. RIFFORD, AND C. VILLANI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, v) := max t 0; (expx(sv))0st is a minimizing geodesic . Then for any x M, we let TCL(x) = tangent; 0 t TCL(x) is compact and coincides with the boundary of the open set I(x). Finally, the cut locus of x may be defined as cut(x) := expx TCL(x) . Many works [2, 8

Villani, Cédric

191

Wind Farms in Regions Exposed to Tropical Cyclones Niels-Erik Clausen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Farms in Regions Exposed to Tropical Cyclones Niels-Erik Clausen1 , niels Energy A/S, A.C. Meyers Vænge 9, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark, Phone +45 44 80 65 71 3 Tripod Wind 6001 Summary The present paper analyses the design basis of wind farms to be established in regions

192

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions that result in the highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The report has been prepared in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection Air Emissions. The dose to the PNNL Site MEI due to routine major and minor point source emissions in 2012 from PNNL Site sources is 9E-06 mrem (9E-08 mSv) EDE. The dose from fugitive emissions (i.e., unmonitored sources) is 1E-7 mrem (1E-9 mSv) EDE. The dose from radon emissions is 2E-6 mrem (2E-08 mSv) EDE. No nonroutine emissions occurred in 2012. The total radiological dose for 2012 to the MEI from all PNNL Site radionuclide emissions, including fugitive emissions and radon, is 1E-5 mrem (1E-7 mSv) EDE, or 100,000 times smaller than the federal and state standard of 10 mrem/yr, to which the PNNL Site is in compliance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

VisIOn: an interactive visualization ontology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VisIOn (Interactive Visualization Ontology) is a web application designed to categorize and store information about Software Visualization (SV) systems, in a way that can be easily searched and used for comparison. VisIOn will allow users and developers ... Keywords: algorithm animation, effectiveness, ontology, program visualization, repository, software visualization, taxonomy

Philippa Rhodes; Eileen Kraemer; Bina Reed

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

IAEA-TECDOC-1403 The long term stabilization of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................ 265 S.V. Mikheykin ANNEX XII. UKRAINE: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEASURES TO BE TAKEN FOR LONG TERM ................................................................... 281 G. Maslyakov ANNEX XIII. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEASURES range of technical measures can be employed to prevent or reduce the extent of these processes. Capping

196

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Improving the iMM904 S. cerevisiae metabolic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In Vitro Pull-Down Assay PCR products encoding the TF coding sequence and the SV40LPAS fragment were used to construct a template for in vitro transcription/translation. The products were combined by overlapping PCR­16250. Roguev, A., Bandyopadhyay, S., Zofall, M., Zhang, K., Fischer, T., Collins, S.R., Qu, H., Shales, M

Maranas, Costas

197

Universit degli Studi di Genova Facolt di Scienze della Formazione  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 Novembre 2009 - ore 16 Aula Magna dell'Università Via Balbi 5 - Genova #12;Università degli Studi Balbi 5 - Genova hanno l'onore di invitare la S.V. alla cerimonia di conferimento della Laurea Honoris

Genova, Università degli Studi di

198

WPI centers on March 11, 2011 and aftermath Toshio Kuroki, MD, PhD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the third disaster; the nuclear power plants in Fukushima became out of control totally and nuclear fuel, the biggest tsunami barriers particularly in these areas and warning systems by catching primary (P) wave City Distance from Fukushima nuclear plants Environmental dose AIMR Sendai 94 km 0.07 Sv/h MANA Tsukuba

Takada, Shoji

199

Characteristics and Trends of River Discharge into Hudson, James, and Ungava Bays, 19642000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics and trends of observed river discharge into the Hudson, James, and Ungava Bays (HJUBs) for the period 19642000 are investigated. Forty-two rivers with outlets into these bays contribute on average 714 km3 yr?1 [= 0.023 Sv (1 ...

Stephen J. Dry; Marc Stieglitz; Edward C. McKenna; Eric F. Wood

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Whole-body counting in the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect

In 1978 the Marshall Islands Radiological Safety Program was organized to perform radiation measurements and assess radiation doses for the people of the Bikini, Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik Atolls. One of the major field components of this program is whole- body counting (WBC). WBC is used to monitor the quantity of gamma- emitting radionuclides present in individuals. A primary objective of the program was to establish {sup 137}Cesium body contents among the Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik populations. {sup 137}Cs was the only gamma-emitting fission radionuclide detected in the 1,967 persons monitored. {sup 137}Cs body burdens tended to increase with age for both sexes, and were higher in males. The average {sup 137}Cs dose Annual Effective Dose for the three populations was as follows: For Enewetak, the dose was 22{+-}4 {mu}Sv. For Utirik, the dose was 33{+-} 3 {mu}Sv. Since 1985 the Rongelap people have been self-exiled to Mejatto. Biological elimination should have reduced their dose to virtually zero, and the measured dose was 2{+-}2 {mu}Sv. If they had remained on Rongelap Island, the calculated dose would have been 99 {mu}Sv, which is about one-third of the background dose. 7 refs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Sun, L.C.; Clinton, J.; Kaplan, E.; Meinhold, C.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass  

SciTech Connect

A series of static leach tests was conducted using glasses developed for vitrifying tank wastes at the Savannah River Site to monitor the disposition of actinide elements upon corrosion of the glasses. In these tests, glasses produced from SRL 131 and SRL 202 frits were corroded at 90{degrees}C in a tuff groundwater. Tests were conducted using crushed glass at different glass surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) ratios to assess the effect of the S/V on the solution chemistry, the corrosion of the glass, and the disposition of actinide elements. Observations regarding the effects of the S/V on the solution chemistry and the corrosion of the glass matrix have been reported previously. This paper highlights the solution analyses performed to assess how the S/V used in a static leach test affects the disposition of actinide elements between fractions that are suspended or dissolved in the solution, and retained by the altered glass or other materials.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Seismic wave propagation in cracked porous media Tim Pointer,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Pi plays an important role. There is much higher attenuation and dispersion for gas (which is more, as for PARTIAL ALIGN, there is no velocity dispersion; there is also increased P and SV attenuation as the gas in there is high attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. Fluid £ow may be on either a wavelength scale

Edinburgh, University of

204

Teddies and the Origin of the Leeuwin Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outflow from the Indonesian seas empties approximately 57 Sv of surface warm (and low salinity) Indonesian Throughflow water into the southern Indian Ocean (at roughly 12S). Using a nonlinear 1-layer model with a simple geometry consisting ...

Doron Nof; Thierry Pichevin; Janet Sprintall

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

External Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix G External Dose Estimates from Global Fallout G-1 #12;External Radiation Exposure from the fallout from all of these tests was about 0.7 mSv, about equivalent to 2-3 years of external radiation exposure from natural background. In contrast to the fallout from tests at the Nevada Test site

206

Vapnik's learning theory applied to energy consumption forecasts in residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of energy conservation, we present in this paper an introduction to the use of support vector (SV) learning machines used as a data mining tool applied to buildings energy consumption data from a measurement campaign. Experiments using ... Keywords: data mining, energy conservation, energy efficiency, predictive modelling, statistical learning theory

Florence Lai; Frederic Magoules; Fred Lherminier

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Molecular Lines as Diagnostics of Solar and Stellar Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Lines as Diagnostics of Solar and Stellar Magnetic Fields S.V. Berdyugina1, S.K. Solanki2 (Berdyugina et al. 2000; Berdyugina & Solanki 2001a). The synthetic Stokes profiles of various molecular and sunspot temperature. Introducing molecular lines into the inversion of sunspot spectra leads

Berdyugina, Svetlana

208

Dynamics of Singular Vectors in the Semi-Infinite Eady Model: Nonzero ? but Zero Mean PV Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonmodal approach based on the potential vorticity (PV) perspective is used to compute the singular vector (SV) that optimizes the growth of kinetic energy at the surface for the ?-plane Eady model without an upper rigid lid. The basic-state ...

H. de Vries; J. D. Opsteegh

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Low dose radiation and cancer in A-bomb survivors: latency and non-linear dose-response in the 195090 mortality cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: Analyses of Japanese A-bomb survivors ' cancer mortality risks are used to establish recommended annual dose limits, currently set at 1 mSv (public) and 20 mSv (occupational). Do radiation doses below 20 mSv have significant impact on cancer mortality in Japanese A-bomb survivors, and is the dose-response linear? Methods: I analyse stomach, liver, lung, colon, uterus, and all-solid cancer mortality in the 0 20 mSv colon dose subcohort of the 195090 (grouped) mortality cohort, by Poisson regression using a time-lagged colon dose to detect latency, while controlling for gender, attained age, and age-atexposure. I compare linear and non-linear models, including one adapted from the cellular bystander effect for ? particles. Results: With a lagged linear model, Excess Relative Risk (ERR) for the liver and all-solid cancers is significantly positive and several orders of magnitude above extrapolations from the Life Span Study Report 12 analysis of the full cohort. Non-linear models are strongly superior to the linear model for the stomach (latency 11.89 years), liver (36.90), lung (13.60) and all-solid (43.86) in fitting

Greg Dropkin; Greg Dropkin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Prediction of scoliosis progression with serial three-dimensional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spinal X-rays. To decrease radiation exposure, an artificial pro- gression surface (APS) is proposed / Published online: 9 July 2010 ? International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2010 radiation dose (e.g., abdominal CT doses 7.3 mSv) [7]. MR imaging allows multiplanar views and no radiation

Xue, Deyi

211

The geomagnetic secularvariation timescale in observations and numerical dynamo models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The geomagnetic secularvariation timescale in observations and numerical dynamo models Florian March 2011; published 5 May 2011. [1] The knowledge of the spatial power spectra of the main geomagnetic for recent satellite field models. In the broader context of geomagnetic data assimilation, tSV could provide

Aubert, Julien

212

Recycling issues facing target and RTL materials of inertial fusion designs L. El-Guebaly, P. Wilson, M. Sawan, D. Henderson, A. Varuttamaseni,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sv/hr) with an extended cooling period of two years. Advanced remote handling equipment could recycle the Au/Gd and W of fabrication of the hohlraum walls and the highly precise assembly processes using remote handling equipment change of the materials cost to the COE but adds the cost of remote handling equipment and operations

California at San Diego, University of

213

8-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT During 1999, potential (0.4 mSv) per year. Radiological Dose Assessment 8CHAPTER1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT B R O O K H: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 8.1 AMBIENT RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BNL measures environmental background radiation

Homes, Christopher C.

214

APS Long Range Schedule FY1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Beamline Operations Schedule 7 Beamline Operations Schedule January Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 00:00-08:00 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO 08:00-16:00 MS UO UO UO SV UO UO 16:00-24:00 MS UO UO UO UO UO UO 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 00:00-08:00 UO UO UO UO UO MS MS 08:00-16:00 UO SV SV Contingency UO MS MS MS 16:00-24:00 UO UO UO UO MS MS MS 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 00:00-08:00 MS UO UO UO UO UO MS 08:00-16:00 UO UO SV Contingency UO UO MS MS 16:00-24:00 UO UO UO UO UO MS MS 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 00:00-08:00 MS SM SM SM SM SM SM 08:00-16:00 MS SM SM SM SM SM SM 16:00-24:00 MS SM SM SM SM SM SM FEB Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

215

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Database Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.olade.org/sieeEn.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

217

OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar Agency/Company /Organization: Latin America Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Implementation, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Presentation, Webinar, Workshop, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.olade.org/eficiencia/indexEn.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

218

EIS-0380-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-SA-02: Supplement Analysis -SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0380-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Transport and Storage of High-Activity Sealed Sources From Uruguay and Other Locations This supplement analysis (SA) was prepared to assess whether there are substantial changes, or significant new circumstances or information, relevant to environmental concerns associated with continuing the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) activities to recover and manage high-activity beta/gamma sealed sources relative to analysis in the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (LANL SWEIS) and other relevant National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) reviews. This SA analyzes an aspect of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) that was not

219

Enhancing low-carbon development by greening the economy: policy dialogue,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

low-carbon development by greening the economy: policy dialogue, low-carbon development by greening the economy: policy dialogue, advisory services, benchmarking Jump to: navigation, search Name Enhancing low-carbon development by greening the economy: policy dialogue, advisory services, benchmarking Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Implementation Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country Ghana, Morocco, Thailand, Uruguay, China, India Western Africa, Northern Africa, South-Eastern Asia, South America, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The project will promote Green Economy in developing countries and emerging economies as a realistic approach towards low-carbon development. It will

220

OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Background analysis Website: www.olade.org/proyectoPlanificacionEnergetica.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.olade.org/sielEn.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

222

Women @ Energy: Deborah Keszenman Pereyra | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Keszenman Pereyra Keszenman Pereyra Women @ Energy: Deborah Keszenman Pereyra March 11, 2013 - 5:38pm Addthis Women @ Energy: Deborah Keszenman Pereyra Deborah J. Keszenman Pereyra is a Biologist Associate at Brookhaven National Laboratory, working in the Biosciences Department, and a Beam Line Scientist of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Deborah has worked at Brookhaven since 2005, when she started as a Postdoctoral Research Associate. She earned her PhD and Master of Science in Biophysics from the Universidad de la Republica in Uruguay-PEDECIBA, and her MD from the Universidad de la Republica's School of Medicine. Before joining Brookhaven National Laboratory, Deborah worked at the Universidad de la Republica School of Medicine as a Professor for 30 years, beginning there

223

Enhancing Low-carbon Development by Greening the Economy: Policy Dialogue,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Greening the Economy: Policy Dialogue, by Greening the Economy: Policy Dialogue, Advisory Services, Benchmarking Jump to: navigation, search Name Enhancing Low-carbon Development by Greening the Economy: Policy Dialogue, Advisory Services, Benchmarking Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China, Ghana, India, Morocco, Thailand, Uruguay Eastern Asia, Western Africa, Southern Asia, Northern Africa, South-Eastern Asia, South America References Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)[1] Program Overview The project will promote Green Economy in developing countries and emerging

224

Research and Education in Basic Space Science: The Approach Pursued in the UN/ESA Workshops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1990, the United Nations in cooperation with the European Space Agency is holding annually a workshop on basic space science for the benefit of the worldwide development of astronomy. These workshops have been held in countries of Asia and the Pacific (India, Sri Lanka), Latin America and the Caribbean (Costa Rica, Colombia, Honduras), Africa (Nigeria), Western Asia (Egypt, Jordan), and Europe (Germany, France). Additional to the scientific benefits of the workshops and the strengthening of international cooperation, the workshops lead to the establishment of astronomical telescope facilities in Colombia, Egypt, Honduras, Jordan, Morocco, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Uruguay. The annual UN/ESA Workshops continue to pursue an agenda to network these astronomical telescope facilities through similar research and education programmes. Teaching material and hands-on astrophysics material has been developed for the operation of such astronomical telescope facilities in an university environment.

H. M. K. Al-Naimiy; C. P. Celebre; K. Chamcham; H. S. P. de Alwis; M. C. P. de Carias; H. J. Haubold; A. E. Troche Boggino

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

225

SEI uraguay project: Technical specifications. Turn-key' contract for greenfield combined cycle plant. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The study, conducted by Southern Electric International (SEI), was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of U.T.E., the Government of Uruguay's electric power company. It is an assessment of three potential projects under consideration by U.T.E. The changes resulting from these projects would add 120 to 360 megawatts capacity to the current system. The first option would involve repowering Jose Batlle y Ordonez Units 3 and 4. As an alternate to this plan, U.T.E. is considering new combined cycle plant at a Greenfield site. The third project would increase capacity at La Tablada. Each of the plants under consideration will have dual-fuel capability to operate on natural gas and No. 2 distillate. A conceptual design was performed and budgetary capital costs were developed for each alternative. SEI ultimately makes recommendations for each of the three projects. This is volume 2 of 3.

Not Available

1994-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway Islands Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Zealand Nicaragua Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

227

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of eastern California. SV and P wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles,

228

Borough of Tarentum, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Borough of Tarentum Place Pennsylvania Utility Id 18456 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Service Commercial General Power Service(Primary Voltage-1000 volts or greater) Commercial General Service Commercial Residential Service Residential Street Light Service- (100W SV) Lighting Street Light Service- (175W MV) Lighting Street Light Service- (200W SV) Lighting Street Light Service- (250W MV) Lighting

229

Online Monitoring And Determination Of Environmental Dose Rate, Using Radiological Network In Albania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From May 2004, in the Institute of Nuclear Physics is installed Albanian Radiological Monitoring Network, in the framework of emergency monitoring in the territory of Albania. In this network, this is unique monitoring on-line system in our country. are included 5(five) monitoring stations, respectively in Tirane, Shkoder, Kukes, Korce and Vlore. The last four stations are near Albanian borders The network performs measures of ambient dose rate in a range from 5 nSv/h up to 10 Sv/h. For measurements are used detector of type VACUTEC 70045 A, which are calibrated in the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, University of Tirana, using standard radiation source Cs-137. This monitoring help to warn in real time the relative authorities, in case of radiological accidents of 5th degree (for example accidents in nuclear power plants, near Albanian territory).

Telhaj, Ervis [Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana (Albania); Deda, Antoneta [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana (Albania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site -- calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emission from the Hanford Site in 1997, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the MEI. The report has been prepared in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. This report has also been prepared in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The effective dose equivalent to the MEI from the Hanford Site`s 1997 point source emissions was 1.2 E-03 mrem (1.2 E-05 mSv), which is well below the 40 CFR 61 Subpart H regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr. Radon and thoron emissions, exempted from 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the MEI of 2.5 E-03 mrem (2.5 E-05 mSv). The effective dose equivalent to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive emissions was 2.2 E-02 mrem (2.2 E-04 mSv). The total effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions was 2.6 E-02 mrem (2.6 E-04 mSv). The effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions is well below the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 246-247, regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr.

Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

1998-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando[reg] phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10 000 children.

Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A.; Stewart, Robert D.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Hsi, Wen C. [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Preprintreihe SFB 478 Geometrische Strukturen in der Mathematik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a Hopf algebra Hq over C, where q C? is a parameter, generated by group like elements ±1 and two skew 1. Moreover, we do not only consider standard Hq-module algebra structures on S(V )#f G, but also to the elements of a union of conjugacy classes of G. The paper is organized as follows: in the first section we

233

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

Wahl, Linnea

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

235

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

Wahl, Linnea

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Supplementary Information1 Characterization of the Sources and Processes of Organic and Inorganic2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., diesel and gasoline emissions. 4 3.85 HOA, COA, SV-OOA, and LV-OOA factors resolved, but the physically of (A) DEC fixed site, (B) Parking Lot6, and (C) Parking30 Lot15; (b) wind roses for the entire study.31 225 270 315 0 - 1 1 - 2 2 - 3 3 - 4 4 - 5 5 - 6 6+ Wind Speed (m/s) (b) Traffic #12;4 32 Fig. S2. Q

Meskhidze, Nicholas

237

Visualization of a Deterministic Radiation Transport Model Using Standard Visualization Tools  

SciTech Connect

Output from a deterministic radiation transport code running on a CRAY SV1 is imported into a standard distributed, parallel, visualization tool for analysis. Standard output files, consisting of tetrahedral meshes, are imported to the visualization tool through the creation of a application specific plug-in module. Visualization samples are included, providing visualization of steady state results. Different plot types and operators are utilized to enhance the analysis and assist in reporting the results of the analysis.

James A. Galbraith; L. Eric Greenwade

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A dose assessment for a U.S. nuclear test site -- Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. Here the authors provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 and strontium-90 to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The estimated maximum annual effective dose is 4.4 mSv y{sup {minus}1} when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 10 cSv, 14 cSv, and 16 cSv, respectively. An analysis of interindividual variability in 0- to 30-y expected integral dose indicates that 95% of Bikini residents would have expected doses within a factor of 3.4 above and 4.8 below the population-average value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {+-}35% of its expected value. The authors have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to less than 10% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory - East project final report.  

SciTech Connect

The ATSR D&D Project was directed toward the following goals: (1) Removal of radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the ATSR Reactor facility; (2) Decontamination of the ATSR Reactor facility to unrestricted use levels; and (3)Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure). These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the ATSR Reactor facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The reactor aluminum, reactor lead, graphite piles in room E-111, and the contaminated concrete in room E-102 were the primary areas of concern. NES, Incorporated (Danbury, CT) characterized the ATSR Reactor facility from January to March 1998. The characterization identified a total of thirteen radionuclides, with a total activity of 64.84 mCi (2.4 GBq). The primary radionuclides of concern were Co{sup 60}, Eu{sup 152}, Cs{sup 137}, and U{sup 238}. No additional radionuclides were identified during the D&D of the facility. The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the reactor tank and shield tank. Contact radiation levels of 30 mrem/hr (0.3 mSv/hr) were measured on reactor internals during dismantlement of the reactor. A level of 3 mrem/hr (0.03 mSv/hr) was observed in a small area (hot spot) in room E-102. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem/yr (50 mSv/yr); the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr).

Fellhauer, C.; Garlock, G.; Mathiesen, J.

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Whole genome sequence of an unusual Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato isolate  

SciTech Connect

Human Lyme disease is caused by a number of related Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species. We report here the complete genome sequence of Borrelia sp. isolate SV1 from Finland. This isolate is to date the closest known relative of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, but it is sufficiently genetically distinct from that species that it and its close relatives warrant its candidacy for new-species status. We suggest that this isolate should be named 'Borrelia finlandensis.'

Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W. G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

One pyrimidine dimer inactivates expression of a transfected gene in xeroderma pigmentosum cells  

SciTech Connect

The authors have developed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair utilizing UV-treated plasmid vectors. The assay primarily reflects cellular repair of transcriptional activity of damaged DNA measured indirectly as enzyme activity of the transfected genes. They studied three plasmids (pSV2cat, 5020 base pairs; pSV2catSVgpt, 7268 base pairs; and pRSVcat, 5027 base pairs) with different sizes and promoters carrying the bacterial cat gene (CAT, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) in a construction that permits cat expression in human cells. All human simian virus 40-transformed cells studied expressed high levels of the transfected cat gene. UV treatment of the plasmids prior to transfection resulted in differential decrease in CAT activity in different cell lines. With pSV2catSVgpt, UV inactivation of CAT expression was greater in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and D lines than in the other human cell lines tested. The D0 of the CAT inactivation curve was 50 J X m-2 for pSV2cat and for pRSVcat in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. The similarity of the D0 data in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells for three plasmids of different size and promoters implies they all have similar UV-inactivation target size. UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plasmids was quantified by assay of the number of UV-induced T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites. In the most sensitive xeroderma pigmentosum cells, with all three plasmids, one UV-induced pyrimidine dimer inactivates a target of about 2 kilobases, close to the size of the putative CAT mRNA.

Protic-Sabljic, M.; Kraemer, K.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

it invrints s slieness ostrutions nd their reltion to gssonEqordon invrints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for stellite knotsF e use this to study the reltion etween the et invrint slieness ostrutionD et invrint ri ixmples SU IHFIF tellite knots SU IHFPF it invrints nd LPEet invrints of stellite knots SV IHFQF the set Pirr;met k @I@MKAA is in sense mximlF sn ll ses we use stellite onstrution to get knots whose et

Friedl, Stefan

244

Environmental Radioactivity 54 (2001) 221229 Bronchial Rn dose survey for residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PAECT), annual effective dose (E), concentration of Rn gas (RC) and annual dose conversion factor (ADCF) for all the residential sites combined were 0.11 ? 0.05, 3.1 ? 1.4 mWL, 1.2 ? 0.5 mSv yr? 1 , 23 ? 10 Bq m region. Furthermore, Hopke et al. (1990) calculated the deposition characteristics of the progeny

Yu, K.N.

245

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

Peterson, S

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: mxy131@ncc.re.k [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero or as young children, October 1950 - May 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer mortality for the period from October 1950 through May 1992 was analyzed in atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero. Risk estimates for this group were also compared to those for survivors who were less than 6 years old at the time of exposure. The cohorts studied include 807 in utero survivors and 5,545 persons exposed during childhood with all members of both groups having estimated doses of at least 0.01 Sv. The comparison group includes 10,453 persons with little (<0.01 Sv) or no exposure. Analyses were limited mainly to cancer deaths occurring between the ages of 17 and 46. Only 10 cancer deaths were observed among persons exposed in utero. However, there is a significant dose response with an estimate of excess relative risk per sievert (ERR/Sv) of 2.1 (90% confidence interval of 0.2 to 6.0). This estimate does not differ significantly from that for survivors exposed during the first 5 years of life. The cancer deaths among those exposed during the first 5 years of life. 23 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Delongchamp, R.R.; Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

STUDIES OF TROPICAL TUNA SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN A LARGE WATER TUNNEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The metabolic rates (V ? O?) of three tropical tunas [yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), kawakawa (Euthynnus affinis) and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis)] were estimated using a large water-tunnel respirometer. Experiments lasting up to 31 h were used to determine the effects of velocity (U) on tuna V ? O ? over a range of U (17?150 cm s ?1) and temperatures (1830 ?C). Replicate tests were carried out on several fish. The swimming V ? O ? of yellowfin is temperature-dependent (Q10=1.67, determined over intervals of 35 ?C). For yellowfin and skipjack, it was also possible to partition metabolic costs between maintenance and locomotion. The standard metabolic rate (SV ? O?) was estimated by extrapolation of the U/V ? O ? function to U=0. Comparisons of SV ? O ? for different size groups of yellowfin show that the mass-specific scaling exponent for V ? O ? is ?0.40. The SV ? O ? of tuna is comparable to values determined previously by stasis respirometry and is approximately three times higher than that of salmonids. Further comparisons with salmonids show that the slope of the U/V ? O ? function is less for tunas, which demonstrate a greater swimming efficiency.

I. Energetics; Heidi Dewar; Jeffrey; B. Graham

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

Kong, Zueqian

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dose Reconstruction Using Computational Modeling of Handling a Particular Arsenic-73/Arsenic-74 Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A special work evolution was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with a particular 73As/74As source but the workers extremity dosimeter did not appear to provide appropriate dosimetric information for the tasks performed. This prompted a reconstruction of the dose to the workers hands. The computer code MCNP was chosen to model the tasks that the worker performed to evaluate the potential nonuniform hand dose distribution. A model was constructed similar to the workers hands to represent the performed handling tasks. The model included the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and the palm. The dose was calculated at the 7 mg cm-2 skin depth. To comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 835, the 100 cm2 area that received the highest dose must be calculated. It could be determined if the dose received by the worker exceeded any regulatory limit. The computer code VARSKIN was also used to provide results to compare with those from MCNP where applicable. The results from the MCNP calculations showed that the dose to the workers hands did not exceed the regulatory limit of 0.5 Sv (50 rem). The equivalent nonuniform dose was 0.126 Sv (12.6 rem) to the right hand and 0.082 Sv (8.2 rem) to the left hand.

Stallard, Alisha M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

LLNL NESHAPs 2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC operates facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H, which regulates radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Specifically, NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem (100 {mu}Sv) to any member of the public. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, LLNL personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 1.0, to calculate the dose to the maximally exposed individual for the Livermore site and Site 300. The dose for the LLNL site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2008 are summarized here: {sm_bullet} Livermore site: 0.0013 mrem (0.013 {mu}Sv) (26% from point source emissions, 74% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by EPA Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. {sm_bullet} Site 300: 0.000000044 mrem (0.00000044 {mu}Sv) (100% from point source emissions).

Bertoldo, N; Gallegos, G; MacQueen, D; Wegrecki, A; Wilson, K

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Risk associated with hospital rooms contaminated with 131I by patients being treated for thyroid carcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iodine-131 contamination is known to be present in hospital rooms that are used to confine patients being treated with quantities of 1311 in excess of 1. 1 GBq. These activities of 13 'I are used as a post-surgical follow-up procedure to a thyroidectomy as a means of treating thyroid cancer. Previous studies have indicated the extent of contamination in hospital rooms being used during these procedures. However, contamination has not been related to risk. This paper quantifies the risk in terms of effective dose equivalent to members of the public and personnel from 1311 contamination when only minimal precautions are taken to contain the contamination during the 1311 thyroid cancer treatment procedure. Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) calculations using the NRC published dose models for surface contamination results in public exposures of less than 2.7 uSv per patient and personnel exposures of less than 2.1 uSv yr-1. Maximum TEDE to the public considering the detectable limits of portable area survey equipment indicated a worst case exposure of 340 uSv per patient. As a result, conservative protective measures utilized by many institutions, such a lining the room with plastic, appear not to be warranted.

Jones, David Maurice

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

Raddatz, C.T. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Division of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radiation Doses to Members of the U.S. Population from Ubiquitous Radionuclides in the Body: Part 3, Results, Variability, and Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect

This paper is part three of a three-part series investigating annual effective doses to residents of the United States from intakes of ubiquitous radionuclides, including radionuclides occurring naturally, radionuclides whose concentrations are technologically enhanced, and anthropogenic radionuclides. The radionuclides of interest are the 238U series (14 nuclides), the actinium series (headed by 235U; 11 nuclides), and the 232Th series (11 nuclides); primordial radionuclides 87Rb and 40K; cosmogenic and fallout radionuclides 14C and 3H; and purely anthropogenic radionuclides 137Cs-137mBa, 129I and 90Sr-90Y. This series of papers explicitly excludes intakes from inhaling 222Rn, 220Rn, and their short-lived decay products; it also excludes intakes of radionuclides in occupational and medical settings. Part one reviewed, summarized, characterized, and grouped all published and some unpublished data for U.S. residents on ubiquitous radionuclide concentrations in tissues and organs. Part two described the methods used to organize the data collected in part one and segregate it into the ages and genders defined by the study, imputed missing values from the existing data, apportioned activity in bone, and imputed activity in hollow organ contents and the remainder of the body. This paper estimates equivalent doses to target tissues from source regions and maps target tissues to lists of tissues with International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) tissue-weighting factors or to surrogate tissue regions when there is no direct match. Effective doses, using ICRP tissue-weighting factors recommended in 1977, 1990, and 2007, are then calculated, and an upper bound of variability of the effective dose is estimated by calculating the average coefficients of variation (CV), assuming all variance is due to variability. Most of the data were for adult males, whose average annual effective dose is estimated to be 337 ?Sv (CV = 0.65, geometric mean = 283 ?Sv, geometric standard deviation sG = 1.81) using 2007 ICRP tissue-weighting factors. This result is between the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements 1987 estimate of 390 ?Sv (using 1977 wTs) and its 2009 estimate of 285 ?Sv (using 2007 wTs) and is higher than the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiations 2000 estimate of 310 ?Sv (using 1990 wTs). The methods and software developed for this project are sufficiently detailed and sufficiently general to be usable with autopsy data from any or all countries.

Watson, David J.; Strom, Daniel J.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1.4 mSv was measured, respectively. Using kilovoltage or megavoltage radiation to obtain cone beam computed tomography scans led to an additional dose of 8-46 mSv. For treatment verification images performed once per week using double exposure technique, an additional effective dose of up to 18 mSv was measured. Conclusions: Daily setup imaging using kilovoltage planar images or TomoTherapy megavoltage fan beam CT imaging can be used as a standard procedure in clinical routine. Daily kilovoltage and megavoltage cone beam computed tomography setup imaging should be applied on an individual or indication based protocol. Depending on the imaging scheme applied, image-guided radiation therapy can be administered without increasing the dose outside of the treated volume compared to therapies without image guidance.

Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057 (Switzerland) and Radiotherapie Hirslanden AG, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Potential Impact of Atmospheric Releases at Russian Far East Nuclear Submarine Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ''Assessment of the Impact of Russian Nuclear Fleet Operations on Far Eastern Coastal Regions'' is being performed as part of the Radiation Safety of the Biosphere Project (RAD) of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) of Laxenburg, Austria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive unclassified analysis of the potential impact of accidents at the Russian Far East nuclear submarine sites near Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk. We have defined the situation there based upon available information and studies commissioned by RAD in collaboration with Russian research institutes including Russian Research Center-''Kurchatov Institute'', Institute of Northern Environmental Problems and Lazurit Central Design Bureau. Further, in our original work, some in collaboration with the staff of the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, we have calculated the nuclide trajectories from these sites in the atmospheric boundary layer, less than 1.5 kilometers high, and determined their probability of crossing any of the nearby countries as well as Asiatic Russia. We have further determined the concentrations in each of these crossings as well as the total, dry and wet depositions of nuclides on these areas. Finally, we have calculated the doses to the Japanese Island population from typical winter airflow patterns (those most likely to cross the Islands in the minimum times), strong north winds, weak north winds and cyclonic winds for conditions similar to the Chazhma Bay criticality accident (fresh fuel) and for a criticality accident for the same type of reactor with fuel being withdrawn (spent fuel). The maximum individual committed dosages were less than 2 x 10-7 and 2 x 10-3 mSv, respectively. The long-term external doses by radionuclides deposited on the ground and the internal doses by consumption of foods were not evaluated as it is believed that such doses can be avoided by social controls. In other calculations taking these longer term doses into account and determining the sum of the maximum individual committed dosages (SMICD), we found for each of the surrounding countries to be less than 1 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv. For releases from the Petropavlovsk sites the (SMICD) for each of the surrounding countries is less than 0.3 mSv. In that part of Russia the (SMICD) is less than 6 mSv.

Parker, F.; Mahura, A.; Compton, K.; Brown, K.; Takano, M.; Novikov, V.; Soerensen, J. H.; Baklanov, A.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore South Africa Spain Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

259

Transforming on-grid renewable energy markets. A review of UNDP-GEF support for feed-in tariffs and related price and market-access instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a Global Environment Facility (GEF) founding implementing agency, UNDP has worked on over 230 GEF-supported clean energy projects in close to 100 developing countries since 1992. About 100 of these projects in 80 countries have focused on renewable energy, supported by approximately US $ 293 million in GEF funds and leveraging US $1.48 billion in associated co-financing from national governments, international organizations, the private sector and non-governmental organizations. As part of UNDP efforts to codify and share lessons learnt from these initiatives, this report addresses how scarce public resources can be used to catalyze larger private financial flows for renewable energy. It provides an overview of UNDP-GEFs extensive work supporting development of national renewable energy policies such as feed-in tariffs. In these activities UNDP-GEF assists developing countries to assess key risks and barriers to technology diffusion and then to identify a mix of policy and financial de-risking measures to remove these barriers and drive investment. This approach is illustrated through three case studies in Uruguay, Mauritius and Kazakhstan. This report is complemented by a companion publication presenting an innovative UNDP financial modeling tool to assist policymakers in appraising different public instruments to promote clean energy.

Glemarec, Yannick; Rickerson, Wilson; Waissbein, Oliver

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an accidental release was calculated for a release of about 1,500 Ci HTO that occurred in October 1954. The likely dose for this release was probably less than 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem), but, because of many unknowns (e.g., release-specific meteorological and accidental conditions) and conservative assumptions, the uncertainty was very high. As a result, the upper confidence limit on the predictions, considered a dose that could not have been exceeded, was estimated to be 2 mSv (200 mrem). The next highest dose, from the 1970 accidental release of about 290,000 Ci (10,700 TBq) HT when wind speed and wind direction were known, was one-third as great. Doses from LLNL accidental releases were well below regulatory reporting limits. All doses, from both routine and accidental releases, were far below the level (3.6 mSv [360 mrem] per year) at which adverse health effects have been documented in the literature.

Peterson, S

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

ROKKAN, D.J.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental Protection Department LLNL NESHAPs 2007 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs; Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61, Subpart H). Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 {micro}Sv) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2007 are summarized here. Livermore site: 0.0031 mrem (0.031 {micro}Sv) (42% from point source emissions, 58% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. Site 300: 0.0035 mrem (0.035 {micro}Sv) (90% from point source emissions, 10% from diffuse source emissions). The EDEs were calculated using the U.S. EPA-approved CAP88-PC air dispersion/dose-assessment model, except for doses for two diffuse sources that were estimated using measured radionuclide concentrations and dose calculations. Specific inputs to CAP88-PC for the modeled sources included site-specific meteorological data and source emissions data, the latter variously based on continuous stack effluent monitoring data, stack flow or other release-rate information, ambient air monitoring data, and facility knowledge.

Bertoldo, N A; Larson, J M; Wilson, K R

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. 27 refs., 2 figs.

Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with reduced dose application in positron emission tomography using beta-gamma coincidences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) permits a functional understanding of the underlying causes of many diseases. Modern whole-body PET systems reach a spatial resolution of 2-6 mm (FWHM). A limitation of this technique occurs from the thermalization and diffusion of the positron before its annihilation, typically within the mm range. We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced effective dose application compared to conventional PET. This 'gamma-PET' technique draws on specific medical isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon accompanying the beta^+ decay. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize the potential of this technique, MC simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in each direction for the visualization of a 22Na point source. Starting with a source activity of only 1.48 MBq for 89Zr, corresponding to ca. 130 - 270 times less compared to a conventional PET examination using 18F-FDG, about 40 intersections (sufficient for a reliable image reconstruction of a point source) can be identified after a typical examination time of 900 seconds. This results in a strongly reduced effective dose of, e.g., 0.785 mSv for 89Zr-cmAb-U36, compared to the applied effective dose in a typical human PET examination with 18F-FDG of about 7.5 mSv. Increasing the applied effective dose to 7.5 mSv, the examination time will be reduced to 94 s for only 14.2 MBq of 89Zr-cmAb-U36. The reduced effective dose, or, the reduced examination time, surpass the performance of a conventional PET device by more than one order of magnitude.

C. Lang; D. Habs; K. Parodi; P. G. Thirolf

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Radiation Badge Survey for Family Members Living With Patients Treated With a {sup 103}Pd Permanent Breast Seed Implant  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Sixty-seven patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated in a Phase I/II clinical trial using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant as adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. We report the dose received by family members living with these patients and compare measured doses with theoretical worst-case scenario estimates. Methods and Materials: Exposure-rate measurements were taken at 1 m from the patient by using a calibrated low-energy survey meter. Landauer (Landauer Inc., Glenwood, IL) Luxel badges, with sensitivity of 0.01 mSv, were given to family members to wear after the implantation. Badge readings for 33 spouses and 28 other family members were used to estimate effective doses, and these were compared with theory. Results: Average preimplantation planning target volume from computed tomography was 50.3 ml (range, 18.0-96.7 ml), and average preimplantation distance between the skin and the most anterior planning target volume margin was 0.57 cm. The average maximum exposure rate was measured to be 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mR/h, and average measured dose to a spouse was 0.99 {+-} 1.0 mSv. The calculated exposure rates and spousal doses using preimplantation computed tomography scan data overestimated those measured. Average measured family member dose (excluding spouses) was 0.20 {+-} 0.58 mSv. Conclusions: Based on measured and calculated spousal doses, a permanent breast seed implant using {sup 103}Pd is safe for the public. However, it is recommended that extra precautions in the way of a breast patch be used when patients with an implant will be in the vicinity of toddlers or pregnant women.

Keller, Brian M. [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: brian.keller@sunnybrook.ca; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa; O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Calculation of conversion factors for effective dose for various interventional radiology procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide dose-area-product (DAP) to effective dose (E) conversion factors for complete interventional procedures, based on in-the-field clinical measurements of DAP values and using tabulated E/DAP conversion factors for single projections available from the literature. Methods: Nine types of interventional procedures were performed on 84 patients with two angiographic systems. Different calibration curves (with and without patient table attenuation) were calculated for each DAP meter. Clinical and dosimetric parameters were recorded in-the-field for each projection and for all patients, and a conversion factor linking DAP and effective doses was derived for each complete procedure making use of published, Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors for single static projections. Results: Fluoroscopy time and DAP values for the lowest-dose procedure (biliary drainage) were approximately 3-fold and 13-fold lower, respectively, than those for the highest-dose examination (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, TIPS). Median E/DAP conversion factors from 0.12 (abdominal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty) to 0.25 (Nephrostomy) mSvGy{sup -1} cm{sup -2} were obtained and good correlations between E and DAP were found for all procedures, with R{sup 2} coefficients ranging from 0.80 (abdominal angiography) to 0.99 (biliary stent insertion, Nephrostomy and TIPS). The DAP values obtained in this study showed general consistency with the values provided in the literature and median E values ranged from 4.0 mSv (biliary drainage) to 49.6 mSv (TIPS). Conclusions: Values of E/DAP conversion factors were derived for each procedure from a comprehensive analysis of projection and dosimetric data: they could provide a good evaluation for the stochastic effects. These results can be obtained by means of a close cooperation between different interventional professionals involved in patient care and dose optimization.

Compagnone, Gaetano; Giampalma, Emanuela; Domenichelli, Sara; Renzulli, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita [Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Radiology Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Medical Physics Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Radiology Department, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Issued by: Approved by: Environmental Health and Safety Radiation Protection Committee Date issued: Date approved: Date revised: Date revision approved:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination for most radioactive materials in use is 0.5Bq per square centimeter. Different Action Levels for certain radioisotopes may be required and will be listed in the conditions of the Internal Radioisotope Permit. The contamination level may be averaged over an area not exceeding 100 square centimeters. Accidental release: Is defined as the accidental release of radioactive material resulting in following levels of radiation levels: o Greater than 2 mSv/hour on the external surface of a package o Greater than 0.1 mSv/hour at a distance of 1m from the package ALI Annual Limit on Intake Added: The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has published Annual Limits on Intake of Radionuclides by Workers Based on the 1990 Recommendations (Publication 60) of the ICRP for limiting dose. The annual limit on intake (ALI) is the maximum intake in becquerel (1 Bq = 1 disintegration per second) that a worker may ingest orally and not exceed his/her annual average dose limit as per the 1990 recommendations. This average annual limit was 20 mSv. The ALIs themselves are published in ICRP Publication 61. The CNSC requires the University to classify each area room or enclosure where unsealed radioactive materials are used at a single time as Basic Level if the quantity does not exceed 5ALIs or Intermediate Level if the quantity does not exceed 50ALIs. (addition approved by RSCttee Feb 2, 2006) Applicable Designated Workers and Permit Holders For the purposes of this defining when dosimetry is required (RSP-310), staff and students working in a lab designated as Intermediate according to RSP-411, working with sealed sources over 370 kBq and personnel working in a Basic Laboratory with radioisotopes other than H-3, C-14, S-35, Ca-45 and P-33 may be considered

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

Keller, Brian [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Dynamics of Motor Network Overactivation After Striatocapsular Stroke. A Longitudinal PET Study Using a Fixed-Performance Paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, which otherwise induces complex activation patterns17,18; and a pilot clinical study showed that recovering hemiparetic patients were able to perform the TI tapping task at this rate (authors unpublished observations, 1998). The task lasted a total of 1... effort was needed, especially for PET1. Total whole body radiation exposure was kept below 5 mSv for both groups. In control subjects, and as described in detail elsewhere,14 this task induced activation mainly of the SM1, parietal operculum and anterior...

Calautti, Cinzia; Guincestre, Jean-Yves; Leroy, Franois; Baron, Jean-Claude

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Estimation in Hazard Regression Models under Ordered Departures from Proportionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ri wkh gdwd wlowlqj phwkrgrorj| lv wr #15;qg s @ s #24;wkdw plqlplvhv d srzhu phdvxuh ri glyhujhqfh +Fuhvvlh dqg Uhdg/ 4<;7, iurp s #19;#20;#14; #18;#22;#21;dprqj doo s*v iru zklfk wkh frqvwudlqw lv vdwlv#15;hg/ l1h1/ iru zklfk a#15; #19;w #7; #3; #8... wkh hoderudwh mdfnqlih surfhgxuhv uhtxluhg lq wkh suhylrxvphwkrg1Ixuwkhu/ zh #15;qg dgdswlyh edqgzlgwk hvwlpdwruv hdvlhu wr lqwhusuhw wkdq gdwd wlow0lqj1 Jlyhq wkh rswlpdo edqgzlgwkv dw wkh gl#14;huhqw djhv/ wkh xvhu fdq dovr lqihu derxwwkh vwuhqjwk ri...

Bhattacharjee, Arnab

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Application of the comprehensive set of heterozygous yeast deletion mutants to elucidate the molecular basis of cellular chromium toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

individually in YEPD or YNB media [45,46]. Where specified, organisms were cultured in 300 ?l volumes in 48-well plates (Greiner Bio-One, Stone- house, Gloucestershire, UK) with shaking at 30C in a BioTek Powerwave microplate reader (BioTek, Vinooski, VT, USA... . Nature Biotechnol 1998, 16:572-575. 5. Avery SV: Metal toxicity in yeasts and the role of oxidative stress. Adv Appl Microbiol 2001, 49:111-142.Genome Biology 2007, 8:R268 ml of cells were pelleted by centrifugation and resuspended in 60 ?l of Passive...

Holland, Sara; Lodwig, Emma; Sideri, Theodora; Reader, Tom; Clarke, Ian; Gkargkas, Konstantinos; Hoyle, David C; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Avery, Simon V

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

274

VNIIEF VNIIEF Methods of Numerical Simulation for Multi-  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

32 32 VNIIEF VNIIEF Methods of Numerical Simulation for Multi- Methods of Numerical Simulation for Multi- Dimensional Gas Dynamic Flows Dimensional Gas Dynamic Flows Spir Spiri idonov donov V.F V.F., ., Bakhrakh Bakhrakh S.M., S.M., Velichko Velichko S.V., S.V., Delov Delov V.I., V.I., Yanilkin Yu.V Yanilkin Yu.V., ., Sokolov Sokolov S.S., S.S., Butnev Butnev O.I, O.I, Stenin Stenin A.M., A.M., Zmushko Zmushko V.V., V.V., Voronin Voronin B.L., B.L., Bykov Bykov A.N. A.N. RFCN-VNIIEF, 607190, RFCN-VNIIEF, 607190, Sarov Sarov, , Nizhni Nizhni Novgorod region Novgorod region Joint Russian-American Five-Laboratory Conference on Computation Joint Russian-American Five-Laboratory Conference on Computation Mathematics|Physics Mathematics|Physics 19-23 June 2005, 19-23 June 2005, Crowne

275

Assessment of potential radiation exposures by uncontrolled recycle or reuse of radioactive scrap metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With current waste monitoring technology it is reasonable to assume that much of the material designated as low-level waste, generated within nuclear facilities, is in fact uncontaminated. A criterion for uncontrolled disposal of low-level radioactive contaminated waste is that the radiation exposure of the public and of each individual caused by this disposal is so low that radiation protection measures need not be taken. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggests an annual effective dose of 10 {micro}Sv as a limit for the individual radiation dose and derived the initial control levels of residual radioactivity based on the Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1990, new recommendations on radiation protection standards were developed by ICRP to take into account new biological information related to the detriment associated with radiation exposure. Adoption of these recommendations necessitated a revision of the Commission's secondary limits contained in Publication 30. This study summarizes the potential radiation exposure from valuable scrap metal considered for uncontrolled recycle by new ICRP recommendations. Potential exposure pathways to people were analyzed and concentrations leading to an individual dose of 10 {micro}Sv/year were calculated for 14 key radionuclides. These potential radiation doses are compared with the results of previous study.

Lee, S.Y.; Lee, K.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Meteorology-induced variations in the spatial behavior of summer ozone pollution in Central California  

SciTech Connect

Cluster analysis was applied to daily 8 h ozone maxima modeled for a summer season to characterize meteorology-induced variations in the spatial distribution of ozone. Principal component analysis is employed to form a reduced dimension set to describe and interpret ozone spatial patterns. The first three principal components (PCs) capture {approx}85% of total variance, with PC1 describing a general spatial trend, and PC2 and PC3 each describing a spatial contrast. Six clusters were identified for California's San Joaquin Valley (SJV) with two low, three moderate, and one high-ozone cluster. The moderate ozone clusters are distinguished by elevated ozone levels in different parts of the valley: northern, western, and eastern, respectively. The SJV ozone clusters have stronger coupling with the San Francisco Bay area (SFB) than with the Sacramento Valley (SV). Variations in ozone spatial distributions induced by anthropogenic emission changes are small relative to the overall variations in ozone amomalies observed for the whole summer. Ozone regimes identified here are mostly determined by the direct and indirect meteorological effects. Existing measurement sites are sufficiently representative to capture ozone spatial patterns in the SFB and SV, but the western side of the SJV is under-sampled.

Jin, Ling; Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Studies of the mortality of atomic bomb survivors. Report 12, Part I. Cancer: 1950-1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This continues the series of periodic general reports on cancer mortality in the cohort of A-bomb survivors followed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The follow-up is extended by the 5 years 1986-1990, and analysis includes an additional 10,500 survivors with recently estimated radiation doses. Together these extensions add about 550,000 person-years of follow-up. The cohort analyzed consists of 86,572 subjects, of which about 60% have dose estimates of at least 0.005 Sv. During 1950-1990 there have been 3086 and 4741 cancer deaths for the less than and greater than 0.005 Sv groups, respectively. It is estimated that among these there have been approximately 420 excess cancer deaths during 19509-1990, of which about 85 were due to leukemia, For cancers other than leukemia (solid cancers), about 25% of the excess deaths in 1950-1990 occurred during the last 5 years; for those exposed as children this figure is nearly 50%. For leukemia only about 3% of the excess deaths in 1950-1990 occurred in th last 5 years. Whereas most of the excess for leukemia occurred in the first 15 years after exposure, for solid cancers the pattern of excess risk in apparently more like alife-long elevation of the natural age-specific cancer risk. 29 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

Pierce, D.A.; Shimizu, Y.; Preston, D.L. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A radiological evaluation of phosphogypsum  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum is the by-product resulting from phosphoric acid or phosphate fertilizer production. The phosphate used in these chemical processes contains the naturally occurring radioactive material U and all its subsequent decay products. During processing, the U generally remains in the phosphoric acid product, while the daughter, {sup 226}Ra, tends to be concentrated in the phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has physical properties that make it useful as a sub-base for roadways, parking lots, and similar construction. A radiological evaluation, to determine exposures to workers mixing this material with a stabilizing agent (portland cement), was performed at a South Louisiana phosphoric acid chemical plant. Measurements of the {sup 226}Ra content of the phosphogypsum showed an average of 1.1 +/- 0.3 Bq g-1 (0.7-1.7 Bq g-1). The average measured gross gamma exposure rate on the phosphogypsum pile corresponded to a dose equivalent rate of 0.368 +/- 0.006 mu Sv h-1 (0.32-0.42 mu Sv h-1). Radon daughter concentrations measured on top of the phosphogypsum pile ranged from 0.0006 to 0.001 working levels. An analysis of the airborne {sup 226}Ra concentrations showed only background levels.

Laiche, T.P.; Scott, L.M. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The children of parents exposed to atomic bombs: Estimates of the genetic doubling dose of radiation for humans  

SciTech Connect

The data collected in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the past 40 years on the children of survivors of the atomic bombings and on the children of a suitable control population are analyzed on the basis of the newly revised estimates of radiation doses. No statistically significant effects emerge with respect to eight different indicators. Since, however, it may confidently be assumed some mutations were induced, we have taken the data at face value and calculated the minimal gametic doubling doses of acute radiation for the individual indicators at various probability levels. An effort has also been made to calculate the most probable doubling dose for the indicators combined. The latter value is between 1.7 and 2.2 Sv. It is suggested the appropriate figure for chronic radiation would be between 3.4 and 4.5 Sv. These estimates suggest humans are less sensitive to the genetic effects of radiation than has been assumed on the basis of past extrapolations from experiments with mice.

Neel, J.V.; Schull, W.J.; Awa, A.A.; Satoh, C.; Kato, H.; Otake, M.; Yoshimoto, Y. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

436 JOURNAL OF CLIMATE VOLUME 20 Climate Response to External Sources of Freshwater: North Atlantic versus the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of an atmosphereocean general circulation model (AOGCM) to perturbations of freshwater fluxes across the sea surface in the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean is investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate aspects of the so-called bipolar seesaw where one hemisphere warms and the other cools and vice versa due to changes in the ocean meridional overturning. The experimental design is idealized where 1 Sv (1 Sv ? 10 6 m 3 s ?1) of freshwater is added to the ocean surface for 100 model years and then removed. In one case, the freshwater perturbation is located in the Atlantic Ocean from 50 to 70N. In the second case, it is located south of 60S in the Southern Ocean. In the case where the North Atlantic surface waters are freshened, the Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) and associated northward oceanic heat transport weaken. In the Antarctic surface freshening case, the Atlantic THC is mainly unchanged with a slight weakening toward the end of the integration. This weakening is associated with the spreading of the fresh sea surface anomaly from the Southern Ocean into the rest of the World Ocean. There are two mechanisms that may be responsible for such weakening of the Atlantic THC. First is that the sea surface salinity (SSS) contrast between the North Atlantic and North Pacific is reduced. And, second, when freshwater from the Southern Ocean reaches the high latitudes of the

Ronald J. Stouffer; Dan Seidov; Bernd; J. Haupt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

New Stochastic Annual Limits on Intake for Selected Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Annual limits on intake (ALI) have historically been tabulated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (e.g., ICRP 1979, 1961) and also by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). These compilations have been rendered obsolete by more recent ICRP dosimetry methods, and, rather than provide new ALIs, the ICRP has opted instead to provide committed dose coefficients from which an ALI can be determined by a user for a specific set of conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy historically has referenced compilations of ALIs and has defined their method of calculation in its radiation protection regulation (10 CFDR 835), but has never provided a specific compilation. Under June 2007 amendments to 10 CFR 835, ALIs can be calculated by dividing an appropriate dose limit, either 5-rem (0.05 Sv) effective dose or 50 rem (0.5 Sv) equivalent dose to an individual organ or tissue, by an appropriate committed dose coefficient. When based on effective dose, the ALI is often referred to as a stochastic annual limit on intake (SALI), and when based on the individual organ or tissue equivalent limit, it has often been called a deterministic annual limit on intake (DALI).

Carbaugh, Eugene H.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Decontamination of hot cells K-1, K-3, M-1, M-3, and A-1, M-Wing, Building 200: Project final report Argonne National Laboratory-East  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to remove radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the hot cells, to decontaminate the hot cells, and to dispose of the radioactive waste. The goal was to reduce stack releases of Rn-220 and to place the hot cells in an emptied, decontaminated condition with less than 10 {micro}Sv/h (1 mrem/h) general radiation background. The following actions were needed: organize and mobilize a decontamination team; prepare decontamination plans and procedures; perform safety analyses to ensure protection of the workers, public, and environment; remotely size-reduce, package, and remove radioactive materials and equipment for waste disposal; remotely decontaminate surfaces to reduce hot cell radiation background levels to allow personnel entries using supplied air and full protective suits; disassemble and package the remaining radioactive materials and equipment using hands-on techniques; decontaminate hot cell surfaces to remove loose radioactive contaminants and to attain a less than 10 {micro}Sv/h (1 mrem/h) general background level; document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste; and conduct a final radiological survey.

Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radionuclide decay effects on waste glass corrosion and weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of glass components into solution, including radionuclides, may be influenced by the presence of radiolytically produced nitric acid, carboxylic acid, and transient water dissociation products such as {center_dot}OH and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}. Under batch test conditions, glass corrosion has been shown to increase up to a maximum of three-to five-fold in irradiated tests relative to nonirradiated tests, while in other studies the presence of radiolytic products has actually decreased glass corrosion rates. Bicarbonate groundwaters will buffer against pH decreases and changes in corrosion rates. Under high surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) conditions, the bicarbonate buffering reservoir may be quickly overwhelmed by radiolytic acids that are concentrated in the thin films of water contacting the samples. Glass reaction rates have been shown to increase up to 10-to-15-fold due to radiation exposure under high S/V conditions. Radiation damage to solid glass materials results in bond damage and atomic displacements. This type of damage has been shown to increase the release rates of glass components up to four-fold during subsequent corrosion tests, although under actual disposal conditions, glass annealing processes may negate the solid radiation damage effects.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Induction of transcription from the long terminal repeat of Moloney murine sarcoma provirus by UV-irradiation, x-irradiation, and phorbol ester  

SciTech Connect

The long terminal repeat (LTR) of Moloney murine sarcoma virus (Mo-MuSV) was used as a model system to study the stress response of mammalian cells to physical carcinogens. The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was inserted between two Mo-MuSV LTRs, and the LTR-CAT-LTR construct was used for virus production and was integrated into the genome of NIH 3T3 cells in the proviral form. This construct was used to assure that the integrated CAT gene was driven by the promoter of the LTR. Expression of the CAT gene was stimulated 4-fold by UV irradiation, and the peak of activity was observed at 18 hr. In contrast, stimulation of the CAT expression after x-irradiation was 2-fold and occurred at 6 hr. Phorbol myristate acetate also stimulated CAT activity 4-fold with a peak at 6 hr. Down-regulation of protein kinase C blocked totally the response to x-irradiation but only partially the response to UV. The protein kinase inhibitor H7 blocked the response to treatment by UV, x-ray, and phorbol ester.

Lin, C.S.; Goldthwait, D.A.; Samols, D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Competing...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-a, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV) markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

Andrew B. Hellman; Kang Shen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fast neutron dosimeter using Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL)  

SciTech Connect

Data is presented that demonstrates the concept of a fast neutron dosimeter using Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence. CaF{sub 2}:Mn powder, compounded with polyethylene, was injection molded and pressed into 0.1-cm-thick sheets. The sheets were then cut to form dosimeters with dimensions, 1.25 cm by 1.25 cm. After a laser anneal, the dosimeters were exposed to various amounts (from 10 mSv to 100 mSv) of fast {sup 252}Cf neutrons. The exposed dosimeters were cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature, stimulated with laser light, and then allowed to warm up to room temperature whereupon the dose dependent luminescence was recorded with a photon counting system. When the control and gamma components were subtracted from the {sup 252}Cf response, a dose-dependent neutron response was observed. The design, construction, and preliminary performance of an automated system for the dose interrogation of individual CaF{sub 2}:Mn grains within the polyethylene matrix will also be discussed. The system uses a small CO{sub 2} laser to heat areas of the cooled dosimeter to room temperature. If the readout of very small grain within the plastic matrix is successful, it will enhance the neutron to gamma response of the dosimeter.

Eschbach, P.A.; Miller, S.D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Experiences from First Top-Off Injection at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) is moving toward Top-Off injection mode, SLAC's Radiation Protection Department is working with SSRL on minimizing the radiological hazards of this mode. One such hazard is radiation that is created inside the accelerator concrete enclosure by injected beam. Since during Top-Off injection the stoppers that would otherwise isolate the storage ring from the experimental area stay open, the stoppers no longer prevent such radiation from reaching the experimental area. The level of this stray radiation was measured in April 2008 during the first Top-Off injection tests. They revealed radiation dose rates of up to 18 microSv/h (1.8 millirem/h) outside the experimental hutches, significantly higher than our goal of 1 microSv/h (0.1 millirem/h). Non-optimal injection increased the measured dose rates by a factor two. Further tests in 2008 indicated that subsequent improvements by SSRL to the injection system have reduced the dose rates to acceptable levels. This presentation describes the studies performed before the Top-Off tests, the tests themselves and their major results (both under initial conditions and after improvements were implemented), and presents the controls being implemented for full and routine Top-Off injection.

Bauer, J.M.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

288

Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

Bertelli, Luiz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toohey, Richard E [ORISE/ORAU; Sugarman, Steven A [ORISE/ORAU; Christensen, Doran R [ORISE/ORAU

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The British Journal of Radiology, 80 (2007), 362366 Patient dose from 3D rotational neurovascular studies 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT. The use of image-guided interventional radiological techniques is increasing in prevalence and complexity. Imaging system developments have helped improve the information available to interventionalists to plan and guide procedures. Information on doses to patients resulting from alternative imaging techniques or protocols is useful for both the process of justifying particular procedures and in optimizing the resultant exposures. Such information is not always available, especially for new or developing imaging techniques. We have undertaken a study of doses to patients associated with two alternative imaging methods for pre-intervention assessment of intracranial aneurysms. In the first technique the aneurysm is assessed from a series of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) runs taken at different imaging projections. The second technique involved acquiring images from one single image run while the imaging system rotated 180 ? around the patients head. In this technique, the aneurysm was then evaluated from a 3D reconstruction of the projection images. Effective doses were calculated using a computer model to simulate the exposure geometry and parameters. The mean dose from the DSA protocol used at our centre was 3.4 mSv and from the 3D rotational angiography (RA) technique was 0.20 mSv.

R R Bridcut; E Murphy; A Workman; R J Winder

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Release of Residues from Melting NORM-Contaminated Steel Scrap - A German Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As many raw materials like crude oil, natural gas, mineral sands, phosphor ores and others are contaminated by radionuclides from the Uranium and/or Thorium decay chain (NORM), also plants for processing these materials became contaminated during operation. When plants are shut down, large quantities of pipes, valves, pumps and other components have to be scrapped. As scrap yards and steel mills are equipped by large detector systems to avoid an input of radioactivity into the steel cycle, decontamination is required before recycling. Siempelkamp is operating a melting plant for processing NORM and/or chemically/ toxically contaminated steel scrap. Beside the decontaminated steel as output, residues like slag and filter dust have to be managed within the range of licensed values. Based on the European Safety Standard the European member states have to implement radiation exposure from work activities with NORM in their Radiation Protection Ordinances (RPO). The German government revised the RPO in July 2001. Part 3 describes exposure limits for workers and for the public. Exposures from residues management have to meet 1 mSv/year. Brenk Systemplanung has performed calculations for assessing the radiation exposure from residues of the Siempelkamp melting plant. These calculations have been based on the input of metal from different origins and include all relevant exposure pathways in a number of scenarios. The calculations have been based on the dose criterion of 1 mSv/y as required by the German RPO. The methods and results will be presented.

Quade, U.; Thierfeldt, S.; Wvrlen, S.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

During 1988, as in previous years, Savannah River Site operations had no adverse impact on the general public or the environment. Based on the SRS site-specific code, the maximum radiation dose commitment to a hypothetical individual at the SRS boundary from 1988 SRS atmospheric releases of radioactive materials was 0.46 millirem (mrem) (0.0046 millisievert (mSv)). To obtain the maximum dose, an individual would have had to reside on the SRS boundary at the location of highest dose for 24 hours per day, 365 days per year, consume a maximum amount of foliage and meat which originated from the general vicinity of the plant boundary, and drink a maximum amount of milk from cows grazing at the plant boundary. The average radiation dose commitment from atmospheric releases to the hypothetical individual on the SRS boundary in 1988 was 0.18 mrem (0. 0018 mSv). This person, unlike the maximumly exposed individual, consumes an average amount of foliage, meat, and milk which originated from the foliage and animals living at the plant boundary.

Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Stevenson, D.A. (eds.); Davis, H.A.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Updated Mortality Analysis of Radiation Workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 46,970 workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). Overall, 5,801 workers were involved in radiation activities, including 2,232 who were monitored for intakes of radionuclides, and 41,169 workers were engaged in rocket testing or other non-radiation activities. The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought, updated and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). Because only negligible exposures were received by the 247 workers monitored for radiation activities after 1999, the mean dose from external radiation remained essentially the same at 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv) as reported previously, as did the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined at 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional 9 years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation for the radiation workers by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included external comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models and the computation of relative risks (RRs). A low SMR for all causes of death (SMR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.85) continued to indicate that the Rocketdyne radiation workers were healthier than the general population and were less likely to die. The SMRs for all cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the RR at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17), and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but no significant increases in lung and kidney disease were seen. The extended follow-up reinforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger combined studies of early workers in the United States using similar methodologies are warranted to refine and clarify radiation risks after protracted exposures.

Boice Jr JD, Colen SS, Mumma MT, Ellis ED, Eckerman DF, Leggett RW, Boecker BB, Brill B, Henderson BE

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

296

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

297

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in I998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR SI), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection--Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H; require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv), which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.5 E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent ofthe 10 mrem/yr standard.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application Supplemental Information [Sec 1 Thru 5] Vol 1 Thru 3 Appendices A Thru C  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61), Subpart H: ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv). which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.S E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE. which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard.

CURN, B.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part III: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, 1950-1987  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of data on the incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from late 1950 through the end of 1987 (93,696 survivors accounting for 2,778,000 person-years). These analyses add 9 additional years of follow-up for leukemia and 12 for myeloma to that in the last comprehensive reports on these diseases. This is the first analysis of the lymphoma incidence data in the cohort. Using both the Leukemia Registry and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, a total of 290 leukemia, 229 lymphoma and 73 myeloma cases were identified. The primary analyses were restricted to first primary tumors diagnosed among residents of the cities or surrounding areas with Dosimetry Systems 1986 dose estimates between 0 and 4 Gy kerma (231 leukemias, 208 lymphomas and 62 myelomas). Analyses focused on time-dependent models for the excess absolute risk. Separate analyses were carried out for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and adult T-cell leukemia in this population. There was strong evidence of radiation-induced risks for all subtypes except ATL, and there were significant subtype differences with respect to the effects of age at exposure and sex and in the temporal pattern of risk. The AML dose-response function was nonlinear, whereas there was no evidence against linearity for the other subtypes. When averaged over the follow-up period, the excess absolute risk (EAR) estimates (in cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) for the leukemia subtypes were 0.6, 1.1 and 0.9 for ALL, AML and CML, respectively. The corresponding estimated average excess relative risks at 1 Sv are 9.1, 3.3 and 6.2, respectively. There was some evidence of an increased risk of lymphoma in males (EAR = 0.6 cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) but no evidence of any excess in females. 64 refs., 14 figs., 19 tabs.

Preston, D.L.; Izumi, Shizue; Kusumi, Shizuyo (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Tomonaga, Masao (A-bomb Institute of Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Ron, E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Dohy, Hiroo (Hiroshima A-bomb Hospital (Japan)); Matsui, Tatsuki (Nagasaki City Hospital (Japan)); Nonaka, Hiroaki (George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMAT IN-LINE INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR DETECTION, DISCRIMINATION, AND GRADING OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN PIPELINES  

SciTech Connect

This report describes prototypes, measurements, and results for a project to develop a prototype pipeline in-line inspection (ILI) tool that uses electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to detect and grade stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The introduction briefly provides motivation and describes SCC, gives some background on EMATs and guided ultrasonic waves, and reviews promising results of a previous project using EMATs for SCC. The experimental section then describes lab measurement techniques and equipment, the lab mouse and prototypes for a mule, and scan measurements made on SCC. The mouse was a moveable and compact EMAT setup. The prototypes were even more compact circuits intended to be pulled or used in an ILI tool. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the best modes, transduction, and processing to use, to characterize the transducers, and to prove EMATs and mule components could produce useful results. Next, the results section summarizes the measurements and describes the mouse scans, processing, prototype circuit operating parameters, and performance for SH0 scans. Results are given in terms of specifications--like SNR, power, insertion loss--and parametric curves--such as signal amplitude versus magnetic bias or standoff, reflection or transmission coefficients versus crack depth. Initially, lab results indicated magnetostrictive transducers using both SH0 and SV1 modes would be worthwhile to pursue in a practical ILI system. However, work with mule components showed that SV1 would be too dispersive, so SV1 was abandoned. The results showed that reflection measurements, when normalized by the direct arrival are sensitive to and correlated with SCC. This was not true for transmission measurements. Processing yields a high data reduction, almost 60 to 1, and permits A and C scan display techniques and software already in use for pipeline inspection. An analysis of actual SH0 scan results for SCC of known dimensions showed that length and depth could be determined for deep enough cracks. Defect shadow and short length effects were apparent but may be taken into account. The SH0 scan was done with the mule prototype circuits and permanent magnet EMATs. These gave good enough results that this hardware and the processing techniques are very encouraging for use in a practical ILI tool.

Jeff Aron; Jeff Jia; Bruce Vance; Wen Chang; Raymond Pohler; Jon Gore; Stuart Eaton; Adrian Bowles; Tim Jarman

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Long-Term Performance of Transuranic Waste Inadvertently Disposed in a Shallow Land Burial Trench at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1986, 21 m3 of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently disposed in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste must be disposed in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the only facility meeting these requirements. The National Research Council, however, has found that exhumation of buried TRU waste for disposal in a deep geologic repository may not be warranted when the effort, exposures, and expense of retrieval are not commensurate with the risk reduction achieved. The long-term risks of leaving the TRU waste in-place are evaluated in two probabilistic performance assessments. A composite analysis, assessing the dose from all disposed waste and interacting sources of residual contamination, estimates an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 0.01 mSv, or 3 percent of the dose constraint. A 40 CFR 191 performance assessment also indicates there is reasonable assurance of meeting all requirements. The 40 CFR 191.15 annual mean TEDE for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.055 mSv at 10,000 years, or approximately 37 percent of the 0.15 mSv individual protection requirement. In both assessments greater than 99 percent of the dose is from co-disposed low-level waste. The simulated probability of the 40 CFR 191.13 cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the release limit is estimated to be 0.0093 and less than 0.0001, respectively. Site characterization data and hydrologic process modeling support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is reasonable assurance of meeting all regulatory requirements. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the results are insensitive to TRU waste-related parameters. Limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench can meet DOE performance objectives for disposal of TRU waste and contribute negligibly to disposal site risk. Leaving limited quantities of buried TRU waste in-place may be preferred over retrieval for disposal in a deep geologic repository.

Gregory J. Shott; Vefa Yucel

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Dose assessment for radioactive contamination of a child  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dose assessments produced using the computer code MCNP are important to simulate events that are difficult to recreate experimentally. An emergency scenario involving whole-body skin contamination is one example of such an event. For these scenarios, an anthropomorphic phantom of a 10-year-old male with uniform skin contamination was created and combined with MCNP for dose calculations. Activity on the skin was modeled with gamma-ray sources at energies of 50 keV, 100 keV, 250 keV, 500 keV, 750 keV, 1 MeV, 1.25 MeV, 1.5 MeV, and 2 MeV. The radionuclides 60Co, 137Cs, and 131I were also modeled. The effective dose to the body and major organs was calculated for each scenario. Exposure rate contour lines were also produced around the body. The activity required to result in a dose equal to the legal limit of 0.1 mSv for minors was calculated for each scenario. The highest activity required to produce this limit was from the 50 keV gamma-ray source. This activity was increased by an arbitrary value, approximately tenfold the current value, to represent an emergency scenario. This new activity concentration of 1 mCi per 100 cm2 was used to produce doses for each of the scenarios. The lowest effective dose for the body was 0.82 mSv, produced from the 50 keV source. The highest effective dose was 19.59 mSv, produced from the 2 MeV source. The exposure rates nearest the body were approximately 1.25 R/h, decreasing to100 mR/h approximately 60 cm from the body. The data points were found to be dependent on the energy of the gamma ray. These data can also be improved by deriving solutions previously assumed in this scenario. For example, the skin may be broken down into multiple regions to allow for independent calculations for regional contamination. The activity on the skin can also be derived from air concentration models, allowing for the use of other models to be used in conjunction with this research.

Kowalczik, Jeffrey Aaron

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Data:D86c896a-7368-4445-b57a-ae97b1436012 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c896a-7368-4445-b57a-ae97b1436012 c896a-7368-4445-b57a-ae97b1436012 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 250 W (OPT 3) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

304

Data:326f24e0-1af5-4688-b0b8-78c66bdc6aca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e0-1af5-4688-b0b8-78c66bdc6aca e0-1af5-4688-b0b8-78c66bdc6aca No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (1000W SV on existing 45 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

305

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1983 - 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To study anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust Notes V s and V p wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the

306

Data:1a245ea5-2a28-477f-af28-94f279cd5e1a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ea5-2a28-477f-af28-94f279cd5e1a ea5-2a28-477f-af28-94f279cd5e1a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 35 ft. steel Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

307

Data:D32b9210-612f-484b-888b-4eb9cb43e3da | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

612f-484b-888b-4eb9cb43e3da 612f-484b-888b-4eb9cb43e3da No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Continental Divide El Coop Inc Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: STREET LIGHTING (Public)-400 W SV* Sector: Lighting Description: * As of Dec. 31, 1999, new mercury vapor fixtures are no longer available. The rates and adjustments set forth below are based on average billing period consumption, as follows: 100-watt fixture:47 kWh/fixture 175-watt fixture:76 kWh/fixture 250-watt fixture:110 kWh/fixture 400-watt mercury vapor fixture:166 kWh/fixture 400-watt sodium vapor fixture:176 kWh/fixture

308

Data:9ce73e7b-c584-4201-8904-e9871b444d41 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3e7b-c584-4201-8904-e9871b444d41 3e7b-c584-4201-8904-e9871b444d41 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Modesto Irrigation District Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SL - Lamp and Fixture on Existing Pole - 200 Watt SV Sector: Lighting Description: This section of this Schedule is applicable to all night lighting on the public streets, alleys, highways and parks for cities, lighting districts or other public bodies. Public outdoor area lighting for other than all night lighting is supplied under Rate Schedule GS. Source or reference: www.mid.org/tariffs/rates/SL_STREET_LIGHTING.pdf

309

Data:Fe192358-808b-4e84-be82-f0a69c0bbf13 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

08b-4e84-be82-f0a69c0bbf13 08b-4e84-be82-f0a69c0bbf13 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - SV 100 Watts - Gas Replica Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

310

Data:45a4ea4d-fd86-417e-b71f-a8ddabadf555 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d-fd86-417e-b71f-a8ddabadf555 d-fd86-417e-b71f-a8ddabadf555 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (100W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 23 ft. fiberglass Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

311

Data:B2d08de9-7920-4db3-b331-715ea3f4a86e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

de9-7920-4db3-b331-715ea3f4a86e de9-7920-4db3-b331-715ea3f4a86e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (1000W SV on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

312

Data:91f37067-d1c0-4535-97f3-d4c37ca84b7a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

67-d1c0-4535-97f3-d4c37ca84b7a 67-d1c0-4535-97f3-d4c37ca84b7a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: New River Light & Power Co Effective date: 2013/01/25 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt SV TOB Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://nrlp.appstate.edu/retail-rate-schedule Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

313

DOE/EA-1607 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DISPOSITION OF DOE EXCESS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

µCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter µCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter MAP mitigation action plan MEI maximally exposed individual mg/kg milligrams per kilogram mrem millirem mSv millisievert MT metric ton MTCA Model Toxics Control Act MTU metric tons of uranium N/A not applicable Final Environmental Assessment: Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium vi NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEF National Enrichment Facility NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NU natural uranium NUF 6 natural uranium hexafluoride pCi/g picocuries per gram PEIS programmatic environmental impact statement PM 2.5 particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less PM 10 particulate matter with a diameter of 10 microns or less

314

Data:A92c7490-23f7-4411-9ba1-1abaef2d5087 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c7490-23f7-4411-9ba1-1abaef2d5087 c7490-23f7-4411-9ba1-1abaef2d5087 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt SV 2 Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

315

Data:4bcce9b7-b421-4224-96a4-b4d7a412c78d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bcce9b7-b421-4224-96a4-b4d7a412c78d bcce9b7-b421-4224-96a4-b4d7a412c78d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 40 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

316

Data:54186112-2d21-4f66-9783-5a39b27111aa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

112-2d21-4f66-9783-5a39b27111aa 112-2d21-4f66-9783-5a39b27111aa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 130000 lumen 1130 watt SV (pendant) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

317

Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin Place Minnesota Utility Id 13780 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A09, A10, A11, A13 - Small General Service Commercial AUTOMATIC PROTECTIVE LIGHTING SERVICE 100 W SV Lighting

318

Data:D723d857-a566-409c-8133-72b28494a769 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-a566-409c-8133-72b28494a769 -a566-409c-8133-72b28494a769 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (50W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 30 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

319

Audit Report: IG-0771  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Over Personally Identifiable Security Over Personally Identifiable Information DOE/IG-0771 July 2007 Department of Energy 'Sv'ashinyton, DC 20585 J u l y 30, 2007 MEMORAhTDUM FOR FROM: inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Security over Personally Identifiable Information" Industry experts have reported that more than 100 million personal privacy records have been lost or stolen over the past two years, including information maintained by corporations, educational institutions, and Federal government agencies. In fact, over the past several years, the Department of Energy has experienced the loss of personal privacy records. On June 23,2006, in response to security incidents involving the loss or compromise of sensitive personal information by several Federal agencies, the Office of

320

Data:1be3c213-ca49-439e-8556-897d7113225c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c213-ca49-439e-8556-897d7113225c c213-ca49-439e-8556-897d7113225c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W SV on existing 45 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

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321

Data:7432c339-7542-47c3-a049-f8e688670b72 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c339-7542-47c3-a049-f8e688670b72 c339-7542-47c3-a049-f8e688670b72 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Modesto Irrigation District Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SL - Lamp and Fixture on Pole - 200 Watt SV Sector: Lighting Description: This section of this Schedule is applicable to all night lighting on the public streets, alleys, highways and parks for cities, lighting districts or other public bodies. Public outdoor area lighting for other than all night lighting is supplied under Rate Schedule GS. Source or reference: www.mid.org/tariffs/rates/SL_STREET_LIGHTING.pdf

322

Data:19741bcd-9dde-4aa4-8b61-ecab1abecec4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dde-4aa4-8b61-ecab1abecec4 dde-4aa4-8b61-ecab1abecec4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Jemez Mountains Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2005/11/23 End date if known: Rate name: Street and Security Lighting Service-250 W SV Sector: Lighting Description: See Source. Source or reference: http://www.jemezcoop.org/News/currentRates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

323

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Nanoscale Measurements of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Temperature-Dependent Mechanical Properties in Polymers M.P. Nikiforov, S. Jesse, L.T. Germinario (CNMS user, Eastman Chemical Co.), and S.V. Kalinin Achievement We report a novel method for local measurements of glass transition temperatures and the temperature dependence of elastic and loss moduli of polymeric materials. The combination of Anasys Instruments' heated tip technology, ORNL-developed band excitation scanning probe microscopy, and a "freeze-in" thermal profile technique allows quantitative thermomechanical measurements at high spatial resolution on the order of ~100 nm. Here, we developed an experimental approach for local thermomechanical probing that reproducibly tracks changes in the mechanical properties of

324

Data:Dd6a03eb-8b03-4eaf-a09e-9a7158d21eb9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eb-8b03-4eaf-a09e-9a7158d21eb9 eb-8b03-4eaf-a09e-9a7158d21eb9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Jemez Mountains Elec Coop, Inc Effective date: 2005/11/23 End date if known: Rate name: Street and Security Lighting Service-100 W SV Sector: Lighting Description: See Source. Source or reference: http://www.jemezcoop.org/News/currentRates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

325

Data:C582c79e-344d-4406-a0e4-48f9a72a778f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e-344d-4406-a0e4-48f9a72a778f e-344d-4406-a0e4-48f9a72a778f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Idaho Power Co Effective date: 2012/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule 15 - SV - 400 watt Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Service under this schedule is available to commercial institutions, industrial plants and residential Customers presently served from the Company's interconnected system within the State of Idaho, where existing overhead secondary distribution facilities of adequate capacity, phase and voltage are presently available adjacent to the Premises to be lighted.

326

Data:1db1e165-4529-44eb-baff-9571a1e1ca7b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

65-4529-44eb-baff-9571a1e1ca7b 65-4529-44eb-baff-9571a1e1ca7b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Sharyland Utilities LP Effective date: 2010/07/13 End date if known: Rate name: Lighting Service unmetered company owned SV Sector: Lighting Description: This Rate Schedule is applicable to Electric Service for street and security lighting purposes. This Rate Schedule is not applicable to temporary, shared, standby, supplementary, maintenance or resale service. Source or reference: http://www.su-power.com/docs/SharylandUtilities_Tariff.pdf Source Parent: Comments This rate is subject to all applicable billing adjustments (Power Cost Recovery Factor (PCRF) - General, Sales Tax, Meter Error Adjustment, Power Factor Adjustment)

327

Data:6fd2e9af-c987-425c-b1be-e50e0b914d3f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af-c987-425c-b1be-e50e0b914d3f af-c987-425c-b1be-e50e0b914d3f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (50W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 23 ft. fiberglass Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

328

Data:Fc88fc03-be90-48af-9e01-1cd976b98236 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fc03-be90-48af-9e01-1cd976b98236 fc03-be90-48af-9e01-1cd976b98236 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (1000W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 45 ft. metal Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

329

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS User Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Nanoscale Measurements of Glass Transition Temperature and Temperature-Dependent Mechanical Properties in Polymers M.P. Nikiforov, S. Jesse, L.T. Germinario (CNMS user, Eastman Chemical Co.), and S.V. Kalinin Achievement We report a novel method for local measurements of glass transition temperatures and the temperature dependence of elastic and loss moduli of polymeric materials. The combination of Anasys Instruments' heated tip technology, ORNL-developed band excitation scanning probe microscopy, and a "freeze-in" thermal profile technique allows quantitative thermomechanical measurements at high spatial resolution on the order of ~100 nm. Here, we developed an experimental approach for local thermomechanical probing that reproducibly tracks changes in the mechanical properties of

330

Data:0b06187a-117e-40d9-a367-0b20833170a3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-117e-40d9-a367-0b20833170a3 a-117e-40d9-a367-0b20833170a3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Central Electric Membership Corporation Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE SV, Security Light Maintenance Sector: Lighting Description: Availability - Available to individual consumers, in all territory served by the Cooperative, for purposes of lighting private outdoor areas or residential subdivision streets from dusk to dawn. Service under this schedule is subject to the Cooperative's established Service Rules and Regulations.

331

Data:3c90aecb-11ce-43f5-81ae-a99ef72da14a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0aecb-11ce-43f5-81ae-a99ef72da14a 0aecb-11ce-43f5-81ae-a99ef72da14a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt SV (pta) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

332

Microsoft Word - Katin_EDIT_Radiotransponder.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radio-Transponder Systems for Remote Monitoring and Identification of Radio-Transponder Systems for Remote Monitoring and Identification of Containers with Fissile Materials S.V. Katin, G.G. Bakhirev, S.L. Torokhov NIIIS, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia Summary: The report presents the main scientific and technical solutions being the basis for the radio- transponder system under development, providing remote state monitoring and identification of fissile materials and radioactive materials containers. Introduction Hazardous substance containers monitoring includes two interrelated tasks. The first is to take the stock of and monitor integrity (availability) of the containers in a storage area or vehicle during transportation. The second task is related to monitoring the containers content state (monitoring the set threshold values overriding by the

333

Методика ЛЭГАК-3Dрасчета трехмерных нестационарных течений многокомпонентной сплошной среды и принципы ее реализации на многоп  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

VNIIEF Methods of Numerical Simulation for Multi- VNIIEF Methods of Numerical Simulation for Multi- Dimensional Gas Dynamic Flows Spirodonov V.F., Bakhrakh S.M., Velichko S.V., Delov V.I., Yanilkin Yu.V., Sokolov S.S., Butnev O.I, Stenin A.M., Zmushko V.V., Voronin B.L., Bykov A.N. Russian Federal Nuclear Center - VNIIEF, Mira Prospect, 37, Sarov, Nizhny Novgorod Region, Russia The Introduction presents a brief review of the approaches to the development of mathematical simulation methods for 2D and 3D gas dynamic flows, used by VNIIEF. In the main part of the Report the development principles of the regular Lagrangian-Eulerian technique (LEGAK), based on the application of the concentration method for computation of gas dynamic flows with big contact boundaries deformations, are presented in detail. The examples of

334

ДИАГНОСТИКА НАНО- И ПИКОСЕКУНДНЫХ  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3: Confinement, Pulsed Power, Emerging Technologies 3: Confinement, Pulsed Power, Emerging Technologies Diagnostics of Nano- and Picosecond Pulsed Single-Stage Processes V.P. Andrianov, V.I. Bogomolov, К.N. Danilenko, А.S. Dolotov, M.I. Ivanov, G.N. Ignatev, N.G. Ignatev, А.Е. Zaharov, S.V. Kapitanov, О.B. Kozlov, P.S. Krapiva, I.G. Pranishnikov, D.S. Semenov, and Yu.K. Slavnov The equipment for registration and measurement of single pulses parameters of ionizing and optical irradiation were developed and manufactured from the beginning of 60 th at Research Institute of Pulse Technique (NIIIT) (that became the Research & Production Center for Pulse Technique, under VNIIA ruling beginning from 2010). In the last tenths, the institute provided progress in design and production of equipment for rapid

335

Data:A364fb58-2cdf-4759-84a6-b65024454dce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4fb58-2cdf-4759-84a6-b65024454dce 4fb58-2cdf-4759-84a6-b65024454dce No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Modesto Irrigation District Effective date: 2013/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SL - Lamp and Fixture on Existing Pole - 100 Watt SV Sector: Lighting Description: This section of this Schedule is applicable to all night lighting on the public streets, alleys, highways and parks for cities, lighting districts or other public bodies. Public outdoor area lighting for other than all night lighting is supplied under Rate Schedule GS. Source or reference: www.mid.org/tariffs/rates/SL_STREET_LIGHTING.pdf

336

Data:3bbf698a-b4a6-4e61-82c9-c66c0654576c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b4a6-4e61-82c9-c66c0654576c b4a6-4e61-82c9-c66c0654576c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W SV on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

337

Data:D15383ee-339e-494a-abbc-a3b81eb7a812 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

339e-494a-abbc-a3b81eb7a812 339e-494a-abbc-a3b81eb7a812 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - SV 200 Watts - Rectilinear Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

338

TY JOUR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid phase supported profluorescent nitroxide probe for the determination Solid phase supported profluorescent nitroxide probe for the determination of aerosol borne reactive oxygen species JF Talanta A1 Mohamad Sleiman A1 Hugo Destaillats A1 Lara A Gundel KW Freeradicals Proxyl fluorescamine Dichlorofluorescin Cigarettesmoke Ozone NOx AB div class abstract svAbstract p id sp0035 Reactive oxygen species ROS and free radicals play important roles in the chemical transformation and adverse health effects of environmental aerosols This work presents a simple and sensitive method for sampling and analysis of ROS using a packed column coated with a profluorescent nitroxide scavenger proxyl fluorescamine PF Quantification was performed by extraction and analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection For comparison the conventional

339

Data:99502e3b-520c-45f1-8296-c8975cfa809f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b-520c-45f1-8296-c8975cfa809f b-520c-45f1-8296-c8975cfa809f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W SV on existing 40 ft. metal Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

340

Data:97c59446-cdd6-48a0-b5eb-5323d9227d60 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-cdd6-48a0-b5eb-5323d9227d60 6-cdd6-48a0-b5eb-5323d9227d60 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (1000W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Data:0ac0efda-9eaa-492e-b336-e8bd4877fe65 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

efda-9eaa-492e-b336-e8bd4877fe65 efda-9eaa-492e-b336-e8bd4877fe65 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (100W SV on existing 30 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

342

Southern Illinois Elec Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elec Coop Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Southern Illinois Elec Coop Place Illinois Utility Id 17631 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Residential Service Residential Commercial Service Commercial Farm and Home Service Residential Irrigation Service Commercial Large Power Service Commercial Large Power Service LP-1 Commercial Off-Peak Service (Applicable to Large Power Service Schedule LP or LP-1) Commercial Security Lighting Service (100 SV Existing Pole) Lighting

343

Data:F1362e2b-dab0-41ce-ae4e-3df74b83bcfd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e2b-dab0-41ce-ae4e-3df74b83bcfd e2b-dab0-41ce-ae4e-3df74b83bcfd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 150 W (OPT 2) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

344

Data:3a623bcb-48e7-4301-8678-d1723719b70f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Data:3a623bcb-48e7-4301-8678-d1723719b70f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 Lumen 173 Watt SV (ml) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

345

DOE/EA-1607: Final Environmental Assessment for Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium (June 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter MAP mitigation action plan MEI maximally exposed individual mg/kg milligrams per kilogram mrem millirem mSv millisievert MT metric ton MTCA Model Toxics Control Act MTU metric tons of uranium N/A not applicable Final Environmental Assessment: Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium vi NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEF National Enrichment Facility NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NU natural uranium NUF 6 natural uranium hexafluoride pCi/g picocuries per gram PEIS programmatic environmental impact statement PM 2.5 particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less PM 10 particulate matter with a diameter of 10 microns or less

346

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Angular Distribution of Intensity in a Flux of Radiation Scattered by a Angular Distribution of Intensity in a Flux of Radiation Scattered by a Cloud Dvoryashin, S.V., Shukurov, K.A., Shukurov, A.K., and Golitsyn, G.S., A.M.Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A study of the angular distribution of intensity in a flux of solar radiation scattered by a cloud was carried out in conditions of translucent clouds (the disk of the Sun is visible). Using the digital video camera KODAK DC200, mounted on the sun tracker, the sky images with the angle of view 38 0) have been obtained in cloudy and cloudless conditions. During measurements the disk of the Sun was closed with a blend. Using the specially developed program the photometry of the received images was

347

Three-dimensional V p /V s variations for the Coso region, California |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

p /V s variations for the Coso region, California p /V s variations for the Coso region, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Three-dimensional V p /V s variations for the Coso region, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent seismological studies of the Coso region of southeastern California document both low P wave velocities and abnormal SV attenuation in Indian Wells Valley, south of the Pleistocene volcanics of the Coso Range. In order to learn more about the physical nature of these colocated anomalies, a tomographic inversion for the three-dimensional variations of Vp /Vs the ratio of compressional to shear velocity was performed. Iterative back projection of 2966 shear and compressional wave travel time residuals from local earthquakes recorded on vertical instruments reveals

348

Data:478345e1-0cdb-4394-bfce-7e40858f630a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cdb-4394-bfce-7e40858f630a cdb-4394-bfce-7e40858f630a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - SV 100 Watts Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

349

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE STOCHASTIC MODELS OF SPACE RADIATION DNA DAMAGE RESPONSES AND CANCER RISKS Francis A. Cucinotta 1 , Janice M. Pluth 2 , Artem Ponomarev 3 , Shaowen Hu 3 , Jennifer Anderson 4 , Jane Harper 4 , and Peter O'Neill 4 1 NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston TX, USA; 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, USA; 3 U.S.R.A., Division of Life Sciences, Houston TX, USA; 4 MRC Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Harwell, Didcot, UK Abstract: On space missions astronauts are exposed to a steady flux of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of high-energy protons and heavy ions. In the next decades long- term missions of up to 200 days to the Earth's moon and 1100 days to Mars are planed by NASA where cumulative doses will not be low (>100 mSv) albeit dose-

350

Data:761dd206-b302-48e5-84dd-4e1808070e4c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

06-b302-48e5-84dd-4e1808070e4c 06-b302-48e5-84dd-4e1808070e4c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W SV on existing DPUA utility pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

351

Data:Faa78733-3a03-426a-b573-d5dcebea7662 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Faa78733-3a03-426a-b573-d5dcebea7662 Faa78733-3a03-426a-b573-d5dcebea7662 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 Lumen 173 Watt SV Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

352

Data:C93b7585-23dd-4007-af1b-f101d2624bb1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

85-23dd-4007-af1b-f101d2624bb1 85-23dd-4007-af1b-f101d2624bb1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W SV on existing 35 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

353

Data:2bb46d92-41e6-4077-9c04-532598a80772 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6d92-41e6-4077-9c04-532598a80772 6d92-41e6-4077-9c04-532598a80772 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (1000W SV on existing 40 ft. metal Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

354

Data:486ba353-7cd2-4bce-99a8-c2c4d10079cd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

53-7cd2-4bce-99a8-c2c4d10079cd 53-7cd2-4bce-99a8-c2c4d10079cd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

355

Data:984448eb-d434-4f0f-b130-f054bdc2fea6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

48eb-d434-4f0f-b130-f054bdc2fea6 48eb-d434-4f0f-b130-f054bdc2fea6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt SV (Pt) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

356

Columbia Basin Elec Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elec Cooperative, Inc Elec Cooperative, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Columbia Basin Elec Cooperative, Inc Place Oregon Utility Id 4005 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Demand Service Commercial Irrigation Pumping Residential Service (Single Phase) Residential Residential Service (Three Phase) Residential Small General Service (Single Phase) Commercial Small General Service (Three Phase) Commercial Street & Security Lighting (100 W SV) Commercial

357

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - SRSO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 United States Government National Nuclear Security Administration SV (McAlhany, 803-208-8230) SUBJECT: Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report TO: Karen L. Boardman, Chairperson, Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP), NNSA Service Center In response to your October 24, 2012, memorandum, we have conducted a staffing analysis for the SRSO. This analysis was conducted in accordance with the models and guidance provided at the FTCP website. We have also completed the attached tables as requested. As SRSO is co-located on an Environmental Management landlord site, we rely on the Savannah River Operations Office for matrix support for certain functions due to the limited number of

358

Vacancy Mechanism Davydov I.А.  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9: Computational Physics-MD 9: Computational Physics-MD DFT and MD Simulation of Self-Diffusion in Silicon: Study of Diffusion Vacancy Mechanism Davydov I.А. * , Anisin А.V. † , Eliseev G.М. ‡ , Kopkin S.V. § , and Reese Jones ** *, †, ‡, § Russian Federal Nuclear Center - All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF), 607190 Sarov, Mira-37, Russia ** Sandia National Laboratories, MS 9404, P.O. Box 0969, Livermore, CA 94551, USA Summary: Computations of jump activation energy DH j and diffusion jump frequency n have been carried out using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) method for a single crystal of Si. These parameters define the rate of vacancy diffusion transport.

359

Data:522d7f1d-2ae6-447b-823f-77c9531f3668 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f1d-2ae6-447b-823f-77c9531f3668 f1d-2ae6-447b-823f-77c9531f3668 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 100 W (OPT 2) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

360

Data:23cd2cd9-4251-4f0f-ba41-0de00de5b052 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cd9-4251-4f0f-ba41-0de00de5b052 cd9-4251-4f0f-ba41-0de00de5b052 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (150W SV on existing 30 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Data:2d549d72-7d6c-4f1b-afbc-ae90babafc19 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9d72-7d6c-4f1b-afbc-ae90babafc19 9d72-7d6c-4f1b-afbc-ae90babafc19 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt SV Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

362

Data:3159ade5-a140-4e34-9957-28f69bb56045 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ade5-a140-4e34-9957-28f69bb56045 ade5-a140-4e34-9957-28f69bb56045 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: New River Light & Power Co Effective date: 2013/01/15 End date if known: Rate name: 150 Watt SV TOB Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://nrlp.appstate.edu/retail-rate-schedule Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

363

Data:F4305257-a041-4f91-990d-7fa77582ebd6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

305257-a041-4f91-990d-7fa77582ebd6 305257-a041-4f91-990d-7fa77582ebd6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt Sv (HDG) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

364

Data:6a1b1db7-dcce-449f-bb60-c29857b3ce79 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

db7-dcce-449f-bb60-c29857b3ce79 db7-dcce-449f-bb60-c29857b3ce79 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - SV 100 Watts - Holophane Decorative Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

365

Data:8e5e81bb-cbee-4d2c-bfa8-8e92adebaf9c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cbee-4d2c-bfa8-8e92adebaf9c cbee-4d2c-bfa8-8e92adebaf9c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - SV 100/Open Refractor Watts Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

366

Data:A27b3192-e8da-41ab-8357-00b1ca3e3cf3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

92-e8da-41ab-8357-00b1ca3e3cf3 92-e8da-41ab-8357-00b1ca3e3cf3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W SV on existing 30 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

367

Data:8e0ddbb3-fa7c-45d0-82ab-22aa8714cb56 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ddbb3-fa7c-45d0-82ab-22aa8714cb56 ddbb3-fa7c-45d0-82ab-22aa8714cb56 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

368

Data:Af1a4e5b-5d65-465b-bb91-f5f82f925408 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a4e5b-5d65-465b-bb91-f5f82f925408 a4e5b-5d65-465b-bb91-f5f82f925408 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 250 W (OPT 2) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

369

Data:Fda79523-e0dc-4464-9c9c-d9076873c7dd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fda79523-e0dc-4464-9c9c-d9076873c7dd Fda79523-e0dc-4464-9c9c-d9076873c7dd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: New River Light & Power Co Effective date: 2013/01/25 End date if known: Rate name: 250 Watt SV TOB Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://nrlp.appstate.edu/retail-rate-schedule Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

370

Data:3162f424-eab7-4e46-a76c-d5366edf5108 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-eab7-4e46-a76c-d5366edf5108 4-eab7-4e46-a76c-d5366edf5108 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (1000W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 50 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

371

Data:943331de-7c5f-44f8-bbfe-5199e7d445e5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

de-7c5f-44f8-bbfe-5199e7d445e5 de-7c5f-44f8-bbfe-5199e7d445e5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (250W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 35 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

372

Data:Ae40b428-293e-4b29-aff4-4a6ba00b8329 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ae40b428-293e-4b29-aff4-4a6ba00b8329 Ae40b428-293e-4b29-aff4-4a6ba00b8329 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 100 W (OPT 3) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

373

Data:330dde4e-c267-4c79-a29b-e31b043efd5e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dde4e-c267-4c79-a29b-e31b043efd5e dde4e-c267-4c79-a29b-e31b043efd5e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 100 W (OPT 1) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

374

Data:142b74d9-3561-477c-ba53-66191850752a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4d9-3561-477c-ba53-66191850752a 4d9-3561-477c-ba53-66191850752a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 Lumen 173 Watt SV (premier) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

375

Data:09ea0611-8078-4c3f-a14d-c326282f776d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ea0611-8078-4c3f-a14d-c326282f776d ea0611-8078-4c3f-a14d-c326282f776d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 150 W (OPT 1) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

376

Iacocca-011013 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iacocca-011013 Iacocca-011013 MATERIALS SCIENCE SEMINAR SPEAKER: Ezio Iacocca University of Gothenburg, Sweden TITLE: Micromagnetic simulations of highly non-linear modes in spin torque oscillators: propagating, solitonic and magnetic dissipative droplet modes DATE: Thursday, January 10, 2013 TIME: 2:00 p.m. PLACE: Building 223, Conference Room S105 HOST: Olle Heinonen ABSTRACT: Magnetic dynamics can be locally excited in spin valve structures by the current-induced spin transfer torque (STT). Such devices are generally referred to as Spin Torque Oscillators where the high current densities required are, for instance, achieved by patterning a metallic nanocontact on top of the spin valve (NC-SV). The resulting dynamics are analytically described with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski

377

FOIA Request - March 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jeffrey L. Cutler Jeffrey L. Cutler Kathryn J. Halford K. Arianne Jordan Dana K. Kann Joseph J. Kaplon Amanda Uvely Scott G. Miller Ralph M. Phillips WOHLNER KAPLON PHILLIPS YOUNG & CUTLER A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION ATTORNEYS AT LAW 15456 VENTURA BOULEVARD SUITE 500 SHERMAN OAKS, CALIFORNIA 91403 (818) 501·8030 FACSIMILE: (818) 501·5306 February 20, 2008 Elizabeth Rosenfeld Renee Sanchez Krista Taylor Jeffrey S. Wohlner Wendy J. Barsh Of Counsel Kenneth P. Young 1950·2003 Freedom ofInformation Act Officer U.S. Department of Energy i 000 hldept:ndtmce Avenue, SV.f Washington, D.C. 20585 MAR04 t~liilii;l'Io~'8"'.~ 2000 0 I ~"'H '-'. * F- lf2 v'J€l1! II.~ Fit"p. Information on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina ,QODU077o

378

Data:4d8df46c-0cc6-4524-9576-10e79e7352e6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

df46c-0cc6-4524-9576-10e79e7352e6 df46c-0cc6-4524-9576-10e79e7352e6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - SV 100 Watts - Flood Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

379

Data:8b859a03-7059-4e4a-9d52-a6d5f4316869 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7059-4e4a-9d52-a6d5f4316869 7059-4e4a-9d52-a6d5f4316869 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (100W SV on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

380

Data:70a88f43-8678-4491-8344-5edcf2275335 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8f43-8678-4491-8344-5edcf2275335 8f43-8678-4491-8344-5edcf2275335 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 250 W (OPT 1) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

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381

Le nom des naksatrani en tibetain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drug ma drug bu, mang po skyes k?ttik?s agni ? maewX? *mmru? 2 snar ma skye dguvi bdag po, dal bavi lha ldan ma, bi rdzi rohi?? (br?hm?) praj?- pati ? pjit ? *pit 3 mgo mgo skyes, smal bo, zla skyes, ri dwags mgo m?ga?iras (?grah?ya??) soma ? tsje... gi lha mo sv?t? v?yu ? khangH ? *kkha?-s 14 sa ga brgyad ldan ma, dbang povi lha ldan vi??khe (r?dh?) indr?gn? ? tej ? *ttij 15 lhamtshams mdza bo anur?dh?s mitra ? bjang ? *ba? Revue dEtudes Tibtaines 6 16 snron gang bu, ldevu, lha ldan, lha...

Jacques, Guillaume

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

An Instrument for Measuring the TRU Concentration in High-Level Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online monitor has been designed, built, and tested that is capable of measuring the residual transuranic concentrations in processed high-level wastes with a detection limit of 370 Bq/ml (10 nCi/ml) in less than six hours. The monitor measures the ({alpha},n) neutrons in the presence of gamma-ray fields up to 1 Sv/h (100 R/h). The optimum design was determined by Monte Carlo modeling and then tempered with practical engineering and cost considerations. A multiplicity counter is used in data acquisition to reject the large fraction of coincident and highly variable cosmic-ray-engendered background events and results in a S/N ratio {approx}1.

Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, R A.; Fink, Samuel D.; Hensley, Walter K.; Holt, Noah OA; Knopf, Michael A.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Mullen, O Dennis; Salaymeh, Saleem R.; Samuel, Todd J.; Smart, John E.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, D

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

An Istrument for Measuring the TRU Concentration in High-Level Liquid Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online monitor has been designed, built, and tested, which is capable of measuring the residual transuranic concentrations in processed high-level wastes with a detection limit of 370 Bq/ml (10 nCi/ml) in less than six hours. The monitor measures the neutrons produced by the transuranics, primarily via (?,n) reactions, in the presence of gamma-ray fields up to 1 Sv/h (100 R/h). The optimum design was determined by Monte Carlo modeling and then tempered with practical engineering and cost considerations. Correct operation of the monitor was demonstrated in a hot cell utilizing an actual sample of high-level waste. Results of that demonstration are given, and suggestions for improvements in the next generation system are discussed.

Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, R. A.; Fink, Samuel D.; Hensley, Walter K.; Holt, Noah O.; Knopf, Michael A.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Mullen, O Dennis; Salaymeh, Saleem R.; Samuel, Todd J.; Smart, John E.; Tinker, Michael R.; Walker, Darrell D.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Discussion - Next Step for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specification of Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography (FMT): (1) 18-feet (5.5-m) drift tube, 2-inch (5-cm) diameter; (2) 108 tubes per layer; (3) Unit layer = 2 layer (detection efficiency: 0.96 x 0.96 = 92%); (4) 12 or 16 layer per module; (5) 16 layers allows momentum analysis at 30% level; (6) 2 module per super module (5.5 x 11 m{sup 2}); and (7) FMT = 2 super module. By deploying MMT next to a research reactor, we will be able to measure the impact of low level radiation fields on muon tomography and reconstruction processes. Radiation level during reactor operation is {approx}50 {micro}Sv/h which provides similar radiation environment of inside the FMT radiation shield at Fukushima Daiichi. We will implement coincidence algorithm on the FPGA board.

Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

385

Influence of cell dissociation procedures on the tumorigenicity of Simian Virus 40 transformed fibroblasts  

SciTech Connect

Mouse fibroblasts transformed by Simian Virus 40 (SV40) were examined for tumor forming ability in syngeneic BALB/c mice following dissociation from tissue culture dishes by two procedures. A significantly greater in vivo proliferative capacity was observed for cells dissociated by the tryspin-EDTA procedure, with the injected cell dose for tumor production in 50 percent of recipient mice (the TPD$sub 50$) being 16-fold lower than the TPD$sub 50$ for cells dissociated by the EDTA procedure. Host immunosuppression with 300 rad whole-body $gamma$ irradiation led to a significant 7-fold decrease in the TPD$sub 50$ for cells dissociated by the EDTA procedure, while no significant decrease in TPD$sub 50$ was observed for cells dissociated by the tryspin-EDTA procedure. (auth)

Tenforde, T.S.; Risius, J.; Beckmann, A.; Tobias, C.A.; Gurney, E.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Effects of boron composition on tunneling magnetoresistance ratio and microstructure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB pseudo-spin-valve magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The effect of B concentration on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x}/MgO/(Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x} (x = 22 and 33) pseudo-spin-valve (P-SV) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) was investigated. The TMR ratios for optimally annealed MTJs with x = 22 and 33 were 340% and 170%, respectively, at room temperature. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation showed a weaker (001) texture in the MgO barrier in the MTJ with x = 33. The bottom electrode was not fully crystallized even with a considerable amount of B in the (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 67}B{sub 33}, while good epitaxy was observed between (001) textured MgO and (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 78}B{sub 22} electrodes.

Kodzuka, M. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ohkubo, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hono, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ikeda, S.; Ohno, H. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gan, H. D. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes: Final report for period April 1, 1986-April 1, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the study of both wave propagation in complex structures and source mechanism of geothermal seismic events. The following work was accomplished in the past one-year period: (1) interpretation of long-period events observed at Mt. St. Helens and at the Fenton Hill hot-dry-rock experimental site in terms of seismic radiation from a fluid-filled crack; (2) interpretation of teleseismic data collected in and near the Valles caldera in terms of a model with irregular topography, caldera fill, and magma chamber; (3) interpretation of VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) data from the Oroville fault zone by ray tracing and polarization calculation for P, SV, and SH waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media containing aligned fluid-filled and/or dry cracks; and (4) development of a new powerful method for calculating seismic motions in media with irregular topography and interfaces by the superposition of Gaussian Beams.

Aki, K.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The estimation of the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an estimation method for the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China. It shows that there are about 6 million underground miners at present and the proportion is about 1, 1 and 4 million for national key coal mines, state-owned local coal mines, and township and private-ownership coal mines, respectively. The collective dose is about 1.65 X 10{sup 4} person-Sv y{sup -1}, of which township and private-ownership coal mines contribute about 91%. This paper also points out that the 2000 UNSCEAR report gives the number of miners of coal production and their collective dose, which are underestimated greatly because the report only includes the number of underground miners in national key coal mines, which only accounts for 1/6 of the workers all working under the best ventilation conditions in China.

Liu, F.D.; Pan, Z.Q.; Liu, S.L.; Chen, L.; Ma, J.Z.; Yang, M.L.; Wang, N.P. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Worker radiation doses in the United States at the dawn of the atomic era (1940--1960)  

SciTech Connect

Radiation doses to workers at the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sites due to external irradiation during 1940--1960 are reviewed. Categorized radiation dose data were available from AEC annual reports for some years. Annual individual radiation dose data for ten MED/AEC sites for all years were available from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR). These data are combined to produce an estimate of external collective dose equivalent to 172,000 person-rems (1720 person-Sv) for 1940--1960. During this period there were 41 overexposures, 19 criticality incidents, and 3 deaths due to acute radiation syndrome among several hundred thousand workers.

Strom, D.J.; Smith, M.H.; Swinth, K.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Pettengill, H.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Otisco`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Otisco`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 42% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 33% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Otisco` produced greater than 2.5-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Otisco` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Otisco` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Fish Creek`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea named `Fish Creek`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 30% more woody biomass than either of its parents (`94001` and `94006`) and 20% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Fish Creek` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Fish Creek` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Oneida`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea.times.S. miyabeana named `Oneida`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 2.7-times greater woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX67`) and greater than 36% more biomass than current production cultivars (`SV1` and `SX64`). `Oneida` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Oneida` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Tully Champion`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Tully Champion`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 25% more woody biomass than two current production clones (Salix dasyclados `SV1` and Salix miyabeana `SX64`), more than 2.5-fold greater biomass than one of its parents (Salix miyabeana `SX67`), and nearly 3-fold more biomass than another production clone (Salix sacchalinensis, `SX61`) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Tully Champion` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Tully Champion` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fast-growing shrub willow named `Owasco`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.Salix miyabeana named `Owasco`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 49% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 39% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Otisco` produced greater than 2.7-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Owasco` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Owasco` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Millbrook`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct female cultivar of Salix purpurea.times.Salix miyabeana named `Millbrook`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 9% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 2% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Millbrook` produced greater than 2-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Millbrook` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Millbrook` displays a low incidence of rust disease.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P [Marcellus, NY; Kopp, Richard F [Marietta, NY; Smart, Lawrence B [Geneva, NY; Volk, Timothy A [Syracuse, NY

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

VP-6 electrodes for welding of cold-resistant low-alloy steels  

SciTech Connect

This article examines VP-6 electrodes based on the standard Sv-10NMA welding rod. The calcium fluoride (with increased CaF/sub 2/ content) coating of the electrodes also contains feldspar and rutile, which reduce the porosity of the weld metal, improve the technological welding properties of the electrodes, and ensure good weld formation throughout. The average surfacing coefficient of the VP-6 electrodes is 9.5 g/A X h. It is concluded that the VP-6 electrodes, intended for the welding of low-alloy 09G2S-type steels, used at temperatures down to -70/sup 0/C, make it possible to eliminate the normalizing of welded joints after welding.

Lositskii, N.T.; Berezhnitskii, S.N.; Geimur, V.V.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

{sup 125}I Measurements for Occupational Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Whenever there is a risk of occupational exposure to dispersible radioactive material, it is necessary to have a monitoring program to assess the effective dose arising from the intake of radionuclides by workers. In this paper we present our experience in bioassay measurements of {sup 125}I in urine samples of workers using high resolution gamma spectrometry. For a 24-hour excretion period, we found activity values of the order of one Bq and estimated the committed effective doses to be less than one {mu}Sv. Although very small, these values led to a re-evaluation and improvement of the laboratory safety conditions. We discuss the calibration procedure followed for the activity measurements, the estimation of the uncertainty in the excreted activity, the calculation of detection and quantification limits and estimation of performance indicators. Aspects regarding the spectral analysis, true coincidence summing and matrix effects are also considered.

Silva, L.; Pinhao, N. R. [Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, ITN-Nuclear and Technological Institute, Estrada Nacional N 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10{sup 4} Bq cm{sup -3} at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10{sup 6} Bq cm{sup -3} after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase due to {sup 179}Ta with a half-life of 1.82 yr and thus require prolonged storage for activity cooling. The H*(10) near the patient side of the tungsten block is about 100 {mu}Sv/h and is 27 times higher at the upstream side of the block. This would lead to an accumulated dose for therapists in a year that may exceed occupational maximum permissible dose (50 mSv/yr). The value of H*(10) at the upstream surface of the tungsten block is about 220 times higher than that of the brass. Conclusions: MLC is an efficient way for beam shaping and overall cost reduction device in proton therapy. However, based on this study, tungsten seems to be not an optimal material for MLC in proton beam therapy. Usage of tungsten MLC in clinic may create unnecessary risks associated with the secondary neutrons and induced radioactivity for patients and staff depending on the patient load. A careful selection of material for manufacturing of an optimal MLC for proton therapy is thus desired.

Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States) and Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (Formerly Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Systematic Comparison of Constitutive Promoters and the Doxycycline-Inducible Promoter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constitutive promoters are used routinely to drive ectopic gene expression. Here, we carried out a systematic comparison of eight commonly used constitutive promoters (SV40, CMV, UBC, EF1A, PGK and CAGG for mammalian systems, and COPIA and ACT5C for Drosophila systems). We also included in the comparison the TRE promoter, which can be activated by the rtTA transcriptional activator in a doxycycline-inducible manner. To make our findings representative, we conducted the comparison in a variety of cell types derived from several species. We found that these promoters vary considerably from one another in their strength. Most promoters have fairly consistent strengths across different cell types, but the CMV promoter can vary considerably from cell type to cell type. At maximal induction, the TRE promoter is comparable to a strong constitutive promoter. These results should facilitate more rational choices of promoters in ectopic gene expression studies.

Jane Yuxia Qin; Li Zhang; Kayla L. Clift; Imge Hulur; Andy Peng Xiang; Bing-zhong Ren; Bruce T. Lahn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Software Verification and Validation Plan Activities, 2011, Project Number: N6423, SAPHIRE Version 8  

SciTech Connect

The SV&V Plan experienced changes over the past year to bring it into the operational software life cycle of SAPHIRE 8 and to maintain its sections on design features. Peer review of the SVVP with the former IV&V members identified the need for the operational use of metrics as a tool for quality maintenance and improvement. New tests were added to the SVVP to verify the operation of the new design features incorporated into SAPHIRE 8. Other additions to the SVVP were the addition of software metrics and the PDR and CDR processes. Audit support was provided for the NRC Technical Manager and Project Manager for the NRC OIG Audit performed throughout 2011. The SVVP is considered to be an up to date reference and useful roadmap of verification and validation activities going forward.

Kurt G. Vedros; Curtis L. Smith

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Data:Da454d00-aafa-49e2-bcd9-f662f62c04c6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

54d00-aafa-49e2-bcd9-f662f62c04c6 54d00-aafa-49e2-bcd9-f662f62c04c6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 400 W (OPT 2) Sector: Lighting Description: To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

403

Data:Bb409837-d37e-432e-9c93-999b039543ca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09837-d37e-432e-9c93-999b039543ca 09837-d37e-432e-9c93-999b039543ca No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Minnesota Power Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: OUTDOOR AND AREA LIGHTING SERVICE SV 400 W (OPT 1) Sector: Lighting Description: APPLICATION To all classes of retail customers for outdoor lighting purposes (Rate Codes 76) and to persons other than governmental subdivisions for the purpose of lighting streets, alleys, roads, driveways and parking lots (Rate Code 77) subject to any applicable Riders. Rate Code 76 is not available on a seasonal or temporary basis.

404

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Amount of Midlatitude Continental Cloud Amount of Midlatitude Continental Clouds in Tomsk Region: Preliminary Results T.B. Zhuravleva, T.M. Rasskazchikova, and T.K. Sklyadneva Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS Tomsk, Russia S.V. Smirnov Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems SB RAS Tomsk, Russia The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program provides concentrated measurements of surface radiative budget as well as measurements of the atmospheric constituents including clouds, aerosols, water vapor, etc. at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), the Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. The data obtained allow studying a wide, but not the full range of climatologically relevant possibilities, and thus additional investigations are needed to provide the

405

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

406

EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

Nawrocki, G.

1993-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

Data:6465f946-01b5-4f79-8f57-9c4c627625f9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-01b5-4f79-8f57-9c4c627625f9 6-01b5-4f79-8f57-9c4c627625f9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (100W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing 30 ft. wood Pole- Overheard Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

408

Data:D9319585-65f9-4886-9e46-3ebb1e097f11 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-65f9-4886-9e46-3ebb1e097f11 5-65f9-4886-9e46-3ebb1e097f11 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (150W SV on existing 23 ft. fiberglass Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

409

Data:5ffecf85-d700-42e2-ab1e-dc492248e4fa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ffecf85-d700-42e2-ab1e-dc492248e4fa ffecf85-d700-42e2-ab1e-dc492248e4fa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 Lumen 173 Watt SV 2 Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

410

Data:E27bda84-6cee-482e-86fb-a00251e7034a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bda84-6cee-482e-86fb-a00251e7034a bda84-6cee-482e-86fb-a00251e7034a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (50W SV Directional Flood Lighting on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

411

Data:7fce87ec-ae42-478a-9520-79ecd25245ae | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7ec-ae42-478a-9520-79ecd25245ae 7ec-ae42-478a-9520-79ecd25245ae No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt SV (ptva) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.bge.com/myaccount/billsrates/ratestariffs/electricservice/pages/electric-services-rates-and-tariffs.aspx Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

412

Data:33423275-cf28-4bbe-b259-8bd929ca61aa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cf28-4bbe-b259-8bd929ca61aa cf28-4bbe-b259-8bd929ca61aa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (400W SV on existing 40 ft. metal Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

413

Data:Fb047104-4eff-4d27-847e-e28046903e05 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fb047104-4eff-4d27-847e-e28046903e05 Fb047104-4eff-4d27-847e-e28046903e05 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (150W SV on existing DPUA utility Pole) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

414

Lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 after exposure to fractionated moderate-dose-rate ionizing radiation in the Canadian fluoroscopy cohort study and a comparison with lung cancer mortality in the atomic bomb survivors study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current lung cancer risk estimates after exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation such as X rays are based on studies of people exposed to such radiation at high dose rates, for example the atomic bomb survivors. Radiobiology and animal experiments suggest that risks from exposure at low to moderate dose rates, for example medical diagnostic procedures, may be overestimated by such risk models, but data for humans to examine this issue are limited. In this paper we report on lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 in a cohort of 64,172 Canadian tuberculosis patients, of whom 39% were exposed to highly fractionated multiple chest fluoroscopies leading to a mean lung radiation dose of 1.02 Sv received at moderate dose rates. These data have been used to estimate the excess relative risk per sievert of lung cancer mortality, and this is compared directly to estimates derived from 75,991 atomic bomb survivors. Based on 1,178 lung cancer deaths in the fluoroscopy study, there was no evidence of any positive association between risk and dose, with the relative risk at 1 Sv being 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.94, 1.07), which contrasts with that based on the atomic bomb survivors, 1.60 (1.27, 1.99). The difference in effect between the two studies almost certainly did not arise by chance (P = 0.0001). This study provides strong support from data for humans for a substantial fractionation/dose-rate effect for low-linear energy transfer radiation and lung cancer risk. This implies that lung cancer risk from exposures to such radiation at present-day dose rates is likely to be lower than would be predicted by current radiation risk models based on studies of high-dose-rate exposures. 25 refs., 8 tabs.

Howe, G.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Lack of effects of atomic bomb radiation on genetic instability of tandem-repetitive elements in human germ cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a pilot study to detect the potential effects of atomic bomb radiation on germ-line instability, we screened 64 children from 50 exposed families and 60 from 50 control families for mutations at six minisatellite loci by using Southern blot analysis with Pc-1, {lambda}TM-18, ChdTC-15, p{lambda}g3, {lambda}MS-1, and CEB-1 probes. In the exposed families, one or both parents received a radiation dose >0.01 Sv. Among the 64 children, only one child had parents who were both exposed. Thus, of a total of 128 gametes that produced the 64 children, 65 gametes were derived from exposed parents and 63 were from unexposed parents, the latter being included in a group of 183 unexposed gametes used for calculating mutation rates. The average parental gonadal dose for the 65 gametes was 1.9 Sv. We detected a total of 28 mutations at the p{lambda}g3, {lambda}MS-1, and CEB-1 loci, but no mutations at the Pc-1, {lambda}TM-18, and ChdTC-15 loci. We detected 6 mutations in 390 alleles of the 65 exposed gametes and 22 mutations in 1098 alleles of the 183 gametes from the unexposed parents. The mean mutation rate per locus per gamete in these six minisatellite loci was 1.5% in the exposed parents and 2.0% in the unexposed parents. We observed no significant difference in mutation rates in the children of the exposed and the unexposed parents (P = .37, Fisher`s exact probability test). 38 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiyama, Keiko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Somatic cell mutations at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes of atomic bomb survivors: Implications for radiation carcinogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To clarify the relationship between somatic cell mutations and radiation exposure, the frequency of hemizygous mutant erythrocytes at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus was measured by flow cytometry for 1,226 heterozygous atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in HIroshima and Nagasaki. For statistical analysis, both GPA mutant frequency and radiation dose were log-transformed to normalize skewed distributions of these variables. The GPA mutant frequency increased slightly but significantly with age at testing and with the number of cigarettes smoked. Also, mutant frequency was significantly higher in males than in females even with adjustment for smoking and was higher to Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. These characteristics of background GPA mutant frequency are qualitatively similar to those of background solid cancer incidence or mortality obtained from previous epidemiological studies of survivors. An analysis of the mutant frequency dose response using a descriptive model showed that the doubling dose is about 1.20 Sv [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95-1.56], whereas the minimum dose for detecting a significant increase in mutant frequency is about 0.24 Sv (95% CI: 0.041-0.51). No significant effects of sex, city or age at the time of exposure on the dose response were detected. Interestingly, the doubling dose of the GPA mutant frequency was similar to that of solid cancer incidence in A-bomb survivors. This observation is in line with the hypothesis that radiation-induced somatic cell mutations are the major cause of excess cancer risk after radiation. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Kyoizumi, Seishi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Tanabe, Kazumi; Hirai, Yuko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Umeki, Shigeko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Measurements and Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose Quantities in the Vicinity of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation  

SciTech Connect

As part of the decommissioning of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (MYAPCo) nuclear power plant, the spent nuclear fuel is being temporarily stored in a dry cask storage facility on a portion of the original licensed property. Each of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage casks hold approximately 25 spent fuel assemblies. Additional storage casks for the greater-than-Class C waste (GTCC) are also used. This waste is contained in 64 casks (60 SNF, 4 GTCC), each of which contain a substantial amount of concrete for shielding and structural purposes. The vertical concrete casks (VCCs) are typically separated by a distance of 4 and 6 feet. The storage casks are effective personnel radiation shields for most of the gamma and neutron radiation emitted from the fuel. However measurable gamma and neutron radiation levels are present in the vicinity of the casks. In order to establish a controlled area boundary around the facility such that a member of the public annual dose level of 0.25-mSv could be demonstrated, measurements of gamma and neutron dose equivalents were conducted. External gamma exposure rates were measured with a Pressurized Ion Chamber (PIC). Neutron absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates were measured with a Rossi-type tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Both gamma and neutron measurements were made at increasing distances from the facility as well as at a background location. The results of the measurements show that the distance to the 0.25-mSv per year boundary for 100% occupancy conditions varies from 321 feet to 441 feet from the geometric center of the storage pads, depending on the direction from the pad. For the TEPC neutron measurements, the average quality factor from the facilities was approximately 7.4. This quality factor compares well with the average quality factor of 7.6 that was measured during a calibration performed with a bare Cf-252 source. (authors)

Darois, E.L.; Keefer, D.G.; Plazeski, P.E. [Radiation Safety and Control Services, 91 Portsmouth Avenue, Stratham, NH 03885 (United States); Connell, J. [Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Wiscasset, ME 04568 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters  

SciTech Connect

Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

METHODOLOGY FOR WORKER NEUTRON EXPOSURE EVALUATION IN THE PDCF FACILITY DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project headed by Washington Group International is meant to design the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) to convert the plutonium pits from excessed nuclear weapons into plutonium oxide for ultimate disposition. Battelle staff are performing the shielding calculations that will determine appropriate shielding so that the facility workers will not exceed target exposure levels. The target exposure levels for workers in the facility are 5 mSv y?1 for the whole body and 100 mSv y?1 for the extremity, which presents a significant challenge to the designers of a facility that will process tons of radioactive material. The design effort depended on shielding calculations to determine appropriate thickness and composition for glove box walls, and concrete wall thicknesses for storage vaults. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff used ORIGEN-S and SOURCES to generate gamma and neutron source terms, and Monte Carlo (computer code for) neutron photon (transport) (MCNP-4C) to calculate the radiation transport in the facility. The shielding calculations were performed by a team of four scientists, so it was necessary to develop a consistent methodology. There was also a requirement for the study to be cost-effective, so efficient methods of evaluation were required. The calculations were subject to rigorous scrutiny by internal and external reviewers, so acceptability was a major feature of the methodology. Some of the issues addressed in the development of the methodology included selecting appropriate dose factors, developing a method for handling extremity doses, adopting an efficient method for evaluating effective dose equivalent in a non-uniform radiation field, modeling the reinforcing steel in concrete, and modularizing the geometry descriptions for efficiency. The relative importance of the neutron dose equivalent compared with the gamma dose equivalent varied substantially depending on the specific shielding conditions and lessons were learned from this effect. This paper addresses these issues and the resulting methodology.

Scherpelz, Robert I.; Traub, Richard J.; Pryor, Kathryn H.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uy uruguay sv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Density Functional for Nuclei and Neutron Stars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Recent observational data on neutron star masses and radii provide stringent constraints on the equation of state of neutron rich matter [ Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 62 485 (2012)]. Purpose: We aim to develop a nuclear energy density functional that can be simultaneously applied to finite nuclei and neutron stars. Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory (DFT) with Skyrme energy density functionals and covariance analysis to assess correlations between observables for finite nuclei and neutron stars. In a first step two energy functionals a high density energy functional giving reasonable neutron properties, and a low density functional fitted to nuclear properties are matched. In a second step, we optimize a new functional using exactly the same protocol as in earlier studies pertaining to nuclei but now including neutron star data. This allows direct comparisons of performance of the new functional relative to the standard one. Results: The new functional TOV-min yields results for nuclear bulk properties (energy, rms radius, diffraction radius, and surface thickness) that are of the same quality as those obtained with the established Skyrme functionals, including SV-min. When comparing SV-min and TOV-min, isoscalar nuclear matter indicators vary slightly while isovector properties are changed considerably. We discuss neutron skins, dipole polarizability, separation energies of the heaviest elements, and proton and neutron drip lines. We confirm a correlation between the neutron skin of 208Pb and the neutron star radius. Conclusions: We demonstrate that standard energy density functionals optimized to nuclear data do not carry information on the expected maximum neutron star mass, and that predictions can only be made within an extremely broad uncertainty band. For atomic nuclei, the new functional TOV-min performs at least as well as the standard nuclear functionals, but it also reproduces expected neutron star data within assumed error bands. This functional is expected to yield more reliable predictions in the region of very neutron rich heavy nuclei.

Erler, J. [UTK/ORNL/German Cancer Research Center-Heidelberg; Horowitz, C. J. [UTK/ORNL/Indiana University; Nazarewicz, Witold [UTK/ORNL/University of Warsaw; Rafalski, M. [UTK/ORNL; Reinhard, P.-G. [Universitat Erlangen, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

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423

The impacts of improving Brazil's transportation infrastructure on the world soybean market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of adequate transportation infrastructure in Brazil has been a bottleneck for the soybean producers for many years. Moreover, the costly inland transportation incurred from this bottleneck has resulted in a loss in competitiveness for Brazil compared to other exporting countries, especially the United States. If transportation costs are reduced by introducing improved infrastructure, Brazil is expected to increase its competitiveness in the world soybean market by increasing its exports and producer revenues. On the other hand, the United States and other significant soybean competing exporting countries are expected to lose market share as well as producer revenues. This study uses a spatial equilibrium model to analyze transportation infrastructure improvements proposed by the Brazilian government vis--vis enhance the nations soybean transportation network. The analyzed transportation improvements are: (i) the development of the Tapajs-Teles Pires waterway; (ii) the completion of the BR- 163 highway; (iii) the construction of the Mortes-Araguaia waterway; (iv) the Ferronorte railroad expansion to Rondonpolis and the linkage between the city of Rio Verde to Uberlndia; and (v) the Ferropar railroad expansion to the city of Dourados. The model specifies the Brazilian inland transportation network and the international ocean shipments. The model divides Brazil into 18 excess supply regions and 8 excess demand regions. The competing exporting countries are the United States, Argentina, Rest of South America (Bolivia, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Canada, and India. The importing countries are composed of China, European Union, Southeast Asia, Mexico, and the Rest of the World. Results suggest these proposed transportation improvements yield potential noteworthy gains to Brazil with producer revenues increasing more than $500 million and exports increasing by 177 thousand metric tons. Consequently, the world soybean price declines by $1.16 per metric ton and producer revenues and exports in the United States fall by 63 thousand metric tons and $104.89 million, respectively. Although the absolute gains in price, revenues, and exports for Brazil are considerable, they only represent in relative changes 1.48, 2.35, and 0.32 percent, respectively. Similarly, the loss in price, revenue, and export value for the United States is also low, declining by 0.23, 0.23, and 0.12 percent, respectively.

Costa, Rafael de Farias

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The impacts of improving Brazil's transportation infrastructure on the world soybean market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of adequate transportation infrastructure in Brazil has been a bottleneck for the soybean producers for many years. Moreover, the costly inland transportation incurred from this bottleneck has resulted in a loss in competitiveness for Brazil compared to other exporting countries, especially the United States. If transportation costs are reduced by introducing improved infrastructure, Brazil is expected to increase its competitiveness in the world soybean market by increasing its exports and producer revenues. On the other hand, the United States and other significant soybean competing exporting countries are expected to lose market share as well as producer revenues. This study uses a spatial equilibrium model to analyze transportation infrastructure improvements proposed by the Brazilian government vis-a?-vis enhance the nation's soybean transportation network. The analyzed transportation improvements are: (i) the development of the Tapajo?s-Teles Pires waterway; (ii) the completion of the BR- 163 highway; (iii) the construction of the Mortes-Araguaia waterway; (iv) the Ferronorte railroad expansion to Rondono?polis and the linkage between the city of Rio Verde to Uberla?ndia; and (v) the Ferropar railroad expansion to the city of Dourados. The model specifies the Brazilian inland transportation network and the international ocean shipments. The model divides Brazil into 18 excess supply regions and 8 excess demand regions. The competing exporting countries are the United States, Argentina, Rest of South America (Bolivia, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Canada, and India. The importing countries are composed of China, European Union, Southeast Asia, Mexico, and the Rest of the World. Results suggest these proposed transportation improvements yield potential noteworthy gains to Brazil with producer revenues increasing more than $500 million and exports increasing by 177 thousand metric tons. Consequently, the world soybean price declines by $1.16 per metric ton and producer revenues and exports in the United States fall by 63 thousand metric tons and $104.89 million, respectively. Although the absolute gains in price, revenues, and exports for Brazil are considerable, they only represent in relative changes 1.48, 2.35, and 0.32 percent, respectively. Similarly, the loss in price, revenue, and export value for the United States is also low, declining by 0.23, 0.23, and 0.12 percent, respectively.

Costa, Rafael de Farias

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Decommissioning of the Austrian 10 MW Research Reactor, Results and Lessons learned Paper  

SciTech Connect

After the decision to shut down the 10 MW ASTRA-MTR Research Reactor was reached in May 1998, the possible options and required phases for decommissioning and removal of the radioactive components were evaluated in a decommissioning study. To support the decisions at each phase, an estimate of the activity inventory in the various parts of the reactor and the waste volume to be expected was performed. Of the possible options an immediate dismantling to phase 1 of IAEA Technical Guide Lines after the immediately following, continued dismantling to phase 2 of these guide lines was identified as the most reasonable and under the auspices optimum choice. The actual decommissioning work on the ASTRA-Reactor began in January 2000 after its final shutdown on July 31, 1999. Preliminary evaluations of the activity inventory gave an estimated amount of 320 kg of intermediate level waste, of about 60 metric tons of contaminated and another 100 metric tons of activated low level radioactive waste. The activities were roughly estimated to be at 200 TBq in the intermediate level and 6 GBq in the low level. The structure of the decommissioning process was decided against cost-, time- and risk-optimization following the basic layout of the main tasks, e.g. the removing of the fuel, the recovering and the treatment of the intermediate level activities in the vicinity of the core, the handling and conditioning of the neutron exposed graphite and the Beryllium-elements. As an example, the dismantling of approx. 1400 metric tons of the biological shield is described in more detail from the determination of the dismantling technique to the clearing procedures and the deposition. The process of dismantling of the biological shield is presented in fast motion. The dismantling of the pump-room installations of the primary loop, the processing of the contaminated or activated metals, the dismantling of the ventilation system and the radiological clearance of the reactor building was done under optimized conditions and is explained in the following. Spent fuel was generally delivered to the US Department of Energy - DOE in several shipments over the operational time of the ASTRA reactor. With the last shipment in May 2001 all the remaining spent fuel elements out of the ASTRA reactor consignment were transferred to DOE. To reduce waste from concrete shielding, German regulations Dt.StrSchV, annex IV, table 1, two clearance values referring to 'clearance restricted for permanent deposit' and to a clearance for unrestricted re-use were used. In order to reduce the amount of an estimated 60 tons of slightly contaminated metals, it was determined that introducing re-melting procedures were the most economical way. To obtain radiological clearance of the reactor building, compliance with the release limits according to Austrian Radiation Protection Ordinance had to be proved to the regulatory body. There, in general, the limits for unrestricted release were defined as a maximum dose rate of 10 {mu}Sv effective for an individual person per year. The results of the regular yearly medical examinations of the staff indicated no influence of the work related to decommissioning. The readings of the personal dosimeters over the entire project amounted to a total of 85.6 mSv, averaging to 1.07 mSv per year and person. After finishing the decommissioning process, the material balance showed 89.6 % for unrestricted reuse, 6.6 % for conventional mass-dumping and 3.8 % of ILW and LLW. The project was covered by an extensive documentation. All operations within NES followed ISO 9000 quality insurance standards. Experiences and knowledge were presented to and shared with the community, e.g. AFR and IAEA throughout the project. (authors)

Hillebrand, G.; Meyer, F. [Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES), Seibersdorf, Austria, Europe (Austria)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Measurement of the neutron leakage from a dedicated intraoperative radiation therapy electron linear accelerator and a conventional linear accelerator for 9, 12, 15(16), and 18(20) MeV electron energies  

SciTech Connect

The issue of neutron leakage has recently been raised in connection with dedicated electron-only linear accelerators used for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In particular, concern has been expressed about the degree of neutron production at energies of 10 MeV and higher due to the need for additional, perhaps permanent, shielding in the room in which the device is operated. In particular, three mobile linear accelerators available commercially offer electron energies at or above the neutron threshold, one at 9 MeV, one at 10 MeV, and the third at 12 MeV. To investigate this problem, neutron leakage has been measured around the head of two types of electron accelerators at a distance of 1 m from the target at azimuthal angles of 0 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 135 deg., and 180 deg. The first is a dedicated electron-only (nonmobile) machine with electron energies of 6 (not used here), 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV and the second a conventional machine with electron energies of 6 (also not used here), 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV. Measurements were made using neutron bubble detectors and track-etch detectors. For electron beams from a conventional accelerator, the neutron leakage in the forward direction in Sv/Gy is 2.1x10{sup -5} at 12 MeV, 1.3x10{sup -4} at 16 MeV, and 4.2x10{sup -4} at 20 MeV, assuming a quality factor (RBE) of 10. For azimuthal angles >0 deg., the leakage is almost angle independent [2x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; (0.7-1.6)x10{sup -5} at 16 MeV, and (1.6-2.9)x10{sup -5} at 20 MeV]. For the electron-only machine, the neutron leakage was lower than for the conventional linac, but also independent of azimuthal angle for angles >0 deg. : ([0 deg. : 7.7x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; 3.0x10{sup -5} at 15 MeV; 1.0x10{sup -4} at 18 MeV]; [other angles: (2.6-5.9)x10{sup -7} at 12 MeV; (1.4-2.2)x10{sup -6} at 15 MeV; (2.7-4.7)x10{sup -6} at 18 MeV]). Using the upper limit of 6x10{sup -7} Sv/Gy at 12 MeV for the IORT machine for azimuthal angles >0 deg. and assuming a workload of 200 Gy/wk and an inverse square factor of 10, the neutron dose equivalent is calculated to be 0.012 mSv/wk. For the primary beam at 12 MeV (0 deg. ), the 10x higher dose would be compensated by the attenuation of a primary beam stopper in a mobile linear accelerator. These neutron radiation levels are below regulatory values (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 'Limitation of exposure to ionizing radiation', NCRP Report No. 116, NCRP Bethesda, MD, 1993)

Jaradat, Adnan K.; Biggs, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

MODEL IMPLEMENTATION TO EVALUATE THE COLLECTIVE FUTURE RADIONUCLIDE RELEASES FROM MULTIPLE FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive Composite Analysis (CA) has been performed considering 152 sources of residual radioactive material at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As part of the CA a model was developed to perform deterministic base case calculations using the commercial GoldSim software. The model treated transport and decay of radionuclides as they are released at the source location and transported through the source region, vadose zone and aquifer to stream outcrops and from there to the Savannah River. A dose to the public was calculated assuming recreational use of stream water and residential use of river water. The specific results from the GoldSim modeling evaluation conducted as part of the CA indicate that the collective maximum dose resulting from the release of radionuclides from all 152 anticipated SRS End State sources of residual radionuclides demonstrate that maximum exposures expected to occur to any offsite MOP will not approach the 300 uSv/yr (30 mrem/yr) dose constraint, and in fact are currently estimated to be only 10% of this. For each of the POA's evaluated, the highest cumulative dose is realized at the Lower Three Runs POA and is calculated to be 29.7 uSv/yr (2.97 mrem/yr). The major dose contributing radionuclide for all of the POA's, with the exception of Upper Three Runs, was {sup 137}Cs in the contaminated streambed sediments. In Upper Three Runs {sup 237}Np from the H-Area Canyon Building was the major dose contributing radionuclide. The major exposure pathway for the SRS streams (where the Recreational Scenario was evaluated) was by the ingestion of fish. In the Savannah River, where the Residential Scenario was evaluated, ingestion of vegetation was the dominant exposure pathway. The uncertainty evaluation lends added assurance to the conclusion that the 30 mrem/yr dose constraint will not be exceeded, in that even at the 95th Percentile, this performance measure is not expected to be exceeded. It must also be added that these conclusions should be regarded as 'preliminary' since the DOE review process of the SRS CA has not yet been completed.

Hiergesell, R.; Smith, F.; Hamm, L.; Phifer, M.; Swingle, R.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Remediation of chromium(VI) in the vadose zone: stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by sulfur dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immobilization and detoxification of chromium in the vadose zone is made possible by the existence of an effective reductant, SO2, that exists in a gaseous form at room temperature. Experimental studies were designed to characterize stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium reduction both in aqueous solutions at pH values near neutrality and in soil. First, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in water. The stoichiometric ratio of S(IV) removed to Cr(VI) removed ranged between 1.6 and 1.8. The overall reaction is believed to be the result of a linear combination of two reactions in which dithionate is an intermediate and sulfate is the stable oxidized product. The reaction was also rapid, with the half-time of about 45 minutes at pH 6 and about 16 hours at pH 7. A two-step kinetic model was developed to describe changes in concentrations of Cr(VI), S(IV), and S(V). Nonlinear regression was applied to obtain the kinetic parameters. The rate of reaction was assumed to be second-order with respect to [Cr(VI)] and first-order with respect to [S(IV)], and [S(V)]. The values for the rate coefficient for the first reaction (k1) were found to be 4.5 (?10%), 0.25 (?9.4%) (mM-2h-1) at pH 6 and 7, respectively. The values of the rate coefficient for the second reaction (k2) were 25 (?29%), 1.1 (? 30%) (mM-2h-1) at pH 6 and 7, respectively. The reaction rate decreased as pH increased. Experiments showed that the rate at pH 7 was lower than that at pH 6 by one order of magnitude. Second, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in soil. The stoichiometric ratio of S(IV) removed to Cr(VI) removed was almost 2, which is slightly higher than that for the reaction in water. This higher value may be due to S(IV) oxidation by soil-derived Fe(III). The reaction was rapid, with the half-time less than 2 minutes, which is faster than in water. The rate coefficients, k1 and k2, were 22 (?41%) and 13 (?77%) (M-2h-1), respectively.

Ahn, Min

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Radiological Monitoring of Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scheduled waste in West Malaysia is handled by Concession Company and is stored and then is incinerated. It is known that incineration process may result in naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) to be concentrated. In this study we have measured three samples consist of by-product from the operation process such as slag, filter cake and fly ash. Other various environmental media such as air, surface water, groundwater and soil within and around the plant have also been analysed for their radioactivity levels. The concentration of Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 in slag are 0.062 Bq/g, 0.016 Bq/g and 0.19 Bq/g respectively. The total activity (Ra{sub eq}) in slag is 99.5 Bq/kg. The concentration in fly ash is 0.032 Bq/g, 0.16 Bq/g and 0.34 Bq/g for Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 respectively resulting in Raeq of 287.0 Bq/kg. For filter cake, the concentration is 0.13 Bq/g, 0.031 Bq/g and 0.33 Bq/g for Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 respectively resulting in Raeq of 199.7 Bq/kg. The external radiation level ranges from 0.08 {mu}Sv/h (Administrative building) to 0.35 {mu}Sv/h (TENORM storage area). The concentration level of radon and thoron progeny varies from 0.0001 to 0.0016 WL and 0.0006 WL to 0.002 WL respectively. For soil samples, the activity ranges from 0.11 Bq/g to 0.29 Bq/g, 0.06 Bq/g to 0.18 Bq/g and 0.065 Bq/g to 0.38 Bq/g for Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40 respectively. While activity in water, except for a trace of K-40, it is non-detectable.

Amin, Y. M. [Physics Dept, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nik, H. W. [Asialab (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd, 14 Jalan Industri USJ 1, 47600 Subang Jaya (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Flow pattern in the Ombai Strait, Indonesia, and its relationship with the Indonesian throughflow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indonesian throughflow has recently been observed in various locations surrounding the Indonesian Seas, including the Ombai Strait, one of the major southern passages. Several oceanographic data sets are available for this strait, including hydrographic (CTD) observations, measurements from a one-year deployment of a current meter mooring, and a two-year sea level measurement from two pressure gauges, one at each end of the strait. North Pacific Intermediate Water and South Pacific Subtropical Water enter the Wetar Strait at its east end, flowing westward through the Ombai Strait toward the Indian Ocean. Some relatively fresh water enters the north Ombai Strait from the Savu Sea to the west. Water from the Flores Sea does not enter the Ombai or Wetar straits through the passage between Alor and Wetar islands. Based on current meter records from December 1995 to early November 1996, the main current direction in the Ombai Strait is westward toward the Indian Ocean, with a mean volume transport estimate of 9.1 Sv over the full depth range 0-1300 m. The along-passage vertical structures of mean current and first EOF modes of time variable currents are highly intensified in the upper 200 m. The low frequency variability of current from direct current measurement in the upper 100 m is significantly correlated with cross-passage sea level difference. In addition, the local forcing of zonal wind stress relates to about 7% of the low frequency current variability in the Ombai Strait. Regression analysis was performed to "calibrate" the cross-passage sea level difference to the contemporaneous direct current measurement. Then, based on geostrophic theory, a "calibrated" two-year cross-passage sea level was used to estimate the Ombai Strait throughflow in the upper 100 m to be 2.6 1.1 Sv in 1996 and 1.9 0.9 in 1997. Tidal currents are dominated by the semidiurnal components M2 and S2. However, the energy of components N2, K2, M4, MS4, Mm and Mf is, in each case, more than 2% of the energy of M2, and that of diurnal components K1 and O1 is approximately 1.6% of the M2 energy.

Pandoe, Wahyu Widodo

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

SITE SPECIFIC REFERENCE PERSON PARAMETERS AND DERIVED CONCENTRATION STANDARDS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is twofold. The first is to develop a set of behavioral parameters for a reference person specific for the Savannah River Site (SRS) such that the parameters can be used to determine dose to members of the public in compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. A reference person is a hypothetical, gender and age aggregation of human physical and physiological characteristics arrived at by international consensus for the purpose of standardizing radiation dose calculations. DOE O 458.1 states that compliance with the annual dose limit of 100 mrem (1 mSv) to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, for dose compliance, SRS has used the MEI concept, which uses adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. Beginning with the 2012 annual site environmental report, SRS will be using the representative person concept for dose compliance. The dose to a representative person will be based on 1) the SRS-specific reference person usage parameters at the 95th percentile of appropriate national or regional data, which are documented in this report, 2) the reference person (gender and age averaged) ingestion and inhalation dose coefficients provided in DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard (DOE-STD-1196-2011), and 3) the external dose coefficients provided in the DC_PAK3 toolbox. The second purpose of this report is to develop SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for all applicable food ingestion pathways, ground shine, and water submersion. The DCS is the concentration of a particular radionuclide in water, in air, or on the ground that results in a member of the public receiving 100 mrem (1 mSv) effective dose following continuous exposure for one year. In DOE-STD-1196-2011, DCSs were developed for the ingestion of water, inhalation of air and submersion in air pathways, only. These DCSs are required by DOE O 458.1 to be used at all DOE sites in the design and conduct of radiological environmental protection programs. In this report, DCSs for the following additional pathways were considered and documented: ingestion of meat, dairy, grains, produce (fruits and vegetables), seafood, submersion in water and ground shine. These additional DCSs were developed using the same methods as in DOE-STD-1196-2011 and will be used at SRS, where appropriate, as screening and reference values.

Jannik, T.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual, requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The conclusions of the optimization are found to be insensitive to all input parameters, the monetary value of the health detriment over a range of values from $200,000 to $15,000,000 per person-Sv, and the period of integration of collective dose. A 2.5 m (8.2 ft) closure cover at the Area 5 RWMS can meet all applicable regulatory requirements and maintain radionuclide releases ALARA.

Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability zone.

Bureau of Economic Geology

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milli-Sievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191. (authors)

Shott, G.J.; Yucel, V.; Desotell, L. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Pyles, G.; Carilli, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans  

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Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Douglas Boreham McMaster University Abstract This research is focused on assessing the radiation risk associated with positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It has been suggested that low dose medical imaging, such as PET scans, carry an added biological risk because they expose the patient to ionizing radiation. PET scanning is an increasingly used nuclear medicine procedure that requires the administration of isotope 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG, E=250 keV β and 511 keV γ) and results in an effective dose to the patient ranging from 7-22 mSv. The radiation induced DNA damage associated with a PET scan was studied in 7-9 week old female wild type Trp53 +/+ mice. Mice were given a PET scan with 18F-FDG and the biological response was assessed in bone marrow using

437

Data:065c3c8b-b609-4761-85b0-cd36772feb03 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b609-4761-85b0-cd36772feb03 b609-4761-85b0-cd36772feb03 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Indiana Inc Effective date: 2009/09/14 End date if known: Rate name: OL - 100 watt SV Sector: Lighting Description: Availability This rate schedule is no longer available after September 1, 2004. Potential lighting customers wanting a lighting system installed and maintained by Company can do so via the Outdoor Lighting Equipment agreement (OLE). Potential customers should contact a Company account representative for further information concerning OLE options. This rate schedule terminates May 1, 2014. Customers currently being provided service under this rate schedule can continue being provided service under this rate schedule until their contract expires or this rate schedule terminates, whichever occurs first.

438

Data:3e229ce1-bd61-4a63-8987-c707c3a4d4cd | Open Energy Information  

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9ce1-bd61-4a63-8987-c707c3a4d4cd 9ce1-bd61-4a63-8987-c707c3a4d4cd No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Duncan, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting- (100W SV on existing 23 ft. fiberglass Pole- Underground Wiring) Sector: Lighting Description: This rate schedule is available on an annual basis to any customer for illumination of outdoor areas. Source or reference: ISU Documentation Rate Binder Ted #9 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh):

439

Data:74761ae9-7e27-40ef-9ded-d0c35c651d78 | Open Energy Information  

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7e27-40ef-9ded-d0c35c651d78 7e27-40ef-9ded-d0c35c651d78 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Duke Energy Ohio Inc Effective date: 2013/05/06 End date if known: Rate name: Rate OL - Outdoor Lighting Service - SV 200 Watts - Flood Sector: Lighting Description: Applicable for outdoor lighting services on private property with Company owned fixtures in the Company's entire service area where secondary distribution lines are adjacent to the premises to be served. Not applicable for lighting public roadways which are dedicated, or anticipated to be dedicated, except to meet the occasional singular need of a customer who has obtained written approval from the proper governmental authority.

440

Data:3da978f9-b25f-40a0-9666-6d9a4ab752c9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78f9-b25f-40a0-9666-6d9a4ab752c9 78f9-b25f-40a0-9666-6d9a4ab752c9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin Effective date: 2012/01/1 End date if known: Rate name: CUSTOMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING GII 70 W SV Sector: Lighting Description: Availability: Available for year-round illumination of public streets, parkways, and highways by electric lamps mounted on standards where the customer owns and maintains an Ornamental Street Lighting system complete with standards, luminaires with refractors, lamps and other appurtenances, together with all necessary cables extending between standards and to points of connection to Company's facilities as designated by Company. Mercury Vapor street lighting service under this schedule is limited to the luminaires being served as of December 31, 1987. Energy Cost Adjustment: Bills subject to the adjustment provided for in Energy Cost Adjustment See Schedule X-1, Sheet No. E 63. GROUPS I & II Daily Operating Schedule: The daily operating schedule of the above lamps shall be from approximately one-half hour after sunset until one-half hour before sunrise.

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441

Data:Cba9814a-cbdb-48d9-9d50-2336c951b5c5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cba9814a-cbdb-48d9-9d50-2336c951b5c5 Cba9814a-cbdb-48d9-9d50-2336c951b5c5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co Effective date: 2013/02/23 End date if known: Rate name: 16000 lumen 173 watt SV (ptac) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or refer