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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Metal-organic frameworks for Xe/Kr separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are provided and are selectively adsorbent to xenon (Xe) over another noble gas such as krypton (Kr) and/or argon (Ar) as a result of having framework voids (pores) sized to this end. MOF materials having pores that are capable of accommodating a Xe atom but have a small enough pore size to receive no more than one Xe atom are desired to preferentially adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component (Xe--Kr mixture) adsorption method. The MOF material has 20% or more, preferably 40% or more, of the total pore volume in a pore size range of 0.45-0.75 nm which can selectively adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component Xe--Kr mixture over a pressure range of 0.01 to 1.0 MPa.

Ryan, Patrick J.; Farha, Omar K.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

2

Metal-organic frameworks for Xe/Kr separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are provided and are selectively adsorbent to xenon (Xe) over another noble gas such as krypton (Kr) and/or argon (Ar) as a result of having framework voids (pores) sized to this end. MOF materials having pores that are capable of accommodating a Xe atom but have a small enough pore size to receive no more than one Xe atom are desired to preferentially adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component (Xe--Kr mixture) adsorption method. The MOF material has 20% or more, preferably 40% or more, of the total pore volume in a pore size range of 0.45-0.75 nm which can selectively adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component Xe--Kr mixture over a pressure range of 0.01 to 1.0 MPa.

Ryan, Patrick J.; Farha, Omar K.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN OF A MULTI-COLUMN EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR KR/XE SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a precursor to FY-15 Kr/Xe separation testing, design modifications to an existing experimental setup are warranted. The modifications would allow for multi-column testing to facilitate a Xe separation followed by a Kr separation using engineered form sorbents prepared using an INL patented process. A new cooling apparatus capable of achieving test temperatures to -40° C and able to house a newly designed Xe column was acquired. Modifications to the existing setup are being installed to allow for multi-column testing and gas constituent analyses using evacuated sample bombs. The new modifications will allow for independent temperature control for each column enabling a plethora of test conditions to be implemented. Sample analyses will be used to evaluate the Xe/Kr selectivity of the AgZ-PAN sorbent and determine the Kr purity of the effluent stream following Kr capture using the HZ-PAN sorbent.

Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Tony Watson

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Abundances of s-process elements in planetary nebulae: Br, Kr & Xe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We identify emission lines of post-iron peak elements in very high signal-to-noise spectra of a sample of planetary nebulae. Analysis of lines from ions of Kr and Xe reveals enhancements in most of the PNe, in agreement with the theories of s-process in AGB star. Surprisingly, we did not detect lines from Br even though s-process calculations indicate that it should be produced with Kr at detectable levels.

Y. Zhang; R. Williams; E. Pellegrini; K. Cavagnolo; J. A. Baldwin; B. Sharpee; M. Phillips; X. -W. Liu

2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

Initial proof-of-principle for near room temperature Xe and Kr separation from air with MOFs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials were developed and tested in support of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle Technology Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal of Xenon and krypton from gaseous products of nuclear fuel reprocessing unit operations. During FY 2012, Three Metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated in greater detail for the removal and storage of Xe and Kr from air at room temperature. Our breakthrough measurements on Nickel based MOF could capture and separate parts per million levels of Xe from Air (40 ppm Kr, 78% N2, 21% O2, 0.9% Ar, 0.03% CO2). Similarly, the selectivity can be changed from Xe > Kr to Xe < Kr simply by changing the temperature in another MOF. Also for the first time we estimated the cost of the metal organic frameworks in bulk.

Thallapally, Praveen K.; Strachan, Denis M.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

First-principles study of the stability and migration of Kr, I and Xe in ZrO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stability and migration of Kr, I and Xe in bulk ZrO2 and on the ZrO2 (1 1 1) surface have been studied by standard density functional theory (DFT) and the DFT-D2 method that corrects for the van der Waals interaction. Both methods show that Kr and Xe prefer to incorporate in the bulk phase rather than adsorb on the surface, and Xe is very mobile in the bulk state. For Kr and Xe adsorption on the surface, van der Waals interaction dominates, causing the weak interaction between the adsorbate and substrate. Iodine is found to have comparable stability in both phases and forms I O bonds with strong covalency. It exhibits higher mobility on the surface than in the bulk ZrO2, and diffusion from bulk-like state to surface state is an exothermic process. The fission product behavior in ZrO2 is shown to be a complicated synergetic effect of fission product atomic size, electron negativity, occupation site and phase structure of the host.

Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Kr II and Xe II axial velocity distribution functions in a cross-field ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser induced fluorescence measurements were carried out in a cross-field ion source to examine the behaviour of the axial ion velocity distribution functions (VDFs) in the expanding plasma. In the present paper, we focus on the axial VDFs of Kr II and Xe II ions. We examine the contourplots in a 1D-phase space (x,v{sub x}) representation in front of the exhaust channel and along the centerline of the ion source. The main ion beam, whose momentum corresponds to the ions that are accelerated through the whole potential drop, is observed. A secondary structure reveals the ions coming from the opposite side of the channel. We show that the formation of the neutralized ion flow is governed by the annular geometry. The assumption of a collisionless shock or a double layer due to supersonic beam interaction is not necessary. A non-negligible fraction of slow ions originates in local ionization or charge-exchange collision events between ions of the expanding plasma and atoms of the background residual gas. Slow ions that are produced near the centerline in the vicinity of the exit plane are accelerated toward the source body with a negative velocity leading to a high sputtering of front face. On the contrary, the ions that are produced in the vicinity of the channel exit plane are partially accelerated by the extended electric field.

Lejeune, A.; Bourgeois, G.; Mazouffre, S. [ICARE, CNRS, 1C Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orlans Cedex 2 (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - ar kr xe Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. The mechanism... report an experiment designed to study the trapping of Xe by sublimation - condensation process... of anthracite. This ex- periment allowed us to probe...

9

High-resolution total-cross-section measurements for electron scattering from Ar, Kr, and Xe employing a threshold-photoelectron source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from Ar and Xe at electron energies ranging from 7 meV to 20 eV were obtained with the experimental technique employing the threshold-photoelectron source. The measured total cross sections are in good agreement with those obtained by other groups down to 100 meV, above which several experimental works have been reported. Scattering lengths for electron scattering from Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined from the present total cross sections and our recent results for Kr using the modified effective range theory. The values of the scattering length obtained in the present analysis differ from the values determined from the previous swarm experiments and beam experiments. The resonant structures in the total cross sections due to Feshbach resonances of Ar, Kr, and Xe with an improved energy resolution were also measured. Analyses of the resonant structure were carried out based on the spin-dependent resonant scattering theory in order to determine the values of the natural width of Feshbach resonances of Ar, Kr, and Xe precisely.

Kurokawa, M.; Kitajima, M.; Toyoshima, K.; Kishino, T.; Odagiri, T. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Ito, K. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Intel® Advisor XE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advisor XE 2013 Threading Assistant Copyright 2012, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved. *Other brands and names are the property of their respective owners. Simplify and...

11

Masses of Kr-77 and Kr-75  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the other Kr iso- topes, we must conclude that the N =39 configuration is not especially favored and that Rb must represent an unusual case. It is now recognized ' that Rb is one Qf the most deformed nuclei known. If one considers the mass predictions...

Moltz, D. M.; Betker, A. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Burch, R. H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Toth, K. S.; Avignone, F. T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cray XE6 Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.Winter (Part 2) |IO COE Performance ofXE6Cray

13

Evolution of deformation in the neutron-rich krypton isotopes: The {sup 96}Kr nucleus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy of the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 96}Kr was measured as 241 keV. The nucleus was produced in the fission of {sup 238}U induced by a 954-MeV {sup 136}Xe beam and prompt {gamma} rays were observed using the clover array CLARA in coincidence with fission products identified with the PRISMA spectrometer. The evolution of the quadrupole collectivity in the Kr isotopes with N{>=}50 is discussed by comparison with that from the Rb to Mo isotones and with predictions of various theoretical calculations.

Marginean, N.; Mihai, C.; Filipescu, D.; Ghita, D.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.; Marginean, R.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Zamfir, N. V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Bucurescu, D. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Academy of Romanian Scientists, 54 Splaiul Independentei, R-050094 Bucharest (Romania); Ur, C. A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Guiot, B.; Mengoni, D.; Napoli, D. R.; Recchia, F.; Stefanini, A. M.; Silvestri, R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy)] (and others)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Intel® Advisor XE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land SurfaceVirus-InfectedIntelligent Coatings forIntel® Advisor XE

15

First-principles study of the stability and migration of Kr, I and Xe in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirmFirsthexagonal 2H-MoS2. |the nobleZrO2.

16

Alamouti {yjdong, sky6174}@ccl.snu.ac.kr, jsno@snu.ac.kr, djshin@hanyang.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@snu.ac.kr, djshin@hanyang.ac.kr (soft-decision-and-forward: SDF) . SDF . Alamouti , . (amplify-and-forward: AF) . , SDF AF . 1. . (source: S-decision-and-forward: SDF) . SDF R S phase, phase 1 phase 2 . Phase 1, S R D , phase 2 R D . , S D

No, Jong-Seon

17

Translational energy dependence of reaction mechanism: Xe++CH4?XeH++CH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of the exoergic ion–molecule reaction Xe+(CH4,CH3)XeH+ were studied by chemical accelerator techniques over the relative translational energy range 0.2 to 8 eV. Results of the kinematicmeasurements are reported as scattering intensity...

Miller, G. D.; Strattan, L. W.; Cole, C. L.; Hierl, Peter M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

EP-MAC e-mail : jyoak@snu.ac.kr, sbahk@snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EP-MAC *, e-mail : jyoak@snu.ac.kr, sbahk@snu.ac.kr Early Preamble MAC to reduce-cycled wireless sensor motes. In this paper we propose Early Preamble-MAC(EP-MAC) which enables to get enhanced performance of low energy and low latency. EP-MAC uses both early preamble and original simple preamble, so

Bahk, Saewoong

19

High energy XeBr electric discharge laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Bubble formation and Kr distribution in Kr-irradiated UO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy observation of small Kr bubbles in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO2 were conducted to understand the inert gas bubble behavior in oxide nuclear fuel. The bubble size and volume swelling are shown as a weak function of ion dose but strongly depend on the temperature. The Kr bubble formation at room temperature was observed for the first time. The depth profiles of implanted Kr determined by atom probe tomography are in good agreement with the calculated profiles by SRIM, but the measured concentration of Kr is about 1/3 of calculated one. This difference is mainly due to low solubility of Kr in UO2 matrix, which has been confirmed by both density-functional theory calculations and chemical equilibrium analysis.

L.F. He; B. Valderrama; A.-R. Hassan; J. Yu; M. Gupta; J. Pakarinen; H.B. Henderson; J. Gan; M.A. Kirk; A.T. Nelson; M.V. Manuel; A. El-Azab; T.R. Allen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Comparative analysis of spectra of the background of the proportional counter filled with Kr, enriched in Kr-78, and with Kr of natural content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of the experiment searching for 2K-capture with large low-background proportional counter are presented. The comparison of spectra of the background of the proportional counter filled with Kr enriched in $^{78}$Kr (8400 hr) and with natural Kr (3039 hr) is given. A new limit on the half-life of $^{78}$Kr with regard to 2K-capture, T$_{1/2}\\geq2.0\\cdot10^{21}$ yrs (95% C.L.) has been obtained.

Yu. M. Gavriljuk; V. N. Gavrin; A. M. Gangapshev; V. V. Kazalov; V. V. Kuzminov; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

22

Enhanced high-order harmonic generation from Xe, Kr, and Ar in a capillary discharge B. A. Reagan,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.17Up, where Ip is the ionization potential of the target atom and Up is the ponderomotive energy in poor phase-matching and conversion efficiency. Finally, the loss of the laser energy due, Delaware 19716, USA Received 26 February 2007; published 17 July 2007 We report the use of a preionized

Rocca, Jorge J.

23

High energy KrCl electric discharge laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high energy KrCl laser for producing coherent radiation at 222 nm. Output energies on the order of 100 mJ per pulse are produced utilizing a discharge excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions, thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HCl is used as a halogen donor which undergoes a harpooning reaction with metastable Kr.sub.M * to form KrCl.

Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Concentration Independent Calibration of ?-? Coincidence Detector Using 131mXe and 133Xe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute efficiency calibration of radiometric detectors is frequently difficult and requires careful detector modeling and accurate knowledge of the radioactive source used. In the past we have calibrated the b-g coincidence detector of the Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) using a variety of sources and techniques which have proven to be less than desirable.[1] A superior technique has been developed that uses the conversion-electron (CE) and x-ray coincidence of 131mXe to provide a more accurate absolute gamma efficiency of the detector. The 131mXe is injected directly into the beta cell of the coincident counting system and no knowledge of absolute source strength is required. In addition, 133Xe is used to provide a second independent means to obtain the absolute efficiency calibration. These two data points provide the necessary information for calculating the detector efficiency and can be used in conjunction with other noble gas isotopes to completely characterize and calibrate the ARSA nuclear detector. In this paper we discuss the techniques and results that we have obtained.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Carman, April J.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Day, Anthony R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Litke, Kevin E.; Ripplinger, Michael D.; Schrom, Brian T.; Suarez, Reynold

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cray XE6 Architecture John Shalf NERSC XE6 User Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.Winter (Part 2) |IO COE Performance ofXE6

26

Mercury: A second-generation KrF laser for inertial fusion research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ``Mercury`` KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora KrF laser. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a testbed for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

Bigio, I.J.; York, G.; McLeod, J.; Czuchlewski, J.; Rose, E.; Hanson, D.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; McCown, A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mercury: A second-generation KrF laser for inertial fusion research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mercury'' KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora KrF laser. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a testbed for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

Bigio, I.J.; York, G.; McLeod, J.; Czuchlewski, J.; Rose, E.; Hanson, D.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; McCown, A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cognitive Radio Network {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Cognitive Radio Network , , {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr Analysis of Average Opportunities in Cognitive Radio Networks Seowoo Jang, Saewoong Bahk INMC, EECS, Seoul National University Cognitive Radio Network . Primary user

Bahk, Saewoong

29

Microfluidics {sjauh, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics {sjauh, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr Solving Shortest Path Problems Using Microfluidics Sahng-Joon Auh and Byoung-Tak Zhang Biointelligence Lab, School of Computer Science and Engineering Seoul National University . microfluidics MEMS

30

Origin of anomalous Xe-H in nanodiamond stardust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Still today, the nucleosynthesis origin of Xe-H in presolar nanodiamonds is far from understood. Historically possible explanations were proposed by a secondary “neutron-burst” process occurring in the He- or C/O-shells of a type-II supernova (SN-II), which are, however, not fully convincing in terms of modern nucleosynthesis conditions. Therefore, we have investigated Xe isotopic abundance features that may be diagnostic for different versions of a classical, primary r-process in high-entropy-wind (HEW) ejecta of core-collapse SN-II. We report here on parameter tests for non-standard r-process variants, by varying electron abundances (Y{sub e}), ranges of entropies (S) and expansion velocities (V{sub exp}) with their correlated neutron-freezeout times (?(freeze)) and temperatures (T{sub 9}(freeze)). From this study, we conclude that a best fi to the measured Xe-H abundance ratios {sup i}Xe/{sup 136}Xe can be obtained with the high-S “main” component of a “cold” r-process variant.

Kratz, K. L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz, Germany and Fachbereich Chemie, Pharmazie und Geowissenschaften, Universitat Mainz, Mainz (United States); Farouqi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz, Germany and Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hallmann, O. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Pfeiffer, B. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Univ. Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Ott, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Univ. of West Hungary, H-9700 Szombathely (Hungary)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

31

n-Selective Single Capture Following Xe{sup 18+} And Xe{sup 54+} Impact On Na(3s) And Na*(3p)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

State selective single charge exchange n-level cross sections are calculated for collisions of Xe18+ and Xe54+ ions with Na(3s) and Na*(3p) over the energy range of 0.1 to 10.0 keV/amu. The CTMC method is used which includes all two-body interactions. Experimental state-selective cross sections and their corresponding transverse momentum spectra for Xe18+ are found to be in reasonable accord with the calculations.

Otranto, S. [CONICET and Dto. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Olson, R. E. [Physics Department, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States); Hasan, V. G.; Hoekstra, R. [KVI-Atomic and Molecular Physics, University of Groeningen (Netherlands)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

2D 3D * iklee)@yonsei.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2012 2D 3D * 0 , 1 , 2 0,2 1 ( 0 skrcjstk, 2 iklee)@yonsei.ac.kr 1 rinthel Science, Yonsei University. 1 Dept. of Information Media, The University of Suwon. 2D 3D . 2D - , 3D (Disparity) 3D . . 1. 3D 3D . 3D 3D [1

Lee, In-Kwon

33

FBDEditor: {ldalove, atang34, syjsmk, jbyoo}@konkuk.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

}@konkuk.ac.kr : Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) . Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) . PLC Function Controller (PLC) Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) . PLC IEC 61131-3 5 (LD: Ladder diagram) . FBD Function Block(FB) . FBD PLC . FPGA Hardware Description Language

34

High power KrF laser development at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the high power laser development program at Los Alamos is to appraise the potential of the KrF laser as a driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), ultimately at energy levels that will produce high target gain (gain of order 100). A KrF laser system prototype, the 10-kJ Aurora laser, which is nearing initial system operation, will serve as a feasibility demonstration of KrF technology and system design concepts appropriate to large scale ICF driver systems. The issues of affordable cost, which is a major concern for all ICF drivers now under development, and technology scaling are also being examined. It is found that, through technology advances and component cost reductions, the potential exists for a KrF driver to achieve a cost goal in the neighborhood of $100 per joule. The authors suggest that the next step toward a multimegajoule laboratory microfusion facility (LMF) is an ''Intermediate Driver'' facility in the few hundred kilojoule to one megajoule range, which will help verify the scaling of driver technology and cost to an LMF size. An Intermediate Driver facility would also increase the confidence in the estimates of energy needed for an LMF and would reduce the risk in target performance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

McDonald, T.; Cartwright, D.; Fenstermacher, C.; Figueira, J.; Goldstone, P.; Harris, D.; Mead, W.; Rosocha, L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Luminescence characteristics of Xe{sub 2}Cl excimer molecules under pumping the dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures with a pulsed electron beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temporal and spectral characteristics of the luminescence of dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures of different composition, excited by a 5-ns pulsed electron beam, were measured. The energy of the electrons amounted to 150 keV and the electron beam current pulse amplitude was 5 A. The gas mixtures were used containing Xe (38-700 Torr) and CCl{sub 4} (0.03-0.3 Torr). The studies were performed within the wavelength range 200-1200 nm using a MAYA-2000Pro diffraction grating spectrometer and a RIGOL DS 5022 ME fast digital oscilloscope. The luminescence lifetimes of the excimer molecules XeCl* (band with {lambda}{sub max} = 308 nm) and Xe{sub 2}Cl* (band with {lambda}{sub max} = 486 nm) were measured, as well as the constants of quenching by the components of the gas mixture for Xe{sub 2}Cl* molecules. A model of plasma-chemical processes for dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures with a very low content of the CCl{sub 4} donor is proposed. It is shown that in such 'poor' mixtures Xe{sub 2}Cl* molecules are mainly produced as a result of recombination of the Xe{sub 2}{sup +} and Cl{sup -} ions. (active media)

Mis'kevich, A I; Jinbo, Guo [National Research Nuclear University 'Moscow Engineering Physics Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)] [National Research Nuclear University 'Moscow Engineering Physics Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Role of impact parameter in branching reactions: Chemical accelerator studies of the reaction Xe++CH4?XeCH3 ++H  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integral reaction cross sections and product velocity distributions have been measured for the ion–molecule reaction Xe+(CH4,H)XeCH3 + over the relative reactant translational energy range of 0.7–5.5 eV by chemical accelerator techniques...

Miller, G. D.; Strattan, L. W.; Hierl, Peter M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with EXO-200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with EXO-200 M. Auger,1 D. J. Auty,2 P. S on a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 136Xe with EXO-200. No signal is observed for an exposure a lower limit on the half-life of the neutrinoless double-beta decay T0#12;#12; 1=2 ð136Xe� > 1:6 � 1025

Piepke, Andreas G.

38

Amplified spontaneous emission over the XeF(D+X) transition in solid Kr H. Kunttu, W. G. Lawrence, and V. A. Apkariar?)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

represent a novel family of lasers. High energy density, high efficiency, broad tunability, low pump, and these states are a! Alfred P. Sloan Fellow. efficiently populated by energy transfer from the high-lying to observe stimulated emission in other condensed phasetriatomic exciplexes, be it in solid, liquid

Apkarian, V. Ara

39

I-XE ANALYSES OF TAGISH LAKE MAGNETITE AND MONAHANS HALITE. A. Busfield1 , J. D. Gil-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- leases were dominated by iodine-derived xenon (129 Xe/132 Xe > 10 consistently). This sample produced of solar sys- tem history. Acknowledgements: We are grateful to R. Wieler for providing the halite grain

Grossman, Lawrence

40

First result of the experimental search for the 2K-capture of Xe-124 with the copper proportional counter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First result of experiment for searching of 2K-capture of Xe-124 with the large-volume copper proportional counter is given. The 12 litre sample with 63.3% (44 g) of Xe-124 was used in measurements. The limit on the half-life of Xe-124 with regard to 2K(2\

Yu. M. Gavrilyuk; A. M. Gangapshev; V. V. Kazalov; V. V. Kuzminov; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich; D. A. Tekueva; S. P. Yakimenko

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

GraXe, graphene and xenon for neutrinoless double beta decay searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new detector concept, GraXe (to be pronounced as grace), to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Xe-136. GraXe combines a popular detection medium in rare-event searches, liquid xenon, with a new, background-free material, graphene. In our baseline design of GraXe, a sphere made of graphene-coated titanium mesh and filled with liquid xenon (LXe) enriched in the Xe-136 isotope is immersed in a large volume of natural LXe instrumented with photodetectors. Liquid xenon is an excellent scintillator, reasonably transparent to its own light. Graphene is transparent over a large frequency range, and impermeable to the xenon. Event position could be deduced from the light pattern detected in the photosensors. External backgrounds would be shielded by the buffer of natural LXe, leaving the ultra-radiopure internal volume virtually free of background. Industrial graphene can be manufactured at a competitive cost to produce the sphere. Enriching xenon in the isotope Xe-136 is easy and relatively cheap, and there is already near one ton of enriched xenon available in the world (currently being used by the EXO, KamLAND-Zen and NEXT experiments). All the cryogenic know-how is readily available from the numerous experiments using liquid xenon. An experiment using the GraXe concept appears realistic and affordable in a short time scale, and its physics potential is enormous.

J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; F. Guinea; M. M. Fogler; M. I. Katsnelson; J. Martin-Albo; F. Monrabal; J. Muñoz-Vidal

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

GraXe, graphene and xenon for neutrinoless double beta decay searches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a new detector concept, GraXe (to be pronounced as grace), to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 136}XE. GraXe combines a popular detection medium in rare-event searches, liquid xenon, with a new, background-free material, graphene. In our baseline design of GraXe, a sphere made of graphene-coated titanium mesh and filled with liquid xenon (LXe) enriched in the {sup 136}XE isotope is immersed in a large volume of natural LXe instrumented with photodetectors. Liquid xenon is an excellent scintillator, reasonably transparent to its own light. Graphene is transparent over a large frequency range, and impermeable to the xenon. Event position could be deduced from the light pattern detected in the photosensors. External backgrounds would be shielded by the buffer of natural LXe, leaving the ultra-radiopure internal volume virtually free of background. Industrial graphene can be manufactured at a competitive cost to produce the sphere. Enriching xenon in the isotope {sup 136}XE is easy and relatively cheap, and there is already near one ton of enriched xenon available in the world (currently being used by the EXO, KamLAND-Zen and NEXT experiments). All the cryogenic know-how is readily available from the numerous experiments using liquid xenon. An experiment using the GraXe concept appears realistic and affordable in a short time scale, and its physics potential is enormous.

Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Monrabal, F.; Vidal, J. Muñoz [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valencia, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Valencia (Spain); Guinea, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), CSIC, Calle Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fogler, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Katsnelson, M.I., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: paco.guinea@icmm.csic.es, E-mail: mfogler@ucsd.edu, E-mail: katsnel@sci.kun.nl, E-mail: justo.martin-albo@ific.uv.es, E-mail: francesc.monrabal@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} ions on the micro-hollow cathode discharge driven by thermionic emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms on the hollow cathode discharge driven by electron thermionic emission is studied using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions modeling. A comparison with the results of two-component (electrons and Xe{sup +} ions) plasma modeling showed that the presence of the Xe{sub 2}{sup +} dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms in the plasma affects the plasma parameters (density, potential, and ion fluxes toward the cathode). The influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} ions and Xe* atoms on the plasma sheath parameters, such as thickness and the ion velocity at the sheath edge, is analyzed.

Levko, D. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)] [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Department of Physics, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)] [Department of Physics, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1, * Milton W. Cole,2 surface, covered by a monolayer of Cs. With data obtained from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

Curtarolo, Stefano

45

Study of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media with laser-polarized ¹²?Xe NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media by using laser-polarized ¹²?Xe . Two different physical processes, the gas transport in porous rock cores and ...

Wang, Ruopeng, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Progress towards an optimized ¹²?Xe / ³He Zeeman maser and a test of boost symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a search for an annual variation of a daily sidereal modulation of the frequency difference between co-located ¹²?Xe and ³He Zeeman masers that sets a stringent limit on boost-dependent Lorentz and CPT violation ...

Canè, Federico

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Study of the effect of {sup 135}Xe poison on the temperature coefficient of TRIGA fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the influence of {sup 135}Xe on the prompt negative temperature coefficient of the 14-MW Romanian TRIGA reactor has been performed. Because of its large absorption cross section below 0.1 eV, we expected that {sup 135}Xe might make a positive contribution to the temperature coefficient because the higher-energy neutrons are less likely to be absorbed by the Xe. This effect would be largest about 16 hours after reactor shutdown. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we have performed cell and core calculations for various fuel temperatures, burnups, and {sup 135}Xe levels. These calculations indeed show a positive contribution of {sup 135}Xe to the temperature coefficient, especially for high burnups, where little {sup 167}Er remains to absorb the higher-energy neutrons. Work is in progress to evaluate the effect of the smaller negative temperature coefficient on the consequences of reactivity insertion accidents in unfavorable situations of {sup 135}Xe poisoning of the Romanian TRIGA core. (author)

Iorgulis, Constantin [TRIGA Reactor Facility, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Search for a permanent electric dipole moment using liquid 129Xe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Search for an electric dipole moment is one of the best motivated low-energy approaches for investigating physics beyond the Standard Model. Our experimental effort is focused on improving the limit on EDM in liquid 129Xe to put constraints on nuclear CP-violating interactions. High nuclear spin density and high electrical breakdown strength make 129Xe a promising medium for EDM searches. At the time the project started, the transverse nuclear spin relaxation time T2 of 129Xe was unknown. We made measurements of T2 using NMR spin-echo techniques and found that it is exceeds 1300 sec, the longest relaxation time ever measured in a liquid [1]. We also began to investigate non-linear dipolar interaction effects in a high-density spin-polarized liquid Xe. In the second iteration of the experiment we setup a high-Tc SQUID system in magnetic shields and performed detailed studies of Xe spin precession. We developed a model for non-linear dipolar interactions and found that for one set of conditions non-linear interactions can delay spin dephasing due to magnetic field gradients, while for another set of conditions they can lead to exponential amplification of the spin precession signals [2]. Our experimental data were in good quantitative agreement with predictions of the model. We also developed a series of numerical simulations to understand various imperfections in the system and made detailed experimental measurements to confirm these numerical predictions [3]. We demonstrated that non-linear interactions can amplify small precession signals and achieved an amplification factor of 10 [4]. This general phenomenon can be used in other precision measurements with non-linear interactions. We also explored practical applications of the liquid Xe system that we developed. We demonstrated that by mixing Xe with organic liquids, such as cyclopentane, one can enhance the proton spin polarization by a factor of 106 [5]. We have used this technique to perform the first measurement of the scalar J-coupling between nuclear spins in van-der-Waals molecules, something that has never been observed before. More recently, we constructed a liquid-He apparatus to acquire Xe spin precession data using a low-Tc SQUID and achieved a signal-to-noise ratio of 106. We are currently investigating factors affecting the stability of Xe spin precession signals in this system using a superconducting magnetic shield and a persistent current magnetic field coil.

PROFESSOR MICHAEL ROMALIS

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

Xe films on a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is employed to study the adsorption of Xe on a quasicrystalline Al-Ni-Co surface. The calculation uses a semiempirical gas-surface interaction, based on conventional combining rules and the usual Lennard-Jones Xe-Xe interaction. The resulting adsorption isotherms and calculated structures are consistent with the results of LEED experimental data. In this paper we focus on five features not discussed earlier (Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 136104 (2005)): the range of the average density of the adsorbate, the order of the transition, the orientational degeneracy of the ground state, the isosteric heat of adsorption of the system, and the effect of the vertical cell dimension.

Wahyu Setyawan; Nicola Ferralis; Renee D. Diehl; Milton W. Cole; Stefano Curtarolo

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Near-yrast, medium-spin structure of {sup 143}Xe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excited states in {sup 143}Xe, populated in spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm, are studied by means of {gamma} spectroscopy using the EUROGAM 2 Ge array. We identify three rotational bands in {sup 143}X: a decoupled band originating from the i{sub 13/2} neutron excitation, a strongly coupled band based on the 5/2{sup -} ground state, and a decoupled band based on the 322.9-keV level with spin 9/2. The new excitation scheme of {sup 143}Xe is compared to quasiparticle-rotor model calculations, performed with a reflection-symmetric potential.

Rzaca-Urban, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ulica Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Urban, W. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ulica Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Pinston, J. A. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Smith, A. G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ahmad, I. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Structure and heat capacity of Ne and Xe adsorbed on a bundle of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structural and thermal properties of Ne and Xe gases adsorbed on the outer surface of a large nanotube bundle have been evaluated with computer simulation. The potential energy model and numerical techniques were used previously to study Ar [N. M. Urban, S. M. Gatica, M. W. Cole, and J. L. Riccardo, ``Correlation functions and thermal properties of Ar adsorbed on the external surface of a bundle of carbon nanotubes'', Phys. Rev. B 71, 245410 (2005)]. Heat capacity results for Ne and Xe exhibit peaks associated with reordering and ``stripe'' melting transitions for these gases.

Daniel E. Shai; Nathan M. Urban; Milton W. Cole

2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

Observation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in Xe-136 with EXO-200  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the observation of two-neutrino double-beta decay in {sup 136}Xe with T{sub 1/2} = 2.11 {+-} 0.04(stat) {+-} 0.21(syst) x 10{sup 21} yr. This second-order process, predicted by the standard model, has been observed for several nuclei but not for {sup 136}Xe. The observed decay rate provides new input to matrix element calculations and to the search for the more interesting neutrinoless double-beta decay, the most sensitive probe for the existence of Majorana particles and the measurement of the neutrino mass scale.

Ackerman, N.; /SLAC; Aharmim, B.; /Laurentian U.; Auger, M.; /Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; /Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barry, K.; Bartoszek, L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Beauchamp, E.; /Laurentian U.; Belov, V.; /Moscow, ITEP; Benitez-Medina, C.; /Colorado State U.; Breidenbach, M.; /SLAC; Burenkov, A.; /Moscow, ITEP; Cleveland, B.; /Laurentian U.; Conley, R.; Conti, E.; /SLAC; Cook, J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Cook, S.; /Colorado State U.; Coppens, A.; /Carleton U.; Counts, I.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Craddock, W.; /SLAC; Daniels, T.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Moscow, ITEP /Maryland U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Bern U. /SLAC /Bern U. /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Maryland U. /Colorado State U. /SLAC /Carleton U. /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Moscow, ITEP /Indiana U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Seoul U. /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

Collisional {sup 3}He and {sup 129}Xe Frequency Shifts in Rb-Noble-Gas Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermi-contact interaction that characterizes collisional spin exchange of a noble gas with an alkali-metal vapor also gives rise to NMR and EPR frequency shifts of the noble-gas nucleus and the alkali-metal atom, respectively. We have measured the enhancement factor {kappa}{sub 0} that characterizes these shifts for Rb-{sup 129}Xe to be 493{+-}31, making use of the previously measured value of {kappa}{sub 0} for Rb-{sup 3}He. This result allows accurate {sup 129}Xe polarimetry with no need to reference a thermal-equilibrium NMR signal.

Ma, Z. L.; Sorte, E. G.; Saam, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112-0830 (United States)

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evolution of Topological Order in Xe Films on a Quasicrystal Surface Stefano Curtarolo,1,* Wahyu Setyawan,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of Topological Order in Xe Films on a Quasicrystal Surface Stefano Curtarolo,1,* Wahyu of a physically adsorbed gas on a quasicrystal- line surface Xe on decagonal Al-Ni-Co. The grand canonical Monte- tural properties employs grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations, with which we have extensive

Curtarolo, Stefano

56

Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o}{yields}6p{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2} transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}{yields}6p[3]{sub 5/2}{sup o} transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm.

Dancheva, Y. [CNISM, University of Siena, CSC and DSFTA, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Biancalana, V. [CNISM, University of Siena, CSC and DIISM, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Pagano, D.; Scortecci, F. [Aerospazio Tecnologie Srl., via Provinciale Nord 42a, 53040 Rapolano Terme (Italy)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Kinetics and radiative processes in Xe/I{sub 2} inductively coupled rf discharges at low pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental concern over the presence of mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps has motivated research into alternative electrically efficient near UV plasma lighting sources. One such candidate is multi-wavelength UV emission from Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures, including excimer radiation from XeI at 253 nm. Previous studies of the XeI system were performed at high pressures and were intended for laser applications. Practical Xe/I{sub 2} lamps will likely operate in the 0.5--10 torr regime and use electrodeless excitation to avoid issues related to electrode erosion by the halogen. In this paper, the authors report on an experimental investigation of low pressure, inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures. The goals of this work are to characterize the UV emission and determine excitation mechanisms in a parameter space of interest to lighting applications.

Barnes, P.N.; Verdeyen, J.T.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy of the XeCl Thomas Lenzer,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements for the neutral state we construct a Morse­Morse-switching­van der Waals model potential functionZero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy of the XeCl� anion Thomas Lenzer,a) Ivan Yourshaw, Berkeley, California 94720 Received 9 November 2001; accepted 21 December 2001 Zero electron kinetic energy

Neumark, Daniel M.

59

Zero electron kinetic energy and photoelectron spectroscopy of the XeI anion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectroscopic data we construct model potentials for the anion and three neutral states, which are comparedZero electron kinetic energy and photoelectron spectroscopy of the XeI anion Thomas Lenzer, Michael and the corresponding neutral X1/2, I3/2, and II1/2 electronic states have been studied by means of zero electron

Neumark, Daniel M.

60

Next stage of search for 2K(2$?$)-capture of $^{78}$Kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A technique to search for 2K-capture of $^{78}$Kr with large low-background proportional counter filled with an enriched in $^{78}$Kr up to 99.8% sample of Krypton at a pressure of 4.51 is described in this paper. The results of first measurements are presented. Analysis of data collected during 159 hours yielded new limit to the half-life of $^{78}$Kr with regard to 2K-capture (T$_{1/2}\\geq6\\cdot10^{21}$ yr (90% C.L.)). Sensitivity of the facility to the process for one year of measurement was evaluated to be $\\texttt{S}=1.0\\cdot10^{22}$ yr (90% C.L.).

Ju. M. Gavriljuk; V. N. Gavrin; A. M. Gangapshev; V. V. Kazalov; V. V. Kuzminov; N. Ya. Osetrova; I. I. Pul'nikov; A. V. Ryabukhin; A. N. Shubin; G. M. Skorynin; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich

2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

FY-12 INL KR CAPTURE ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE OFF-GAS SIGMA TEAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tasks performed this year by INL Kr capture off-gas team members can be segregated into three separate task sub-sections which include: 1) The development and testing of a new engineered form sorbent, 2) An initial NDA gamma scan effort performed on the drum containing the Legacy Kr-85 sample materials, and 3) Collaborative research efforts with PNNL involving the testing of the Ni-DOBDC MOF and an initial attempt to make powdered chalcogel material into an engineered form using our binding process. This document describes the routes to success for the three task sub-sections.

Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D Law

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Eye-Tracker {eskim, jkim, btzhang} @ bi.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eye-Tracker ,, {eskim, jkim, btzhang} @ bi.snu.ac.kr Eye-Tracking Analysis of Attention . `' . . . Eye-Tracker . Eye-Tracker . . 1. , . `' , . . , . . , . 3 [1]. 1) fMRI, MEG, EEG 2) Eye-Tracker, Motion Tracker embodiment cognition 3

63

Seoul National University http://bp.snu.ac.kr The Role of Carbon Incorporation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O2 · Hydrothermal followed by carbonization at 500°C J. Phys. Chem. C 113, 20504 (2009). J. PhysSeoul National University http://bp.snu.ac.kr The Role of Carbon Incorporation in SnO2 of cracks during cycling Sn-Based Oxide Li Metal Carbon-Coated SnO2 #12;Seoul National University http

Park, Byungwoo

64

The onset of optical breakdown in KrF-laser-irradiated silica glass surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A synthetic fused silica obtained from Tosoh SGM Co., ESL-1000 (OH % 1200 wt. ppm), with a thick- ness of 2 mmThe onset of optical breakdown in KrF-laser-irradiated silica glass surfaces Y. Kawaguchia,* , A Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba Central 5, 1

Dickinson, J. Thomas

65

Function Block Diagrams * {ekjee, jbyoo, suhyun, cha}@dependable.kaist.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

}@dependable.kaist.ac.kr : FBD(Function Block Diagram) FBD . PLC FBD C . FBD . FBD Center(ITRC). RLL(Relay Ladder Logic) , . PLC(Programmable Logic Controller) [2] , LD(Ladder Diagram) FBD(Function Block Diagram) PLC . PLC . PLC

66

Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200. No signal is observed for an exposure of 32.5 kg-yr, with a background of ~1.5 x 10^{-3} /(kg yr keV) in the $\\pm 1\\sigma$ region of interest. This sets a lower limit on the half-life of the neutrinoless double-beta decay $T_{1/2}^{0\

M. Auger; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; E. Beauchamp; V. Belov; C. Benitez-Medina; M. Breidenbach; T. Brunner; A. Burenkov; B. Cleveland; S. Cook; T. Daniels; M. Danilov; C. G. Davis; S. Delaquis; R. deVoe; A. Dobi; M. J. Dolinski; A. Dolgolenko; M. Dunford; W. Fairbank Jr.; J. Farine; W. Feldmeier; P. Fierlinger; D. Franco; G. Giroux; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; C. Hall; K. Hall; C. Hargrove; S. Herrin; M. Hughes; A. Johnson; T. N. Johnson; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; F. Leonard; D. Mackay; R. MacLellan; M. Marino; B. Mong; M. Montero Diez; A. R. Muller; R. Neilson; R. Nelson; A. Odian; I. Ostrovskiy; K. O'Sullivan; C. Ouellet; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; C. Y. Prescott; K. Pushkin; P. C. Rowson; J. J. Russell; A. Sabourov; D. Sinclair; S. Slutsky; V. Stekhanov; T. Tolba; D. Tosi; K. Twelker; P. Vogel; J. -L. Vuilleumier; A. Waite; T. Walton; M. Weber; U. Wichoski; J. Wodin; J. D. Wright; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen; O. Ya. Zeldovich

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

FRACTIONAL SKEW MONOID RINGS P. ARA, M.A. GONZ'ALEZ-BARROSO, K.R. GOODEARL, AND E. PARDO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTIONAL SKEW MONOID RINGS P. ARA, M.A. GONZ'ALEZ-BARROSO #12; 2 P. ARA, M.A. GONZ'ALEZ-BARROSO, K.R. GOODEARL, AND E. PARDO In this paper

Bigelow, Stephen

69

Phase formation in Zr/Fe multilayers during Kr ion irradiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed study has been conducted of the effect of Kr ion irradiation on phase formation in Zr-Fe metallic multilayers, using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Metallic multilayers were prepared with different overall compositions (near 50-50 and Fe-rich), and with different wavelengths (repetition thicknesses). These samples were irradiated with 300 keV Kr ions at various temperatures to investigate the final products, as well as the kinetics of phase formation. For the shorter wavelength samples, the final product was in all cases an amorphous Zr-Fe phase, in combination with Fe, while specially for the larger wavelength samples, in the Fe-rich samples the intermetallic compounds ZrFe{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Fe were formed in addition to the amorphous phase. The dose to full reaction decreases with temperature, and with wavelength in a manner consistent with a diffusion-controlled reaction.

Motta, A. T.

1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

Laser-plasma source parameters for Kr, Gd, and Tb ions at 6.6 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser-based lamps for sub-10-nm lithography operating in the region of 6.6 nm. A collisional-radiative model is developed as a post-processor of a hydrodynamic code to investigate emission from resonance lines in Kr, Gd, and Tb ions under conditions typical for mass-limited EUV sources. The analysis reveals that maximum conversion efficiencies of Kr occur at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}W/cm{sup 2}, while for Gd and Tb it was Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.9%/2{pi}sr for laser intensities of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}.

Masnavi, Majid; Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Richardson, Martin C. [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)] [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Resolution of hyperfine transitions in metastable 83Kr using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Narrow linewidth signals of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) in the metastable 83Kr have been observed for the first time. Various hyperfine transitions in 4p55s[3/2]2 to 4p55p[5/2]3 manifolds of 83Kr have been identified through the experimentally observed EIT signals. Some unresolved or poorly resolved hyperfine transitions in saturated absorption spectroscopy (SAS) are clearly resolved in the present work. Using the spectral separation of these EIT identified hyperfine transitions, the magnetic hyperfine constant (A) and the electric quadrupole hyperfine constant (B) are determined with improved accuracy for 4p55s[3/2]2 and 4p55p[5/2]3 manifolds.

Kale, Y B; Tiwari, V B; Singh, S; Rawat, H S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

Gregorich, K.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ion acceleration in Ar-Xe and Ar-He plasmas. I. Electron energy distribution functions and ion composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron energy distribution functions (eedf), ion production, and ion composition are studied in Ar-Xe and Ar-He expanding helicon plasmas. It was found that under the conditions of constant total flow rate, Xe, in addition to Ar, changes the eedf from Maxwellian-like to Druyvesteyn-like with a shortening of the high energy tail at {approx}15 eV. The electron temperature exponentially decreases from {approx}7 eV in pure Ar plasma to {approx}4 eV in pure Xe plasma. Xenon ions dominate the ion population for Xe filling fractions greater than 10%. The plasma density increases by {approx}15% with increasing Xe fraction. For an Ar-He plasma, increasing the helium fraction increases the electron temperature from {approx}7 eV in pure Ar plasma to {approx}14 eV for a He filling fraction of 80%. The plasma density drops by more than three orders of magnitude from 1.14x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} to 6.5x10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. However, the inferred ion densities indicate that even at a helium fraction of 80%, argon ions significantly outnumber helium ions.

Biloiu, Ioana A.; Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morganton, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Model for projectile fragmentation: case study for Ni on Ta, Be and Xe on Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For projectile fragmentation we work out details of a model whose origin can be traced back to the Bevalac era. The model positions itself between the phenomenological EPAX parametrization and microscopic transport models like "Heavy Ion Phase Space Exploration Model" (HIPSE) and antisymmetrised molecular dynamics(AMD). We apply the model to some recent data of projectile fragmentation of Ni on Ta and Be at beam energy 140 MeV/nucleon and some older data of Xe on Al at beam energy 790 MeV/nucleon. Reasonable values of cross-sections for various composites populated in the reactions are obtained.

S. Mallik; G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Probing the Geometry and Interconnectivity of Pores in Organic Aerogels Using Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels represent a class of novel open-pore materials with high surface area and nanometer pore sizes. They exhibit extremely low mass densities, low thermal conductivity, good acoustic insulation, and low dielectric constants. These materials have potential applications in catalysis, advanced separation techniques, energy storage, environmental remediation, and as insulating materials. Organic aerogels are stiffer and stronger than silica aerogels and are better insulators with higher thermal resistance. Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) aerogels are typically prepared through the base-catalyzed sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde in aqueous solution to produce gels, which are then dried in supercritical CO2.1,2 The [resorcinol]/ [catalyst] (R/C) ratio of the starting sol-gel solution has been determined to be the dominant factor that affects the properties of RF aerogels. Since the unique microstructures of aerogels are responsible for their unusual properties, characterizing the detailed porous structures and correlating them with the processing parameters are vital to establish rational design principles for novel organic aerogels with tailored properties. In this communication we report the first use of hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe NMR to probe the geometry and interconnectivity of pores in RF aerogels and to correlate these with synthetic conditions. Our work demonstrates that HP 129Xe NMR is so far the only method for accurately measuring the free volume-to-surface-area (Vg/S) ratios for soft mesoporous materials without using any geometric models.

Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Wang, Li Q.; Baumann, T.; Satcher, J. H.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Ratcliffe, C. I.; Ripmeester, J. A.

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Neutron resonance study of a delayed neutron emitter, /sup 87/Kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unbound levels in /sup 87/Kr have been studied as neutron resonances up to 400 keV neutron energy at the ORELA linear electron accelerator. The observed p-wave resonances, with I/sup pi /=1/2/sup - / and 3/2/sup -/ can also be populated in the beta -decay of the 3/2 /sup -/ ground state of /sup 87/Br. When comparing the present results with previous studies of beta -delayed neutron spectra, the authors find that almost all observed p-wave resonances can be identified with peaks in the delayed neutron spectra. (0 refs).

Fogelberg, B; Macklin, R L; Raman, S; Stelson, P H

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Evidence for a highly deformed oblate 0{sup +} state in {sub 36}{sup 74}Kr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the observation of an isomeric decay in the very neutron deficient nucleus {sub 36}{sup 74}Kr. The isomer is interpreted as an excited 0{sup +} state, consistent with the long standing prediction of high deformation prolate/oblate shape coexistence in this nucleus. The magnitude of the E0 matrix element deduced for the 0{sub 2}{sup +}{r_arrow}0{sub 1}{sup +} transition gives strong support to the prediction of a highly deformed oblate rotor. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Chandler, A.; Regan, P.H.; Pearson, C.J.; Catford, W.N.; Curtis, N.; Gelletly, W.; Vincent, S.M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom); Czajkowski, S.; Janas, Z.; Marchand, C. [CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan, Le Haut-Vigneau, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)] Bruce, A.M. [Cockcroft Building, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Janas, Z.; Lewitowicz, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Pl-00681, Warsaw (Poland)] [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Pl-00681, Warsaw (Poland); Saint-Lauren, M.G.; Winfield, J.S. [GANIL, BP 5027, F-14000, Caen Cedex (France)] Orr, N.A. [LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ISMRA et Universite de Caen, Bld. du Marechal Juin, F-14050, Caen Cedex (France); Reed, A.T. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)] Petrovici, A. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, R-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)] Wadsworth, R. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York Y01 4DD (United Kingdom)] Warner, D.D. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evidence for a highly deformed oblate 0[sup +] state in [sub 36][sup 74]Kr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the observation of an isomeric decay in the very neutron deficient nucleus [sub 36][sup 74]Kr. The isomer is interpreted as an excited 0[sup +] state, consistent with the long standing prediction of high deformation prolate/oblate shape coexistence in this nucleus. The magnitude of the E0 matrix element deduced for the 0[sub 2][sup +][r arrow]0[sub 1][sup +] transition gives strong support to the prediction of a highly deformed oblate rotor. [copyright] [ital 1997] [ital The American Physical Society

Chandler, A.; Regan, P.H.; Pearson, C.J.; Catford, W.N.; Curtis, N.; Gelletly, W.; Vincent, S.M. (Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom)); Czajkowski, S.; Janas, Z.; Marchand, C. (CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan, Le Haut-Vigneau, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)) Bruce, A.M. (Cockcroft Building, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)); Janas, Z.; Lewitowicz, M. (Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Pl-00681, Warsaw (Poland)); Saint-Lauren, M.G.; Winfield, J.S. (GANIL, BP 5027, F-14000, Caen Cedex (France)) Orr, N.A. (LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ISMRA et Universite de Caen, Bld. du Marechal Juin, F-14050, Caen Cedex (France)); Reed, A.T. (Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)) Petrovici, A. (Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, R-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)) Wadsworth, R. (Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Weak interaction rates for Kr and Sr waiting-point nuclei under rp-process conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weak interaction rates are studied in neutron deficient Kr and Sr waiting-point isotopes in ranges of densities and temperatures relevant for the rp-process. The nuclear structure is described within a microscopic model (deformed QRPA) that reproduces not only the half-lives but also the Gamow-Teller strength distributions recently measured. The various sensitivities of the decay rates to both density and temperature are discussed. Continuum electron capture is shown to contribute significantly to the weak rates at rp-process conditions.

P. Sarriguren

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

Shape mixing dynamics in the low-lying states of proton-rich Kr isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the oblate-prolate shape mixing in the low-lying states of proton-rich Kr isotopes using the five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian. The collective Hamiltonian is derived microscopically by means of the CHFB (constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov) + Local QRPA (quasiparticle random phase approximation) method, which we have developed recently on the basis of the adiabatic self-consistent collective coordinate method. The results of the numerical calculation show the importance of large-amplitude collective vibrations in the triaxial shape degree of freedom and rotational effects on the oblate-prolate shape mixing dynamics in the low-lying states of these isotopes.

Koichi Sato; Nobuo Hinohara

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Shape mixing and beta-decay properties of neutron-deficient Kr and Sr isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamow-Teller strength distributions and beta-decay half-lives in neutron-deficient Kr and Sr isotopes are investigated within a deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation. The approach is based on a selfconsistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations and residual separable particle-hole and particle-particle forces. A simple two-level model is used to mix the nuclear shapes into the physical ground state. Good agreement with experiment is found with shape mixing coefficients which are consistent with those obtained phenomenologically from mixing of rotational bands.

P. Sarriguren

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Photoinduced Desorption of Xe from Porous Si following Ultraviolet Irradiation: Evidence for a Selective and Highly Effective Optical Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, photovoltaics, and photocatalysis [1,2]. Photodissociation of N2O on Si (100) has been studied [3] as a mild) of Xe from porous silicon under UV irradiation. It was found that internal morphology and size of the pores and the excita- tion wavelength strongly affect the overall photoresponse of this system. Two

Asscher, Micha

83

Adsorption of H2O, CO2 and Xe on Soft Surfaces Ori Stein and Micha Asscher*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and the Farkas Center for Light-Induced Processes, The Hebrew UniVersity of Jerusalem, Israel studies from multilayer coverage grating of Xe on ODT-SAM have demonstrated that sublimation of the chemistry of these small molecules with biologically relevant surfaces such as membranes. In addition

Asscher, Micha

84

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Microscopic description of spherical to {gamma}-soft shape transitions in Ba and Xe nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid transition between spherical and {gamma}-soft shapes in Ba and Xe nuclei in the mass region A>=130 is analyzed using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce the characteristic evolution of excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities, and in general, a good agreement with available data is obtained. The calculated spectra display fingerprints of a second-order shape phase transition that can approximately be described by analytic solutions corresponding to the E(5) dynamical symmetry.

Li, Z. P. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Chemical accelerator studies of isotope effects on collision dynamics of ion–molecule reactions: Kr++HD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reaction of Kr+ with HD has been studied as a function of relative collision energy over the range 0.08–3.1 eV (c.m.) by measuring integral reaction cross sections and the velocity vector distributions of product ions ...

Chivalak, S.; Hierl, Peter M.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fluorocarbon impurities in KrF lasers Helen H. Hwang, Kristopher James, Roger Hui, and Mark J. KushneP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorocarbon impurities in KrF lasers Helen H. Hwang, Kristopher James, Roger Hui, and Mark J, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (Received 24 January 1991; accepted for publication 7 March 1991) Fluorocarbon amounts of impurities, and flu- orocarbons in particular.' Fluorocarbons such as CF4 are common

Kushner, Mark

89

Characterization of metal surfaces irradiated by a long-pulse KrF excimer laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic samples were irradiated by a long-pulse ([tau] > 300 ns) KrF laser. The experiments were performed with an energy density of 0.3--120 J cm[sup [minus]2] and a power density of 1--400 MW cm[sup [minus]2]. The samples investigated were pure aluminum, aluminum alloy, low-alloy constructional steel and titanium alloy. They were polished to obtain a roughness of 10 < Ra < 0.08 [mu]m and stress-relief heat-treated for some residual stress measurements. The characterization of the irradiated metal surfaces was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), roughness analyzers, a microhardness tester and X-ray diffraction (XRD) residual stress apparatus. The improvement or deterioration in the mechanical properties of the metallic samples and some potential applications are discussed.

Sarnet, T.; Montagne, J.E.; Inglesakis, G.; Autric, M. (Inst. of Fluid Mechanics, Marseille (France). Laser-Matter Interaction Group); Barrallier, L.; Barreau, G. (Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Aix-en-Provence (France). Mecasurf Lab.)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Physics, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui-shi, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu [Tosoh SGM Corp., 4555 Kaisei-cho, Shunan-shi, Yamaguchi 746-0006 (Japan)

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of {sup 136}Xe in KamLAND-Zen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment based on an exposure of 77.6 days with 129 kg of {sup 136}Xe. The measured two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 136}Xe is T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = 2:38 {+-}#6; 0:02(stat)#6;{+-}0.14(syst)#2;x10{sup 21} yr, consistent with a recent measurement by EXO-200. We also obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life, T{sup 0{nu}}{sub 1/2} > 5.7 x#2; 10{sup 24} yr at 90% C.L.

KamLAND-Zen Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kato, R.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakada, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Ono, Y.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yamada, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Yoshida, S.; Banks, T. I.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; O'Donnell, T.; Berger, B. E.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

Status of double beta decay experiments using isotopes other than Xe-136  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay is a lepton-number violating process predicted by many extensions of the standard model. It is actively searched for in several candidate isotopes within many experimental projects. The status of the experimental initiatives which are looking for the neutrinoless double beta decay in isotopes other than Xe-136 is reviewed, with special emphasis given to the projects that passed the R&D phase. The results recently released by the experiment GERDA are also summarized and discussed. The GERDA data give no positive indication of neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 and disfavor in a model-independent way the long-standing observation claim on the same isotope. The lower limit reported by GERDA for the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 is T1/2 > 2.1e25 yr (90% C.L.), or T1/2 > 3.0e25 yr, when combined with the results of other Ge-76 predecessor experiments.

Luciano Pandola

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

Status of double beta decay experiments using isotopes other than Xe-136  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay is a lepton-number violating process predicted by many extensions of the standard model. It is actively searched for in several candidate isotopes within many experimental projects. The status of the experimental initiatives which are looking for the neutrinoless double beta decay in isotopes other than Xe-136 is reviewed, with special emphasis given to the projects that passed the R&D phase. The results recently released by the experiment GERDA are also summarized and discussed. The GERDA data give no positive indication of neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 and disfavor in a model-independent way the long-standing observation claim on the same isotope. The lower limit reported by GERDA for the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 is T1/2 > 2.1e25 yr (90% C.L.), or T1/2 > 3.0e25 yr, when combined with the results of other Ge-76 predecessor experiments.

Pandola, Luciano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

RtS>-l-2437 Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

131+Xe132. This conversion is of importance in the calculation of the total Xe generation duringRtS«>-l»-2437 3*- if, -. Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of Xe and Kr in Fission Gas 4* #12;RIS�-M-2437 UTILIZATION OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF Xe AND Kr IN FISSION GAS RELEASE

95

A microscopic benchmark-study of triaxiality in low-lying states of 76Kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a seven-dimensional generator coordinate calculation in the two deformation parameters $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$ together with projection on three-dimensional angular momentum and two particle numbers for the low-lying states in $^{76}$Kr. These calculations are based on covariant density functional theory. Excellent agreement is found with the data for the spectrum and the electric multipole transition strengths. This answers the important question of dynamic correlations and triaxiality in a fully microscopic way. We find that triaxial configurations dominate both the ground state and the quasi $\\gamma$-band. This yields a different picture from the simple interpretation in terms of "coexistence of a prolate ground state with an oblate low-lying excited state", which is based on the measured sign of spectroscopic quadrupole moments. This study also provides for the first time a benchmark for the collective Hamiltonian in five dimensions. Moreover, we point out that the staggering phase of the $\\gamma$-band is not a safe signature for rigid triaxiality of the low-energy structure.

J. M. Yao; K. Hagino; Z. P. Li; J. Meng; P. Ring

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Isospin transport in 84Kr+112,124Sn reactions at Fermi energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isospin transport phenomena in dissipative heavy ion collisions have been investigated at Fermi energies with a beam of 84Kr at 35AMeV. A comparison of the /Z of light and medium products forward-emitted in the centre of mass frame when the beam impinges on a n-poor 112Sn and a n-rich 124Sn targets is presented. Data were collected by means of a three-layer telescope with very good performances in terms of mass identification (full isotopic resolution up to Z about 20 for ions punching through the first detector layer) built by the FAZIA Collaboration and located just beyond the grazing angle for both reactions. The /Z of the decay products emitted when the n-rich target is used is always higher than that associated to the n-poor one. Since the detector was able to measure only fragments coming from the QuasiProjectile decay and/or neck emission, the observed behaviour can be ascribed to the isospin diffusion, driven by the isospin gradient between QuasiProjectile and QuasiTarget. Moreover, for light fragments the /Z as a function of the lab velocity of the fragment increases when we move from the QuasiProjectile velocity to the centre of mass (neck zone). This effect can be interpreted as an evidence of isospin drift driven by the density gradient between the QuasiProjectile zone (at normal density) and the more diluted neck zone.

S. Piantelli; G. Casini; A. Olmi; S. Barlini; M. Bini; S. Carboni; P. R. Maurenzig; G. Pasquali; G. Poggi; A. A. Stefanini; R. Bougault; N. LeNeindre; O. Lopez; M. Parlog; E. Vient; E. Bonnet; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; D. Gruyer; E. Rosato; G. Spadaccini; M. Vigilante; B. Borderie; M. F. Rivet; M. Bruno; L. Morelli; M. Cinausero; M. Degerlier; F. Gramegna; T. Marchi; R. Alba; C. Maiolino; D. Santonocito; T. Kozik; T. Twarog

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Magnetic moments of Coulomb excited $2^{+}_{1}$ states for radioactive beams of $^{132,134,136}$Te and $^{138}$Xe isotopes at REX-ISOLDE Status Report on the Experiment IS415 at CERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic moments of Coulomb excited $2^{+}_{1}$ states for radioactive beams of $^{132,134,136}$Te and $^{138}$Xe isotopes at REX-ISOLDE

CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and Neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; Speidel, K H; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Balabanski, D L; Behrens, T; Georgiev, G; Gerber, J P; Gernhäuser, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Leske, J; Lo Bianco, G; Lutter, R; Maier-Komor, P; Modamio, V; Schielke, S; Walker, J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Calculo Numerico -Exame -10/07/07 Considere a func~ao f(x) = xe-x  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C´alculo Num´erico - Exame - 10/07/07 1 Considere a fun¸c~ao f(x) = xe-x - e-3 . (a) Esbo¸ce o gr´afico de f. [0.5 pts] (b) Aplique o m´etodo de Newton-Raphson (de prefer^encia em forma tabelar) para que significa o resultado de (a) para a converg^encia dos m´etodos de Gauss-Jacobi e de Gauss

Sussner, Peter

99

Comparing the Performance of Blue Gene/Q with Leading Cray XE6 and InfiniBand Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract—Three types of systems dominate the current High Performance Computing landscape: the Cray XE6, the IBM Blue Gene, and commodity clusters using InfiniBand. These systems have quite different characteristics making the choice for a particular deployment difficult. The XE6 uses Cray’s proprietary Gemini 3-D torus interconnect with two nodes at each network endpoint. The latest IBM Blue Gene/Q uses a single socket integrating processor and communication in a 5-D torus network. InfiniBand provides the flexibility of using nodes from many vendors connected in many possible topologies. The performance characteristics of each vary vastly along with their utilization model. In this work we compare the performance of these three systems using a combination of micro-benchmarks and a set of production applications. In particular we discuss the causes of variability in performance across the systems and also quantify where performance is lost using a combination of measurements and models. Our results show that significant performance can be lost in normal production operation of the Cray XT6 and InfiniBand Clusters in comparison to Blue Gene/Q.

Kerbyson, Darren J.; Barker, Kevin J.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Hoisie, Adolfy

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

100

Pattern recognition techniques to reduce backgrounds in the search for the {sup 136}Xe double beta decay with gaseous TPCs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The observation of the neutrinoless double beta decay may provide essential information on the nature of neutrinos. Among the current experimental approaches, a high pressure gaseous TPC is an attractive option for the search of double beta decay due to its good energy resolution and the detailed topological information of each event. We present in this talk a detailed study of the ionization topology of the {sup 136}Xe double beta decay events in a High Pressure Xenon TPC, as well as that of the typical competing backgrounds. We define some observables based on graph theory concepts to develop automated discrimination algorithms. Our criteria are able to reduce the background level by about three orders of magnitude in the region of interest of the {sup 136}Xe Q{sub ??} for a signal acceptance of 40%. This result provides a quantitative assessment of the benefit of topological information offered by gaseous TPCs for double beta decay search, and proves that it is a promising feature in view of future experiments in the field. Possible ideas for further improvement in the discrimination algorithms and the dependency of these results with the gas diffusion and readout granularity will be also discussed.

Iguaz, F. J.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; Gómez, H.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzon, G.; Segui, L.; Tomas, A. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)] [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Measurement of the complete nuclide production and kinetic energies of the system 136Xe + hydrogen at 1 GeV per nucleon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an extensive overview of production cross sections and kinetic energies for the complete set of nuclides formed in the spallation of 136Xe by protons at the incident energy of 1 GeV per nucleon. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the FRagment Separator (GSI, Darmstadt). Slightly below the Businaro-Gallone point, 136Xe is the stable nuclide with the largest neutron excess. The kinematic data and cross sections collected in this work for the full nuclide production are a general benchmark for modelling the spallation process in a neutron-rich nuclear system, where fission is characterised by predominantly mass-asymmetric splits.

P. Napolitani; K. -H. Schmidt; L. Tassan-Got; P. Armbruster; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; V. Henzl; D. Henzlova; A. Kelic; R. Pleskac; M. V. Ricciardi; C. Schmitt; O. Yordanov; L. Audouin; M. Bernas; A. Lafriaskh; F. Rejmund; C. Stephan; J. Benlliure; E. Casarejos; M. Fernandez Ordonez; J. Pereira; A. Boudard; B. Fernandez; S. Leray; C. Villagrasa; C. Volant

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Ion-radical synergy in HfO{sub 2} etching studied with a XeF{sub 2}/Ar{sup +} beam setup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain more insight into fundamental aspects of the etching behavior of Hf-based high-k materials in plasma etch reactors, HfO{sub 2} films were etched in a multiple-beam setup consisting of a low energy Ar{sup +} ion beam and a XeF{sub 2} radical beam. The etch rate and etch products were monitored by real-time ellipsometry and mass spectrometry, respectively. Although etching of HfO{sub 2} in XeF{sub 2}/Ar{sup +} chemistry is mainly a physical effect, an unambiguous proof of the ion-radical synergistic effect for the etching of HfO{sub 2} is presented. The etch yield for 400 eV Ar{sup +} ions at a substrate temperature of 300 deg. C was 0.3 atoms/ion for Ar{sup +} sputtering and increased to 2 atoms/ion when XeF{sub 2} was also supplied. The etch yield proved to follow the common square root of ion energy dependence both for pure sputtering and radical enhanced etching, with a threshold energy at room temperature of 69{+-}17 eV for Ar{sup +} ions and 54{+-}14 eV for Ar{sup +} ions with XeF{sub 2}.

Gevers, P. M.; Beijerinck, H. C. W.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Limit on Neutrinoless ?? Decay of Xe-136 from the First Phase of KamLAND-Zen and Comparison with the Positive Claim in Ge-76  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from the first phase of the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment, corresponding to an exposure of 89.5 kg yr of Xe-136. We obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of T_{1/2}^{0{\

KamLAND-Zen Collaboration

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.

Zhu, Di [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin (China); Song, Le, E-mail: songle@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Xiong [School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Kajiyama, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

Electron Transport Coefficients and Scattering Cross Sections in CH4, HBr and in Mixtures of He and Xe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have applied a standard swarm procedure in order to obtain electron scattering cross sections and transport coefficients that provide a data base for plasma modeling. In case of CH4 the dissociative excitation cross sections from binary collision experiments were renormalized by fitting the measured excitation coefficients with our calculations. In case of HBr we have produced a complete set of cross sections based on available data from the literature, with some extrapolations. We have also tested the cross sections in He-Xe mixtures and the application of Blanc's law and common mean energy procedure in calculating drift velocities in by comparison with recent measurements. Finally, a well tested Monte Carlo code was used in wide range of both DC and RF electric and magnetic fields in order to calculate a number of transport coefficients in case of CH4 and HBr.

Sasic, Olivera M. [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water$-$Xe system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We study the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a possible instability of clathrate at cryogenic temperatures and conversion to an amorphous phase comprised of "xenon + hydration shell" Xe$\\cdot$(H$_{2}$O)$_{21.5}$ clusters. Simulations of ice$-$xenon solution interface in equilibrium and during ice growth reveal the effects of xenon on the ice$-$liquid interface, where adsorbed xenon causes roughening of ice surface but does not preferentially form clathrate. These results provide evidence against the ice-blocker mechanism of xenon cryoprotection.

Vasilii I. Artyukhov; Alexander Yu. Pulver; Alex Peregudov; Igor Artyuhov

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

A hybrid model for studying nuclear multifragmentation around Fermi energy domain: Case for central collision of Xe on Sn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental data for central collisions of $^{129}$Xe on $^{119}$Sn at beam energies of (a) 32 MeV/nucleon, (b) 39 MeV/nucleon, (c) 45 MeV/nucleon and (d) 50 MeV/nucleon are compared with results calculated using a hybrid model. We use a transport model (BUU) to obtain the excitation energy per nucleon in the center of mass of the multifragmenting system. The canonical thermodynamic model is then used to determine the temperature which would lead to this excitation energy. With this temperature we use the canonical thermodynamic model to calculate various experimental data such as multiplicities of different composites, probability distribution of the largest cluster etc. Agreement with data establishes the validity of the model.

S. Mallik; G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

A hybrid model for studying nuclear multifragmentation around Fermi energy domain: Case for central collision of Xe on Sn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental data for central collisions of $^{129}$Xe on $^{119}$Sn at beam energies of (a) 32 MeV/nucleon, (b) 39 MeV/nucleon, (c) 45 MeV/nucleon and (d) 50 MeV/nucleon are compared with results calculated using a hybrid model. We use a transport model (BUU) to obtain the excitation energy per nucleon in the center of mass of the multifragmenting system. The canonical thermodynamic model is then used to determine the temperature which would lead to this excitation energy. With this temperature we use the canonical thermodynamic model to calculate various experimental data such as multiplicities of different composites, probability distribution of the largest cluster etc. Agreement with data establishes the validity of the model.

Mallik, S; Gupta, S Das

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

G. B. Mitchem

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Temperature and Scaling Studies from Projectile Fragmentation of 86,78Kr+64,58Ni at 35 MeV/A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equation of state. Projectile fragmentation sources were identified from the reactions of 86,78Kr+64,58Ni at 35 MeV/A taken on the NIMROD-ISiS array. The angular coverage, excellent isotopic resolution, and Neutron Ball allow for quasi-complete event...

Wuenschel, Sara K.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

Copyright The Korean Space Science Society 33 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093-1409 Research Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copyright © The Korean Space Science Society 33 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093.29.1.033 Development of CINEMA Mission Uplink Communication System NayoungYoon1 , SeyoungYoon1 ,Yongho Kim2 , Jiwon University, Yongin 446-701, Korea 3 Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94705

California at Berkeley, University of

112

Laser diagnostic experiments on KrF laser ablation plasma-plume dynamics relevant to manufacturing applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief review is given of the potential applications of laser ablation in the automotive and electronics manufacturing industries. Experiments are presented on KrF laser ablation of three materials relevant to manufacturing applications: aluminum metal vs aluminum--nitride (AlN) and alumina (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) ceramics. Plasma and neutral-atom diagnostic data are presented from resonant-holographic-interferometry, dye-laser-resonance-absorption photography, and HeNe laser deflection. Data show that plasma electron densities in excess of 10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3] exist in the ablation of AlN, with lower densities in Al and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Aluminum neutral and ion expansion velocities are in the range of cm/[mu]s. Ambipolar electric fields are estimated to be 5--50 V/cm.

Gilgenbach, R.M.; Ching, C.H.; Lash, J.S.; Lindley, R.A. (Intense Energy Beam Interaction Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Two source emission behavior of projectile fragments alpha in 84^Kr interactions at around 1 GeV per nucleon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emission of projectile fragments alpha has been studied in 84^Kr interactions with nuclei of the nuclear emulsion detector composition at relativistic energy below 2 GeV per nucleon. The angular distribution of projectile fragments alpha in terms of transverse momentum could not be explained by a straight and clean-cut collision geometry hypothesis of Participant - Spectator (PS) Model. Therefore, it is assumed that projectile fragments alpha were produced from two separate sources that belong to the projectile spectator region differing drastically in their temperatures. It has been clearly observed that the emission of projectile fragments alpha are from two different sources. The contribution of projectile fragments alpha from contact layer or hot source is a few percent of the total emission of projectile fragments alphas. Most of the projectile fragments alphas are emitted from the cold source.

M. K. Singh; Ramji Pathak; V. Singh

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-KR-4 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7684, C7688, and C7695  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a data report for sediment samples received by CHPRC from the 100-KR-4 OU. Between December 17, 2010 and February 17, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-KR-4 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part II. Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste forms of /sup 3/H, /sup 129/I, /sup 14/C, and /sup 85/Kr separated from fuel reprocessing streams and procedures for managing them were analyzed regarding compliance with regulations. Transportation of these wastes in certain DOT-specification packagings would be permissible, but some of these packagings may not be acceptable in some disposal situations. Transportation of gaseous /sup 85/Kr in a currently certified cylinder is possible, but a fuel reprocessor may wish to ship larger quantities per package. Disposal of tritium using a package designed by a DOE contractor and shallow land burial, in accord with the regulations of 10 CFR 61, seems practicable. Although 10 CFR 61 permits shallow land burial of /sup 129/I, the concentration limit requires distribution in a volume that may seem impractical to commercial fuel reprocessors. The concentration limit of 10 CFR 61 for shallow land burial of /sup 14/C requires distribution in a lesser, although still large, volume. For both /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C, management as high-level waste offers the advantage of smaller volumes. Similar advantages may be offered by greater confinement or non-near surface concepts for disposal. The concrete waste forms developed for these nuclides may not meet technical criteria being formulated for geologic disposal. The lack of accommodation of /sup 85/Kr at disposal facilities makes storage of the gaseous form at the fuel reprocessing plant, followed by dispersal after partial decay, seem attractive. Ocean disposal of /sup 129/I and /sup 14/C by the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency-London Ocean Dumping Convention offers advantages over shallow land burial: higher allowed concentrations, resulting in smaller volumes and fewer packages. These rules, however, thwart ocean disposal of /sup 85/Kr since gaseous forms are banned, and for solid forms, concentration limits would require distribution of radioactivity in very large volumes. 80 references.

Trevorrow, L.E.; Kolba, V.M.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Steindler, M.J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Seoul National UniversitySeoul National University http://bp.snu.ac.kr1 The Effect of TiCl4-Treated TiO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TiO2 Compact Layer on the Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell #12;Seoul National UniversitySeoul National University http://bp.snu.ac.kr Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell 2 Schematic Diagram of the Electron Flow by the TiO2 compact layer. Electrolyte Hydrolysis of TiCl4 Solution Dye-Coated TiO2 Back Electron Transfere

Park, Byungwoo

117

Copyright The Korean Space Science Society 23 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093-1409 Research Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Electron, MAgnetic fields (CINEMA) is a space science mission with three identical CubeSats. ThreeCopyright © The Korean Space Science Society 23 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093.29.1.023 Thermal Analysis of TRIO-CINEMA Mission JaegunYoo1 , Ho Jin1 , Jongho Seon1 ,Yun-Hwang Jeong2 , David

California at Berkeley, University of

118

d-alpha Correlation functions and collective motion in Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interplay of the effects of geometry and collective motion on d-$\\alpha$ correlation functions is investigated for central Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV. The data cannot be explained without collective motion, which could be partly along the beam axis. A semi-quantitative description of the data can be obtained using a Monte-Carlo model, where thermal emission is superimposed on collective motion. Both the emission volume and the competition between the thermal and collective motion influence significantly the shape of the correlation function, motivating new strategies for extending intensity interferometry studies to massive particles.

G. Verde; P. Danielewicz; W. G. Lynch; C. F. Chan; C. K. Gelbke; K. K. Lau; T. X. Liu; X. D. Liu; D. Seymour; R. Shomin; W. P. Tan; M. B. Tsang; A. Wagner; H. S. Xu; D. A. Brown; Y. Larochelle; R. T. de Souza; R. Yanez; R. J. Charity; L. G. Sobotka

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

d-alpha correlation functions and collective motion in Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interplay of the effects of geometry and collective motion on d-{alpha} correlation functions is investigated for central Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV. The data cannot be explained with out collective motion, which could be partly along the beam axis. A semi-quantitative description of the data can be obtained using a Monte -Carlo model, where thermal emission is superimposed on collective motion. Both the emission volume and the competition between the thermal and collective motion influence significantly the shape of the correlation function, motivating new strategies for extending intensity interferometry studies to massive particles.

Verde, G; Danielewicz, P; Lynch, W; Chan, C; Gelbke, C; Kwong, L; Liu, T; Liu, X; Seymour, D; Tan, W; Tsang, M; Wagner, A; Xu, H; Brown, D; Davin, B; Larochelle, Y; de Souza, R; Charity, R; Sobotka, L

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cray XE Documentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-GovNatural GasCourseCraig SzymanskiLibSciTPSL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

New limit on the mass of 9.4-keV solar axions emitted in an M1 transition in $^{83}$Kr nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for resonant absorption of the solar axion by $^{83}\\rm{Kr}$ nuclei was performed using the proportional counter installed inside the low-background setup at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. The obtained model independent upper limit on the combination of isoscalar and isovector axion-nucleon couplings $|g_3-g_0|\\leq 1.69\\times 10^{-6}$ allowed us to set the new upper limit on the hadronic axion mass of $m_{A}\\leq 130$ eV (95\\% C.L.) with the generally accepted values $S$=0.5 and $z$=0.56.

Derbin, A V; Gavrilyuk, Yu M; Kazalov, V V; Kim, H J; Kim, Y D; Kobychev, V V; Kuzminov, V V; Ali, Luqman; Muratova, V N; Panasenko, S I; Ratkevich, S S; Semenov, D A; Tekueva, D A; Yakimenko, S P; Unzhakov, E V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part I. Initial information base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the information base that was collected and reviewed in preparation for carrying out an analysis of the compatibility with regulations of waste management technologies for disposal of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Based on the review of this literature, summaries are presented here of waste-form characteristics, packaging, transportation, and disposal methods. Also discussed are regulations that might apply to all operations involved in disposal of the four nuclides, including the processing of irradiated fuel in a fuel reprocessing plant, packaging, storage, transport, and final disposal. The compliance assessment derived from this information is reported in a separate document. 309 references.

Trevorrow, L.E.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kolba, V.M.; Steindler, M.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Quasi-elastic peak lineshapes in adsorbate diffusion on nearly flat surfaces at low coverages: the motional narrowing effect in Xe on Pt(111)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasi-elastic helium atom scattering measurements have provided clear evidence for a two-dimensional free gas of Xe atoms on Pt(111) at low coverages. Increasing the friction due to the surface, a gradual change of the shape of the quasi-elastic peak is predicted and analyzed for this system in terms of the so-called motional narrowing effect. The type of analysis presented here for the quasi-elastic peak should be prior to any deconvolution procedure carried out in order to better extract information from the process, e.g. diffusion coefficients and jump distributions. Moreover, this analysis also provides conditions for the free gas regime different than those reported earlier.

R. Martinez-Casado; J. L. Vega; A. S. Sanz; S. Miret-Artes

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

his being, showed us the Temple of Mathematics. The Pages of the Book were there, we had only to open them. Did there, for every k;r 0, exist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to open them. Did there, for every k;r 0, exist a graph G which when r-edge colored necessarily yielded- plaining the correct usage. It appears there was yet a fourth simultaneous conversation. Those were of Paul Erdos. We and the list is long indeed had energy and talent. Paul, through his actions and his

Spencer, Joel

125

Application of a high-power KrF laser for the study of supersonic gas flows and the development of hydrodynamic instabilities in layered media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a miniature laser shock tube for the study of a wide range of hydrodynamic phenomena in liquids at pressures greater than 10 kbar and in supersonic flows with large Mach numbers (greater than 10) is discussed. A substance filling a chamber of quadratic cross section, with a characteristic size of several centimetres, is compressed and accelerated due to local absorption of 100 ns, 100 J KrF laser pulses near the entrance window. It is proposed to focus a laser beam by a prism raster, which provides a uniform intensity distribution over the tube cross section. The system can be used to study the hypersonic flow past objects of complex shape and the development of hydrodynamic instabilities in the case of a passage of a shock wave or a compression wave through the interfaces between different media. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Zvorykin, V D; Lebo, I G [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

First result of the experimental search for the 9.4 keV solar axion reactions with Kr-83 in the copper proportional counter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The experimental search for solar hadronic axions is started at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the Institute for Nuclear Researches Russian Academy of Science. It is assumed that axions are created in the Sun during M1-transition between the first thermally excited level at 9.4 keV and the ground state in Kr-83. The experiment is based on axion detection via resonant absorption process by the same nucleus in the detector. The big copper proportional counter filled with krypton is used to detect signals from axions. The experimental setup is situated in the deep underground low background laboratory. No evidence of axion detection were found after the 26.5 days data collection. Resulting new upper limit on axion mass is m_{A} < 130 eV at 95% C.L.

Yu. M. Gavrilyuk; A. M. Gangapshev; A. V. Derbin; V. V. Kazalov; H. J. Kim; Y. D. Kim; V. V. Kobychev; V. V. Kuzminov; Luqman Ali; V. N. Muratova; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich; D. A. Semenov; D. A. Tekueva; S. P. Yakimenko; E. V. Unzhakov

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

Large-scale calculations of the double-? decay of 76Ge, 130Te, 136Xe, and 150Nd in the deformed self-consistent Skyrme quasiparticle random-phase approximation  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We use the axially deformed Skyrme quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) together with the SkM? energy-density functional, both as originally presented and with the time-odd part adjusted to reproduce the Gamow-Teller resonance energy in 208Pb, to calculate the matrix elements that govern the neutrinoless double-? decay of 76Ge, 130Te, 136Xe, and 150Nd. Our matrix elements in 130Te and 136Xe are significantly smaller than those of previous QRPA calculations, primarily because of the difference in pairing or deformation between the initial and the final nuclei. In 76Ge and 150Nd, our results are similar to those of less computationally intensive QRPA calculations. We suspect the 76Ge result, however, because we are forced to use a spherical ground state, even though our mean-field theory indicates a deformed minimum.

Mustonen, M. T.; Engel, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

van der Waals-corrected Density Functional Theory simulation of adsorption processes on transition-metal surfaces: Xe and graphene on Ni(111)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The DFT/vdW-WF2s1 method, recently developed to include the van der Waals interactions in the Density Functional Theory and describe adsorption processes on metal surfaces by taking metal-screening effects into account, is applied to the case of the interaction of Xe and graphene with a transition-metal surface, namely Ni(111). In general the adsorption of rare-gas atoms on metal surfaces is important because is prototypical for physisorption processes. Moreover, the interaction of graphene with Ni(111) is of particular interest for practical applications (efficient and large-scale production of high-quality graphene) and, from a theoretical point of view, is particularly challenging, since it can be described by a delicate interplay between chemisorption and physisorption processes. The first-principles simulation of transition metals require particular care also because they can be viewed as intermediate systems between simple metals and insulating crystals. Even in these cases the method performs well as d...

Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

High-resolution laser spectroscopy between 0.9 and 14.3 THz in a supersonic beam: Rydberg-Rydberg transitions of atomic Xe at intermediate n values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser-based, pulsed, narrow-band source of submillimeter-wave radiation has been developed that is continuously tunable from 0.1 THz to 14.3 THz. The source is based on difference-frequency mixing in the nonlinear crystal trans-4{sup Prime }-(dimethylamino)-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate. By varying the pulse length, the bandwidth of the submillimeter-wave radiation can be adjusted between 85 MHz and 2.8 MHz. This new radiation source has been integrated in a vacuum-ultraviolet-submillimeter-ware double-resonance spectrometer, with which low-frequency transitions of atoms and molecules in supersonic beams can be detected mass-selectively by photoionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The properties of the radiation source and spectrometer are demonstrated in a study of 33f Leftwards-Arrow nd Rydberg-Rydberg transitions in Xe with n in the range 16-31. The frequency calibration of the submillimeter-wave radiation was performed with an accuracy of 2.8 MHz. The narrowest lines observed experimentally have a full-width at half-maximum of {approx}3 MHz, which is sufficient to fully resolve the hyperfine structure of the Rydberg-Rydberg transitions of {sup 129}Xe and {sup 131}Xe. A total of 72 transitions were measured in the range between 0.937 THz and 14.245 THz and their frequencies are compared with frequencies calculated by multichannel quantum defect theory.

Haase, Christa; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic [Laboratorium fuer Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

XE6_Tips_022011.pptx  

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132

XE6_Tips_09302010.pptx  

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133

Intel® Inspector XE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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134

Completion of the ORNL Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Level 4 Milestone – Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL – FT-14OR031202, MS# M4FT-14OR0312027, “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study”, due May 30, 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter and attached emails document the completion of the FCR&D Level 4 milestone for the Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL work package (FT-14OR031202), “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study” (M4FT-14OR0312027), due May 30, 2014. Support to this effort included providing a literature search and providing a significant number of reference documents covering more than 30 years of past work on Kr recovery, recovery system designs, and past cost analyses. In addition, ORNL provided support on several conference calls to establish an analysis approach for the current study and to review progress.

Jubin, Robert T. [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Search for 2{nu}{beta}{beta} Decay of {sup 130}Te to the First Excited State of {sup 130}Xe with an Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of searching for zero-neutrino double-beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay is to probe an absolute neutrino mass scale suggested by the mass-splitting parameters observed by neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, observation of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay is an explicit instance of Lepton-number non-conservation. A sensitive measurement of two-neutrino double-beta (2{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay can provide critical input to Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) calculations of the nuclear matrix elements in models similar to those used to extract the absolute neutrino mass from (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay experiments. Tellurium-130, an even-even nucleus, can undergo 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay to the first 0+ excited state of {sup 130}Xe producing three possible {gamma}-ray cascades as it transitions to the ground state. The Cascades detector is a high purity germanium (HPGe) crystal array consisting of two ultra-low-background copper cryostats each housing a hexagonal array of seven crystals. The project is currently being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA (USA), and aims to obtain very high {gamma}-ray detection efficiency while utilizing highly effective and low-background shielding. GEANT4 simulations of the detector are performed for a {sup 130}Te sample in order to determine the optimum size and geometry of the source for maximum detection efficiency and predict its sensitivity for measuring 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay to the first 0+ excited state of {sup 130}Xe. These simulations are validated with calibration sources and presented.

Mizouni, L. K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States); University of South Carolina, 712 Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Aalseth, C. E.; Erikson, L. E.; Hossbach, T. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Orrell, J. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [University of South Carolina, 712 Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

Hopper, NERSC's Cray XE6 System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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138

Summary Report on the Volatile Radionuclide and Immobilization Research for FY2011 at PNNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2011, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogen-based aerogels (i.e., chalcogels). A silica aerogel was tested at ORNL for total I2 sorption capacity. It was determined to have 48 mass% capacity while having little physisorbed I2 (I2 not taken up in the aerogel pores). For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated and a new MOF with about 8 mass% capacity for Xe and Kr. The selectivity can be changed from Xe > Kr to Xe < Kr simply by lowering the temperature below 0 C. A patent disclosure has been filed. Lastly, silicon carbide (SiC) was loaded with Kr. The diffusion of Kr in SiC was found to be less than detectable at 500 C.

Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Matyas, Josef; Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

jjaeminn@kaist.ac.kr, hongshin@kaist.ac.kr, moonzoo@cs.kaist.ac.kr (concurrent program)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'2009. pp.53~62 [3] Ehud Trainin, Yarden Nir-Buchbinder, Rachel Tzoref-Brill, Aviad Zlotnick, Shmuel Ur

140

Demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal organic framework materials (MOFs) were developed and tested in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle Technology Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal of xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) from gaseous products of nuclear fuel reprocessing unit operations. Two metal organic framework structures were investigated in greater detail to demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery. Our two bed breakthrough measurements on NiDOBDC and FMOFCu indicate these materials can capture and separate parts per million levels of Xe and Kr from air. The removal efficiency and adsorption capacity for Kr on these two MOFs were further increased upon removal of Xe upfront.

Thallapally, Praveen K.; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

693 jmoh@bi.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the bandwidth problem for dense graphs in average. In Section 3 we 2 #12; observe some to the bandwidth related

142

Masses of Kr-76 and K-74  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Since that time, we have begun a systematic study of the light neutron-deficient iso- . topes of rubidium and krypton to determine accu- rate beta endpoints with an intrinsic germanium detector. (Earlier plastic scintillator measurements have been...

Moltz, D. M.; Toth, K. S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Neese, R. E.; Sullivan, J. P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201800 (China); Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D. [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

jhchang@nova.snu.ac.kr {btzhang,ytkim}@cse.snu.ac.kr Helmholtz machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, J., Elements of Information Theory, John Wiley & Sons, 1991. [2] Dayan, P., Hinton, G. E., Neal, R. M., Zemel, R. S., "The Helmholtz Machine", Neural Computation, vol. 7, pp. 889- 904, 1995. [3] Frey] Hinton, G. E., Dayan, P., Frey, B. J., and Neal, R. M., "The Wake-Sleep Algorithm for Unsupervised Neural

145

(Perturbational) @bi.snu.ac.kr btzhang@cse.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. [5] Eisen, M.B., Spellman, P.T., Brown, P.O., and Botstein, D., Cluster analysis and display. 407, p. 651, 2000. [7] Tavazoie, S., Huges, J.D., Campbell, M.J., Cho, R.J., and Church, G Wide Web, Science, vol. 287, p. 2115a, 2000. [4] DeRisi, J.L., Iyer, V.R., and Brown, P.O., Exploring

146

3G/WLAN *hsim@netlab.snu.ac.kr, sbahk@snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ,min ,max ,max max 1 ( , ) log(1 )(1 ) ( ) ) 1 i i i i i b i i i i i i r r U r N c N r r r r R N = + - - ( + (1) ir log , ir [2]. maxR #12; ,minir ,maxir i . ( )b ic N> . .(3) ,max , max , (1 )log 2 log 2 i broad i before broadcast i broad i before broadcast r c U R N P c

Bahk, Saewoong

147

Systematics of cross sections for target K-vacancy production in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross sections for K-shell ionization by heavy ions have been determined from the measurements of target K x-ray yields. The measurements were performed with Ar, Kr, and Xe ions at energies from 2.5 to 25 MeV/amu and self-supported metallic foil...

Peng, Yong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Adsorption Isotherms for Xenon and Krypton using INL HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The generation of adsorption isotherms compliments the scale-up of off-gas processes used to control the emission of encapsulated radioactive volatile fission and activation products released during Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) reprocessing activities. A series of experiments were conducted to obtain capacity results for varying Kr and Xe gas concentrations using HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN engineered form sorbents. Gas compositions for Kr ranged from 150-40,000 ppmv and 250-5020 ppmv for Xe in a helium balance. The experiments were all performed at 220 K at a flowrate of 50 sccm. Acquired capacities were then respectively fit to the Langmuir equation using the Langmuir linear regression method to obtain the equilibrium parameters Qmax and Keq. Generated experimental adsorption isotherms were then plotted with the Langmuir predicted isotherms to illustrate agreement between the two. The Langmuir parameters were provided for input into the OSPREY model to predict breakthrough of single component adsorption of Kr and Xe on HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN sorbents at the experimental conditions tested. Kr and Xe capacities resulting from model breakthrough predictions were then compared to experimental capacities for model validation.

Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Veronica J. Rutledge; Jack D. Law

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The I*(2P1/2)-I*(2P1/2) Contact Pair Emission in Condensed Media: A Molecular Spring-Gauge for Cavity Sizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rare gas matrixes of Ar, Kr, and Xe.2 We recognize that these condensed phase emission spectraThe I*(2P1/2)-I*(2P1/2) Contact Pair Emission in Condensed Media: A Molecular Spring-Rg potentials. The analysis yields a refined I*I* potential and provides a calibration curve to readout

Apkarian, V. Ara

150

Cosmic-ray-produced stable nuclides: various production rates and their implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rates for a number of reactions producing certain stable nuclides, such as /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He, and fission in the moon are calculated for galactic-cosmic-ray particles and for solar protons. Solar-proton-induced reactions with bromine usually are not an important source of cosmogenic Kr isotopes. The /sup 130/Ba(n,p) reaction cannot account for the undercalculation of /sup 130/Xe production rates. Calculated production rates of /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H agree fairly well with rates inferred from measured excesses of these isotopes in samples with long exposure ages. Cosmic-ray-induced fission of U and Th can produce significant amounts of fission tracks and of /sup 86/Kr, /sup 134/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe, especially in samples with long exposures to cosmic-ray particles.

Reedy, R.C.

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development and Test Evaluations for Ni-DOBDC Metal Organic Framework (MOF) Engineered Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint effort to prepare engineered forms of a Ni-DOBDC metal organic framework (MOF) was completed with contributions from PNNL, SNL and the INL. Two independent methods were used at INL and SNL to prepare engineered form (EF) sorbents from Ni-DOBDC MOF powder developed and prepared at PNNL. Xe and Kr capacity test evaluations were performed at ambient temperature with the cryostat experimental setup at INL. The initial INL EF MOF test results indicated a Xe capacity of 1.6 mmol/kg sorbent and no Kr capacity. A large loss of surface area also occurred during minimal testing rendering the INL EF MOF unusable. Four capacity tests were completed using the SNL EF MOF at ambient temperature and resulted in Xe capacities of 1.4, 4.2, 5.0 and 3.8 mmol/kg sorbent with no Kr capacity observed in any ambient temperature tests. Two additional capacity tests were performed at 240 K to further evaluate SNL EF MOF performance. Xe capacities of 50.7 and 49.3 mmol/kg of sorbent and Kr capacities of 0.77 and 0.69 mmol/kg of sorbent were obtained, respectively. Following the adsorption evaluations, the SNL EF MOF material had lost about 40 % of the initial mass and 40 % of the initial surface area. In general, the Xe capacity results at ambient temperature for the INL and SNL EF Ni-DOBDC MOF’s were lower than 9.8 mmol Xe/kg sorbent test results reported by INL in FY-12 using PNNL’s inital EF supplied material.

Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

gwangui.hong@se.kaist.ac.kr, ekjee@se.kaist.ac.kr, bae@se.kaist.ac.kr Systematic code verification for properties of real-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] . . UPPAAL [4] . TIMES Linux , ANSI-C CBMC(Bounded Model Checking for C/C++)[5_trans() , . CBMC ANSI-C , SAT(satisfiability problem) . CBMC main() , assert() (3 ), ANSI-C . VVI 1 7 . assert(!hp || rdClock(Ventricle_x)

Jee, Eunkyoung

153

*, **LG, *** {kilmd55, sky6174, carecano}@ccl.snu.ac.kr, jsno@snu.ac.kr, habchung@hongik.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Univ., **LG Electronic, ***Hongik Univ. , (soft-decision-and-forward: SDF) . (signal-to-noise ratio: SNR) , . . [1] SDF (maximum-likelihood: ML) , [2] (pairwise error probability: PEP) . SDF SNR , . 1 . . 1 1 (source: S

No, Jong-Seon

154

ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN 136Xe BOMBARDMENTS OF 249Cf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

onto the column in HHO. or HCl in a volume of lessin about 50ul of a 0.1M HHO_ solution. The walls of tha

Gregorich, K.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ar xe o2: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stellar decay rates of 128I and only marginally affected by the specific stellar neutron flux. For this reason it represents an important test for He-shell burning in AGB...

156

Gas phase 129Xe NMR imaging and spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 l l Dynamic NMR microscopy of gas phase Poiseuille flowmetal vapors and noble gases can be used to efficientlypolarize the nuclei ofthe noble-gas atoms. As a result, the

Kaiser, Lana G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Configuration of Hopper, NERSC's Cray XE6 System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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158

New Features of the Hopper XE6 - Differences from Franklin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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159

KAIST {jmcho, yjoh, jbyoo, cha}@salmosa.kaist.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System . 2.2. 2.3.4 , AECL(The Atomic Energy of Cnanda Limited) . [2] AECL FRS for Nuclear Domain) . KSSAN AECL . ACEL DFD FOD(Function Overview Diagrams) condition-event SDT

160

Hanford Site - 100-KR-4 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2nd Else Kröner-Fresenius Symposium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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162

PLC 149 ekjee@dependable.kaist.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLC 149 21 : : 2007 4 11 2008 1 25 : : : ekjee , . , . , , , . : 35 3(2008.3) PLC (A Structural Testing Strategy for PLC Programs Specified by Function Block Diagram) (Eunkyoung Jee) (Seungjae Jeon) (Sungdeok Cha) (PLC: Programmable Logic

Jee, Eunkyoung

163

Hyper Logic Programs in SILK: Redefining the KR Playing Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as users · Initial version 2004, then refined extensively and tested rigorously · For recent info, see http://www.ai.sri.com/project/aura #12;6 Another Bit of Inspirational Ancient History ... · "It's the Economy, Stupid!" · Campaign slogan war in 1991, the US economy suffered a recession later in 1991. · E.g., see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It's_the_economy

Polz, Martin

164

*woogin@yonsei.ac.kr, **hysong@yonsei.ac.kr A Study on the Video Quality Improvement of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University TVCATV, TV, IPTV, DMB, . (Standard, Jimmy jib, Hand held, Dolly)() . . 1 . 4~5 Standard Jimmy jib( ), Hand held(), Dolly( ) . Hand held . . Hand held ZOOM IN, OUT ZOOM OUTZOOM IN . Jimmy jib . Jimmy jibHandheld Hand held

Song, Hong-Yeop

165

Experimental investigation of left-right asymmetry in photon-atom interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single ionization of noble gas atoms by linearly polarized synchrotron radiation has been studied by employing angle- and energy-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements were carried out in the plane defined by the momentum and polarization vectors of the photon. Parameters describing the left-right asymmetry (LRA) (relative to the photon propagation direction) of the photoelectron angular distribution were determined experimentally for the $s$-shells of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe atoms and H$_2$ molecules and for the $p$-shells of Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe atoms. The values of the left-right asymmetry differ significantly from zero for both subshells. The photon and photoelectron energy dependence of the LRA parameters are presented also. Possible experimental and instrumental sources that could generate asymmetry are discussed and excluded as well.

Ricz, S; Kövér, Á; Holste, K; Borovik,, A; Schippers, S; Varga, D; Müller, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Molecular interactions with ice: Molecular embedding, adsorption, detection, and release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of atomic and molecular species with water and ice is of fundamental importance for chemistry. In a previous series of publications, we demonstrated that translational energy activates the embedding of Xe and Kr atoms in the near surface region of ice surfaces. In this paper, we show that inert molecular species may be absorbed in a similar fashion. We also revisit Xe embedding, and further probe the nature of the absorption into the selvedge. CF{sub 4} molecules with high translational energies (?3 eV) were observed to embed in amorphous solid water. Just as with Xe, the initial adsorption rate is strongly activated by translational energy, but the CF{sub 4} embedding probability is much less than for Xe. In addition, a larger molecule, SF{sub 6}, did not embed at the same translational energies that both CF{sub 4} and Xe embedded. The embedding rate for a given energy thus goes in the order Xe > CF{sub 4} > SF{sub 6}. We do not have as much data for Kr, but it appears to have a rate that is between that of Xe and CF{sub 4}. Tentatively, this order suggests that for Xe and CF{sub 4}, which have similar van der Waals radii, the momentum is the key factor in determining whether the incident atom or molecule can penetrate deeply enough below the surface to embed. The more massive SF{sub 6} molecule also has a larger van der Waals radius, which appears to prevent it from stably embedding in the selvedge. We also determined that the maximum depth of embedding is less than the equivalent of four layers of hexagonal ice, while some of the atoms just below the ice surface can escape before ice desorption begins. These results show that energetic ballistic embedding in ice is a general phenomenon, and represents a significant new channel by which incident species can be trapped under conditions where they would otherwise not be bound stably as surface adsorbates. These findings have implications for many fields including environmental science, trace gas collection and release, and the chemical composition of astrophysical icy bodies in space.

Gibson, K. D.; Langlois, Grant G.; Li, Wenxin; Sibener, S. J., E-mail: s-sibener@uchicago.edu [The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Killelea, Daniel R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Loyola University Chicago, 1068 W. Sheridan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60660 (United States)

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Octatetraene-Xe van der Waals Clusters Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2002, Vol. 23, No. 2 195 Fluorescence Excitation Spectroscopy of Octatetraene-Xe van der Waals Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a conjugated double bond structure, playing important roles in photobiological systems. Conversion of light conversion of light in biolog- ical systems. Some years ago, this group has reported the role of the rare gas for the molecular interactions among the collision pairs and the solvation dynamics.1,2 Since the rare gas atoms

Kim, Sang Kyu

168

G G G G G G dlxotjr0321@naver.com, hyjang@bi.snu.ac.kr, btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Andrew Blake [3] "Depth-Encoded Hough Voting for Joint Object Detection and Shape Recovery", Min Sun1, Gary Bradski2, Bing-Xin Xu1, Silvio Savarese1 [4]"A skeleton based shape matching and recovery approach

169

Laser plasma cryogenic target on translating substrate for generation of continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To generate continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses with various wavelengths from laser-produced plasmas, a one-dimensionally translating substrate system with a closed He gas cryostat that can continuously supply various cryogenic targets for ?10 Hz laser pulses has been developed. The system was successfully operated at a lowest temperature of 15 K and at a maximum up-down speed of 12 mm/s. Solid Ar, Kr, and Xe layers were formed, and their growth rates and the laser crater sizes on them were studied. By optimization of the operational parameters in accordance with our design rule, it was shown that stable output power was achieved continuously from the plasma emission at frequencies of 1–10 Hz. The average soft X-ray and EUV powers obtained were 19 mW at 3.2 nm, 33 mW at 10.0 nm, and 66 mW at 10.8 nm, with 10% bandwidths, from the Ar, Kr, and Xe solid targets, respectively, with a laser power of 1 W. We will be able to achieve higher frequencies using a high beam quality laser that produces smaller craters, and can expect higher powers. Although only Ar, Kr, and Xe gases were tested in this study, the target system achieved a temperature of 15 K and can thus solidify almost all target gases, apart from H and He, and can continuously supply the solid target. The use of various target materials will enable expansion of the EUV and soft X-ray emission wavelength range.

Amano, Sho [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Design for a Compact Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a prototype, compact time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) is described. The system primarily consists of an ion acceleration/focusing/steering assembly (AFSA), an 8 cm field-free region, a 4 cm, dual-stage reflectron and a miniature microchannel plate detector. Consequently, the resulting flight length of the system is 12 cm. The system has been designed with the capability to sample directly from atmosphere at ambient pressures. This is accomplished through the use of an electrodynamic ion funnel, housed in an intermediate-vacuum chamber that is coupled to the inlet of the TOF chamber. TOF spectra were obtained using noble gases (Ar, Kr and Xe) as test chemicals. These measured flight times were used to probe the performance of the instrument. A temporal resolution (tflight/?t) of approximately 125, acquired using 129Xe+, has been measured for the system.

Manard, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Communication: Nuclear quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in noble gas atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic and imaging methods may be developed by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic effects. A first-principles electronic structure formulation of nuclear electric quadrupole moment-induced Cotton-Mouton effect (NQCME) is presented for closed-shell atoms. In NQCME, aligned quadrupole moments alter the index of refraction of the medium along with and perpendicular to the direction of nuclear alignment. The roles of basis-set convergence, electron correlation, and relativistic effects are investigated for three quadrupolar noble gas isotopes: {sup 21}Ne, {sup 83}Kr, and {sup 131}Xe. The magnitude of the resulting ellipticities is predicted to be 10{sup ?4}–10{sup ?6} rad/(M cm) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. These should be detectable in the Voigt setup. Particularly interesting is the case of {sup 131}Xe, in which a high degree of spin polarization can be achieved via spin-exchange optical hyperpolarization.

Fu, Li-juan; Vaara, Juha, E-mail: juha.vaara@iki.fi [NMR Research Group, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)] [NMR Research Group, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Rizzo, Antonio [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IPCF-CNR), Area della Ricerca, via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)] [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IPCF-CNR), Area della Ricerca, via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Measurements of ultra-low-energy electron scattering cross sections of atoms and molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new experimental technique for the total cross section measurements of ultra-low energy electron collisions with atoms and molecules utilizing the synchrotron radiation is presented. The technique employs a combination of the penetrating field technique and the threshold photoionization of rare gas atoms using the synchrotron radiation as an electron source in order to produce a high resolution electron beam at very low energy. Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the energy region from extremely low electron energy to 20 eV are presented.

Kitajima, M.; Shigemura, K.; Kurokawa, M. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 152-8551 Tokyo (Japan); Odagiri, T. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 102-8554 Tokyo, Japan and Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 152-8551 Tokyo (Japan); Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 102-8554 Tokyo (Japan); Ito, K. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, 305-0801 Tsukuba (Japan)

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

173

Analysis of fission gas release kinetics by on-line mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The release of fission gas (Xe and Kr) and helium out of nuclear fuel materials in normal operation of a nuclear power reactor can constitute a strong limitation of the fuel lifetime. Moreover, radioactive isotopes of Xe and Kr contribute significantly to the global radiological source term released in the primary coolant circuit in case of accidental situations accompanied by fuel rod loss of integrity. As a consequence, fission gas release investigation is of prime importance for the nuclear fuel cycle economy, and is the driven force of numerous R and D programs. In this domain, for solving current fuel behavior understanding issues, preparing the development of new fuels (e.g. for Gen IV power systems) and for improving the modeling prediction capability, there is a marked need for innovations in the instrumentation field, mainly for: . Quantification of very low fission gas concentrations, released from fuel sample and routed in sweeping lines. Monitoring of quick gas release variations by quantification of elementary release during a short period of time. Detection of a large range of atomic masses (e.g. H{sub 2}, HT, He, CO, CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), together with a performing separation of isotopes for Xe and Kr elements. Coupling measurement of stable and radioactive gas isotopes, by using in parallel mass spectrometry and gamma spectrometry techniques. To fulfill these challenging needs, a common strategy for analysis equipment implementation has been set up thanks to a recently launched collaboration between the CEA and the Univ. of Provence, with the technological support of the Liverpool Univ.. It aims at developing a chronological series of mass spectrometer devices based upon mass filter and 2D/3D ion traps with Fourier transform operating mode and having increasing levels of performances to match the previous challenges for out-of pile and in-pile experiments. The final objective is to install a high performance online mass spectrometer coupled to a gamma spectrometer in the fission product laboratory of the future Jules Horowitz Material Test Reactor. An intermediate step will consist of testing first equipment on an existing experimental facility in the LECA-STAR Hot Cell Laboratory of the CEA Cadarache. This paper presents the scientific and operational stakes linked to fission gas issues, resumes the current state of art for analyzing them in nuclear facilities, then presents the skills gathered through this collaboration to overcome technological bottlenecks. Finally it describes the implementation strategy in nuclear research facilities of the CEA Cadarache. (authors)

Zerega, Y.; Reynard-Carette, C. [Univ. of Provence, Laboratoire Chimie Provence, UMR 6264, Avenue escadrille Normandie - Niemen, F-13397 Marseille (France); Parrat, D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carette, M. [Univ. of Provence, Laboratoire Chimie Provence, UMR 6264, Avenue escadrille Normandie - Niemen, F-13397 Marseille (France); Brkic, B. [Univ. of Liverpool, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Lyoussi, A.; Bignan, G. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Janulyte, A.; Andre, J. [Univ. of Provence, Laboratoire Chimie Provence, UMR 6264, Avenue escadrille Normandie - Niemen, F-13397 Marseille (France); Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Taylor, S. [Univ. of Liverpool, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pore-structure determinations of silica aerogels by {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy and imaging.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silica aerogels represent a new class of open-pore materials with pore dimensions on a scale of tens of nanometers, and are thus classified as mesoporous materials. In this work, we show that the combination of NMR spectroscopy and chemical-shift selective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can resolve some of the important aspects of the structure of silica aerogels. The use of xenon as a gaseous probe in combination with spatially resolved NMR techniques is demonstrated to be a powerful, new approach for characterizing the average pore structure and steady-state spatial distributions of xenon atoms in different physicochemical environments. Furthermore, dynamic NMR magnetization transfer experiments and pulsed-field gradient (PFG) measurements have been used to characterize exchange processes and diffusive motion of xenon in samples at equilibrium. In particular, this new NMR approach offers unique information and insights into the nanoscopic pore structure and microscopic morphology of aerogels and the dynamical behavior of occluded adsorbates. MRI provides spatially resolved information on the nature of the flaw regions found in these materials. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for magnetization transfer among the bulk and occluded xenon phases indicate xenon-exchange rate constants on the order of 1 s-1 for specimens having volumes of 0.03 cm3. PFG diffusion measurements show evidence of anisotropic diffusion for xenon occluded within aerogels, with nominal self-diffusivity coefficients on the order of D= 10-3cm2/s.

Gregory, D. M.; Gerald, R. E., II; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

New Tools for Chemically Directed Glycoproteomics and Xe-based MRI Contrast Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q Gradient ultrapure water purification system (Millipore).Q Gradient ultrapure water purification system (Millipore).Q Gradient ultrapure water purification system (Millipore).

Palaniappan, Krishnan K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Comprehensive Simulation Study of a Liquid-Xe Detector for Contraband Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, a new detector concept, for combined imaging and spectroscopy of fast-neutrons and gamma was presented. It encompasses a liquid-xenon (LXe) converter-scintillator coupled to a UV-sensitive gaseous Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM)-based imaging photomultiplier (GPM). In this work we present and discuss the results of a systematic computer-simulation study aiming at optimizing the type and performance of LXe converter. We have evaluated the detector spectral response, detection efficiency and spatial resolution for gamma-rays and neutrons in the energy range of 2-15 MeV for 50 mm thick converters consisting of plain LXe volume and LXe-filled capillaries, of Teflon, Polyethylene or hydrogen-containing Teflon (Tefzel). Neutron detection efficiencies for plain LXe, Teflon-capillaries and Tefzel-capillaries converters were about 20% over the entire energy range. In polyethylene capillaries converters the neutron detection efficiency was about 10% at 2 MeV and increased up to about 20% at 14 MeV. Dete...

Israelashvili, I; Vartsky, D; Arazi, L; Bar, D; Caspi, E N; Breskin, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Presentations from Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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179

SciTech Connect: Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in $^{136}$Xe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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180

Laser action in para-quaterphenyl vapor pumped by XeCl* laser radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach is proposed to the search for active media involving a theoretical study of the spectral, luminescence, and lasing properties of organic molecules. Laser action was obtained in gas-phase para-quaterphenyl (lambda/sub l/=361.5 nm) with a low threshold pumping level (1.1 MW/cm/sup 2/). The lasing capacity of some substituted forms of para-quaterphenyl is predicted.

Danilova, V.I.; Degtyarenko, K.M.; Gruzinskii, V.V.; Kopylova, T.N.; Maier, G.V.; Tarasenko, V.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Workshop on Cray XE6 User Experiences September 27-28  

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182

Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates byUser GuideHadoopUsingon-package memoryACML

183

Web Documents for Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011  

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184

Franklin XT4 to Hopper XE6 Katie Antypas and Helen He NERSC User Services Group  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" GiveFuture ofFRANKLIN

185

Agenda for Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFM LEAPAgenda Agenda Large ScaleAgenda

186

Towards a precision measurement of the half life of neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent neutrino oscillation experiments provide proof that neutrinos are massive par- ticles, but the absolute neutrino mass scale remains unknown. Observation of neu- trinoless double… (more)

Stanford University, Dept. of Physics

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Microsoft Word - LATEST_Final Report_KR_v03_2_22.doc  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation...

188

Reproducible Features of Congested Highway Traffic C.F. Daganzo and K.R. Smilowitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accumulations between detectors vary with flow in a predictable way, and that a macroscopic kinematic wave] and the kinematic wave (KW) continuum theory of [3] and [4]. As a result, more complicated theories that allow

Daganzo, Carlos F.

189

Nuclear waste processing based on FOOF and KrF sub 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A class of oxygen fluoride compounds and krypton difluoride show great promise in recovering and purifying plutonium and other actinides from nuclear waste and residues. Since 1983, a significant effort has been expended in three main areas of research; one area is the characterization of the reactive species and the fluorination reaction chemistry with various actinides. The second area is to develop efficient production methods for the active chemicals. The third area is actually in demonstrating application of these fluorinating agents to actinides recovery and purification. Substantial progress has been made in all three areas and some of the highlights in their research effort is discussed. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Kim, K.C.; Blum, T.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

PromSearch 22 , bhkim, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) (TSS) . 300bp , . , (TATA box, Inr, GC box, CAAT box) DPE(downstream promoter elementInspector . PromSearch TSS (downstream) bp , PromSearch . 3.2 22 [7] 22 gene start) PromSearch . . [7] . (TSS) (downstream) 555bp

191

Processes for Removal and Immobilization of 14C, 129I, and 85Kr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a white paper covering the results of a literature search and preliminary experiments on materials and methods to remove and immobilize gaseous radionuclided that come from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

Strachan, Denis M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Henager, Charles H.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Matyas, Josef; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Weber, William J.; Zheng, Feng

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

Optical logic gates and its application e-mail : slee@kist.re.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognition system, label / payload separation system, gray code to BCD converter, binary counter, parity bit] [9] [8]* ETC Gray code to BCD converter Binary counter Parity bit checker Encryption system Flip . gray code to BCD converter, binary counter, parity bit checker, encryption system, Flip-flop memory

Park, Namkyoo

193

All optical gray code to BCD converter e-mail : nkpark@plaza.snu.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[. 1] / [ 2] / All optical gray code to BCD converter *1) , 2) , 2) , 2) , 1) 1) , 2 to binary-coded-decimal (BCD) converter for the first time in our knowledge utilizing cross gain modulations-level-simplification-method that has been used in electronics, we successfully designed the 4-bit all-optical Gray- code to BCD

Park, Namkyoo

194

Ohmyoung Kwon1 e-mail: omkwon@wow.hongik.ac.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a new non-destructive evaluation NDE technique of imaging sub-surface structure- dimensional micro and nanoengineered devices are developed in the future, the demand for the NDE technique at much slower speeds than sound waves which is commonly used in NDE at large scales. Hence, for a given

Shi, Li

195

me.postech.ac.kr Department of Mechanical Engineering Introducing POSTECH_04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

education, fostering advanced research, and the industrial application of scientific research. POSTECH intelligent robot research center in Korea, the Pohang Institute of Intelligent Robotics. And with 4th development, transforming the industrial city of Pohang to a city of Science and technology. POSTECH

Sung, Wokyung

196

Numerical study and validation of one swirling flame , Sren K. Kr, Chungen Yin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy Technology Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstræde 101, 9220 Aalborg, Denmark Abstract) methods show different flow patterns in isothermal and reacting case. The influence of heat release@et.aau.dk Proceedings of the European Combustion Meeting 2011 based on a bluff-body burner. Central jet tube is 3.6 mm

Berning, Torsten

197

Phonon wave-packet simulations of Ar/Kr interfaces for thermal rectification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by designing them to have extremely low thermal conductivities in the one direction.4 Thermally rectifying extremely difficult. Materials that exhibit thermal rectification would drastically improve our ability and dissimilar materials which have shown thermal rectify- ing behavior. In 2002, Terraneo et al.6 demonstrated

Walker, D. Greg

198

Characterization of the thermal dependence of bioengineered glufosinate resistance in cotton. Dawson, K.R.1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of the thermal dependence of bioengineered glufosinate resistance in cotton isolated from glufosinate resistant cotton. The thermal dependencies of the Km of PAT for glufosinate the thermal dependence of the bioengineered glufosinate resistance in cotton will be determined. #12;

Mukhtar, Saqib

199

Microsoft Word - LATEST_Final Report_KR_v03_2_22.doc  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuringInformation 9StructureContactWind ProjectHEATHigh

200

Market-Based Incentives for Green Building Alternatives K.R. Grosskopf, Ph.D.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be addressed. Key Words Best management practices (BMPs), demand-side management, externalities, rebates for developing market-based initiatives to stimulate demand-side conservation. This approach is founded on the principal that reducing water use and subsequent wastewater discharge through demand-side or "user

Jawitz, James W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

First-principles calculations of the stability and incorporation of helium, xenon and krypton in uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While metallic fuels have a long history of reactor use, their fundamental physical and thermodynamic properties are not well understood. Many metallic nuclear fuels are body-centered cubic alloys of uranium that swell under fission conditions, creating fission product gases such as helium, xenon and krypton. In this paper, helium, xenon, and krypton point defects are investigated in the a and ? phases of metallic uranium using first principles calculations. A density functional theory (DFT) framework is utilized with projector augmented-wave (PAW) pseudopotentials. Formation and incorporation energies of He, Xe, and Kr are calculated at various defect positions for the prediction of fission gas behavior in uranium. In most cases, defect energies follow a size effect, with helium incorporation and formation energies being the smallest. The most likely position for the larger Xe and Kr atoms in uranium is the substitutional site. Helium atoms are likely to be found in a wide variety of defect positions due to the comparable formation energies of all defect configurations analyzed. This is the first detailed study of the stability and incorporation of fission gases in uranium.

B. Beeler; B. Good; S. Rashkeev; M. Baskes; M. Okuniewski

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of impurity atoms and molecules on the lifetime of antiprotonic helium atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Delayed annihilation time spectra of antiprotons (DATS) in room temperature helium gas have been studied as a function of the concentration of admixed noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) as well as molecular gases (N_2,O_2,H_2) at the low energy antiproton ring (LEAR) at CERN. The DATS were a superposition of two exponential components, one with lifetime of several 100 ns and the other with lifetime 1 to 3 \\mus. They showed a shorter average lifetime (T_{av}) than DATS of pure helium. Ne, Ar, and Kr were found to affect T_{av} only slightly even in concentrations up to 20\\%, while Xe showed a much stronger influence. In the case of molecular gases the presence of N_2 influenced the DATS much less than O_2 and H_2 which destroyed the metastability almost completely in concentrations of 100 ppm and less. The decay rate of the slow component of DATS was found to exhibit a linear relation to the number density of the admixture. From this a collisional destruction (``quenching'') cross section \\sigma_q was extracted. No ...

Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T; Hayano, R S; Iwasaki, M; Nakamura, S N; Tamura, H; Ito, T M; Kawachi, A; Nishida, N; Higemoto, M; Ito, Y; Morita, N; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Schmid, W; Hoffmann, J; Eades, John

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.Use of US croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gasesovercome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil. Proc. Natl.

Tsao, Chi-Chung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Non-dipole effects in photoelectron angular distributions for rare gas atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a theoretical study of O(ka) and O(k{sup 2}a{sup 2}) corrections to the dipole approximation in photoionization of rare gas atoms, where k is the magnitude of the photon wave vector and a is the radius of the ionized subshell. In the dipole approximation, the photoelectron angular distribution is characterized by the single parameter {Beta}. The O(ka) corrections are characterized by two parameters {gamma} and {delta}, and the O(k{sup 2}a{sup 2}) corrections are characterized by three parameters {lambda}, {mu}, and {nu}, constrained by the relation {lambda} + {mu} + {nu} = 0 and a correction {Delta}{Beta} to the dipole parameter {Beta}. Formulas are given for the non-dipole parameters in terms of reduced matrix elements of electric and magnetic multipole operators. Tables and graphs of the seven angular distribution parameters, calculated in the relativistic independent-particle approximation (IPA), are given for electron energies ranging from 20 to 5,000 eV for all 41 subshells of the rare gas atoms He,NE,Ar,Kr, and Xe. Tables and graphs of the O(ka) parameters are also given in the energy range 2--60 eV for the n = 3 and 4 shells of Kr, and for the n = 4 and 5 shells of Xe, where interesting non-dipole effects are found. Comparisons of the IPA calculations with correlated relativistic random-phase approximation calculations are made for selected subshells of Ar and Kr, illustrating the influence of correlation on the non-dipole parameters.

Derevianko, A.; Johnson, W.R.; Cheng, K.T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Quantity of 135I Released from the AGR 1, AGR 2, and AGR 3/4 Experiments and Discovery of 131I at the FPMS Traps during the AGR-3/4 Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of three Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). From 2006 through 2014, these experiments supported the development and qualification of the new U.S. tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Each AGR experiment consisted of multiple fueled capsules, each plumbed for independent temperature control using a mix of helium and neon gases. The gas leaving a capsule was routed to individual Fission Product Monitor (FPM) detectors. For intact fuel particles, the TRISO particle coatings provide a substantial barrier to fission product release. However, particles with failed coatings, whether because of a minute percentage of initially defective particles, those which fail during irradiation, or those designed to fail (DTF) particles, can release fission products to the flowing gas stream. Because reactive fission product elements like iodine and cesium quickly deposit on cooler capsule components and piping structures as the effluent gas leaves the reactor core, only the noble fission gas isotopes of Kr and Xe tend to reach FPM detectors. The FPM system utilizes High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors coupled with a thallium activated sodium iodide NaI(Tl) scintillator. The HPGe detector provides individual isotopic information, while the NaI(Tl) scintillator is used as a gross count rate meter. During irradiation, the 135mXe concentration reaching the FPM detectors is from both direct fission and by decay of the accumulated 135I. About 2.5 hours after irradiation (ten 15.3 minute 135mXe half lives) the directly produced 135mXe has decayed and only the longer lived 135I remains as a source. Decay systematics dictate that 135mXe will be in secular equilibrium with its 135I parent, such that its production rate very nearly equals the decay rate of the parent, and its concentration in the flowing gas stream will appear to decay with the parent half life. This equilibrium condition enables the determination of the amount of 135I released from the fuel particles by measurement of the 135mXe at the FPM following reactor shutdown. In this paper, the 135I released will be reported and compared to similar releases for noble gases as well as the unexpected finding of 131I deposition from intentional impure gas injection into capsule 11 of experiment AGR 3/4.

Dawn Scates

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Measurement of a magnetic-dipole transition probability in Xe32+ using an electron-beam ion trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D2 5D3 M1 transition of interest at 413.94 nm Measurement of a magnetic-dipol using an electron-bea F. G. Serpa,* C. A. Morgan, E Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standard E. Tr Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Universit D. A.... Sugar, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 3 ~1991!. @8# C.A. Morgan, F.G. Serpa, E. Taka?cs, E.S. Meyer, J.D. Gillaspy, J. Sugar, J.R. Roberts, C.M. Brown, and U. Feldman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1716 ~1995!. @9# F.G. Serpa, E.S. Meyer, C.A. Morgan, J.D. Gillaspy...

Serpa, F. G.; Morgan, C. A.; Meyer, E. S.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Trabert, E.; Church, David A.; Takacs, E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Xe chemical shift measurements on a single crystal surface H.J. Jaansch *, P. Gerhard, M. Koch, D. Stahl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as to understand the numerous phenomena occurring in catalytic reactions, corrosion, or lubrication phenomena. Many;diffusion phenomena and electric field gradients at surfaces. These experiments use highly polarized lithium

208

Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of Ge76, Se82, Mo100 and Xe136 to excited 0^+ states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutrinoless double beta decay transition to the first excited 0^+ collective final state is examined for A=76, 82, 100 and 136 nuclei by assuming light and heavy Majorana neutrino exchange mechanisms as well as the trilinear R-parity violating contributions. Realistic calculations of nuclear matrix elements have been performed within the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation. Transitions to the first excited two-quadrupole phonon 0^+ state are described within a boson expansion formalism and alternatively by using the operator recoupling method. We present the sensitivity parameters to different lepton number violating signals, which can be used in planning the neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay to the first excited state 0^+_1 is by a factor of 10 to 100 larger than that of the transition to the ground state.

F. Simkovic; M. Nowak; W. A. Kaminski; A. A. Raduta; Amand Faessler

2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactor accident in Marchof detector materials by Fukushima fallout, which includeCo are not detected near Fukushima or our soil samples, we

Gando, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

{jskim, cylee, eskim, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr Characterization of Actors in TV Drama via Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

notations. But for loops, we don't. Instead, we [2] look at what specifications a loop refines. We take

211

A Cargo Inspection System for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Based on Associated Particle Neutron Generators and Liquid-Kr Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility analysis is presented of a cargo inspection system based on neutron-induced fission followed by the coincident detection of multiple prompt fission gamma rays as a signature of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The system does not require gamma ray spectroscopy and would be capable of distinguishing U-238 from U-235 using the ratio of signals from two modes of detection: thermal neutron capture induced fission and fast neutron-induced fission. The system utilizes two deuterium-tritium (DT) associated particle neutron generators, each capable of 10{sup 9} neutrons/s at 14.1 MeV, with sub-nanosecond timing resolution ZnO:Ga alpha detectors. The expected {approx}1 MeV prompt gamma rays are detected using liquid krypton (LKr) detectors with sub-nanosecond timing resolution ({approx}600 ps) and high detection efficiency. The expected SNM signal and randomly correlated background rates are discussed using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

Koltick, David S.; Kane, Steven Z. [Purdue University Applied Physics Laboratory 740 Navco Dr., Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Plasmonic photovoltaics K.R. Catchpole1,2, S. Pillai2, M.A. Green2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australia 3California Institute of Technology (CALTECH) Pasadena, California, USA #12;UNSW Why Solar of the worlds energy using 8% efficient photovoltaics. The Solar Resource Average solar irradiance, W/m2. #12? The size of the resource. The small black dots show the area of solar panels needed to generate all

Polman, Albert

213

Quantum Mechanics II Set 4 Due Oct. 7, 2008 (http://beauty.phys.pusan.ac.kr/qmg/fall08)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 3. The potential energy of the electron in hydrogen atom is given as V (r) = - 3e2 80 R3 R2 - 1 3r2 if r R ( a0), - e2 40 1 r if r > R (2) (a) Find the first order energy correction to the state for a 0) for |x| energy and wavefunctions, when V0

Hong, Deog Ki

214

MESURE AU COMPTEUR PROPORTIONNEL DU RAPPORT captureL/captureK DU 79Kr Par MICHEL LANGEVIN,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measured by use of a mixture of the radia- tive element with propane in a proportional counter. Some details are given on experimental pro- cedure and results. LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ET LE RADIUM. TOME 16 très faible de photons K soit absorbée. Nous avons utilisé à cet effet un remplissage de propane, gaz

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

Reply to the comments of Dr. K.R. Rushton on ``Steady flow to a horizontal drain in an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 174­185 Mazda Kompani-Zare a,*, Hongbin Zhan b,1 a Desert Management Department, School of Agriculture

Zhan, Hongbin

216

Accurate transition rates for the 5p-5s transitions in KrI Krzysztof Dzierzega,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of other experiments used thermal plasma sources, either wall- stabilized electric arcs in the experiments in neutral krypton atoms. The measurements were made with a wall-stabilized electric arc and a 2-m mono- chromator for the spectral lines in the visible, and with a hollow cathode lamp and the NIST 2-m Fourier

217

---Home Yahoo! Help My Yahoo! http://asia.news.yahoo.com/041102/kyodo/d863kr500.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2, 17:04 PM Japan, EU, others to discuss nuclear fusion reactor next week Japan, the European where they will build the world's first prototype nuclear fusion reactor, Japan's science ministry said are together working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project will meet next Tuesday

218

Programme Committee Member 1. KR 2014, 14th International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the 9th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. Toronto, Canada, 10 May­8 September 2012 9. ECAI 2012, 20th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence Montpellier, France 27 Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems Paris, France, 16­17 December 2010 17. JELIA 2010, 12th European Conference

Toni, Francesca

219

KR Smith/N Bruce, et al. Millions dead: how do we know and what does it mean? Web supplement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...........................................................................................................................7 2.2 MODELING HOUSEHOLD EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTION FROM SOLID FUEL COMBUSTION IN RURAL HOUSEHOLDS......................................................................................................5 2. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT............................................................................................................................................7 2.1 GLOBAL ESTIMATES OF SOLID FUEL USE

Silver, Whendee

220

Multiple ionization of noble gases by swift H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in breakup and nonbreakup collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured multiple-ionization yields of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe targets by 1.0 MeV/amu H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ions for both the dissociative and nondissociative channels. Except for the case of the breakup of the H{sub 2}{sup +} into two protons, we have also determined the absolute cross sections for the multiple ionization of the targets. The ratios of multiple to single ionization for the nondissociative channel are similar to those for equivelocity protons, which, however, are consistently smaller than those for the breakup channels, for all charge states and targets. A simple analysis, based on the independent particle model, considering postcollisional time-delayed ionization for the Ne and Ar targets, evinces the importance of these mechanisms in the target multiple ionization and of the antiscreening in collisions where the projectile electron undergoes a transition.

Sigaud, G.M.; Luna, H.; Montenegro, E.C. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22452-970 (Brazil); Sant'Anna, M.M.; Santos, A.C.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); McGrath, C.; Shah, M.B. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cavalcanti, E.G. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22780-160 (Brazil)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Vibrational Modes of Adsorbed Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, because the interaction. a d t ion is weak corn pared to the Ne-A , n the 11. and ].~m ' w e 1V mode. modes lie below the In comparisons with the mass-def y eing a measure of the mass divided C. Ne on Kr The three" rin"p incipal surface mod... represe~t~~g lo or izontal" polari- 0 P) 0 CU 0 2v 1H 1L 4H e - XENON FIG. 1. Dimens' are ni nsionless f nine substrate requency (d* o- ' 'o a layers b vs two- d b 1 I" ng y try ' o He on Xe. There 15 5081 5082 R LA%REN C E AND R . E...

LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Exposure of nuclear track emulsion to thermal neutrons, heavy ions and muons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical analysis of exposures of test samples of reproduced nuclear track emulsion (NTE) is presented. In boron enriched NTE the angular and energy correlations of products of the reaction induced by thermal neutrons n$_{th} + ^{10}B \\rightarrow ^{7}Li + (\\gamma) + \\alpha$ are studied. NTE was exposed to ions $^{86}Kr^{+17}$ and $^{124}Xe^{+26}$ of energy about 1.2 A MeV. Measurements of the heavy ion ranges of in NTE allowed one to determine their energy on a basis of the SRIM model. Nuclear stars of large multiplicity of target nuclei are observed in exposure of NTE to ultrarelativistic $\\mu$-mesons. The kinematical characteristics of the events of splitting of carbon nuclei into three $\\alpha$-particles studied in this exposure point to a nuclear diffractive mechanism of interactions.

D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; A. A. Zaitsev; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; V. V. Rusakova

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Partial doubly differential cross sections for multiple ionization of argon, krypton, and xenon atoms by electron impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partial doubly differential cross sections for multiple ionization d/sup 2/sigma/sup (n)//dE d..cap omega.. of argon, krypton, and xenon by electron impact have been measured as a function of incident electron energy and ejected electron energy, for argon up to Ar/sup 4+/, for krypton up to Kr/sup 5+/, and for xenon up to Xe/sup 8+/. Incident electron energies between 0.5 and 10 keV were used, while the electrons ejected at an angle of 90/sup 0/ to the incident electron direction were detected with energies between 20 and 270 eV. The doubly differential cross section (sum of partial doubly differential cross sections) for ionization for each gas has been compared with experimental data in the literature.

Chaudhry, M.A.; Duncan, A.J.; Hippler, R.; Kleinpoppen, H.

1989-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

Lee, S. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

ADMISSIONS GUIDE FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://me.kaist.ac.kr 3002 Aerospace Engineering http://ae.kaist.ac.kr 3702 Ocean Systems Engineering http://kaist-ocean.or.kr/ 1505 Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering http://cbe.kaist.ac.kr/ 3904://gsnt.kaist.ac.kr/ 1102 Biological Sciences http://bio.kaist.ac.kr/index_eng.htm 2605 Bio & Brain Engineering http

Kim, Yong Jung

226

Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The removal of volatile radionuclides generated during used nuclear fuel reprocessing in the US is almost certain to be necessary for the licensing of a reprocessing facility in the US. Various control technologies have been developed, tested, or used over the past 50 years for control of volatile radionuclide emissions from used fuel reprocessing plants. The US DOE has sponsored, since 2009, an Off-gas Sigma Team to perform research and development focused on the most pressing volatile radionuclide control and immobilization problems. In this paper, we focus on the control requirements and methodologies for 85Kr and 129I. Numerous candidate technologies have been studied and developed at laboratory and pilot-plant scales in an effort to meet the need for high iodine control efficiency and to advance alternatives to cryogenic separations for krypton control. Several of these show promising results. Iodine decontamination factors as high as 105, iodine loading capacities, and other adsorption parameters including adsorption rates have been demonstrated under some conditions for both silver zeolite (AgZ) and Ag-functionalized aerogel. Sorbents, including an engineered form of AgZ and selected metal organic framework materials (MOFs), have been successfully demonstrated to capture Kr and Xe without the need for separations at cryogenic temperatures.

N. R. Soelberg; J. D. Law; T. G. Garn; M. Greenhalgh; R. T. Jubin; P. Thallapally; D. M. Strachan

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Production yields of noble-gas isotopes from ISOLDE UC$_{x}$/graphite targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yields of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe isotopic chains were measured from UC$_{x}$/graphite and ThC$_{x}$/graphite targets at the PSB-ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity achieved by the combination of a plasma-discharge ion source with a water-cooled transfer line. %The measured half-lives allowed %to calculate the decay losses of neutron-rich isotopes in the %target and ion-source system, and thus to obtain information on the in-target %productions from the measured yields. The delay times measured for a UC$_x$/graphite target allow for an extrapolation to the expected yields of very neutron-rich noble gas isotopes, in particular for the ``NuPECC reference elements'' Ar and Kr, at the next-generation radioactive ion-beam facility EURISOL. \\end{abstract} \\begin{keyword} % keywords here, in the form: keyword \\sep keyword radioactive ion beams \\sep release \\sep ion yields \\sep ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) \\sep uranium and thorium carbide targets. % PACS codes here, in the form: \\PACS code \\sep code...

Bergmann, U C; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Diget, C A; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Gausemel, H; Georg, U; Giles, T; Hagebø, E; Jeppesen, H B; Jonsson, O C; Köster, U; Lettry, Jacques; Nilsson, T; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Riisager, K; Weissman, L; Äystö, J

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Adaptation of gas tagging for failed fuel identification in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses experience with noble gas tagging and its adaptation to commercial reactors. It reviews the recent incidence of fuel failures in light water reactors, and methods used to identify failures, and concludes that the on-line technique of gas tagging could significantly augment present flux tilting, sipping and ultrasonic testing of assemblies. The paper describes calculations on tag gas stability in-reactor, and tag injection tests that were carried out collaboratively with Commonwealth Edison Company in the Byron-2 pressurized water reactor (P%a) and with Duke Power Company and Babcock and Wilcox Fuel Company in the Oconee-2 PWM. The tests gave information on: (a) noble gas concentration dynamics as the tag gases were dissolved in and eventually removed from subsystems of the RCS; and (b) the suitability of candidate Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopes for tagging PWR fuel. It was found that the activity of Xe{sup 125} (the activation product of the tag isotope Xe{sup 124}) acted as a ``tag of a tag`` and tracked gas through the reactor; measured activities are being used to model gas movement in the RCS. Several interference molecules (trace contaminants normally present at sub-ppM concentrations in RCS samples) and entrained air in the RCS were found to affect mass spectrometer sensitivity for tag isotopes. In all instances the contaminants could be differentiated from the tag isotopes by operating the mass spectrometer at high resolution (2500). Similarly, it was possible to distinguish all the candidate tag gases against a high background of air. The test results suggested, however, that for routine analysis a high resolution static mass spectrometer will be preferable to the dynamic instrument used for the present analyses.

Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Depiante, E.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Callis, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Egebrecht, P.M. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Downers Grove, IL (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A method for direct, semi-quantitative analysis of gas phase samples using gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new and complete GC–ICP-MS method is described for direct analysis of trace metals in a gas phase process stream. The proposed method is derived from standard analytical procedures developed for ICP-MS, which are regularly exercised in standard ICP-MS laboratories. In order to implement the method, a series of empirical factors were generated to calibrate detector response with respect to a known concentration of an internal standard analyte. Calibrated responses are ultimately used to determine the concentration of metal analytes in a gas stream using a semi-quantitative algorithm. The method was verified using a traditional gas injection from a GC sampling valve and a standard gas mixture containing either a 1 ppm Xe + Kr mix with helium balance or 100 ppm Xe with helium balance. Data collected for Xe and Kr gas analytes revealed that agreement of 6–20% with the actual concentration can be expected for various experimental conditions. To demonstrate the method using a relevant “unknown” gas mixture, experiments were performed for continuous 4 and 7 hour periods using a Hg-containing sample gas that was co-introduced into the GC sample loop with the xenon gas standard. System performance and detector response to the dilute concentration of the internal standard were pre-determined, which allowed semi-quantitative evaluation of the analyte. The calculated analyte concentrations varied during the course of the 4 hour experiment, particularly during the first hour of the analysis where the actual Hg concentration was under predicted by up to 72%. Calculated concentration improved to within 30–60% for data collected after the first hour of the experiment. Similar results were seen during the 7 hour test with the deviation from the actual concentration being 11–81% during the first hour and then decreasing for the remaining period. The method detection limit (MDL) was determined for the mercury by injecting the sample gas into the system following a period of equilibration. The MDL for Hg was calculated as 6.8 ?g · m{sup ? 3}. This work describes the first complete GC–ICP-MS method to directly analyze gas phase samples, and detailed sample calculations and comparisons to conventional ICP-MS methods are provided.

Carter, Kimberly E.; Gerdes, Kirk

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Electron capture from H-2 to highly charged Th and Xe ions trapped at center-of-mass energies near 6 eV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ions with charge states as high as 80+, produced in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion trap were extracted and transferred to a Penning ion trap (RETRAP). RETRAP was operated at cryogenic temperature in the field of a...

Weinberg, G.; Beck, B. R.; Steiger, J.; Church, David A.; McDonald, J.; Schneider, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Dependence of cross sections for multi-electron loss by 6 mev/amu xe18+ ions on target atomic number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ions in the present energy and charge regime. A semiempirical calculation based the IEA shows that the average most probable impact parameter for electron loss is much smaller than the target molecular bond length. This result is believed to account...

Peng, Yong

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

FASTGRASS: A mechanistic model for the prediction of Xe, I, Cs, Te, Ba, and Sr release from nuclear fuel under normal and severe-accident conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary physical/chemical models that form the basis of the FASTGRASS mechanistic computer model for calculating fission-product release from nuclear fuel are described. Calculated results are compared with test data and the major mechanisms affecting the transport of fission products during steady-state and accident conditions are identified.

Rest, J.; Zawadzki, S.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

OFDM PAPR Blind SLM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OFDM PAPR Blind SLM *, *, *, *, * *, ** joohs@ccl.snu.ac.kr, hsjbest@ccl.snu.ac.kr, lucidream@ccl.snu.ac.kr, jsno@snu.ac.kr, djshin@hanyang.ac.kr New Blind SLM with Low Complexity for PAPR- power ratio) . SLM (SI; side information) . m- sequence blind SLM

No, Jong-Seon

234

Radiochemistry as a (rho)R Diagnostic with the RAGS Gas Collection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiochemical diagnostic techniques such as gas-phase capsule debris analysis may prove to be successful methods for establishing the success or failure of ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Samples in the gas phase offer the most direct method of collection by simply pumping out the large target chamber following a NIF shot. The target capsules will be prepared with dopants which will produce radioactive noble gas isotopes upon activation with neutrons. We have designed and constructed the Radchem Apparatus for Gas Sampling (RAGS) in order to collect post-shot gaseous samples for NIF capsule diagnostics. The design of RAGS incorporates multiple stages intended to purify, transfer, and count the radioactive decays from gaseous products synthesized in NIF experiments. At the moment the dopant of choice is {sup 124}Xe, which will undergo (n,{gamma}) and (n, 2n) reactions to produce {sup 125}Xe and {sup 123}Xe. The half-lives of each are on the order of multiple hours and are suitable for long-term gamma-counting. These isotopes and the rest of the gases evolved in a NIF shot will be drawn through the NIF turbo pumps, past the temporarily shuttered cryo pumps (to aid our collection efficiency), and towards the first main portion of the RAGS system: the pre-cleaner. The pre-cleaner will consist of a water removal system, a series of heated getter cartridges to remove most other impurities such as N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, etc., and a residual gas analyzer (RGA) to monitor vacuum quality. The noble gases will flow through the precleaner and into the second stage of the system: the cryo collector. This cryo collector consists of a main cryo head for noble gas collection which will operate for approximately five minutes post-shot. Afterwards a valve will close and isolate the pre-cleaner, while the cryo head warms to release the Xe gas to one of two locations - either a second cryo station for in-situ gamma counting, or to a small cooled gas bottle for removal and counting. Additional capabilities of the RAGS system include a noble gas calibration apparatus attached to the NIF target chamber, which will be operated hours pre-shot to determine collection efficiency through the whole RAGS system via the signal detected from the RGA. Also it is possible there will be the addition of a helium puff system to drive the Xe through the pre-cleaner and collection stations. It is also likely that multiple cryo collection stations will be built into the system in the future to fractionate and collect other noble gases such as Kr, Ar, and possibly Ne. A prototype pre-cleaner has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and is in the testing phases. The information learned in this testing will help collaborators at Sandia National Laboratory that are building and delivering the systems that will be deployed at NIF. The LBNL testing so far has demonstrated that radioactive fission gases can be flowed through the system with and without carrier gases of air and/or He, and the activity can be collected on an activated charcoal sample. Further testing in the upcoming months will hopefully yield more information about any presence of Xe in the water removed from the system, and commissioning of a small cryo cooler as well.

Nelson, S L; Shaughnessy, D A; Schneider, D H; Stoeffl, W; Moody, K J; Cerjan, C; Stoyer, M A; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Hoffman, R

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

{yjoh, jmcho, jbyoo, sdcha}@salmosa.kaist.ac.kr A Technique to Specify and Analyze Reactive and Real-Time Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Analyze Reactive and Real-Time Software Younju Oh, Jaemyoung Cho, Junbeom Yoo, Sungdeok Cha Div. of CS, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology requirements specification (SRS). Many specification languages are suggested to specify reactive and real

236

United States Department of the Interior, J .A. Kr , Secretary Fish and Jildli!e Service, Albert M. Day, Dir c or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fresh fish . Food consumption per capita by United States civilians in 1948 will be slightly lower than last year IS rate of per capita consumption are indicated for fresh and frozen fish, evaporated milk, but still above the consumption rates of the late 1930's. For only a few items is the per capita consumption

237

Extended version of paper in KR-2010 NYU CIMS Technical Report: TR2010-926 The Temporal Logic of Token Causes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine what is responsible for a pa- tient's symptoms, why a stock plummeted in value, or the reason the type-level relationship has been instantiated and take into account that we may wish to also assess

Mishra, Bud

238

A Finite Volume Approach For Contingent Claims R. Zvan \\Lambda , P.A. Forsyth y , and K.R. Vetzal z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Finite Volume Approach For Contingent Claims Valuation R. Zvan \\Lambda , P.A. Forsyth y , and K presents a nonconservative finite volume approach for solving two­ dimensional contingent claims valuation problems. The finite volume method is more flexible than finite difference schemes which are often

Forsyth, Peter A.

239

http://soc2010.inha.ac.kr 2 0 1 0 S o C C o n f e r e n c e  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-ku, Seoul, Korea 120-749 2 LG electronics System IC Business MSC;17 P 1. 14:00 - 16:30 001 #12;2010 SoC 1 , 1 , 2 , 1 1 2 LG IC MCS : (02)2123-7709, E-Kyung Seong1 , Pyung-Su Han2 , Woo-Young Choi1 1 School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei

Choi, Woo-Young

240

Development of a 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Power Pack : Fuel Cell S. Andreasen, M. Bang, A. Korsgaard, M. Nielsen, S. Kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Power Pack : Fuel Cell Stack Test S, containing about 8 times more energy by volume. Fuelling NaÃ?on based low temperature PEM (LTPEM) fuel cells]. PBI (polybenzoemidazole) based high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cells can operate stable at much

Berning, Torsten

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

United states Department of t he Interior, J. A. Kr ug, Secr et ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day , Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.L O.S. i n London. *F. L. 206 Fish Proc essi~ r achi nery, F . L. 207 Q,uick Freezing and Cold storage of Fisheri es, Dr. G. A. Reay, Department of Scientific and Industrial Resear ch, and Lt . H. :w.. L . Farrer, Herring Industry Board, for the British Inte lligenc e Objectives Sub- Committee , 32 Bryanstone Square

242

Programme Committee Membership by CLArg Members (since 2007) 1. KR 2014, 14th International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Multi-Agent Systems collocated with the 9th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Conference on Logic Programming Budapest, Hungary 4­8 September 2012 9. ECAI 2012, 20th European Conference European Conference on Logics in Artificial Intelligence Helsinki, Finland, 13­15 September 2010 18. COMMA

Toni, Francesca

243

Near-Intrinsic Energy Resolution for 30 to 662 keV Gamma Rays in a High Pressure Xenon Electroluminescent TPC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The search for neutrinoless double beta decay, Riv. NuovoSearch for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in Xe Xe with EXO-

Català, J.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental application of stable xenon and radioxenon monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1969) Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company, Richland WA. [8]Batches Processed through Hanford Separations Plants, 1944Locations Ref iso = Xe Ave. Hanford Fuel Xe) 216-Z-1A Pu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

Moody, K.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Does socioeconomic disparity in cancer incidence vary across racial/ethnic groups?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bauer KR, Brown M, Cress RD, Parise CA, Caggiano V (2007)M, Tsodikov A, Bauer KR, Parise CA, Caggiano V (2008) The

Yin, Daixin; Morris, Cyllene; Allen, Mark; Cress, Rosemary; Bates, Janet; Liu, Lihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Department of Industrial and Management Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@postech.ac.kr 054-279-2195 Purdue Univ., Ph.D. /, kjk@postech.ac.kr 054-279-2208 Rensselaer Polytechnic Ins

Sung, Wokyung

248

Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing. These can evolve in volatile species in the reprocessing facility off-gas streams, depending on the separations and reprocessing technologies that are used. Radionuclides that have been identified as “volatile radionuclides” are noble gases (most notably isotopes of Kr and Xe); 3H; 14C; and 129I. Radionuclides that tend to form volatile species that evolve into reprocessing facility off-gas systems are more challenging to efficiently control compared to radionuclides that tend to stay in solid or liquid phases. Future used fuel reprocessing facilities in the United States can require efficient capture of some volatile radionuclides in their off-gas streams to meet regulatory emission requirements. In aqueous reprocessing, these radionuclides are most commonly expected to evolve into off-gas streams in tritiated water [3H2O (T2O) and 3HHO (THO)], radioactive CO2, noble gases, and gaseous HI, I2, or volatile organic iodides. The fate and speciation of these radionuclides from a non-aqueous fuel reprocessing facility is less well known at this time, but active investigations are in progress. An Off-Gas Sigma Team was formed in late FY 2009 to integrate and coordinate the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) activities directed towards the capture and sequestration of the these volatile radionuclides (Jubin 2012a). The Sigma Team concept was envisioned to bring together multidisciplinary teams from across the DOE complex that would work collaboratively to solve the technical challenges and to develop the scientific basis for the capture and immobilization technologies such that the sum of the efforts was greater than the individual parts. The Laboratories currently participating in this effort are Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). This article focuses on control of volatile radionuclides that evolve during aqueous reprocessing of UNF. In particular, most of the work by the Off-gas Sigma Team has focused on the capture and sequestration of 129I and 85Kr, mainly because, as discussed below, control of 129I can require high efficiencies to meet regulatory requirements, and control of 85Kr using cryogenic processing, which has been the technology demonstrated and used commercially to date, can add considerable cost to a reprocessing facility.

Soelberg, Nicolas R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, Troy [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, Mitchell [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jubin, Robert T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Strachan, Denis M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thallapally, Praveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as “fission product other” or “actinide other”. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Theoretical direct WIMP detection rates for transitions to nuclear excited states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent WMAP and Planck data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Many extensions of the standard model provide dark matter candidates, in particular Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Thus the direct dark matter detection is central to particle physics and cosmology. Most of the research on this issue has hitherto focused on the detection of the recoiling nucleus. In this paper we study transitions to the excited states, possible in some nuclei, which have sufficiently low lying excited states. Examples considered previously were the first excited states of $^{127}$I and $^{129}$Xe. We examine here $^{83}$Kr, which offers some kinematical advantages and is currently considered as a possible target. We find appreciable branching ratios for the inelastic scattering mediated by the spin cross sections, with an inelastic event rate of $4.4\\times 10^{-4}$kg$^{-1}$d$^{-1}$. So, the extra signature of the gamma ra...

Vergados, J D; Pirinen, P; Srivastava, P C; Kortelainen, M; Suhonen, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hadron attenuation in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed theoretical investigation of hadron attenuation in deep inelastic scattering off complex nuclei in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment. The analysis is carried out in the framework of a probabilistic coupled-channel transport model based on the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, which allows for a treatment of the final-state interactions beyond simple absorption mechanisms. Furthermore, our event-by-event simulations account for the kinematic cuts of the experiments as well as the geometrical acceptance of the detectors. We calculate the multiplicity ratios of charged hadrons for various nuclear targets relative to deuterium as a function of the photon energy {nu}, the hadron energy fraction z{sub h}=E{sub h}/{nu}, and the transverse momentum p{sub T}. We also confront our model results on double-hadron attenuation with recent experimental data. Separately, we compare the attenuation of identified hadrons ({pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and p) on {sup 20}Ne and {sup 84}Kr targets with the data from the HERMES Collaboration and make predictions for a {sup 131}Xe target. At the end we turn towards hadron attenuation on {sup 63}Cu nuclei at EMC energies. Our studies demonstrate that (pre-)hadronic final-state interactions play a dominant role in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment while our present approach overestimates the attenuation at EMC energies.

Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 3, Inorganic instrumental methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods cover: C in solutions, F (electrode), elements by atomic emission spectrometry, inorganic anions by ion chromatography, Hg in water/solids/sludges, As, Se, Bi, Pb, data calculations for SST (single shell tank?) samples, Sb, Tl, Ag, Pu, O/M ratio, ignition weight loss, pH value, ammonia (N), Cr(VI), alkalinity, U, C sepn. from soil/sediment/sludge, Pu purif., total N, water, C and S, surface Cl/F, leachable Cl/F, outgassing of Ge detector dewars, gas mixing, gas isotopic analysis, XRF of metals/alloys/compounds, H in Zircaloy, H/O in metals, inpurity extraction, reduced/total Fe in glass, free acid in U/Pu solns, density of solns, Kr/Xe isotopes in FFTF cover gas, H by combustion, MS of Li and Cs isotopes, MS of lanthanide isotopes, GC operation, total Na on filters, XRF spectroscopy QC, multichannel analyzer operation, total cyanide in water/solid/sludge, free cyanide in water/leachate, hydrazine conc., ICP-MS, {sup 99}Tc, U conc./isotopes, microprobe analysis of solids, gas analysis, total cyanide, H/N{sub 2}O in air, and pH in soil.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Curcumin-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Coating onto Metal Stent by EPD Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2007, Vol. 28, No. 3 397 Curcumin-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@plaza.snu.ac.kr Received December 4, 2006 Restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) continues

Park, Jong-Sang

255

Xe films on a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystalline surface Wahyu Setyawan,1 Nicola Ferralis,2 Renee D. Diehl,2 Milton W. Cole,2 and Stefano Curtarolo1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Diehl,2 Milton W. Cole,2 and Stefano Curtarolo1, * 1Department of Mechanical Engineering 2005; revised manuscript received 9 May 2006; published 28 September 2006 The grand canonical Monte of the decagonal Al73Ni10Co17 quasicrystal QC using the grand canonical Monte Carlo sim

Curtarolo, Stefano

256

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, JUlY 1991, p. 2079-2084 Vol. 57, No. 7 0099-2240/91/072079-06$02.00/0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, JUlY 1991, p. 2079-2084 Vol. 57, No. 7 0099Uus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), fungus (Trichophyton mentagrophytes), and viruses (feline is by the application of acoustic energy, which is investigated here. Considerable insight has been gained through

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

257

Spectroscopy of AlAr and AlKr from 31 000 cm-1 to the ionization limit Scott A. Heidecke,@ Zhenwen Fu,b, John FL Colt,") and Michael D. Morse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speciessuch as glyoxal-Ar (Ref. 10) and s-tetrazine-acety- lene." In most cases, however, only one (or a few

Morse, Michael D.

258

Time-resolved spatial distribution of plasma in the ablation of a Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} target by 25?ns KrF ultraviolet laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed radially and longitudinally time-resolved plasma analysis during pulsed laser deposition of Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} thin films. The plasma is shown to be optically thick and strongly non-uniform during the early expansion phase and the resonance line Ba II (455.4?nm) is strongly self-reversed during this time. Plasma temperature and electron density were obtained by comparing experimental emission spectra with the spectral radiance computed for a non-uniform plasma in local thermal equilibrium.

Lagrange, J. F.; Wolfman, J.; Motret, O. [Groupe de Recherche en Matériaux, microélectronique, Acoustique et Nanotechnologies (GREMAN) - UMR 7347 CNRS-CEA, Université François Rabelais de Tours, Faculté des Sciences and Techniques, Parc Grandmont - bât. E – 37200 Tours (France); Hermann, J. [Laboratoire Lasers, Plasmas et Procédés Photoniques (LP3), UMR 6182 CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 163 Avenue de Luminy, C. 917 - 13288 Marseille (France)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

System size effects and N/Z dependence of balance energy for different isotopic series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the N/Z dependence of energy of vanishing flow or balance energy for different isotopic series of various system masses like Ca+Ca, Ni+Ni, Zr+Zr, Sn+Sn and Xe+Xe. We find that balance energy decreases with N/Z of the system and follows a linear behaviour. The slope of N/Z dependence is steeper for lighter systems like Ca+Ca and less for heavier ones like Xe+Xe.

Aman D. Sood; Sakshi Gautam

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

260

March 4, 2013 R&D towards large-liquid scintillator detectors and measurement of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of experiments to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe. The first such experiment, known

McDonald, Kirk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Diversity and Change in Cambodian Households (1998-2006)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns depend on having lost parents during the KR and on9.8% for individuals who lost their parent(s) in a differentamong individuals who lost a parent during the KR, it was

Demont, Floraine; Heuveline, Patrick

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NITROGEN BALANCE IN INTENSIVE AGRICULTURE IN THE NORTH CHINA PLAIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chen DL, White RE, Chalk PM, Heng LK, Fisher R, Helyar KR.NIAES , 1994. pp. 209-234. Heng LK, White RE, Helyar KR,water balance (SWB) model (Heng et al. 2001) were conducted.

Zhang, Yuming; Hu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Jiabao; Chen, Deli

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Quenching of krypton atoms in the metastable 5s ({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state in collisions with krypton and helium atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used the absorption probe method to study the processes of collisional quenching of the metastable 5s [3/2]{sup o}{sub 2}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state of the krypton atom in electron-beam-excited high-pressure He – Kr mixtures with a low content of krypton. The rate constants of plasma-chemical reactions Kr* + Kr + He ? Kr*{sub 2}+He [(2.88 ± 0.29) × 10{sup -33} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}], Kr* + 2He ? HeKr* + He [(4.6 ± 1.3) × 10{sup -36} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}] and Kr* + He ? products + He [(1.51 ± 0.15) × 10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}] are measured for the first time. The rate constants of similar reactions in the Ar – Kr mixture are refined. (active media)

Zayarnyi, D A; L'dov, A Yu; Kholin, I V [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Inhaltsverzeichnis 2 Development of a device for experimental stent coating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Guido Schropa, Jakob Krüger, Alexander Krump Purpose: The project describes the development process Bornmann, Guido Schropa, Jakob Krüger, Alexander Krump Aufgabenstellung: Die vorliegende Projektarbeit

Berlin,Technische Universität

265

Sediment transport time measured with U-Series isotopes: Results from ODP North Atlantic Drill Site 984  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1043. V. Baker, B.N. Bjornstad, A.J. Busacca, K.R. Fecht,1991, 215-250 pp. B.N. Bjornstad, K.R. Fecht, C.J. Pluhar,

DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Kate; Christensen, John N.; McManus, Jerry

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric krypton-85 concentrations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Krypton-85 85 Kr 10.72 years Uranium-234 234 U 2.445E+5 years Krypton-88 88 Kr 2.84 hours Uranium... Radiation Energeticallychargedparticlesfromouterspacecontinuouslyhitthe earth's...

267

Microstructural Analysis of Irradiated U-Mo Fuel Plates: Recent Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural characterization of irradiated dispersion and monolithic RERTR fuel plates using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is being performed in the Electron Microscopy Laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory. The SEM analysis of samples from U-Mo dispersion fuel plates focuses primarily on the behavior of the Si that has been added to the Al matrix to improve the irradiation performance of the fuel plate and on the overall behavior of fission gases (e.g., Xe and Kr) that develop as bubbles in the fuel microstructure. For monolithic fuel plates, microstructural features of interest, include those found in the U-Mo foil and at the U-Mo/Zr and Zr/6061 Al cladding interfaces. For both dispersion and monolithic fuel plates, samples have been produced using an SEM equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB). These samples are of very high quality and can be used to uncover some very unique microstructural features that are typically not observed when characterizing samples produced using more conventional techniques. Overall, for the dispersion fuel plates with matrices that contained Si, narrower fuel/matrix interaction layers are typically observed compared to the fuel plates with pure Al matrix, and for the monolithic fuel plates microstructural features have been observed in the U-10Mo foil that are similar to what have been observed in the fuel particles found in U-Mo dispersion fuels. Most recently, more prototypic monolithic fuel samples have been characterized and this paper describes the microstructures that have been observed in these samples.

D. D. Keiser, Jr.; J. Jue; B. D. Miller; J. Gan; A. B. Robinson; P. V. Medvedev

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Method for introduction of gases into microspheres  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing small hollow glass spheres filled with a gas by introduction of the gas during formation of the hollow glass spheres. Hollow glass microspheres having a diameter up to about 500.mu. with both thin walls (0.5 to 4.mu.) and thick walls (5 to 20.mu.) that contain various fill gases, such as Ar, Kr, Xe, Br, DT, H.sub.2, D.sub.2, He, N.sub.2, Ne, CO.sub.2, etc. in the interior thereof, can be produced by the diffusion of the fill gas or gases into the microsphere during the formation thereof from a liquid droplet of glass-forming solution. This is accomplished by filling at least a portion of the multiple-zone drop-furnace used in producing hollow microspheres with the gas or gases of interest, and then taking advantage of the high rate of gaseous diffusion of the fill gas through the wall of the gel membrane before it transforms into a glass microsphere as it is processed in the multiple-zone furnace. Almost any gas can be introduced into the inner cavity of a glass microsphere by this method during the formation of the microsphere provided that the gas is diffused into the gel membrane or microsphere prior to its transformation into glass. The process of this invention provides a significant savings of time and related expense of filling glass microspheres with various gases. For example, the time for filling a glass microballoon with 1 atmosphere of DT is reduced from about two hours to a few seconds.

Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA); Rosencwaig, Allan (Danville, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Dissolver Off-gas Hot Operations Authorization (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The head-end processing of the Coupled-End-to-End (CETE) Demonstration includes fuel receipt, fuel disassembly, exposure of fuel (e.g., by segmenting the fuel pins), voloxidation of the fuel to separate tritium, and fuel dissolution. All of these processing steps with the exception of the dissolution step will be accomplished in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) (Building 3525). The final headend step will be performed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (Building 7920). The primary purpose of the fuel dissolution step is to prepare the solid fuel for subsequent liquid separations steps. This is accomplished by dissolving the fuel solids using nitric acid. During the dissolution process gases are evolved. Oxides of nitrogen are the primary off-gas components generated by the reactions of nitric acid and the fuel oxides however, during the dissolution and sparging of the resulting solution, iodine, C-14 as carbon dioxide, xenon, and krypton gasses are also released to the off-gas stream. The Dissolver Off-gas treatment rack provides a means of trapping these volatile fission products and other gases via various trapping media. Specifically the rack will recover iodine on a solid sorbent bed, scrub NOx in a water/acid column, scrub CO{sub 2} in a caustic scrubber column, remove moisture with solid sorbent drier beds and recover Xe and Kr using solid absorbent beds. The primary purpose of this experimental rack and the off-gas rack associated with the voloxidation equipment located at IFEL is to close the material balances around the volatile gases and to provide an understanding of the impacts of specific processing conditions on the fractions of the volatile components released from the various head-end processing steps.

Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sequestration of noble gases by H3+ in protoplanetary disks and outer solar system composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the efficiency of the noble gases sequestration by the ion H3+ in the form of XH3+ complexes (with X = argon, krypton or xenon) in gas phase conditions similar to those encountered during the cooling of protoplanetary disks, at the epoch of icy planetesimals formation. We show that XH3+ complexes form very stable structures in the gas phase and that their binding energies are much higher than those involved in the structures of X-H2O hydrates or pure X-X condensates. This implies that, in presence of H3+ ions, argon, krypton or xenon are likely to remain sequestrated in the form of XH3+ complexes embedded in the gas phase rather than forming ices during the cooling of protoplanetary disks. The amount of the deficiency depends on how much H3+ is available and efficient in capturing noble gases. In the dense gas of the mid-plane of solar nebula, H3+ is formed by the ionization of H2 from energetic particles, as those in cosmic rays or those ejected by the young Sun. Even using the largest estimate of the cosmic rays ionization rate, we compute that the H3+ abundance is two and three orders of magnitude lower than the xenon and krypton abundance, respectively. Estimating the ionization induced by the young Sun, on the other hand, is very uncertain but leaves the possibility to have enough H3+ to make krypton and xenon trapping efficent. Finally, additional source of H3+ formation may be provided by the presence of a nearby supernova, as discussed in the literature. Recent solar system observations show a deficiency of Ar, and, even more, of Kr and Xe in Titan and in comets. In this article, we consider the possibility that this deficiency is caused by the afore-mentioned process, namely trapping of those noble gases by H3+ ions in the solar nebula.

Olivier Mousis; Francoise Pauzat; Yves Ellinger; Cecilia Ceccarelli

2007-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

271

Modeling the Jovian subnebula: II - Composition of regular satellites ices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the evolutionary turbulent model of Jupiter's subnebula described by Alibert et al. (2005a) to constrain the composition of ices incorporated in its regular icy satellites. We consider CO2, CO, CH4, N2, NH3, H2S, Ar, Kr, and Xe as the major volatile species existing in the gas-phase of the solar nebula. All these volatile species, except CO2 which crystallized as a pure condensate, are assumed to be trapped by H2O to form hydrates or clathrate hydrates in the solar nebula. Once condensed, these ices were incorporated into the growing planetesimals produced in the feeding zone of proto-Jupiter. Some of these solids then flowed from the solar nebula to the subnebula, and may have been accreted by the forming Jovian regular satellites. We show that ices embedded in solids entering at early epochs into the Jovian subdisk were all vaporized. This leads us to consider two different scenarios of regular icy satellites formation in order to estimate the composition of the ices they contain. In the first scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals that have been produced in Jupiter's feeding zone without further vaporization, whereas, in the second scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals produced in the Jovian subnebula. In this latter case, we study the evolution of carbon and nitrogen gas-phase chemistries in the Jovian subnebula and we show that the conversions of N2 to NH3, of CO to CO2, and of CO to CH4 were all inhibited in the major part of the subdisk. Finally, we assess the mass abundances of the major volatile species with respect to H2O in the interiors of the Jovian regular icy satellites. Our results are then compatible with the detection of CO2 on the surfaces of Callisto and Ganymede and with the presence of NH3 envisaged in subsurface oceans within Ganymede and Callisto.

Olivier Mousis; Yann Alibert

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - acm international conference Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON COMPUTERAIDED DESIGN ICCV IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE... OF KR & REASONING MICRO IEEEACM MICRO MOBILEHCI INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HUMANCOMPUTER INTERACTION......

273

Microsoft Word - ECAR-968 Rev 2 jv.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

54 Comparison Between Normalized Volume Average Fuel Temperature and Log of RB For Radionuclide Kr-85m ......

274

7, 1398914010, 2007 TTL climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 13989­14010, 2007 TTL climatology K. Kr¨uger et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions Long-term climatology of air mass transport through the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) during NH: K. Kr¨uger (kkrueger@ifm-geomar.de) 13989 #12;ACPD 7, 13989­14010, 2007 TTL climatology K. Kr

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

CAMPUS LIFE w w w . d g i s t . a c . k r  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ice.dgist.ac.kr 053)785-6301~3 http://robot.dgist.ac.kr 053)785-6201~3 http://energy.dgist.ac.kr 053)785-1942 · , · ·, ·· · 053)785-5131~2 ·, ·, · ·· ·· · · ·, , OT, · 053)785-5151~5 · 053)785-1161 · 053 & Technology 11 : · http://ems.dgist.ac.kr · http://ice.dgist.ac.kr · http://robot

276

GENERATION OF RADIOXENON ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the continued population of the International Monitoring System (IMS) network and the certification of radioxenon laboratory systems it has become necessary to calibrate and test these systems using as many of the radioxenon isotopes as possible. Several very promising techniques have been explored recently that allow for convenient production of Xe-133, Xe-131m, the short-lived isotope Xe-135, and even the difficult to obtain Xe-133m. IMS national and international laboratories have traditionally obtained Xe-133 from medical isotope suppliers. The activity of these medical dose samples is extremely high (~ 740 MBq) and requires very careful fume hood work to dilute down to appropriate levels (~ 10 Bq). By waiting for 10 or more half-lives it is possible to reduce the handling regimen considerably, while also obtaining a strong Xe-131m signature due to its longer half-life (11.9 days). The short-lived isotope Xe-135 (9.14 hrs) and the longer lived parent nuclide Xe-133m (2.2 day half-life) are never present in these samples. To obtain these isotopes another source or technique is required. This paper will discuss the two techniques developed and implemented at Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) and show the results obtained from each technique. The first is an in-house method that allows for on demand production of two of these isotopes, Xe-133 and Xe-135, using HEU and a modest flux neutron source. The second method uses a research reactor at the Pullman campus of Washington State University to produce Xe-133, Xe-133m and Xe-135.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Miley, Harry S.; Ripplinger, Mike D.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Enriched Xenon Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The EXO Collaboration is actively pursuing both liquid-phase and gas-phase Xe detector technologies with scalability to the ton-scale. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe is especially attractive because of the possibility of tagging the resulting Ba daughter ion, eliminating all sources of background other than the two neutrino decay mode. EXO-200, the first phase of the project, is a liquid Xe time projection chamber with 200 kg of Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe. EXO-200, which does not include Ba-tagging, will begin taking data in 2009, with two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4x10{sup 25} years. This corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV.

Dolinski, M. J. [Stanford University Physics Department, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

Higher dimensions Max flow min cut in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe| e. Value-negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe of flow xe (non-negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex is zero

Duval, Art

279

Higher dimensions Max flow min cut in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex is zero; and |xe| e. Value of flow is x0. Duval: net flow at each vertex is zero; and |xe| e. Value of flow is x0. Definition Cut is minimal set

Duval, Art

280

Adsorption of atmospheric organic pollutants by carbonaceous adsorbents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College, PA) and the Ambersorb adsorbents XE-340, XE-347 and XE-348 (donated by Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA). Each of the Ambersorb adsorbents was individually ground in a U. S. Stoneware Ball Mill (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M...ADSORPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC ORGANIC POLLUTANTS BY CARBONACEOUS ADSORBENTS A Thesis by JAMES BOWLIN McCOY COLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Coley, James Bowlin McCoy

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic xenon laser Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

laser-polarized 129 Xe via flow and diffusion. Fig. 2 shows the penetration of xenon into aerogel... , a common situation in industrial processes that use heterogeneous catalysts....

282

LES KARATES UNE COMMUNAUTE CAIROTE A L'HEURE DE L'TAT-NATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ensuite en Palestine au Xe siècle, et arriva en Egypte. Un certain nombre de familles persanes, dont les

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

283

Environmental application of stable xenon and radioxenonmonitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of transuranic waste is needed to makedecisions about waste site remediation. Soil-gas sampling for xenonisotopes can be used to define the locations of spent fuel andtransuranic wastes. Radioxenon in the subsurface is characteristic oftransuranic waste and can be measured with extreme sensitivity usinglarge-volume soilgas samples. Measurements at the Hanford Site showed133Xe and 135Xe levels indicative of 240Pu spontaneous fission. Stablexenon isotopic ratios from fission are distinct from atmospheric xenonbackground. Neutron capture by 135Xe produces an excess of 136Xe inreactor-produced xenon providing a means of distinguishing spent fuelfrom separated transuranic materials.

Dresel, P. Evan; Olsen, Khris B.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre,Justin I.; Waichler, Scott R.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Cooper, Matt; Kennedy,B. Mack

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Cooperative optimal path planning for herding problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can include lower and upper limits on the control. The controls (speed of the 7 pursuer) are restricted in the following manner: Controls : 8 >>>: _xp 2 [?1;1] _yp 2 [?1;1] (2.4) We determine difierential equations for the states by manipulating... only take the minus sign for _xe and _ye. So state equations are: State Equations : 8 >>>: _xe = ?1r cos( ) _ye = ?1r sin( ) (2.9) where: r = q (xp ?xe)2 +(yp ?ye)2 = tan?1 ?y p ?ye xp ?xe ! 8 For a representative computation, the initial conditions...

Lu, Zhenyu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay with EXO-200 .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work presents a search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe using data from the EXO-200 detector collected between 2011 and 2012. Neutrinoless double… (more)

Slutsky, Simon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

September 14. 2010 Romualdo de Souza  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functions and collective motion in Xe+Au collisions at E/A=50 MeV, G. Verde, P. Danielewicz, W.G. Lynch, C

de Souza, Romualdo T.

287

Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

r I- t of silica aerogels by Xe-129 NMR spectroscopy andcatalysts, ceramics, aerogels, food products, and antiquatedxenon penetration within an aerogel sample as a function of

Goodson, B.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Aerial Measurement of Radioxenon Concentration off the West Coast of Vancouver Island following the Fukushima Reactor Accident  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In response to the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, on March 20th, 2011, Natural Resources Canada conducted aerial radiation surveys over water just off of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Dose-rate levels were found to be consistent with background radiation, however a clear signal due to Xe-133 was observed. Methods to extract Xe-133 count rates from the measured spectra, and to determine the corresponding Xe-133 volumetric concentration, were developed. The measurements indicate that Xe-133 concentrations on average lie in the range of 30 to 70 Bq/m3.

L. E. Sinclair; H. C. J. Seywerd; R. Fortin; J. M. Carson; P. R. B. Saull; M. J. Coyle; R. A. Van Brabant; J. L. Buckle; S. M. Desjardins; R. M. Hall

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

c Copyright 2010. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The Common-Emitter Amplifier Basic Circuit Fig. 1 shows the circuit and emitter with Thévenin equivalent circuits as shown in Fig. 4. vtb = vs R1kR2 Rs + R1kR2 Rtb = RskR1kR2 vte + Rte (c) Solve for the voltage gain Av = vo/vs. A flow graph is shown in Figure 6. Figure 6: Flow

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

290

c Copyright 2010. W. Marshall Leach, Jr., Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The Common-Collector Amplifier Basic Circuit Fig. 1 shows the circuit with a Thévenin equivalent circuit as shown in Fig. 4. vtb = vs R1kR2 Rs + R1kR2 Rtb = R1kR2 Exact Solution (a) Solve for the voltage gain. The flow graph is shown in Figure 6. It is given by Av = ve vs = vtb vs � ve

Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

291

Spherical waves r Legendre polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Spherical waves r er e e Impedance · Legendre polynomials P0(x) = 1 P1(x) = x P2(x · Spherical waves ­ Spherical Hankel functions hn (2)(kr)=jn(kr)-iyn(kr) Impedance · Spherical waves Order: 0 1 4 Circumferential And azimuthal: 0,0 1,1 3,2 #12;3 Impedance · Spherical waves ­ Arbitrary

Berlin,Technische Universität

292

array antenna applications: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 182 EEL 4461 Antenna Systems 1. Catalog Description (3...

293

adaptive antenna radio-fiber: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 498 IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS, VOL. 13,...

294

Coating af ventilationskomponenter PSO 338-080  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ventilation, energiadfærd, energioptimering, vedligehold ISBN 87-991436-2-3 Pris Kr. 75,00 inkl. 25% moms

295

Feasibility, reliability, and clinical validity of the Test of Attentional Performance for Children (KiTAP) in Fragile X syndrome (FXS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genet 2007, 144:517-532. 30. Van der Molen KJ, HuizingaM, Huizinga HM, Ridderinkhof KR, Van der Molen MW, Hamel BJ,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

XL Compiler Dr. Achim Bmelburg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=> traditional (K&R) C-compiler xlc => ANSI 89 C c89 => alias for xlc xlC => ANSI 98 C++ c99 => ANSI 99 C #12

Fiebig, Peter

297

Niels Monberg, en af landets frste IT-ingenir-studerende, har selv  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

først lige vise din interesse og din værdi", siger Niels Monberg. "Det kræver, at du stiller dig der

298

E-Print Network 3.0 - attosecond electron wavepacket Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of valence electron motion Eleftherios Goulielmakis1 Summary: a Figure 4 | Attosecond absorption spectroscopy reveals intra-atomic electron wave-packet motion in Kr1 . a... ....

299

Tim Schuster The ALICE Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V Kr, Au FOPI, KAOS, HADES RHIC BNL, Brookhaven 2000-today sNN=200 GeV Cu, Au, U STAR, PHENIX, BRAHMS

300

(c l.O), 240 mp (e 13,300), XE;l3 6.02 and 6.25 p. Anal. Calcd. for G1Ha20: C, 83.94; H, 10.73. Found: C, 83.84; H,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-108.5", [a]z4~ +64" (c l.O), +4160", [$]:BO;lgh -2240". Anal. Calcd. for C~gH300: C, 83.15; H, 11.01. Found

Berry, R. Stephen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Koedinger, K.R., Pavlik, P., McLaren, B.M., & Aleven, V. (2008). Is it Better to Give than to Receive? The Assistance Dilemma as a Fundamental Unsolved Problem in the Cognitive Science of Learning and Instruction. In B. C. Love, K. McRae, & V. M. Sloutsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that we remain far from a precise and sound scientific response. We believe this "Assistance Dilemma-instruction measures: transfer, long-term retention, or accelerated future learning. Because time is so valuable that increases immediate performance or reduces mental effort. Thus, a change that may put greater demands

McLaren, Bruce Martin

302

Yager, P.L., R.M. Sherrell, S.E. Stammerjohn, A.-C. Alderkamp, O. Schofield, E.P. Abrahamsen, K.R. Arrigo, S. Bertilsson, D.L. Garay, R. Guerrero, K.E. Lowry, P.-O. Moksnes, K. Ndungu,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for dramatic heat and air-sea gas exchange, greater light penetra- tion, and air-sea access for birds;Oceanography | September 2012 41 Sarmiento et al., 2004). The efficiency of the biological pump in high

303

Time-reversal invariance violation measurement using polarized neutron scattering from polarized xenon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We proposed to use polarized neutrons scattering from a hyperpolarized 131Xe gaseous target in order to measure time-reversal violation effect in baryon processes with nucleons. This article provides a brief introduction, historical review, and possible methods to construct a hyperpolarized 131Xe gaseous target.

Pinghan Chu

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Two Dimensional Hybrid Model of a Miniaturized Cylindrical Hall Thruster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@laplace.univ-tlse.fr. § Research Physicist, PPPL, Princeton, yraitses@pppl.gov. ** Research Physicist, Tri Alpha Energy Inc experimentally has been carefully studied and can be attributed to double charged ions. The low energy ions voltage W = electron-wall effective energy loss coefficient x, r = axial, radial coordinate Xe+ , Xe2

305

Electronic desorption of alkyl monolayers from silicon by very highly charged ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-assembled alkyl monolayers SAM on Si 111 .13 AFM images of SAMs after exposure to Xe41 and Au63 show craters ions, like Xe41 and Th73 . Atomic force microscope images show craters from single ion impacts be used to modify surfaces at very low impact energies. Impact energies are limited by the image charge

306

Surface-plasmon exploration of multilayer physisorbed and chemisorbed films on metal substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of this 3 year DOE contract we have built up a high quality Surface Plasmon Resonance apparatus, surveyed Xe, O/sub 2/ and CO multilayer adsorption of silver, made several appropriate experimental modifications and then obtained data on low pressure bulk formation of Xenon multilayers. A publication of current Xe results is now in preparation.

Bretz, M.

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

Welch, R.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A ROBUST ABSOLUTE DETECTION EFFICIENCY CALIBRATION METHOD UTILIZING BETA/GAMMA COINCIDENCE SIGNATURES AND ISOTOPICALLY PURIFIED NEUTRON ACTIVATED RADIOXENON ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts to calibrate the absolute efficiency of gas cell radiations detectors have utilized a number of methodologies which allow adequate calibration but are time consuming and prone to a host of difficult-to-determine uncertainties. A method that extrapolates the total source strength from the measured beta and gamma gated beta coincidence signal was developed in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It has become clear that it is possible to achieve more consistent results across a range of isotopes and a range of activities using this method. Even more compelling is the ease with which this process can be used on routine samples to determine the total activity present in the detector. Additionally, recent advances in the generation of isotopically pure radioxenon samples of Xe-131m, Xe-133, and Xe-135 have allowed these measurement techniques to achieve much better results than would have been possible before when using mixed isotopic radioxenon source. This paper will discuss the beta/gamma absolute detection efficiency technique that utilizes several of the beta-gamma decay signatures to more precisely determine the beta and gamma efficiencies. It will than compare these results with other methods using pure sources of Xe-133, Xe-131m, and Xe-135 and a Xe-133/Xe-133m mix.

McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

The role of lattice excitation in Si etching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemistries of fluorine, F?, and xenon difluoride, XeF?, with clean Si are basically the same, while their chemistries diverge dramatically past I ML F coverage. With a clean Si surface, F? and XeF? react utilizing an ...

Blair, Michael Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermodynamic Investigations of Aqueous Ternary Complexes for Am/Cm Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lawrencium. The element promethium is notable for being theRn]5f 3 6d 1 7s 2 [Rn]5f 3 Promethium [Xe]4f 5 6s 2 [Xe]4f 4Cerium Praseodymium Neodymium Promethium Samarium Europium

Leggett, Christina Joy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

FRACTIONAL SKEW MONOID RINGS P. ARA, M.A. GONZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTIONAL SKEW MONOID RINGS P. ARA, M.A. GONZ â?? ALEZ­BARROSO, K.R. GOODEARL, AND E. PARDO FQM­298 of the Junta de Andalucâ??�a. 1 #12; 2 P. ARA, M.A. GONZ â?? ALEZ­BARROSO, K.R. GOODEARL, AND E

Bigelow, Stephen

312

SYSTEM FRAMEWORK AND ITS APPLICATION IN MOBILE RFID SERVICE NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@security.re.kr + dhwon@security.re.kr Mobile RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) is a newly emerging technology which uses the mobile phone as an RFID reader with a wireless technology and provides new valuable services and wireless internet. UHF Mobile RFID technology is based on ISO/IEC 18000-6C can share UHF RFID tags used

California at Los Angeles, University of

313

PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silicon prototype window, coated with 500 nm thin- #12;Ms-270102 3 film silicon nitride (Si3N4), has been Development of a Silicon Based Electron Beam Transmission Window for Use in a KrF Excimer Laser System by C transmission window for use in a KrF excimer laser system C. A. Gentilea) , H. M. Fana) , J. W. Hartfielda) , R

314

Aminoclay-templated nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) synthesis for efficient harvesting of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1 Young-Chul Lee,ae Kyubock Lee,b Yuhoon Hwang,c Henrik Rasmus ). On the basis of these characteristics, oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 was harvested within 3 min at a > 20 g LÃ?1

Mosegaard, Klaus

315

Laser Fusion Research at NRL Fusion Power Associates Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulations 0 1.0 1.50.5 2.0 Two focal zooms during implosion G = 10* *Gives Recirculating power = 25% >Laser efficiency = KrF = 7.0% > Thermal efficiency = 40% > Blanket Burnup = = 1.1 #12;Simulations predict enough gain for a power plant with only a 529 kJ. KrF driver (

316

Test of potential homogeneity in the KATRIN gaseous tritium source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

83mKr is supposed to be used to study the properties of the windowless gaseous tritium source of the experiment KATRIN. In this work we deduce the amount of 83mKr which is necessary to determine possible potential inhomogeneities via conversion-electron-line broadening.

M. Rysavy

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effect of Grain Boundaries on Krypton Segregation Behavior in Irradiated Uranium Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission products, such as krypton (Kr), are known to be insoluble within UO2, segregating towards grain boundaries, eventually leading to a lowering of the thermal conductivity and fuel swelling. Recent computational studies have identified that differences in grain boundary structure have a significant effect on the segregation behavior of fission products. However, experimental work supporting these simulations is lacking. Atom probe tomography was used to measure the Kr distribution across grain boundaries in UO2. Polycrystalline depleted-UO2 samples was irradiated with 0.7 and 1.8 MeV Kr-ions and annealed to 1000, 1300, and 1600°C for 1 hour to produce a Kr-bubble dominated microstructure. The results of this work indicate a strong dependence of Kr concentration as a function of grain boundary structure. Temperature also influences grain boundary chemistry with greater Kr concentration evident at higher temperatures, resulting in a reduced Kr concentration in the bulk. While Kr migration is active at elevated temperatures, no changes in grain size or texture were observed in the irradiated samples.

Billy Valderrama; Lingfeng He; Hunter B. Henderson; Janne Pakarinen; Brian Jaques; Jian Gan; Darryl P. Butt; Todd R. Allen; Michele V. Manuel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13, 5138-5162; doi:10.3390/ijms13045138 International Journal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dong, Jinju, 660-701, Korea; E-Mails: suguna@bio.gnu.ac.kr (S.S.); megac@bio.gnu.ac.kr (C.M.); ysohn@bio obesity. Cortisol is an important regulator of fuel metabolism during the starvation and stress which

Lee, Keun Woo

319

A Preliminary Experimental Study on Haptic Teleoperation of Mobile Robot with Variable Force Feedback Gain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial constructions, etc. In all these application examples human-robot interfaces play the key role and its application for e-mail:ildar.info@gmail.com e-mail:jhryu@kut.ac.kr e-mail:robot@dgist.ac.kr O Y XA Preliminary Experimental Study on Haptic Teleoperation of Mobile Robot with Variable Force

Ryu, Jee-Hwan

320

Power-consumption minimization mechanism for heterogeneous multi-cell cellular network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@mmlab.snu.ac.kr, {tkkwon, yhchoi } @snu.ac.kr Abstract With growing concern of global warming, decreasing of CO2 emission. Introduction Many works point out that global warming is a major concern of modern world. The energy], Information and Communication Technology (ICT) causes about 2% of total CO2 emission of the world. Various

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

National Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Methane Hydrates Energy Storage · Nanoscale Electrode Materials for Batteries Energy Conversion potential to meet the IFE requirements Electra KrF Laser (NRL) = 248 nm (fundamental) Gas Laser Mercury target performance #12;What is a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) Laser? · Gas Laser--Excimer (Excited Dimer

322

Multi-piconet Formation to Increase Channel Utilization in IEEE 802.15.3 High-Rate WPAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.15.3 WPAN. 1 Introduction Recently, we have witnessed a noticeable increase of personal devices. The devices physical cables. Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPANs) can con- nect various personal devices within}@ece.skku.ac.kr {jsd, hslee75, tgkwon, chojw}@keti.re.kr Abstract. IEEE 802.15.3 high-rate Wireless Personal Area

Lee, Tae-Jin

323

thesis.dvi  

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324

thesis.dvi  

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325

thesis.dvi  

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326

thesis.dvi  

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327

thesis.dvi  

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328

thesis.dvi  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the 1 SC.Dinko E.

329

thesis.dvi  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the 1 SC.Dinko

330

thesis.dvi  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the 1 SC.DinkoA.

331

thesis_ls_note.dvi  

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332

through Los Alamos National  

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333

tichler-98.pdf  

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334

tichler-99.PDF  

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335

timma | The Ames Laboratory  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the 1Areatimma Ames

336

titov-99  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the 1Areatimma

337

tlemons | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the

338

tnz6085.tmp  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the-84-"27 DE8g

339

tobin-99.PDF  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the-84-"27

340

toughfx | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

tqz1334.tmp  

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342

tr2000226.PDF  

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343

training | National Nuclear Security Administration  

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344

trans-K3[TcO2(CN)4]. | EMSL  

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345

transitional | netl.doe.gov  

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346

treadwell-98.pdf  

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347

treaty verification | National Nuclear Security Administration  

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348

trebotich.pptx  

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349

trinity-aa-use-case-v1.2a  

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350

trishchenko-98.pdf  

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351

trishchenko-99.PDF  

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352

trvsst | The Ames Laboratory  

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353

tsay-98.pdf  

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354

tsk_get_files - "The Sleuth Kit"  

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355

tunll.dvi  

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356

tunlli.dvi  

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357

turbine thermal index | netl.doe.gov  

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358

turner-98.pdf  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43 Long-Term

359

turner-99.PDF  

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360

turner_poster.arctic_bbhrp.ppt  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

turner_poster.rhubc.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate Profiles

362

turner_shupe_poster.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate Profiles) ST

363

txb9391.tmp  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate Profiles)

364

tymesvol2no18  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate

365

tymesvol2no18  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1 A newsletter

366

uboone_flux.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1 A

367

ubva0f2.tmp  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1 A65847

368

uca9041.tmp  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1 A65847.

369

ucr hbcu | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1 A65847.2012

370

ucr | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1

371

ujjalb | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1ujjalb Ames

372

umesse | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of 43Rate1ujjalb

373

unconventional-resources | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of

374

univ turbine workshop | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse ofTurbine Systems

375

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse ofTurbine

376

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse ofTurbineSimulation and

377

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse ofTurbineSimulation

378

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse

379

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUseBifurcation to 3D

380

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUseBifurcation to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUseBifurcation toCause of

382

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUseBifurcation toCause

383

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUseBifurcation

384

Alexis Michaud* Guillaume Jacques**Robert L. Rankin*** * (LACITO-CNRS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jackson 1986 : 801, §1142 *tnow traoñ (IPA:/trãõ//tãõ/) *cnow (IPA:/*know/) kraoñ (IPA: /krãõ() grõhuw -- gnúis grui (IPA:[gris]) -- gnusachtach grsat -- cnáip kræb' -- cnáim; cnàimh kræ v kra 2 ( )( Prinmi) 5 IPA /i//i/ halshs-00915473,version1-8Dec2013 #12;2014 /grebla /)*-pna( [Dorsey 1885

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

MARMOT Enhanced  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To develop mechanistic models for fuel thermal conductivity, the Fuel team used supercells up to 55 nm long to determine the thermal conductivity of UO2 with Xe incorporated.

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - au film system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with a Dewetting Solid Film J.S. Palmer, P. Swaminathan, and J.H. Weaver Summary: and surface tension causes hole spreading and film breakup. For Au on Xe we show that, as for...

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - au thin films Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticle assembly during dewetting and sublimation of a solid thin film. Metal... and surface tension causes hole spreading and film breakup. For Au on Xe we show that, as for...

388

Optical Spectroscopy: Condensed Matter and Magnetic Science,...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

633nm, 785nm, 1064nm, visible argon-ion lines, various NIR diode lines Xe lamp and tungsten blackbody lamp Acton 300i, 500i spectrometers Princeton Instruments backthinned...

389

Discrimination of nuclear explosions against civilian sources based on atmospheric xenon isotopic activity ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will be used to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of nuclear explosions, empirical data for both test and reactor releases as well as observations by measurement stations of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) are used to provide a proof of concept for the isotopic ratio based method for source discrimination.

Kalinowski, Martin B.; Axelssson, A.; Bean, Marc; Blanchard, X.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Brachet, G.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Peters, Jana; Pistner, Christoph; Raith, Maria; Ringbom, Anders; Saey, P. R.; Schlosser, C.; Stocki, Trevor J.; Taffary, T.; Ungar, R. Kurt

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

1349.ps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 14, 2006 ... is based on the well-known fact that k + |F| = n for every forest F of G ... If we replace the integrity constraints xe ? {0,1} by the trivial con-.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201100129 GasSurface Interactions on Quasicrystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201100129 Gas­Surface Interactions on Quasicrystals Stefano Curtarolo,[a] Wahyu-energy electron dif- fraction (LEED) and grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) was performed for Xe adsorption

Curtarolo, Stefano

393

Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Aromatic Hydrocarbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edney E.O. Izumi K. Sato K. 244 cm fluorescent bulbs 244cm fluorescent bulbs 1.6 kW Xe lamps 19 kW xenon arc lamps

Tang, Ping

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER FOR PRODUCTION OF NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI ( 136 Xe Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's weekly \\Green Sheet," 30 July 1999 #12; c Thomas W. O'Donnell 2000 All

O'Donnell, Tom

395

Probing Porosity and Pore Interconnectivity in Crystalline Mesoporous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Porosity and Pore Interconnectivity in Crystalline Mesoporous TiO2 Using Hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR. Probing Porosity and Pore Interconnectivity in Crystalline Mesoporous TiO2 Using...

396

Acceleration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the Cray XE6 platform Kirsten M. Fagnan, Michael Lijewski, George Pau, Nicholas J. Wright Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 May 18, 2011...

397

SUPPORTING INFORMATION Multicolored vertical silicon nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The nanowires have radii of about 50 nm and are 1 µm long. Light from a Xe arc lamp was focused into an optical on the single crystalline silicon wafer. Inductively coupled plasma- reactive ion etch (STS) was used

398

SUPPORTING INFORMATION Chromatic Plasmonic Polarizers for Active Visible Color  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that was used to image the transmission through the CPP samples. Light from a Xe arc lamp was focused glass slides were cleaned by solvent and oxygen plasma and covered with poly(methyl methacylate

399

Ab initio study of MXe{sub n}{sup +} (M=Cu, Ag, and Au; n=1,2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, dissociation energies, and populations of the title species were studied at Hartree-Fock (HF), second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2), and coupled-cluster singles-doubles (triples) [CCSD(T)] levels. The electron correlation effects and relativistic effects on the geometry and stability were investigated at the CCSD(T) level. Both effects stabilize title species. The populations analyses show that M-Xe bonding is dominated by electrostatic interactions and the best theoretical estimate of the dissociation energies are 1.104 and 2.260 eV for AuXe{sup +} and AuXe{sub 2}{sup +}, respectively. The Cu and Ag are weakly bonded to Xe compared to Au.

Li Xinying; Cao Xue [School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

ECOLE PRATIQUE DES HAUTES ETUDES Mention Histoire, textes et documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Etude diachronique du système verbal persan (Xe -XVIe siècles) : d'un équilibre à l'autre ? Agnès changements morphologiques et syntaxiques du système verbal persan entre les Xe et XVIe siècles. Dix textes en prose représentatifs (régions et dialectes, judéo-persan compris) ont pu faire apparaître les évolutions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF RADIOXENON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring changes in atmospheric radioxenon concentrations is a major tool in the detection of an underground nuclear explosion. Ground based systems like the Automated Radioxenon Sampler /Analyzer (ARSA), the Swedish Unattended Noble gas Analyzer (SAUNA) and the Automatic portable radiometer of isotopes Xe (ARIX), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes by processing and transferring samples into a high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector. The high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector makes these systems highly sensitive to the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe. The standard analysis uses regions of interest (ROI) to determine the amount of a particular radioxenon isotope present. The ROI method relies on the peaks of interest falling within energy limits of the ROI. Some potential problems inherent in this method are the reliance on stable detector gains and a fixed resolution for each energy peak. In addition, when a high activity sample is measured there will be more interference among the ROI, in particular within the 133Xe, 133mXe, and 131mXe regions. A solution to some of these problems can be obtained through spectral fitting of the data. Spectral fitting is simply the fitting of the peaks using known functions to determine the number and relative peak positions and widths. By knowing this information it is possible to determine which isotopes are present. Area under each peak can then be used to determine an overall concentration for each isotope. Using the areas of the peaks several key detector characteristics can be determined: efficiency, energy calibration, energy resolution and ratios between interfering isotopes (Radon daughters).

Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

States and Their Transitions The tuple  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When the average is a moving average, a different technique is needed (Kao (R89723057) and Lyuu (2003)). c 2014 analytical solutions are the Black-Scholes formulas: C = Se-qa N(x) - Xe-r N(x - a ), (33) P = Xe-r N(-x + a ) - Se-qa N(-x), (33 ) ­ With the volatility set to a / 3 . ­ With the dividend yield set to qa (r + q

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

403

An economic analysis of investment in agricultural land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'eXaX~~, imp"-' feet-bawRedge ea4 Xaeb c4 Xeoaee ~ em be ~ceXXy ~t~ Xe. eeX~~ eet' orat?e ~. @d$~'~ ieoeeeetp. -Tbe ~i ~ sif ~-ha the' ~4mB 'ej. ee -hei' f@4g~ X46 epee kw X%2 to 286 @otee Xe Xpap, e XN. SK ~e. Net eeet ~epee em ee ~)eetec beers' woe34...

Cherry, Russell Cather

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

arXiv:1205.5608v1[hep-ex]25May2012 Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arXiv:1205.5608v1[hep-ex]25May2012 Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with EXO-200: May 28, 2012) We report on a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 136 Xe with EXO-200 in the ±1 region of interest. This sets a lower limit on the half-life of the neutrinoless double-beta decay

Gratta, Giorgio

405

Isospin Effects of the Critical Behavior in the Lattice Gas Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isospin effects of the critical phenomena were studied via Xe isotopes in the frame of lattice gas model. All the critical temperatures for four Xe isotopes are close to 5.5 MeV at the same freeze-out density of about 0.39 $\\rho_0$. The critical values of power law parameter of mass distribution, mean multiplicity of intermediate mass fragments (IMF), information entropy and Campi's second moment show minor dependence on the isospin at the critical point.

Yu-Gang Ma; Qian-Min Su; Wen-Qing Shen; Jian-Song Wang; Xiang-Zhou Cai; De-Qing Fang

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Volume 158,number 3,4 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS YJune 1989 ION MIGRATION FOLLOWING CHARGE TRANSFER REACTIONS IN RARE-GAS SOLIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that photoinduced charge transfer processes in rare-gas solids, such as Xe+C& +2hv+ Xe+Cl- +Cl result in highly of photochemical processes in rare-gas solids is motivated in part by the fact that these sys- tems act as solvents crystals or rare-gas solids [ 2 1.In most studied processes, the rare-gas solid seems in- deed to act

Apkarian, V. Ara

407

ac linear positioning: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 187 The Square Root Law Requires a Linear Key Andrew D. Ker...

408

antenna complexes protect: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on LTCC Substrate for Millimeter-wave Applications Il Kwon Kim-0250, USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos...

409

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reliability based assessment of FRP rehabilitation of reinforced concrete girders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J.P. SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis, CourseL.A. Statistical Methods for Reliability Data. AppliedA.S. ; Collins, K.R. Reliability of Structures; McGraw-Hill

Wilcox, Patrick Carlo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Close in Place Option for Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1994). 11. J.D. ISTOK, D.O. BLOUT, L. BARKER, K.R. JOHNEJACK, and D.P. HAMMERMEISTER, Spatial Variability in Alluvium Properties at a Low-Level Nuclear Waste Site, Soil Sci....

412

Algae Tile Data: 2004-2007, BPA-51; Preliminary Report, October 28, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple files containing 2004 through 2007 Tile Chlorophyll data for the Kootenai River sites designated as: KR1, KR2, KR3, KR4 (Downriver) and KR6, KR7, KR9, KR9.1, KR10, KR11, KR12, KR13, KR14 (Upriver) were received by SCS. For a complete description of the sites covered, please refer to http://ktoi.scsnetw.com. To maintain consistency with the previous SCS algae reports, all analyses were carried out separately for the Upriver and Downriver categories, as defined in the aforementioned paragraph. The Upriver designation, however, now includes three additional sites, KR11, KR12, and the nutrient addition site, KR9.1. Summary statistics and information on the four responses, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a Accrual Rate, Total Chlorophyll, and Total Chlorophyll Accrual Rate are presented in Print Out 2. Computations were carried out separately for each river position (Upriver and Downriver) and year. For example, the Downriver position in 2004 showed an average Chlorophyll a level of 25.5 mg with a standard deviation of 21.4 and minimum and maximum values of 3.1 and 196 mg, respectively. The Upriver data in 2004 showed a lower overall average chlorophyll a level at 2.23 mg with a lower standard deviation (3.6) and minimum and maximum values of (0.13 and 28.7, respectively). A more comprehensive summary of each variable and position is given in Print Out 3. This lists the information above as well as other summary information such as the variance, standard error, various percentiles and extreme values. Using the 2004 Downriver Chlorophyll a as an example again, the variance of this data was 459.3 and the standard error of the mean was 1.55. The median value or 50th percentile was 21.3, meaning 50% of the data fell above and below this value. It should be noted that this value is somewhat different than the mean of 25.5. This is an indication that the frequency distribution of the data is not symmetrical (skewed). The skewness statistic, listed as part of the first section of each analysis, quantifies this. In a symmetric distribution, such as a Normal distribution, the skewness value would be 0. The tile chlorophyll data, however, shows larger values. Chlorophyll a, in the 2004 Downriver example, has a skewness statistic of 3.54, which is quite high. In the last section of the summary analysis, the stem and leaf plot graphically demonstrates the asymmetry, showing most of the data centered around 25 with a large value at 196. The final plot is referred to as a normal probability plot and graphically compares the data to a theoretical normal distribution. For chlorophyll a, the data (asterisks) deviate substantially from the theoretical normal distribution (diagonal reference line of pluses), indicating that the data is non-normal. Other response variables in both the Downriver and Upriver categories also indicated skewed distributions. Because the sample size and mean comparison procedures below require symmetrical, normally distributed data, each response in the data set was logarithmically transformed. The logarithmic transformation, in this case, can help mitigate skewness problems. The summary statistics for the four transformed responses (log-ChlorA, log-TotChlor, and log-accrual ) are given in Print Out 4. For the 2004 Downriver Chlorophyll a data, the logarithmic transformation reduced the skewness value to -0.36 and produced a more bell-shaped symmetric frequency distribution. Similar improvements are shown for the remaining variables and river categories. Hence, all subsequent analyses given below are based on logarithmic transformations of the original responses.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

938 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 49, NO. 5, MAY 2001 Prediction of a CDMA Output Spectrum Based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Telecommunication Research Laboratory, LG Electronics Inc., 431-080 Anyang, Korea and is also with the School Communication Laboratory, LG Elec- tronics Inc., 431-080 Anyang, Korea (e-mail: odori@lgic.co.kr). Publisher

Nam, Sangwook

414

www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/332/6025/77/DC1 Supporting Online Material for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) measurement with an Ocean-optics NIR-512 spectrophotometer using 633nm HeNe laser excitation. Transmission) was carried out with a Kratos Analytical Axis Ulta XPS instrument. Data were obtained with Al KR radiation

Rabani, Eran

415

Compiti scritti di Robotica 1 http://www.dis.uniroma1.it/labrob/people/deluca/rob1.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.08 2 Velocità angolare nel metodo asse angolo: dimostrazione e calcolo di una traiettoria numerico di inversione cinematica --- 2007 06.28 2 Jacobiano geometrico relativo al polso per robot KUKA KR

De Luca, Alessandro

416

Biologia 63/6: 791--798, 2008 Section Botany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& G¨artner was originally described as Chlorella reniformis by Watanabe (1977) from a Japanese soil, which was originally designated as Chlorella saccha- rophila (Kr¨uger) Migula. They concluded

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator research hifar Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

related to the feasibility of IFE. These research areas include heavy... -ion accelerators, Krypton- Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers, diode-pumped, solid-state (DPSSL) lasers, IFE...

418

4264 KOMPA, PARKER, AND PIMENTEL of the following reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the HF kr/ko ratio and the DF k2/kl and kI/ko ratios to give a complete picture. Thus, the UF6-H2 system

Zare, Richard N.

419

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K.R. , Biofuels, Air Pollution and Health: A Global Review.K.R. , Biofuels, Air Pollution and Health: A Global Review.K.R. , Biofuels, Air Pollution and Health: A Global Review.

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - al sistema cubano Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S inferiore al 2% e valutare il... tempo di assestamento (al 5%) del sistema. - y ia u + . KR m Ka ia e a Figura 1 Problema 2 - Si... casi K > 0 e K < 0 il diagramma di...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Numerical Simulation of Liquid-Solid, Solid-Liquid Phase Change Using Finite Element Method in h,p,k Framework with Space-Time Variationally Consistent Integral Forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: cp@T@t r (krTs) = 0 8(x;t) 2 sxt = sx t = sx (0; ) (2.1) Liquid Phase: cp@T@t r (krTl) = 0 8(x;t) 2 lxt = lx t = lx (0; ) (2.2) At the interface: Lfvn = [( krTs) ( krTl)] n 8(x;t) 2 x;t = x t (2.3) 10 in which sx and lx are solid... and liquid spatial domains, x(t) = sxT lx is the interface between the two phases, Lf is the latent heat of fusion,n is the unit exterior normal from the solid phase at the interface, and vn is the normal velocity of the interface. Subscripts s and l...

Truex, Michael

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

ALGEBRA HOMOLOGICZNA, WYK#AD 13 Zak#adamy, #e X jest normaln# przestrzeni# topologiczn#.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Wtedy mamy kr#tki ci#gh dok#adny snop#w 0 ! F ! I ! G, kt#ry daje nam d#ugi ci#g dok#adny grup abelowych

Kowalski, Piotr

423

Pulsed Laser Deposition | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is composed of the following: An electro-polished stainless-steel chamber pumped via a turbo molecular pump and backed by a rotary scroll dry pump An excimer laser (KrF) for...

424

A Neuronal Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates the Balance of Muscle Excitation and Inhibition in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Caenorhabditis elegans Maelle Jospin1,2 , Yingchuan B. Qi3,4. , Tamara M. Stawicki4. , Thomas Boulin5. , Kim R TM, Boulin T, Schuske KR, et al. (2009) A Neuronal Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates the Balance

Boyer, Edmond

425

Aerobic and Anaerobic Transformations of Pentachlorophenol in Wetland Soils Elisa M. D'Angelo* and K. R. Reddy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. of Agronomy, Univ. of Kentucky, N-122 Agricultural Sci. Bldg. North, Lexington, KY 40546-0091; and K.R. Reddy), availability of electron acceptors (Haggblom et al., 1993), electron donors (Ku- watsuka and Igarashi, 1975

Florida, University of

426

The effect carbohydrate consumption on Argentine ants' nutritional ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 18, 111-an invasive mealybug. Ecology, 83, 2425-2438. Helms, K.R. &invasions. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, Kaplan,

Chou, Cheng T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TU KAISERSLAUTERN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY - STUDY GUIDE - H Rb Sr K Ca ...Mn Fe... ONC He P S Br Kr .................................................................................................22 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: JUN.-Prof. Dr. M. Esselen...............................................................................24 FOOD CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: Prof. Dr. E. Richling

Madlener, Klaus

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - ac power source Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LEE... , Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea E-mail: jclee9@snu.ac.kr New power combining technique which... in the desired mode without spurious oscillation at other...

429

E-Print Network 3.0 - agenda abstracts index Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Engineering Pohang, Republic of Korea lcj80,hugman,gblee@postech.ac.kr Abstract... This work presents an agenda-based approach to improve the robustness of the...

430

aluminum nitride insulator: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K-r grown by a modified Bridgman tech- nique,r6 Rollins, Andrew M. 27 Low-voltage organic thin film transistors with hydrophobic aluminum nitride film as gate insulator Materials...

431

Simulation of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [ K.?R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen ...

Barton, T. J.

432

Characterization of the Biosynthetic Pathway of Fungal Aromatic Polyketides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

act KR with the anthraquinone emodin and suggested that actacid 52 which is the anthraquinone precursor of the well-fren minimal PKS, the anthraquinone compound 63 is formed

Li, Yanran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Laser development for laser fusion applications. Research progress report, October 1978-September 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this report period, emphasis has been directed toward the advanced development of the HF, KrF, Se(/sup 1/S)-Se(/sup 3/P), and the chemically pumped iodine laser systems.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Characterizing population structure of cetaceans within an ecological context /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JD, Calambokidis J, Balcomb KC et al. (1996) Movement of aMorton AB, Palm RS, Balcomb KC (1998) Dietary specializationGH, Evenson JR, Flynn KR, Balcomb KC, Claridge DE, Bloedel

Fleming, Alyson H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure ?- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.

Barnowski, R.; Chien; H.; Gopalsami, N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

438

Synthesis of Nano-scaled -Al2O3 Particles by Combustion Spray Byungsei Jun1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. a bsjun@Kyungnam.ac.kr, b SJLee@Kyungnam.ac.kr, c messing@ems solution was prepared by dissolving aluminium nitrate (Al(NO3)3·9H2O, 99%, Aldrich Chem. Co. Inc., USA) as an oxidizer and carbohydrazide (CH6N4O, 97%, Acros Organics, New Jersey, USA) as a fuel with the mo

Messing, Gary L.

439

T-Negative Issue 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. "Easy, Kr. Sulu, until we're well away...': "Thirty-five kilometers, forty.. .fifty...'* Chekov recited. And then another voice interrupted him -- Kr. Leslie's, Jim tentatively identified it, Imagining him filling in at Spock's station. Permanently......" Leslie: "Ten meters and...it's gone!" There was a pause, and then Jim heard muffled cheers from the rest of the bridge crew. "Sensors register a kind of Imploslve force at the moment it disappeared ? but there was nothing there to Implode." "Like...

Multiple Contributors

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

DOE-Imaging grant FG02-06ER15829, entitled "Developing Laser-Induced Re-Collision Electron Self-Diffraction" Brief summary of accomplishments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our principal goal was the experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Key steps along the development of this experimental technique have been accomplished and reported in the publications listed in this brief report. We started with measuring 3D electron momenta spectra in aligned nitrogen and oxygen molecules. Chakra Maharjan (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) was a lead researcher on this project. Although Chakra succeeded in obtaining those spectra, we were scooped by the publication of identical results in Science by the NRC Ottawa group. Our results were never published as a refereed article, but became a part of Chakra's Ph.D. dissertation. That Science paper was the first experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Chakra also worked on wavelength dependence of 3D ATI spectra of atoms and molecules using tunable OPA pulses. Another Ph.D. student, Maia Magrakvelidze (her GRA was funded by the grant), started working on COLTRIMS experiments using OPA pulses (1800 nm wavelength). After some initial experiments it became apparent that COLTRIMS did not yield sufficient count rates of electrons in the high-energy part of the spectrum to see diffraction signatures with acceptable statistics (unfavorable scaling of the electron yield with laser wavelength was partly to blame). Nevertheless, Maia managed to use COLTRIMS and OPA to measure the angular dependence of the tunneling ionization rate in D{sub 2} molecules. Following the initial trial experiments, the decision was made to switch from COLTRIMS to VMI in order to increase the count rates by a factor of {approx}100, which may have given us a chance to see LIED. Research Associate Dr. Sankar De (his salary was funded by the grant), in collaboration with Matthias Kling's group (then at MPQ Garching), proceeded to design a special multi-electrode VMI spectrometer for capturing high-energy ATI electrons and to install it in place of COLTRIMS inside our experimental chamber. That apparatus was later used for the first demonstration of field-free orientation in CO using two-color laser pulses as well as for a series of other experiments, such as pump-probe studies of molecular dynamics with few-cycle laser pulses, control of electron localization in dissociating hydrogen molecules using two-color laser pulses, and ATI spectra of Xe ionized by two-color laser pulses. In parallel, Dipanwita Ray (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) worked on measuring angle-resolved ATI spectra of noble gases using a stereo-ATI phasemeter as a TOF electron spectrometer. She observed the angular diffraction structures in 3D ATI spectra of Ar, Kr and Xe, which were interpreted in terms of the Quantitative Rescattering theory newly developed by C.D. Lin. We also attempted to use a much more powerful OPA (five times more energy per pulse than the one we had at JRML) available at the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) in Montreal to observe LIED. Two visits to ALLS by the PI, Igor Litvinyuk, and one visit by the PI's Ph.D. student (Irina Bocharova) were funded by the grant. Though we failed to observe LIED (the repetition rate of the ALLS OPA was too low at only 100 Hz), this international collaboration resulted in several publications on other related subjects, such as the wavelength dependence of laser Coulomb explosion of hydrogen, the wavelength dependence of non-sequential double ionization of neon and argon, the demonstration of charge-resonance enhanced ionization in CO{sub 2}, and the study of non-elastic scattering processes in H{sub 2}. Theoretical efforts to account for the hydrogen Coulomb explosion experiment resulted in another paper by Maia Magrakvelidze as lead author. Although for various reasons we failed to achieve our main goal of observing LIED, we salute the recent success in this endeavor by Lou DiMauro's group (with theoretical support from our KSU colleague C.D. Lin) published in Nature, which validates our approach.

Igor V. Litvinyuk, and Itzik Ben-Itzhak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain boundaries derived from separate atomistic calculations, we simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures using finite element methods (FEM), as implemented in the MOOSE framework from Idaho National Laboratory. Thermal transport together with the power distribution determines the temperature distribution in the fuel rod and it is thus one of the most influential properties on nuclear fuel performance. The fuel thermal conductivity changes as function of time due to microstructure evolution (e.g. fission gas redistribution) and compositional changes. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied the impact of different types of grain boundaries and fission gas bubbles on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba{sup +} ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe{sup +} ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice because the Xe plasma density peaks further upstream.

Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

443

XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article we report a detailed study of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels prepared under different processing conditions, [resorcinol]/[catalyst] (R/C) ratios in the starting sol-gel solutions, using continuous flow hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR in combination with solid-state 13C and two-dimensional wide-line separation (2D-WISE) NMR techniques. The degree of polymerization and the mobility of the cross-linking functional groups in RF aerogels are examined and correlated with the R/C ratios. The origin of different adsorption regions is evaluated using both co-adsorption of chloroform and 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. A hierarchical set of Xe exchange processes in RF aerogels is found using 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. The exchange of Xe gas follows the sequence (from fastest to slowest): mesopores with free gas, gas in meso- and micro-pores, free gas with micropores, and, finally, among micropore sites. The volume-to-surface-area (Vg/S) ratios for aerogels are measured for the first time without the use of geometric models. The Vg/S parameter, which is related both to the geometry and the interconnectivity of the pore space, has been found to correlate strongly with the R/C ratio and exhibits an unusually large span: an increase in the R/C ratio from 50 to 500 results in about a 5-fold rise in Vg/S.

Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, C I.; Ripmeester, J A.; Wang, Li Q.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Baumann, T; Satcher, J H.

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

In-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of time-dependent Xenon-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, it has been shown that the time dependent Xe-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna, Austria can be measured via gamma spectrometry even in the presence of strong background radiation. It is focussing on the measurement of (but not limited to) the nuclide Xe-135. The time dependent Xe-135 inventory of the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna has been measured using a temporary beam line between one fuel element of the core placed onto the thermal column after shutdown and a detector system located just above the water surface of the reactor tank. For the duration of one week, multiple gamma ray spectra were recorded automatically, starting each afternoon after reactor shutdown until the next morning. One measurement series has been recorded over the weekend. The Xe-135 peaks were extracted from a total of 1227 recorded spectra using an automated peak search algorithm and analyzed for their time-dependent properties. Although the background gamma radiation present in the core after shutdown was large especially in the lower energy range, the Xe-135 peak located at 249.8 keV could be extracted from the most spectra where present and could be compared to theoretical calculations.

Julia Riede; Helmuth Boeck

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Kormendy Relation for early-type galaxies. Dependence on the magnitude range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous studies indicate that faint and bright early-type galaxies (ETGs) present different coefficients and dispersion for their Kormendy relation (KR). A recently published paper states that the intrinsic dispersion of the KR depends on the magnitude range within which the galaxies are contained, therefore, we investigate here whether the magnitude range has also an influence over the values of the coefficients of the KR; $\\alpha$ (zero point) and $\\beta$ (slope). We perform numerical simulations and analysis of these coefficients for 4 samples of galaxies, which contain an approximate total of 9400 ETGs in a relatively ample magnitude range ($$ $\\sim 6 mag$). The analysis of the results makes us conclude that the values of the KR coefficients depend on the width of the magnitude range and the brightness of galaxies within the magnitude range. This dependence is due to the fact that the distribution of galaxies in the $\\log (r_{e}) - _{e}$ plane depends on luminosity and that this distribution is not symmetrical, that is, the geometric shape of the distribution of galaxies in the $\\log (r_{e}) - _{e}$ plane plays an important role in the determination of the values of the coefficients of the KR.

A. Nigoche-Netro; A. Ruelas-Mayorga; A. Franco-Balderas

2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF RADIOXENON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive xenon (radioxenon) is produced by the fissioning of nuclear material, either via neutron-induced or spontaneous fission, and also via neutron activation of xenon gas and other reactions. The most abundant xenon isotopes in the atmosphere are 131mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe, having been measured at several locations in the northern hemisphere associated with reactor operation, medical isotope production, and more recently associated with the spontaneous fission of 240Pu from the legacy materials at plutonium production facility in Hanford, Washington. Radioactive xenon measurement at levels near the average atmospheric level (1-10 mBq/m3) is a “specialty” measurement, requiring specialized collection, separation, and nuclear measurement techniques. This paper describes the political and scientific drivers for making radioxenon measurements, background sources, and current techniques for these measurements.

Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.

2007-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Searching for E(5) behavior in nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of even-even nuclei with 30 {le} Z {le} 82, A {ge} 60 have been examined to find examples displaying the characteristics of E(5) critical-point behavior for the shape transition from a spherical vibrator to a triaxially soft rotor. On the basis of the known experimental state energies and E2 transition strengths, the best candidates that were identified are {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106,108}Cd, {sup 124}Te, {sup 128}Xe, and {sup 134}Ba. The closest agreement between experimental data and the predictions of E(5) is for {sup 128}Xe and for the previously suggested example of {sup 134}Ba. It is proposed that {sup 128}Xe may be a new example of a nucleus at the E(5) critical point.

Clark, R.M.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Descovich, M.; Diamond, R.M; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Mahmud, H.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Stephens, F.S.; Ward, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radioxenon detections in the CTBT International Monitoring System likely related to the announced nuclear test in North Korea conducted on February 12, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Observations of the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe and 131mXe collected at the IMS stations RN38 and RN58 on April 7-8, and April 12-13 2013, respectively, are unique with respect to the measurement history of these stations. Comparison of measured data with calculated isotopic ratios as well as analysis using atmospheric transport modeling indicate that it is likely that the xenon measured was created in the underground nuclear test conducted by North Korea on February 12, 2013, and released 7 weeks later. More than one release is required to explain all observations. The 131mXe source terms for each release were calculated to 7x1011 Bq, corresponding to about 1-10% of the total xenon inventory for a 10-kt explosion, depending on fractionation and release scenario. The observed ratios could not be used to obtain any information regarding the fissile material that was used in the test.

Ringbom, Anders; Axelssson, A.; Aldener, M.; Auer, M.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Fritioff, T.; Hoffman, Ian; Khrustalev, Kirill; Nikkinen, Mika; Popov, Vladimir Y.; Popov, Y.; Ungar, R. Kurt; Wotawa, G.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Robust upper limit on the neutron single-particle energy of the $i_{13/2}$ orbit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The boundary of the neutron $i_{13/2}$ single-particle energy is investigated with exact shell-model calculations, where random two-body interactions are adopted to overcome the bias from effective interactions. Excitation energies of $3^-_1$ state in $^{134}$Te and $^{136}$Xe, as well as those of $13/2^+_1$ states in $^{135}$Te and $^{137}$Xe, are taken as touchstones of our samplings. A robust upper limit of $\\varepsilon_{i13/2}mixing of $i_{13/2}$ single-neutron configuration and $f_{7/2}\\otimes 3^-$ configuration in $13/2^+_1$ states of $N=83$ isotones.

Y. Lei; H. Jiang

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Melt mixing causes negative correlation of trace element enrichment and CO2 content prior to an Icelandic eruption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for datasets that include and exclude highly enriched inclusions. Elements anal- ysed with low precision (e.g. F and Sm), or that are strongly af- fected by PEC or diffusive alteration (e.g. MgO, FeO and H2O), are excluded to prevent the identification... the best enriched and depleted end-member compositions (Ce and Cd): C = [ XeCe + (1? Xe)Cd ] (1? F )D?1 (1) where C is the concentration of an element in a melt inclusion and D is the bulk partition coefficient of the assemblage removed dur- ing...

Neave, David A.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

453

Linear Diagnostics to Assess the Performance of an Ensemble Forecast System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The mathematical model we adopt to predict the evolution of uncertainty in a local state estimate (analysis or forecast), xe, is based on the assumption that the error in the state estimate, ? = xe ? xt, (2.1) *Portions of this chapter have been reprinted from... variable. In Equation (2.1) xt is the model representation of the, in practice unknown, true state of the atmosphere. The covariance between the different components of ? is described by the error covariance matrix P`. We employ a K-member ensemble...

Satterfield, Elizabeth A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

454

States and Their Transitions The tuple  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Scholes formulas. ­ With the volatility set to a / 3 . ­ With the dividend yield set to qa (r + q + 2 /6)/2. · The formula is therefore C = Se-qa N(x) - Xe-r N(x - a ), (29) P = Xe-r N(-x + a ) - Se-qa N(-x), (29 ) ­ x ln(S/X)+(r-qa+2 a /2) a . c 2008 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 332 #12;An

Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

455

A revised model of the kidney for medical internal radiation dose calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are frequently the organs receiving the highest level of radioactivity and, therefore, the largest radiation dose. Short lived radiopharmaceuticals, that are now injected in millicurie quantities in nuclear medicine for rapid-sequence imaging of the brain... radionuclides (Appendix B). 17 These include the following radionuclides presently used in nuclear medicine: P-32, Cr-51, Co-57, Ga-67, Tc-99m, In-ill, I-123, Xe-127, I-131, Xe-133, and T1-201. If the radionuclide emits penetrating radiation, the code...

Patel, Jyoti Shivabhai

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities <Kr> using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability <Kr> to obtain the same spreading. Generally, <Kr> is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The <Kr> are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent <Kr>. Finally, the calculated <Kr> are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

459

Conversion electrons used to monitor the energy scale of electron spectrometer near tritium endpoint - a simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the endpoint region of the tritium beta-decay spectrum provides good possibility to determine neutrino mass. This, however, needs a perfect monitoring of the spectrometer energy scale. A parallel measurement of electron line of known energy - in particular the 83mKr conversion K-line - may serve well to this purpose. The 83Rb decaying to 83mKr seems to be a very suitable radioactive source due to its halflife of 86.2 day. In this work, we determine the amount of 83Rb which is necessary for a successful monitoring.

M. Rysavy

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 2: Designs, Assessments, and Comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability, economics, and technology development needs.

Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C. D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Momentum distributions in medium and heavy exotic nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study nucleon momentum distributions of even-even isotopes of Ni, Kr, and Sn in the framework of deformed self-consistent mean-field Skyrme HF+BCS method, as well as of theoretical correlation methods based on light-front dynamics and local density approximation. The isotopic sensitivities of the calculated neutron and proton momentum distributions are investigated together with the effects of pairing and nucleon-nucleon correlations. The role of deformation on the momentum distributions in even-even Kr isotopes is discussed. For comparison, the results for the momentum distribution in nuclear matter are also presented.

Gaidarov, M K; Sarriguren, P; Antonov, A N; Ivanov, M V; de Guerra, E Moya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

NdI dyLf da. 8005, df.df. Tddd AdySdj, dya>ddjT -560 080, ddTd ddTdfSd edddd AIdQdf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fy, vfHknku uohdj.k Hkkjrh; foKku vdkneh dh LFkkiuk lj lh oh jkeu }kjk 1934 esa gqbZ vkSj rHkh ls oV lkbal vlksfl,'ku }kjk izdkf'kr fd;k tkrk gS] Hkh vdkneh }kjk izcaf/kr dh tkrh gSA fiNys dbZ n'kdksa ls"Bk izkIr dj pqdh gSaA bl ekU;rk dh le;-le; ij dbZ ckj varjkZ"Vªh; vfHkdrkZvksa }kjk cuk, x, ekun.Mksa t

Dhingra, Narender K.

463

Microsoft PowerPoint - 100-K_PropPlan(de).pptx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping theEnergyInnovationMichaelGE1Plan for Remediation of 100-KR- KR-2

464

OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 1: Executive Summary & Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability economics, and technology development needs.

Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C.D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Written by: Al Hansen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Also written by: Robert Hornbaker, Qin Zhang, John Reid, Loren Bode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WD tractor Rated power (gross engine power) 316 kW (425 hp) xE Diesel On-Farm Evaluation Project Hornbaker, Qin Zhang, John Reid, Loren Bode Date: 08/4/00 Project Title: Evaluation of E diesel representatives in the middle of February, 2000, evaluation of E Diesel commenced at the beginning of April, 2000

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

466

First applications of the HIPSE event generator Aymeric Van Lauwe, Denis Lacroix and Dominique Durand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range, are compared with experimental data collected, comparisons between the model and the experiment have been performed for the system Xe+Sn from 25 to 80 MeV/u bombarding energy [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. 2. Brief presentation of the experimental data In order to test

Boyer, Edmond

467

X-Ray Reflectivity ofa 200 Layer W25Si75  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

together with EDB INIS-DE only together with EDB-DE Only non-nuclear energy in EDB AT/CH/DD/XE SIGLE only'-- : .;. .>· - _... ._ Compiled Data Evaluated Data Experimental Data Statistical Data Theoretical Data DataBase · " t " ' -- INIS

468

EUROPEAN ORGANISATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNPPE/95027  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mesons. The measurements for the vector states update previously published results based on lower cross sections, with respect to the scaled energy variable xE , have been compared to JETSET and HERWIG 15 , O.C. Cooke 16 , M. Cuffiani 2 , S. Dado 22 , C. Dallapiccola 17 , G.M. Dallavalle 2 , C. Darling

469

Xavier Gr`acia _ Geometria Diferencial 2 _ Suplement d'`algebra _ 21 mar,c 2007* * 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Xavier Gr`acia _ Geometria Diferencial 2 _ Suplement d'`algebra _ 21 mar,c 2007'o lineal "x:E manera s'obt'e una aplicaci'o linea* *l canSexemplesuinteressants,psobreose* *m que E t'e una base finita (ei). Llavors E*t'e l'anomenada base dual diverses q"uestions d'`algebra

Gràcia, Xavier

470

The CsI Multi-GEM Photomultiplier A.Breskin 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electron multipliers. The detector is filled with argon and other non-aging mixtures of Ar/Ne , Ar/Xe , Ar pixelized position sensitive photon detectors, capable of operation at high photon flux and under MHz frame for photon localization over very large sensitive areas and under high illumination flux. They offer single

471

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 1 mole of ClF5 ")\\uF6- to J\\uCl yields six moles ofreacts with XeF6 to foDll UF6. The M-F stretching and M-0appears more covalent than UF6-. However, if the bonding is

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

To link to this article : DOI:10.1016/j.anucene.2013.04.026 URL : http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anucene.2013.04.026  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as prediction of xe- non induced oscillations are an important part in the operation of a nuclear power plant and a 4DVAR scheme. Tests were made in twin experiments using a simulation code which implements a mono-dimensional coupled model of xenon dynamics, thermal, and thermal­hydraulic processes. We enlighten the very good

Mailhes, Corinne

473

Zur Gleichverteilung im Rn Abstract: A seQuence in a compact set K in Rn is uniformly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, daE das erwahnte Ergebnis gar nichts mit der Kugel zu tun hat, sondern auch flir beliebige kompakte verwandten Problems. Ich danke den Herren H. Rindler, L. Schmetterer und K. Sigmund flir Hinweise und ergibt sich aus der Umkehrformel zur Fouriertransfor mation. Es ist namlich flir jedes xE Rn " i

Michor, Peter W.

474

In-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of time-dependent Xenon-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, it has been shown that the time dependent Xe-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna, Austria can be measured via gamma spectrometry even in the presence of strong background radiation. It is focussing on the measurement of (but not limited to) the nuclide Xe-135. The time dependent Xe-135 inventory of the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna has been measured using a temporary beam line between one fuel element of the core placed onto the thermal column after shutdown and a detector system located just above the water surface of the reactor tank. For the duration of one week, multiple gamma ray spectra were recorded automatically, starting each afternoon after reactor shutdown until the next morning. One measurement series has been recorded over the weekend. The Xe-135 peaks were extracted from a total of 1227 recorded spectra using an automated peak search algorithm and analyzed for their time-dependent properties. Although the background gamma radiation present in the core after shutdown...

Riede, Julia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

24 February1995 ChemicalPhysicsLetters233 (1995)555-558  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Xe, OCS readily dissociates upon irradiation at 248 nm. On continuation of the laser irradiation prepared in a closed-cycle cryostat equipped with four optical windows. The details of the growth scheme from Takachiho Shoji Co. Both gases were used without further purifica- tion. Irradiation

Apkarian, V. Ara

476

Densification, anisotropic deformation, and plastic flow of SiO2 during MeV heavy ion irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use in optical fibers. Some of the studies showed that ion irradiation causes densificationDensification, anisotropic deformation, and plastic flow of SiO2 during MeV heavy ion irradiation E and implantation masks to 4.0 MeV Xe irradiation is studied. Trenches in silica deform dramatically after

Polman, Albert

477

Hyperfine Quenching: Review of Experiment and W.R. Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hyperfine Quenching: Review of Experiment and Theory W.R. Johnson Abstract: We give a brief-like Xe Tr¨abert et al. [38]. W.R. Johnson.1 Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame IN 46556 1 Corresponding author (e-mail: johnson@nd.edu). Differences between

Johnson, Walter R.

478

Ion Impacts on Graphene/Ir(111): Interface Channeling, Vacancy Funnels, and a Nanomesh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion Impacts on Graphene/Ir(111): Interface Channeling, Vacancy Funnels, and a Nanomesh Sebastian simulations we study the production of defects in graphene on Ir(111) under grazing incidence of low energy Xe ions. We demonstrate that the ions are channeled in between graphene and the substrate, giving rise

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

479

Infrastructure Hans de Vries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

> National Model and Data Centre > National cooperation in the eld of observations/observation systems G G G servers > SAN: EMC CLARiiON CX4 > Spectra Logic T950 tape library + SGI Altix XE 270 cluster > Linux #12;G G G G User remarks > Plans for new BUFR library? > MARS (ECFS) reliability, performance issues

Vries, Hans de

480

Status of EXO-200  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EXO-200 is the first phase of the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment, which searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 136}Xe to measure the mass and probe the Majorana nature of the neutrino. EXO-200 consists of 200 kg of liquid Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe in an ultra-low background TPC. Energy resolution is enhanced through the simultaneous collection of scintillation light using Large Area Avalanche Photodiodes (LAAPD's) and ionization charge. It is being installed at the WIPP site in New Mexico, which provides a 2000 meter water-equivalent overburden. EXO-200 will begin taking data in 2009, with the expected two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4 x 10{sup 25} years. According to the most recent nuclear matrix element calculations, this corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV. It will also measure the two neutrino mode for the first time in {sup 136}Xe.

Ackerman, Nicole; /SLAC

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uus kr xe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass spectrometry , C. Hall a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico [2]. EXO-200 is sensitive to a neutrinoless double beta decay collaboration is constructing and operating a series of experiments to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe [1]. The first such experiment, known as EXO-200, is currently collecting data

Gratta, Giorgio

482

arXiv:1109.1046v1[physics.ins-det]6Sep2011 Xenon purity analysis for EXO-200 via mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe[1]. The first such experiment, known as EXO-200, is currently double beta decay half life of 6.4 Ã? 1025 years, equivalent to a Majorana neutrino mass of order 100 me collecting data at the WIPP facility near Carlsbad, New Mexico[2]. EXO-200 is sensitive to a neutrinoless

Gratta, Giorgio

483

Nuclear structure relevant to neutrinoless double beta decay candidate {sup 130}Te and other recent results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have undertaken a series of single-nucleon and pair transfer reaction measurements to help constrain calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay. In this talk, a short overview of measurements relevant to the {sup 130}Te?{sup 130}Xe system is given. Brief mention is made of other recent and forthcoming results.

Kay, B. P. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

484

Eur. Phys. J. D 6, 8387 (1999) THE EUROPEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fisica Springer-Verlag 1999 Dependence of cluster ion emission from uranium oxide surfaces on the charge for highly charged ion sputtering have been measured for a uranium oxide target for Xe44+ , Au63.46.+w Clusters, nanoparticles, and nanocrystalline materials ­ 82.65.-i Surface and interface chemistry

485

Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Anions at 118.2 nm: Observation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at 118.2 nm (10.488 eV) by tripling the third harmonic output (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser in a XeAr cell. Our study focuses on a set of...

486

Status of EXO-200  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXO-200 is the first phase of the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment, which searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in 136Xe to measure the mass and probe the Majorana nature of the neutrino. EXO-200 consists of 200 kg of liquid Xe enriched to 80% in 136Xe in an ultra-low background TPC. Energy resolution is enhanced through the simultaneous collection of scintillation light using Large Area Avalanche Photodiodes (LAAPD's) and ionization charge. It is being installed at the WIPP site in New Mexico, which provides a 2000 meter water-equivalent overburden. EXO-200 will begin taking data in 2009, with the expected two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4 10^25 years. According to the most recent nuclear matrix element calculations, this corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV. It will also measure the two neutrino mode for the first time in 136Xe.

Nicole Ackerman

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

487

Status of Particle Physics 1999 -2009 -2019  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: oscillations and masses Super- Kamiokande solar: xe atmospheric: x SNO 2005 · sun is doing all right-layer additional b-layerATLAS Pixel phase I phase II ? CMS tracker #12;e+e- linear collider ILC 500-1000 GeV c

Hebbeker, Thomas

488

THERMAL LOADING OF A DIRECT DRIVE TARGET IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optics. A background gas, such as Xe, could reduce the damage on the wall from ion and heat loading fusion micro explosion (~ 10 Hz), ions and heat loads threaten to damage the reactor wall and driver. · The thermal loading of a target (radiation from the chamber wall and convection from the protective gas) may

Raffray, A. René

489

December 5-6, 2002 HAPL Program Workshop, NRL, Washington, D.C. 1 Enhancing Target Survival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as Background Gas · For an assumed condensation coefficient of ~1, q''= 6000 W/m2 with only 2.5mtorr/4000K Xe on Maintaining DT Below its Triple Point · Analysis using ANSYS - Target is not tumbling - 2-D heat flux · Major limit on energy transfer from background gas and absorbed radiation from chamber wall #12;December

Raffray, A. René

490

October 27-28, 2004 HAPL meeting, PPPL 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Mechanical Analysis of the Target Heat loads: · Energy transfer from impinging atoms of background gas?) · Better definition is needed Physics requirements: IFE Chamber (R~6 m) Protective gas (Xe, He) at ~4000 K - Enthalpy transfer (including condensation) or convective loading - Recombination of ions (much uncertainty

Raffray, A. René

491

Numer. Math. 38, 309-332 (1982) Numerische 9 Springer-Verlag 1982  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Diffusion Algorithm and Its Applications to the Navier-Stokes Equations O. Pironneau D6partement de Math6matiques, CSP the velocity of the flow at xe(2 and time t. Although it is not essential, we shall assume fo

Pironneau, Olivier

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Xenon in Mercury-Manganese Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous studies of elemental abundances in Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) stars have occasionally reported the presence of lines of the ionized rare noble gas Xe II, especially in a few of the hottest stars with Teff ~ 13000--15000 K. A new study of this element has been undertaken using observations from Lick Observatory's Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph. In this work, the spectrum synthesis program UCLSYN has been used to undertake abundance analysis assuming LTE. We find that in the Smith & Dworetsky sample of HgMn stars, Xe is vastly over-abundant in 21 of 22 HgMn stars studied, by factors of 3.1--4.8 dex. There does not appear to be a significant correlation of Xe abundance with Teff. A comparison sample of normal late B stars shows no sign of Xe II lines that could be detected, consistent with the expected weakness of lines at normal abundance. The main reason for the previous lack of widespread detection in HgMn stars is probably due to the strongest lines being at longer wavelengths than the photographic blue. The lines used in this work were 4603.03A, 4844.33A and 5292.22A.

M. M. Dworetsky; J. L. Persaud; K. Patel

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

493

Investigation of collective radial expansion and stopping in heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of collective radial expansion and stopping in heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies in central Xe+Sn reactions at Fermi energies. Performing a comparison between the predictions central collisions at Fermi energies. However, considering the same central event selection

Boyer, Edmond

494

Contributed papers Study of gas-fluidization dynamics with laser-polarized 129  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas fluidization is a process in which solid particles experience fluid-like suspension in an upward. Bubbles, or void spaces with volume much larger than that of a single particle, emerge when the gas flowContributed papers Study of gas-fluidization dynamics with laser-polarized 129 Xe Ruopeng Wanga

Walsworth, Ronald L.

495

DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT Version Date 8/14/01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are small with respect to the absolute mass scale [6], to the hierarchical, where mass differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 4.2 Xe purification techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 4.3 Ultimate are of the same order as the mass themselves. However, while the neutrino mass scale is unknown, the present data

Wechsler, Risa H.

496

Oak Ridge 25URC Tandem Accelerator 2007 SNEAP Lab Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY 2008, the 25URC operated for slightly over 3,000 research hours. The radioactive species 80Ge and 17,18F accounted for 763 of these hours. This included an experiment using 17F which was only possible due to an improvement of a factor of 50 in beam intensity over our previous facility record. Twenty stable beam species were provided this year. Operation for the experimental program was at terminal potentials from 2.02 to 23.8 MV. Approximately 200 hours of conditioning were done to return the machine to operation after tank openings. There were six tank openings during the year: three scheduled for general maintenance and three unscheduled. Two of the unscheduled openings were required to correct shorting rod issues and the other was to reestablish communication with one of the major dead sections. On July 28, an event happened that caused all accelerators at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) to suspend operation. At approximately 8 AM on that Monday, during operations with approximately 12 {micro}A of 50-MeV protons on a uranium carbide target, delivering neutron-rich 81Zn beam to the new Low-energy Radioactive Ion Beam Spectroscopy Station (LeRIBSS), a radiological control technician (RCT) reported higher than normal radiation levels just outside the shield door to the IRIS1 vault (the room in which RIBs are produced at HRIBF). The measured dose rate equivalent was 4 mrem/hr. The presence of radiological contamination on the floor just outside the shield door was subsequently noted, as was the possible presence of airborne radioactivity. These observations were reported to facility management. Accelerators were put in standby immediately and the building evacuated. The event was declared a laboratory operational emergency. Parts of the building were cleared for reentry to collect belongings on Monday afternoon. The entire building was cleared for reoccupation on Tuesday morning after a detailed radiological survey found no contamination outside the shielded vaults. No decontamination was required. No individual received any detectable radiological dose as a result of this event. The 25URC tandem accelerator was given permission to resume operation with stable beams in early September, but radioactive ion production is still not allowed. Subsequent analysis indicated a release that consisted entirely of noble gasses (Xe and Kr isotopes). We believe we have identified two unrelated failures, one associated with the HVAC system and the other with the roughing system exhaust which accounts for both the escape of noble gasses into the IRIS1 vault and their migration outside the vault. An investigation team report is expected by October 24. At that time, corrective actions will be determined and the path to future radioactive ion beam production will be known. The break from operations allowed a few upgrades to be implemented. The most notable was the installation and commissioning of a SNICS ion source purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). The SNICS replaced the old Alton/Aarhus source that we have used for many years. An ANU style gas cathode holder was purchased also but has not yet been implemented. The first beams have been produced by the source and the biggest problem encountered was reducing the beam for very low current experiments. A new power supply for the injection magnet was installed during this period also. Radioactive ion beam (RIB) development at the High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL) has been delayed this year while installing the platforms, conduits and equipment for the second Injector for Radioactive Ion Species (IRIS2) which is co-located with the HPTL facility. The majority of development activities have been performed at the two off-line ion source test facilities (ISTF1 and ISTF2) and the On-Line Test Facility (OLTF). Both test facilities have been developing systems which will eventually be used with IRIS2. Two new tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers have been ordered for continuing development of an ion source based on laser ionization using all solid-state

Meigs, Martha J [ORNL; Juras, Raymond C [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Oak Ridge 25URC Tandem Accelerator 2008 SNEAP Lab Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY 2008, the 25URC operated for slightly over 3,000 research hours. The radioactive species {sup 80}Ge and {sup 17,18}F accounted for 763 of these hours. This included an experiment using {sup 17}F which was only possible due to an improvement of a factor of 50 in beam intensity over our previous facility record. Twenty stable beam species were provided this year. Operation for the experimental program was at terminal potentials from 2.02 to 23.8 MV. Approximately 200 hours of conditioning were done to return the machine to operation after tank openings. There were six tank openings during the year: three scheduled for general maintenance and three unscheduled. Two of the unscheduled openings were required to correct shorting rod issues and the other was to reestablish communication with one of the major dead sections. On July 28, an event happened that caused all accelerators at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) to suspend operation. At approximately 8 AM on that Monday, during operations with approximately 12 {micro}A of 50-MeV protons on a uranium carbide target, delivering neutron-rich {sup 81}Zn beam to the new Low-energy Radioactive Ion Beam Spectroscopy Station (LeRIBSS), a radiological control technician (RCT) reported higher than normal radiation levels just outside the shield door to the IRIS1 vault (the room in which RIBs are produced at HRIBF). The measured dose rate equivalent was 4 mrem/hr. The presence of radiological contamination on the floor just outside the shield door was subsequently noted, as was the possible presence of airborne radioactivity. These observations were reported to facility management. Accelerators were put in standby immediately and the building evacuated. The event was subsequently declared a laboratory operational emergency. Parts of the building were cleared for reentry to collect belongings on Monday afternoon. The entire building was cleared for reoccupation on Tuesday morning after a detailed radiological survey found no contamination outside the shielded vaults. No decontamination was required. No individual received any detectable radiological dose as a result of this event. The 25URC tandem accelerator was given permission to resume operation with stable beams in early September, but radioactive ion production is still not allowed. Subsequent analysis indicated a release that consisted entirely of noble gasses (Xe and Kr isotopes). We believe we have identified two unrelated failures, one associated with the HVAC system and the other with the roughing system exhaust which accounts for both the escape of noble gasses into the IRIS1 vault and their migration outside the vault. An investigation team report is expected by October 24. At that time, corrective actions will be determined and the path to future radioactive ion beam production will be known. The break from operations allowed a few upgrades to be implemented. The most notable was the installation and commissioning of a SNICS ion source purchased from National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). The SNICS replaced the old Alton/Aarhus source that we have used for many years. An ANU style gas cathode holder was purchased also but has not yet been implemented. The first beams have been produced by the source and the biggest problem encountered was reducing the beam for very low current experiments. A new power supply for the injection magnet was installed during this period also. Radioactive ion beam (RIB) development at the High Power Target Laboratory (HPTL) has been delayed this year while installing the platforms, conduits and equipment for the second Injector for Radioactive Ion Species (IRIS2) which is co-located with the HPTL facility. Therefore, the majority of development activities have been performed at the two off-line ion source test facilities (ISTF1 and ISTF2) and the On-Line Test Facility (OLTF). Both test facilities have been developing systems which will eventually be used with IRIS2. Two new tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers have been ordered for continuing development of an ion source

Meigs, Martha J [ORNL; Juras, Raymond C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Porting the NAS-NPB Conjugate Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.kr/Center_for_Manycore_Programming/SNU_NPB_Suite.html NPB Benchmarks #12;! "A conjugate gradient method is used to compute an approximation to the smallestPorting the NAS-NPB Conjugate Gradient Benchmark to CUDA NVIDIA Corporation #12;Outline ! Overview coding methodologies and architectures. ! Suite of benchmarks: ! Integer Sort ! Conjugate Gradient ! CFD

Crawford, T. Daniel

499

Analysis of Time Series Using Compact Model-Based Descriptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Time Series Using Compact Model-Based Descriptions Hans-Peter Kriegel, Peer Kr this is a combination of the coefficients 1, . . . , 3 representing the three input time series using a function f-of-the-art compression methods. The results are visually presented in a very concise way so that the user can easily

Kriegel, Hans-Peter

500

Gerhard Ertl 78 M A X P L A N C K F O R S C H U N G 4 / 2 0 0 7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, dass ich ihm die Reaktion aufmale, die ich unter- sucht habe. Da hab ich die Ammoni- akreaktion- krümeln in übelriechendes Ammoni- ak, den Ausgangsstoff für Kunstdün- ger, umwandelt. Die Methode