Sample records for uus kr xe

  1. Metal-organic frameworks for Xe/Kr separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Patrick J.; Farha, Omar K.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are provided and are selectively adsorbent to xenon (Xe) over another noble gas such as krypton (Kr) and/or argon (Ar) as a result of having framework voids (pores) sized to this end. MOF materials having pores that are capable of accommodating a Xe atom but have a small enough pore size to receive no more than one Xe atom are desired to preferentially adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component (Xe--Kr mixture) adsorption method. The MOF material has 20% or more, preferably 40% or more, of the total pore volume in a pore size range of 0.45-0.75 nm which can selectively adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component Xe--Kr mixture over a pressure range of 0.01 to 1.0 MPa.

  2. Metal-organic frameworks for Xe/Kr separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Patrick J.; Farha, Omar K.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are provided and are selectively adsorbent to xenon (Xe) over another noble gas such as krypton (Kr) and/or argon (Ar) as a result of having framework voids (pores) sized to this end. MOF materials having pores that are capable of accommodating a Xe atom but have a small enough pore size to receive no more than one Xe atom are desired to preferentially adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component (Xe--Kr mixture) adsorption method. The MOF material has 20% or more, preferably 40% or more, of the total pore volume in a pore size range of 0.45-0.75 nm which can selectively adsorb Xe over Kr in a multi-component Xe--Kr mixture over a pressure range of 0.01 to 1.0 MPa.

  3. Multiproperty empirical interatomic potentials for ArXe and KrXe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pack, R.T; Valentini, J.J.; Becker, C.H.; Buss, R.J.; Lee, Y.T.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crossed molecular beam measurements of elastic differential cross sections (DCS) for the scattering of Ar and Kr by Xe are reported. Empirical multiparameter M3SV interatomic potentials for the ArXe and KrXe interactions are determined by simultaneously fitting the DCS, the viscosities, and virial coefficients; the results are the most accurate potentials yet reported for these systems.

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN OF A MULTI-COLUMN EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR KR/XE SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Tony Watson

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a precursor to FY-15 Kr/Xe separation testing, design modifications to an existing experimental setup are warranted. The modifications would allow for multi-column testing to facilitate a Xe separation followed by a Kr separation using engineered form sorbents prepared using an INL patented process. A new cooling apparatus capable of achieving test temperatures to -40° C and able to house a newly designed Xe column was acquired. Modifications to the existing setup are being installed to allow for multi-column testing and gas constituent analyses using evacuated sample bombs. The new modifications will allow for independent temperature control for each column enabling a plethora of test conditions to be implemented. Sample analyses will be used to evaluate the Xe/Kr selectivity of the AgZ-PAN sorbent and determine the Kr purity of the effluent stream following Kr capture using the HZ-PAN sorbent.

  5. ar kr xe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detectors, Gas Electron Multipliers, Geiger-mode APDs. . .. 12 85 Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of 134Xe HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: In view of recent great...

  6. Abundances of s-process elements in planetary nebulae: Br, Kr & Xe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; R. Williams; E. Pellegrini; K. Cavagnolo; J. A. Baldwin; B. Sharpee; M. Phillips; X. -W. Liu

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify emission lines of post-iron peak elements in very high signal-to-noise spectra of a sample of planetary nebulae. Analysis of lines from ions of Kr and Xe reveals enhancements in most of the PNe, in agreement with the theories of s-process in AGB star. Surprisingly, we did not detect lines from Br even though s-process calculations indicate that it should be produced with Kr at detectable levels.

  7. First-principles study of the stability and migration of Kr, I and Xe in ZrO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Haiyan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Weber, William J [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability and migration of Kr, I and Xe in bulk ZrO2 and on the ZrO2 (1 1 1) surface have been studied by standard density functional theory (DFT) and the DFT-D2 method that corrects for the van der Waals interaction. Both methods show that Kr and Xe prefer to incorporate in the bulk phase rather than adsorb on the surface, and Xe is very mobile in the bulk state. For Kr and Xe adsorption on the surface, van der Waals interaction dominates, causing the weak interaction between the adsorbate and substrate. Iodine is found to have comparable stability in both phases and forms I O bonds with strong covalency. It exhibits higher mobility on the surface than in the bulk ZrO2, and diffusion from bulk-like state to surface state is an exothermic process. The fission product behavior in ZrO2 is shown to be a complicated synergetic effect of fission product atomic size, electron negativity, occupation site and phase structure of the host.

  8. High-resolution total-cross-section measurements for electron scattering from Ar, Kr, and Xe employing a threshold-photoelectron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurokawa, M.; Kitajima, M.; Toyoshima, K.; Kishino, T.; Odagiri, T. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Ito, K. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from Ar and Xe at electron energies ranging from 7 meV to 20 eV were obtained with the experimental technique employing the threshold-photoelectron source. The measured total cross sections are in good agreement with those obtained by other groups down to 100 meV, above which several experimental works have been reported. Scattering lengths for electron scattering from Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined from the present total cross sections and our recent results for Kr using the modified effective range theory. The values of the scattering length obtained in the present analysis differ from the values determined from the previous swarm experiments and beam experiments. The resonant structures in the total cross sections due to Feshbach resonances of Ar, Kr, and Xe with an improved energy resolution were also measured. Analyses of the resonant structure were carried out based on the spin-dependent resonant scattering theory in order to determine the values of the natural width of Feshbach resonances of Ar, Kr, and Xe precisely.

  9. Many-body potentials of an open shell atom: Spectroscopy of spin-orbit transitions of iodine in crystalline Xe and Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Many-body potentials of an open shell atom: Spectroscopy of spin-orbit transitions of iodine: 2E,,2-`1E1,2 and 2EI12+ESj2 transitions. Two pairs of bands are observed each in Xe and Kr. The long-body potentials of open shell species-atoms, radicals or molecules-as encountered in condensed media, cannot

  10. Kinetics and spectroscopy of KrF (B) and Kr sub 2 F (4 sup 2. Gamma. )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, A.W.; Greene, D.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorption spectra corresponding to transitions from the 4{sup 2}{Gamma} level to upper excited states of several rare gas-halide trimers (Kr{sub 2}F, Ar{sub 2}F and Xe{sub 2}Cl) have been measured at wavelengths ranging from 200 nm to as large as 800 nm. Absolute absorption cross sections for Kr{sub 2}F have been determined. Experiments are discussed that will measure the radiative lifetime of the KrF (B) state which is formed utilizing a sub-picosecond source. KrF B {leftrightarrow} C mixing, quenching rates and the B{yields}X stimulated emission cross section will be measured. 21 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Masses of Kr-77 and Kr-75

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moltz, D. M.; Betker, A. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Burch, R. H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Toth, K. S.; Avignone, F. T.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the other Kr iso- topes, we must conclude that the N =39 configuration is not especially favored and that Rb must represent an unusual case. It is now recognized ' that Rb is one Qf the most deformed nuclei known. If one considers the mass predictions...

  12. Intel® Inspector XE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin andInterimInvokingInspector XE 2013 Memory

  13. Alamouti {yjdong, sky6174}@ccl.snu.ac.kr, jsno@snu.ac.kr, djshin@hanyang.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No, Jong-Seon

    @snu.ac.kr, djshin@hanyang.ac.kr (soft-decision-and-forward: SDF) . SDF . Alamouti , . (amplify-and-forward: AF) . , SDF AF . 1. . (source: S-decision-and-forward: SDF) . SDF R S phase, phase 1 phase 2 . Phase 1, S R D , phase 2 R D . , S D

  14. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for XeF2 Etcher Coral Name: XeF2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for XeF2 Etcher Coral Name: XeF2 Model #: SE Tech ES-2000XM Location this system you must RESERVE the equipment in CORAL. It is mandatory to ENGAGE the machine before you start processing. Please enter etch rate data in CORAL and the logbook by the tool If you encounter any problems

  15. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A. (X-Ray Science Division); (National Research Council of Canada); (Univ. of Saskatchewan); (ORNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific {sup 83}Kr nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  16. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

  17. Bubble formation and Kr distribution in Kr-irradiated UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.F. He; B. Valderrama; A.-R. Hassan; J. Yu; M. Gupta; J. Pakarinen; H.B. Henderson; J. Gan; M.A. Kirk; A.T. Nelson; M.V. Manuel; A. El-Azab; T.R. Allen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ and ex situ transmission electron microscopy observation of small Kr bubbles in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO2 were conducted to understand the inert gas bubble behavior in oxide nuclear fuel. The bubble size and volume swelling are shown as a weak function of ion dose but strongly depend on the temperature. The Kr bubble formation at room temperature was observed for the first time. The depth profiles of implanted Kr determined by atom probe tomography are in good agreement with the calculated profiles by SRIM, but the measured concentration of Kr is about 1/3 of calculated one. This difference is mainly due to low solubility of Kr in UO2 matrix, which has been confirmed by both density-functional theory calculations and chemical equilibrium analysis.

  18. Gas phase 129Xe NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Lana G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    129Xe flowing through aerogel fragments at two differentT = 290 K). Xenon occluded in aerogel gives rise to a signalsieves (zeolites) and aerogels. Stochastic displacement of

  19. Comparative analysis of spectra of the background of the proportional counter filled with Kr, enriched in Kr-78, and with Kr of natural content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. M. Gavriljuk; V. N. Gavrin; A. M. Gangapshev; V. V. Kazalov; V. V. Kuzminov; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the experiment searching for 2K-capture with large low-background proportional counter are presented. The comparison of spectra of the background of the proportional counter filled with Kr enriched in $^{78}$Kr (8400 hr) and with natural Kr (3039 hr) is given. A new limit on the half-life of $^{78}$Kr with regard to 2K-capture, T$_{1/2}\\geq2.0\\cdot10^{21}$ yrs (95% C.L.) has been obtained.

  20. High energy KrCl electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy KrCl laser for producing coherent radiation at 222 nm. Output energies on the order of 100 mJ per pulse are produced utilizing a discharge excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions, thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HCl is used as a halogen donor which undergoes a harpooning reaction with metastable Kr.sub.M * to form KrCl.

  1. AUV {gslee, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    AUV , {gslee, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr Transmission Power Control in Cluster AUV (CH) AUV . 1 . 1. 2. 3 . AUV CH (Buoy

  2. KR Energy Spa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New Energy CoKERAFOL GmbH Jump to:KR Energy Spa Jump

  3. Energy levels and radiative rates for transitions in B-like to F-like Kr ions (Kr XXXII-XXVIII)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggarwal, K.M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: K.Aggarwal@qub.ac.uk; Keenan, F.P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Lawson, K.D. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and lifetimes have been calculated for transitions in B-like to F-like Kr ions, Kr XXXIII-XXVIII. For the calculations, the fully relativistic GRASP code has been adopted, and results are reported for all electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions among the lowest 125, 236, 272, 226, and 113 levels of Kr XXXII, Kr XXXI, Kr XXX, Kr XXIX, and Kr XXVIII, respectively, belonging to the n {<=} 3 configurations. Comparisons are made with earlier available theoretical and experimental results, and some discrepancies have been noted and explained.

  4. Formation of XeI(B) in low pressure inductive radio frequency electric discharges sustained in mixtures of Xe and I2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    in mixtures of Xe and I2 Paul N. Barnes Advanced Plasma Research Section (POOC-2), Wright Laboratory, Wright

  5. Mercury: A second-generation KrF laser for inertial fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigio, I.J.; York, G.; McLeod, J.; Czuchlewski, J.; Rose, E.; Hanson, D.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; McCown, A.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``Mercury`` KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora KrF laser. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a testbed for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

  6. Mercury: A second-generation KrF laser for inertial fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigio, I.J.; York, G.; McLeod, J.; Czuchlewski, J.; Rose, E.; Hanson, D.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; McCown, A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mercury'' KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora KrF laser. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a testbed for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

  7. Origin of anomalous Xe-H in nanodiamond stardust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratz, K. L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz, Germany and Fachbereich Chemie, Pharmazie und Geowissenschaften, Universitat Mainz, Mainz (United States); Farouqi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz, Germany and Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hallmann, O. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Pfeiffer, B. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Univ. Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Ott, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Univ. of West Hungary, H-9700 Szombathely (Hungary)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Still today, the nucleosynthesis origin of Xe-H in presolar nanodiamonds is far from understood. Historically possible explanations were proposed by a secondary “neutron-burst” process occurring in the He- or C/O-shells of a type-II supernova (SN-II), which are, however, not fully convincing in terms of modern nucleosynthesis conditions. Therefore, we have investigated Xe isotopic abundance features that may be diagnostic for different versions of a classical, primary r-process in high-entropy-wind (HEW) ejecta of core-collapse SN-II. We report here on parameter tests for non-standard r-process variants, by varying electron abundances (Y{sub e}), ranges of entropies (S) and expansion velocities (V{sub exp}) with their correlated neutron-freezeout times (?(freeze)) and temperatures (T{sub 9}(freeze)). From this study, we conclude that a best fi to the measured Xe-H abundance ratios {sup i}Xe/{sup 136}Xe can be obtained with the high-S “main” component of a “cold” r-process variant.

  8. Driving photochemistry by clustering: The ICl-Xe case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glodic, Pavle [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Kartakoullis, Andreas; Kitsopoulos, Theofanis N. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Voutes, 71110 Heraklion (Greece); Farnik, Michal [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague (Czech Republic); Samartzis, Peter C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, 71110 Heraklion (Greece)

    2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present slice imaging data demonstrating the influence of clustering on the photodissociation dynamics of a diatomic molecule: iodine monochloride (ICl) was dissociated at 235 nm in He and Xe seed gasses, probing both Cl and I photofragment energy and angular distributions. We observe that the kinetic energy releases of both Cl and I fragments change from He to Xe seeding. For Cl fragments, the seeding in Xe increases the kinetic energy release of some Cl fragments with a narrow kinetic energy distribution, and leads to some fragments with rather broad statistical distribution falling off exponentially from near-zero energies up to about 2.5 eV. Iodine fragment distribution changes even more dramatically from He to Xe seeding: sharp features essentially disappear and a broad distribution arises reaching to about 2.5 eV. Both these observations are rationalized by a simple qualitative cluster model assuming ICl dissociation inside larger xenon clusters and 'on surface' of smaller Xe species.

  9. Cognitive Radio Network {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    2010 Cognitive Radio Network , , {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr Analysis of Average Opportunities in Cognitive Radio Networks Seowoo Jang, Saewoong Bahk INMC, EECS, Seoul National University Cognitive Radio Network . Primary user

  10. Microfluidics {sjauh, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microfluidics {sjauh, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr Solving Shortest Path Problems Using Microfluidics Sahng-Joon Auh and Byoung-Tak Zhang Biointelligence Lab, School of Computer Science and Engineering Seoul National University . microfluidics MEMS

  11. Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Shu; Ferrara, Joseph; Bell, Edward; Patel, Shital; Sieradzki, Manny [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Optima XE is the first production worthy single wafer high energy implanter. The new system combines a state-of-art single wafer endstation capable of throughputs in excess of 400 wafers/hour with a production-proven RF linear accelerator technology. Axcelis has been evolving and refining RF Linac technology since the introduction of the NV1000 in 1986. The Optima XE provides production worthy beam currents up to energies of 1.2 MeV for P{sup +}, 2.9 MeV for P{sup ++}, and 1.5 MeV for B{sup +}. Energies as low as 10 keV and tilt angles as high as 45 degrees are also available., allowing the implanter to be used for a wide variety of traditional medium current implants to ensure high equipment utilization. The single wafer endstation provides precise implant angle control across wafer and wafer to wafer. In addition, Optima XE's unique dose control system allows compensation of photoresist outgassing effects without relying on traditional pressure-based methods. We describe the specific features, angle control and dosimetry of the Optima XE and their applications in addressing the ever-tightening demands for more precise process controls and higher productivity.

  12. High-spin rotational structures in {sup 76}Kr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Svensson, C.E.; Finlay, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Hyland, B.; Phillips, A.A.; Schumaker, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); O'Leary, C.D.; Jenkins, D.; Johnston-Theasby, F.; Joshi, P.; Kelsall, N.S.; Wadsworth, R. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Appelbe, D.E. [CLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Austin, R.A.E.; Cameron, J.A.; Waddington, J.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Ball, G.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [and others

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-spin states in {sup 36}{sub 76}Kr{sub 40} have been populated in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,4p){sup 76}Kr fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV and studied using the Gammasphere and Microball multidetector arrays. The ground-state band and two signature-split negative parity bands of {sup 76}Kr have been extended to {approx}30({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Lifetime measurements using the Doppler-shift attenuation method show that the transition quadrupole moment of these three bands decrease as they approach their maximum-spin states. Two signatures of a new rotational structure with remarkably rigid rotational behavior have been identified. The high-spin properties of these rotational bands are analyzed within the framework of configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations.

  13. FBDEditor: {ldalove, atang34, syjsmk, jbyoo}@konkuk.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    }@konkuk.ac.kr : Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) . Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) . PLC Function Controller (PLC) Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) . PLC IEC 61131-3 5 (LD: Ladder diagram) . FBD Function Block(FB) . FBD PLC . FPGA Hardware Description Language

  14. Role of impact parameter in branching reactions: Chemical accelerator studies of the reaction Xe++CH4?XeCH3 ++H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, G. D.; Strattan, L. W.; Hierl, Peter M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integral reaction cross sections and product velocity distributions have been measured for the ion–molecule reaction Xe+(CH4,H)XeCH3 + over the relative reactant translational energy range of 0.7–5.5 eV by chemical accelerator techniques...

  15. Luminescence characteristics of Xe{sub 2}Cl excimer molecules under pumping the dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures with a pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mis'kevich, A I; Jinbo, Guo [National Research Nuclear University 'Moscow Engineering Physics Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)] [National Research Nuclear University 'Moscow Engineering Physics Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporal and spectral characteristics of the luminescence of dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures of different composition, excited by a 5-ns pulsed electron beam, were measured. The energy of the electrons amounted to 150 keV and the electron beam current pulse amplitude was 5 A. The gas mixtures were used containing Xe (38-700 Torr) and CCl{sub 4} (0.03-0.3 Torr). The studies were performed within the wavelength range 200-1200 nm using a MAYA-2000Pro diffraction grating spectrometer and a RIGOL DS 5022 ME fast digital oscilloscope. The luminescence lifetimes of the excimer molecules XeCl* (band with {lambda}{sub max} = 308 nm) and Xe{sub 2}Cl* (band with {lambda}{sub max} = 486 nm) were measured, as well as the constants of quenching by the components of the gas mixture for Xe{sub 2}Cl* molecules. A model of plasma-chemical processes for dense Xe-CCl{sub 4} gas mixtures with a very low content of the CCl{sub 4} donor is proposed. It is shown that in such 'poor' mixtures Xe{sub 2}Cl* molecules are mainly produced as a result of recombination of the Xe{sub 2}{sup +} and Cl{sup -} ions. (active media)

  16. Applications developed for byproduct /sup 85/Kr and tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remini, W.C.; Case, F.N.; Haff, K.W.; Tiegs, S.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radionuclides, krypton-85 and tritium, both of which are gases under ordinary conditions, are used in many applications in industries and by the military forces. Krypton-85 is produced during the fissioning of uranium and is released during the dissolution of spent-fuel elements. It is a chemically inert gas that emits 0.695-MeV beta rays and a small yield of 0.54-MeV gammas over a half life of 10.3 years. Much of the /sup 85/Kr currently produced is released to the atmosphere; however, large-scale reprocessing of fuel will require collection of the gas and storage as a waste product. An alternative to storage is utilization, and since the chemical and radiation characteristics of /sup 85/Kr make this radionuclide a relatively low hazard from the standpoint of contamination and biological significance, a number of uses have been developed. Tritium is produced as a byproduct of the nuclear-weapons program, and it has a half life of 12.33 years. It has a 0.01861-MeV beta emission and no gamma emission. The absence of a gamma-ray energy eliminates the need for external shielding of the devices utilizing tritium, thus making them easily transportable. Many of the applications require only small quantities of /sup 85/Kr or tritium; however, these uses are important to the technology base of the nation. A significant development that has the potential for beneficial utilization of large quantities of /sup 85/Kr and of tritium involves their use in the production of low-level lighting devices. Since these lights are free from external fuel supplies, have a long half life (> 10 years), are maintenance-free, reliable, and easily deployed, both military and civilian airfield-lighting applications are being studied.

  17. Optical hyperpolarization and NMR detection of $^{129}$Xe on a microfluidic chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez-Martinez, Ricardo; Rosenbluh, Michael; Donley, Elizabeth A; Knappe, Svenja; Seltzer, Scott J; Ring, Hattie L; Bajaj, Vikram S; Kitching, John

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optically hyperpolarized $^{129}$Xe gas has become a powerful contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging, with applications ranging from studies of the human lung to the targeted detection of biomolecules. Equally attractive is its potential use to enhance the sensitivity of microfluidic NMR experiments, in which small sample volumes yield poor sensitivity. Unfortunately, most $^{129}$Xe polarization systems are large and non-portable. Here we present a microfabricated chip that optically polarizes $^{129}$Xe gas. We have achieved $^{129}$Xe polarizations greater than 0.5$\\%$ at flow rates of several microliters per second, compatible with typical microfluidic applications. We employ in situ optical magnetometry to sensitively detect and characterize the $^{129}$Xe polarization at magnetic fields of 1 $\\mu$T. We construct the device using standard microfabrication techniques, which will facilitate its integration with existing microfluidic platforms. This device may enable the...

  18. Charge-exchange EUV spectroscopy in collisions of Xe{sup q+} (q=7-9) with rare gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanuma, H.; Ohashi, H.; Yamamoto, N.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Fujioka, S.; Nishimura, H.; Nishihara, K. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Ohsawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission spectra have been measured in charge exchange collisions between Xe{sup q+} (q=7--9) and rare gases at an energy of 20 q keV. We have observed 4, 22, and 39 lines in collisions of Xe{sup 7+}, Xe{sup 8+}, and Xe{sup 9+}. Of these emission lines, four lines of Xe vii, eight lines of Xe viii, and nine lines of Xe ix correspond to newly observed transitions. The identification procedure is described in detail. The aim of this work is to obtain spectroscopic data for multiply charged Xe ions. In addition, the electron capture mechanism is also discussed using the crude classical over-the-barrier model to understand the target dependence of the emission spectra.

  19. Hanford Site - 100-KR-4 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,Assessment Documents |Project|ProjectsKR-4 Hanford

  20. GraXe, graphene and xenon for neutrinoless double beta decay searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; F. Guinea; M. M. Fogler; M. I. Katsnelson; J. Martin-Albo; F. Monrabal; J. Muñoz-Vidal

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new detector concept, GraXe (to be pronounced as grace), to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Xe-136. GraXe combines a popular detection medium in rare-event searches, liquid xenon, with a new, background-free material, graphene. In our baseline design of GraXe, a sphere made of graphene-coated titanium mesh and filled with liquid xenon (LXe) enriched in the Xe-136 isotope is immersed in a large volume of natural LXe instrumented with photodetectors. Liquid xenon is an excellent scintillator, reasonably transparent to its own light. Graphene is transparent over a large frequency range, and impermeable to the xenon. Event position could be deduced from the light pattern detected in the photosensors. External backgrounds would be shielded by the buffer of natural LXe, leaving the ultra-radiopure internal volume virtually free of background. Industrial graphene can be manufactured at a competitive cost to produce the sphere. Enriching xenon in the isotope Xe-136 is easy and relatively cheap, and there is already near one ton of enriched xenon available in the world (currently being used by the EXO, KamLAND-Zen and NEXT experiments). All the cryogenic know-how is readily available from the numerous experiments using liquid xenon. An experiment using the GraXe concept appears realistic and affordable in a short time scale, and its physics potential is enormous.

  1. GraXe, graphene and xenon for neutrinoless double beta decay searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Monrabal, F.; Vidal, J. Muñoz [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valencia, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, 46980 Valencia (Spain); Guinea, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), CSIC, Calle Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fogler, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Katsnelson, M.I., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: paco.guinea@icmm.csic.es, E-mail: mfogler@ucsd.edu, E-mail: katsnel@sci.kun.nl, E-mail: justo.martin-albo@ific.uv.es, E-mail: francesc.monrabal@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new detector concept, GraXe (to be pronounced as grace), to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 136}XE. GraXe combines a popular detection medium in rare-event searches, liquid xenon, with a new, background-free material, graphene. In our baseline design of GraXe, a sphere made of graphene-coated titanium mesh and filled with liquid xenon (LXe) enriched in the {sup 136}XE isotope is immersed in a large volume of natural LXe instrumented with photodetectors. Liquid xenon is an excellent scintillator, reasonably transparent to its own light. Graphene is transparent over a large frequency range, and impermeable to the xenon. Event position could be deduced from the light pattern detected in the photosensors. External backgrounds would be shielded by the buffer of natural LXe, leaving the ultra-radiopure internal volume virtually free of background. Industrial graphene can be manufactured at a competitive cost to produce the sphere. Enriching xenon in the isotope {sup 136}XE is easy and relatively cheap, and there is already near one ton of enriched xenon available in the world (currently being used by the EXO, KamLAND-Zen and NEXT experiments). All the cryogenic know-how is readily available from the numerous experiments using liquid xenon. An experiment using the GraXe concept appears realistic and affordable in a short time scale, and its physics potential is enormous.

  2. Influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} ions on the micro-hollow cathode discharge driven by thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levko, D. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)] [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Bliokh, Y. P.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Department of Physics, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)] [Department of Physics, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms on the hollow cathode discharge driven by electron thermionic emission is studied using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions modeling. A comparison with the results of two-component (electrons and Xe{sup +} ions) plasma modeling showed that the presence of the Xe{sub 2}{sup +} dimer ions and excited Xe* atoms in the plasma affects the plasma parameters (density, potential, and ion fluxes toward the cathode). The influence of Xe{sub 2}{sup +} ions and Xe* atoms on the plasma sheath parameters, such as thickness and the ion velocity at the sheath edge, is analyzed.

  3. Study of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media with laser-polarized ¹²?Xe NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ruopeng, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media by using laser-polarized ¹²?Xe . Two different physical processes, the gas transport in porous rock cores and ...

  4. Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1, * Milton W. Cole,2 surface, covered by a monolayer of Cs. With data obtained from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

  5. Progress towards an optimized ¹²?Xe / ³He Zeeman maser and a test of boost symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canè, Federico

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for an annual variation of a daily sidereal modulation of the frequency difference between co-located ¹²?Xe and ³He Zeeman masers that sets a stringent limit on boost-dependent Lorentz and CPT violation ...

  6. Xe films on a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahyu Setyawan; Nicola Ferralis; Renee D. Diehl; Milton W. Cole; Stefano Curtarolo

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is employed to study the adsorption of Xe on a quasicrystalline Al-Ni-Co surface. The calculation uses a semiempirical gas-surface interaction, based on conventional combining rules and the usual Lennard-Jones Xe-Xe interaction. The resulting adsorption isotherms and calculated structures are consistent with the results of LEED experimental data. In this paper we focus on five features not discussed earlier (Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 136104 (2005)): the range of the average density of the adsorbate, the order of the transition, the orientational degeneracy of the ground state, the isosteric heat of adsorption of the system, and the effect of the vertical cell dimension.

  7. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

  8. Influence of the chlorine concentration on the radiation efficiency of a XeCl exciplex lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avtaeva, S. V., E-mail: s_avtaeva@mail.ru [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan); Sosnin, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Saghi, B. [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria)] [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria); Panarin, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High-Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Rahmani, B. [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria)] [Mohamed Boudiaf University of Sciences and Technology, Department of Electronics (Algeria)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the chlorine concentration on the radiation efficiency of coaxial exciplex lamps (excilamps) excited by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in binary Xe-Cl{sub 2} mixtures at pressures of 240–250 Torr is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments were carried out at Cl{sub 2} concentrations in the range of 0.01–1%. The DBD characteristics were calculated in the framework of a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model at Cl{sub 2} concentrations in the range of 0.1–5%. It is found that the radiation intensities of the emission bands of Xe*{sub 2}(172 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) are comparable when the chlorine concentration in the mixture is in the range of 0.01–0.1%. In this case, in the mixture, the radiation intensity of the Xe*{sub 2} molecule rapidly decreases with increasing Cl{sub 2} concentration and, at a chlorine concentration of ?0.2%, the radiation of the B ? X band of XeCl* molecules with a peak at 308 nm dominates in the discharge radiation. The radiation efficiency of this band reaches its maximum value at chlorine concentrations in the range of 0.4–0.5%. The calculated efficiencies of DBD radiation exceed those obtained experimentally. This is due to limitations of the one-dimensional model, which assumes the discharge to be uniform in the transverse direction, whereas the actual excilamp discharge is highly inhomogeneous. The influence of the chlorine concentration on the properties of the DBD plasma in binary Xe-Cl{sub 2} mixtures is studied numerically. It is shown that an increase in the Cl{sub 2} concentration in the mixture leads to the attachment of electrons to chlorine atoms and a decrease in the electron density and discharge conductivity. As a result, the electric field and the voltage drop across the discharge gap increase, which, in turn, leads to an increase in the average electron energy and the probability of dissociation of Cl{sub 2} molecules and ionization of Xe atoms and Cl{sub 2} molecules. The total energy deposited in the discharge rises with increasing chlorine concentration due to an increase in the power spent on the heating of positive and negative ions. The power dissipated by electrons decreases with increasing chlorine concentration in the working mixture. Recommendations on the choice of the chlorine content in the mixture for reducing the intensity of VUV radiation of the second continuum of the Xe*{sub 2} excimer without a substantial decrease in the excilamp efficiency are formulated.

  9. Apparatus for improving the working time of the XeBr laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sander, Robert K. (Los Alamos, MN); Balog, George (Los Alamos, MN); Seegmiller, Emma T. (Los Alamos, MN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In XeBr lasers which make use of HBr as the source of bromine, it has been found that the working life of the laser is limited because of dissociation of the HBr in the lasing region to form H.sub.2 and Br.sub.2. Accordingly, apparatus is disclosed for substantially improving the working time of the XeBr laser wherein means are provided for recombining H.sub.2 and Br.sub.2 into HBr and for continuously circulating the gaseous working medium from the lasing region through the recombination region. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  10. Observation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in Xe-136 with EXO-200

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, N.; /SLAC; Aharmim, B.; /Laurentian U.; Auger, M.; /Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; /Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barry, K.; Bartoszek, L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Beauchamp, E.; /Laurentian U.; Belov, V.; /Moscow, ITEP; Benitez-Medina, C.; /Colorado State U.; Breidenbach, M.; /SLAC; Burenkov, A.; /Moscow, ITEP; Cleveland, B.; /Laurentian U.; Conley, R.; Conti, E.; /SLAC; Cook, J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Cook, S.; /Colorado State U.; Coppens, A.; /Carleton U.; Counts, I.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Craddock, W.; /SLAC; Daniels, T.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Moscow, ITEP /Maryland U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Bern U. /SLAC /Bern U. /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Maryland U. /Colorado State U. /SLAC /Carleton U. /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Moscow, ITEP /Indiana U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Seoul U. /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of two-neutrino double-beta decay in {sup 136}Xe with T{sub 1/2} = 2.11 {+-} 0.04(stat) {+-} 0.21(syst) x 10{sup 21} yr. This second-order process, predicted by the standard model, has been observed for several nuclei but not for {sup 136}Xe. The observed decay rate provides new input to matrix element calculations and to the search for the more interesting neutrinoless double-beta decay, the most sensitive probe for the existence of Majorana particles and the measurement of the neutrino mass scale.

  11. Evolution of Topological Order in Xe Films on a Quasicrystal Surface Stefano Curtarolo,1,* Wahyu Setyawan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Evolution of Topological Order in Xe Films on a Quasicrystal Surface Stefano Curtarolo,1,* Wahyu of a physically adsorbed gas on a quasicrystal- line surface Xe on decagonal Al-Ni-Co. The grand canonical Monte- tural properties employs grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations, with which we have extensive

  12. Kinetics and radiative processes in Xe/I{sub 2} inductively coupled rf discharges at low pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.N.; Verdeyen, J.T.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental concern over the presence of mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps has motivated research into alternative electrically efficient near UV plasma lighting sources. One such candidate is multi-wavelength UV emission from Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures, including excimer radiation from XeI at 253 nm. Previous studies of the XeI system were performed at high pressures and were intended for laser applications. Practical Xe/I{sub 2} lamps will likely operate in the 0.5--10 torr regime and use electrodeless excitation to avoid issues related to electrode erosion by the halogen. In this paper, the authors report on an experimental investigation of low pressure, inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures. The goals of this work are to characterize the UV emission and determine excitation mechanisms in a parameter space of interest to lighting applications.

  13. Copyright(c)2002 by Seoul National University Library. All rights reserved.(http://library.snu.ac.kr)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .(http://library.snu.ac.kr) - 6 - 2.2.2 Dominance Based Crossover Operator for Evolutionary Multi-objective Algorithms [Rudenko et

  14. Microscopic description of collective properties of even-even Xe isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Prochniak

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective properties of the even-even 118-144Xe isotopes have been studied within a model employing the general Bohr Hamiltonian derived from the mean-field theory based on the UNEDF0 energy functional. The calculated low energy spectra and E2 transition probabilities are in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Next stage of search for 2K(2$?$)-capture of $^{78}$Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju. M. Gavriljuk; V. N. Gavrin; A. M. Gangapshev; V. V. Kazalov; V. V. Kuzminov; N. Ya. Osetrova; I. I. Pul'nikov; A. V. Ryabukhin; A. N. Shubin; G. M. Skorynin; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich

    2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to search for 2K-capture of $^{78}$Kr with large low-background proportional counter filled with an enriched in $^{78}$Kr up to 99.8% sample of Krypton at a pressure of 4.51 is described in this paper. The results of first measurements are presented. Analysis of data collected during 159 hours yielded new limit to the half-life of $^{78}$Kr with regard to 2K-capture (T$_{1/2}\\geq6\\cdot10^{21}$ yr (90% C.L.)). Sensitivity of the facility to the process for one year of measurement was evaluated to be $\\texttt{S}=1.0\\cdot10^{22}$ yr (90% C.L.).

  16. Interfacing a KR580IK80A microprocessor with the IEC bus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugvnov, L.A.; Mednis, A.O.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an interface for a controller, based on a KR580IK80A microprocessor, of an EPR spectrometer with the IEC bus for controlling measuring instruments and data acquisition. The circuit is implemented by a KR580VV55 programmable parallel interface. The GPC-microprocessor interface described here has been used to read out data from a Ch3-47A general-purpose frequency counter and may be used for the enture main measurement cycle in an EPR experiment.

  17. Eye-Tracker {eskim, jkim, btzhang} @ bi.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eye-Tracker ,, {eskim, jkim, btzhang} @ bi.snu.ac.kr Eye-Tracking Analysis of Attention . `' . . . Eye-Tracker . Eye-Tracker . . 1. , . `' , . . , . . , . 3 [1]. 1) fMRI, MEG, EEG 2) Eye-Tracker, Motion Tracker embodiment cognition 3

  18. KrF-laser annealing of native oxides on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.; Anderson, G.; Dunlavy, D.; Maggiore, C.; Hammond, R.B.; Stotlar, S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annealing of native oxides grown on GaAs has been performed using a pulsed KrF laser. This process allows the oxides to be heated to temperatures well above 350/sup 0/C without arsenic loss from the GaAs substrate. The physical, chemical, and electronic properties of the oxide are markedly changed by laser processing.

  19. Function Block Diagrams * {ekjee, jbyoo, suhyun, cha}@dependable.kaist.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    }@dependable.kaist.ac.kr : FBD(Function Block Diagram) FBD . PLC FBD C . FBD . FBD Center(ITRC). RLL(Relay Ladder Logic) , . PLC(Programmable Logic Controller) [2] , LD(Ladder Diagram) FBD(Function Block Diagram) PLC . PLC . PLC

  20. Calculo Numerico -Exame -10/07/07 Considere a func~ao f(x) = xe-x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussner, Peter

    C´alculo Num´erico - Exame - 10/07/07 1 Considere a fun¸c~ao f(x) = xe-x - e-3 . (a) Esbo¸ce o gr

  1. Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Auger; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; E. Beauchamp; V. Belov; C. Benitez-Medina; M. Breidenbach; T. Brunner; A. Burenkov; B. Cleveland; S. Cook; T. Daniels; M. Danilov; C. G. Davis; S. Delaquis; R. deVoe; A. Dobi; M. J. Dolinski; A. Dolgolenko; M. Dunford; W. Fairbank Jr.; J. Farine; W. Feldmeier; P. Fierlinger; D. Franco; G. Giroux; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; C. Hall; K. Hall; C. Hargrove; S. Herrin; M. Hughes; A. Johnson; T. N. Johnson; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; F. Leonard; D. Mackay; R. MacLellan; M. Marino; B. Mong; M. Montero Diez; A. R. Muller; R. Neilson; R. Nelson; A. Odian; I. Ostrovskiy; K. O'Sullivan; C. Ouellet; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; C. Y. Prescott; K. Pushkin; P. C. Rowson; J. J. Russell; A. Sabourov; D. Sinclair; S. Slutsky; V. Stekhanov; T. Tolba; D. Tosi; K. Twelker; P. Vogel; J. -L. Vuilleumier; A. Waite; T. Walton; M. Weber; U. Wichoski; J. Wodin; J. D. Wright; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen; O. Ya. Zeldovich

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200. No signal is observed for an exposure of 32.5 kg-yr, with a background of ~1.5 x 10^{-3} /(kg yr keV) in the $\\pm 1\\sigma$ region of interest. This sets a lower limit on the half-life of the neutrinoless double-beta decay $T_{1/2}^{0\

  2. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

  3. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield with high-pressure gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA for improved neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakajima, Y; Matis, H S; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C; Renner, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Xe TPCs are among the most popular choices for double beta decay and WIMP dark matter searches. Gaseous Xe has intrinsic advantages when compared to Liquid Xe, specifically, tracking capability and better energy resolution for double beta decay searches. The performance of gaseous Xe can be further improved by molecular additives such as trimethylamine(TMA), which are expected to (1) cool down the ionization electrons, (2) convert Xe excitation energy to TMA ionizations through Penning transfer, and (3) produce scintillation and electroluminescence light in a more easily detectable wavelength (300 nm). These features may provide better tracking and energy resolution for double-beta decay searches. They are also expected to enhance columnar recombination for nuclear recoils, which can be used for searches for WIMP dark matter with directional sensitivity. We constructed a test ionization chamber and successfully measured scintillation and ionization yields at high precision with various Xe and TMA mixtu...

  4. Results of wavelet processing of the 2K-capture Kr-78 experiment statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. M. Gavrilyuk; A. M. Gangapshev; V. V. Kazalov; V. V. Kuzminov; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich

    2010-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a search for Kr-78 double K-capture with the large low-background proportional counter (2005-2008 years) at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory are presented. An experimental method and characteristics of detectors are described. Basic features of the digitized pulses processing using wavelet transform are considered. With due account taken of the analysis of individual noise characteristic it has been shown that the appropriate choice of both wavelet characteristics and sequence of processing algorithms allows one to decrease the background in the energy region of useful events with a unique set of characteristics by ~2000 times. New limit on the half-life of Kr-78 with regard to 2K-capture has been found: T_{1/2} >= 2.4E21 yrs (90% C.L.).

  5. Phase formation in Zr/Fe multilayers during Kr ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, A. T.

    1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study has been conducted of the effect of Kr ion irradiation on phase formation in Zr-Fe metallic multilayers, using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Metallic multilayers were prepared with different overall compositions (near 50-50 and Fe-rich), and with different wavelengths (repetition thicknesses). These samples were irradiated with 300 keV Kr ions at various temperatures to investigate the final products, as well as the kinetics of phase formation. For the shorter wavelength samples, the final product was in all cases an amorphous Zr-Fe phase, in combination with Fe, while specially for the larger wavelength samples, in the Fe-rich samples the intermetallic compounds ZrFe{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Fe were formed in addition to the amorphous phase. The dose to full reaction decreases with temperature, and with wavelength in a manner consistent with a diffusion-controlled reaction.

  6. Laser-plasma source parameters for Kr, Gd, and Tb ions at 6.6 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masnavi, Majid; Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Richardson, Martin C. [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)] [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser-based lamps for sub-10-nm lithography operating in the region of 6.6 nm. A collisional-radiative model is developed as a post-processor of a hydrodynamic code to investigate emission from resonance lines in Kr, Gd, and Tb ions under conditions typical for mass-limited EUV sources. The analysis reveals that maximum conversion efficiencies of Kr occur at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}W/cm{sup 2}, while for Gd and Tb it was Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.9%/2{pi}sr for laser intensities of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregorich, K.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Workshop on Cray XE6 User Experiences September 27-28

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin the ChallengeHistoryWorkshop on Cray XE6

  9. Ion acceleration in Ar-Xe and Ar-He plasmas. I. Electron energy distribution functions and ion composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biloiu, Ioana A.; Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morganton, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron energy distribution functions (eedf), ion production, and ion composition are studied in Ar-Xe and Ar-He expanding helicon plasmas. It was found that under the conditions of constant total flow rate, Xe, in addition to Ar, changes the eedf from Maxwellian-like to Druyvesteyn-like with a shortening of the high energy tail at {approx}15 eV. The electron temperature exponentially decreases from {approx}7 eV in pure Ar plasma to {approx}4 eV in pure Xe plasma. Xenon ions dominate the ion population for Xe filling fractions greater than 10%. The plasma density increases by {approx}15% with increasing Xe fraction. For an Ar-He plasma, increasing the helium fraction increases the electron temperature from {approx}7 eV in pure Ar plasma to {approx}14 eV for a He filling fraction of 80%. The plasma density drops by more than three orders of magnitude from 1.14x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} to 6.5x10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. However, the inferred ion densities indicate that even at a helium fraction of 80%, argon ions significantly outnumber helium ions.

  10. Hyperpolarized Xe-129 NMR Investigation of Ammonia Borane in Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li Q.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe NMR was used for the first time to probe the porosity for nanophase ammonium borane (AB) infused in mesoporous silica (MCM). Variable temperature HP 129Xe NMR measurements have been systematically carried out on a series of AB:MCM materials with different AB loading. Three distinct types of pore environments are clearly evident: pristine mesopores; pores coated with AB inside the meso-channels, and inter-particle spacing formed from AB aggregates outside the meso-channels. We found similarly uniform coating of AB on mesoporous silica channels with 1:2 and 1:1 AB:MCM loading (ratio of weight percent). When the loading of AB to MCM is larger than 1:1, AB starts to aggregate outside the meso-channels. Further increases in loading (? 3:1) result in the formation of partially blocked meso-channels as a result of excessive AB loading. The detailed information obtained from this study on how supported AB resides in nanoporous channels and how it evolves with the increase of AB loading is helpful for rational design of novel materials with optimal hydrogen storage and release properties.

  11. Probing the Geometry and Interconnectivity of Pores in Organic Aerogels Using Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Wang, Li Q.; Baumann, T.; Satcher, J. H.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Ratcliffe, C. I.; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerogels represent a class of novel open-pore materials with high surface area and nanometer pore sizes. They exhibit extremely low mass densities, low thermal conductivity, good acoustic insulation, and low dielectric constants. These materials have potential applications in catalysis, advanced separation techniques, energy storage, environmental remediation, and as insulating materials. Organic aerogels are stiffer and stronger than silica aerogels and are better insulators with higher thermal resistance. Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) aerogels are typically prepared through the base-catalyzed sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde in aqueous solution to produce gels, which are then dried in supercritical CO2.1,2 The [resorcinol]/ [catalyst] (R/C) ratio of the starting sol-gel solution has been determined to be the dominant factor that affects the properties of RF aerogels. Since the unique microstructures of aerogels are responsible for their unusual properties, characterizing the detailed porous structures and correlating them with the processing parameters are vital to establish rational design principles for novel organic aerogels with tailored properties. In this communication we report the first use of hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe NMR to probe the geometry and interconnectivity of pores in RF aerogels and to correlate these with synthetic conditions. Our work demonstrates that HP 129Xe NMR is so far the only method for accurately measuring the free volume-to-surface-area (Vg/S) ratios for soft mesoporous materials without using any geometric models.

  12. Shape mixing dynamics in the low-lying states of proton-rich Kr isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koichi Sato; Nobuo Hinohara

    2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the oblate-prolate shape mixing in the low-lying states of proton-rich Kr isotopes using the five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian. The collective Hamiltonian is derived microscopically by means of the CHFB (constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov) + Local QRPA (quasiparticle random phase approximation) method, which we have developed recently on the basis of the adiabatic self-consistent collective coordinate method. The results of the numerical calculation show the importance of large-amplitude collective vibrations in the triaxial shape degree of freedom and rotational effects on the oblate-prolate shape mixing dynamics in the low-lying states of these isotopes.

  13. Shape mixing and beta-decay properties of neutron-deficient Kr and Sr isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sarriguren

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamow-Teller strength distributions and beta-decay half-lives in neutron-deficient Kr and Sr isotopes are investigated within a deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation. The approach is based on a selfconsistent Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations and residual separable particle-hole and particle-particle forces. A simple two-level model is used to mix the nuclear shapes into the physical ground state. Good agreement with experiment is found with shape mixing coefficients which are consistent with those obtained phenomenologically from mixing of rotational bands.

  14. Weak interaction rates for Kr and Sr waiting-point nuclei under rp-process conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sarriguren

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak interaction rates are studied in neutron deficient Kr and Sr waiting-point isotopes in ranges of densities and temperatures relevant for the rp-process. The nuclear structure is described within a microscopic model (deformed QRPA) that reproduces not only the half-lives but also the Gamow-Teller strength distributions recently measured. The various sensitivities of the decay rates to both density and temperature are discussed. Continuum electron capture is shown to contribute significantly to the weak rates at rp-process conditions.

  15. Neutron resonance study of a delayed neutron emitter, /sup 87/Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogelberg, B; Macklin, R L; Raman, S; Stelson, P H

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unbound levels in /sup 87/Kr have been studied as neutron resonances up to 400 keV neutron energy at the ORELA linear electron accelerator. The observed p-wave resonances, with I/sup pi /=1/2/sup - / and 3/2/sup -/ can also be populated in the beta -decay of the 3/2 /sup -/ ground state of /sup 87/Br. When comparing the present results with previous studies of beta -delayed neutron spectra, the authors find that almost all observed p-wave resonances can be identified with peaks in the delayed neutron spectra. (0 refs).

  16. Observation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with the EXO-200 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    , the most sensitive probe for the existence of Majorana particles and the measurement of the neutrino massObservation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with the EXO-200 Detector N. Ackerman,1,* B Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, California, USA 2 Physics Department, Laurentian University, Sudbury

  17. Observation of Two-Neutrino Double-Beta Decay in [superscript 136]Xe with the EXO-200 Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldman, Samuel J.

    We report the observation of two-neutrino double-beta decay in [superscript 136]Xe with T[subscript 1/2]=2.11±0.04(stat)±0.21(syst)×10[superscript 21]??yr. This second-order process, predicted by the standard model, has ...

  18. Photoinduced Desorption of Xe from Porous Si following Ultraviolet Irradiation: Evidence for a Selective and Highly Effective Optical Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asscher, Micha

    , photovoltaics, and photocatalysis [1,2]. Photodissociation of N2O on Si (100) has been studied [3] as a mild) of Xe from porous silicon under UV irradiation. It was found that internal morphology and size of the pores and the excita- tion wavelength strongly affect the overall photoresponse of this system. Two

  19. Microscopic description of spherical to {gamma}-soft shape transitions in Ba and Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. P. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid transition between spherical and {gamma}-soft shapes in Ba and Xe nuclei in the mass region A>=130 is analyzed using excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce the characteristic evolution of excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities, and in general, a good agreement with available data is obtained. The calculated spectra display fingerprints of a second-order shape phase transition that can approximately be described by analytic solutions corresponding to the E(5) dynamical symmetry.

  20. Surface Morphology and Phase Stability of Titanium Foils Irradiated by 136 MeV 136Xe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sadi; A. Paulenova; W. Loveland; P. R. Watson; J. P. Greene; S. Zhu; G. Zinkann

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A stack of titanium foils was irradiated with 136 MeV 136Xe to study microstructure damage and phase stability of titanium upon irradiation. X- ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the resulting microstructure damage and phase stability of titanium. We observed the phase transfor- mation of polycrystalline titanium from alpha-Ti (hexagonally closed packed (hcp)) to face centered cubic (fcc) after irradiation with 2.2 x 1015 ions/cm2. Irradiation of Ti with 1.8 x 1014-2.2 x 1015 ions/cm2 resulted in the forma- tion of voids, hillocks, dislocation loops, dislocation lines, as well as polygonal ridge networks.

  1. Surface Morphology and Phase Stability of Titanium Foils Irradiated by 136 MeV 136Xe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadi, S; Loveland, W; Watson, P R; Greene, J P; Zhu, S; Zinkann, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stack of titanium foils was irradiated with 136 MeV 136Xe to study microstructure damage and phase stability of titanium upon irradiation. X- ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the resulting microstructure damage and phase stability of titanium. We observed the phase transfor- mation of polycrystalline titanium from alpha-Ti (hexagonally closed packed (hcp)) to face centered cubic (fcc) after irradiation with 2.2 x 1015 ions/cm2. Irradiation of Ti with 1.8 x 1014-2.2 x 1015 ions/cm2 resulted in the forma- tion of voids, hillocks, dislocation loops, dislocation lines, as well as polygonal ridge networks.

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

  3. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  4. KrF laser path to high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion) laboratory microfusion facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A.; Figueiro, J.F.; Cartwright, D.C.; McDonald, T.E.; Hauer, A.A.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Younger, S.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The krypton-fluoride laser has many desirable features for inertial confinement fusion. Because it is a gas laser capable of operation with high efficiency, it is the only known laser candidate capable of meeting the driver requirements for inertial fusion energy (IFE) production. Los Alamos National Laboratory has defined a program plan to develop KrF lasers for IFE production. This plan develops the KrF laser and demonstrates the target performance in single-pulse facilities. A 100-kJ Laser Target Test Facility (LTTF) is proposed as the next step, to be followed by a 3 to 10-MJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The LTTF will resolve many target physics issues and accurately define the driver energy required for the LMF. It is also proposed that the technology development for IFE, such as the high-efficiency, high-reliability, repetitively pulsed driver, the reactor, mass production of targets, and the mechanism of injecting targets be developed in parallel with the single-pulse facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Relativistic many-body Moller-Plesset perturbation theory calculations of the energy levels and transition rates in Na-like to P-like Xe ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilkas, Marius J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, PR 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Traebert, Elmar [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); High Temperature and Astrophysics Division, LLNL, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: traebert@astro.rub.de

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations have been performed for Xe{sup 43+} to Xe{sup 39+} ions, resulting in energy levels, electric dipole transition rates, and level lifetimes. The second-order many-body perturbation theory calculation of energy levels included mass shifts, the frequency-dependent Breit correction, and Lamb shifts. The calculated transition energies and E1 transition rates are used to present synthetic spectra in the extreme ultraviolet range for some of the Xe ions.

  6. Fluorocarbon impurities in KrF lasers Helen H. Hwang, Kristopher James, Roger Hui, and Mark J. KushneP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Fluorocarbon impurities in KrF lasers Helen H. Hwang, Kristopher James, Roger Hui, and Mark J, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (Received 24 January 1991; accepted for publication 7 March 1991) Fluorocarbon amounts of impurities, and flu- orocarbons in particular.' Fluorocarbons such as CF4 are common

  7. MODELLING OF THE PERC STRUCTURE WITH STRIPE AND DOT BACK K.R. Catchpole and A.W. Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELLING OF THE PERC STRUCTURE WITH STRIPE AND DOT BACK CONTACTS K.R. Catchpole and A.W. Blakers Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Engineering Department, FEIT, The Australian National University commercial cell designs with only a small increase in process complexity. Optimisation of the PERC structure

  8. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of {sup 136}Xe in KamLAND-Zen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND-Zen Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kato, R.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakada, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Ono, Y.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yamada, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Yoshida, S.; Banks, T. I.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; O'Donnell, T.; Berger, B. E.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment based on an exposure of 77.6 days with 129 kg of {sup 136}Xe. The measured two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 136}Xe is T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = 2:38 {+-}#6; 0:02(stat)#6;{+-}0.14(syst)#2;x10{sup 21} yr, consistent with a recent measurement by EXO-200. We also obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life, T{sup 0{nu}}{sub 1/2} > 5.7 x#2; 10{sup 24} yr at 90% C.L.

  9. Ligand Migration and Cavities within Scapharca Dimeric HbI: Studies by Time-Resolved Crystallo- graphy, Xe Binding, and Computational Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, James E.; Pahl, Reinhard; Cohen, Jordi; Nichols, Jeffry C.; Schulten, Klaus; Gibson, Quentin H.; Š rajer, Vukica; Royer, Jr., William E.; (UMASS MED); (UIUC); (UC_

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As in many other hemoglobins, no direct route for migration of ligands between solvent and active site is evident from crystal structures of Scapharca inaequivalvis dimeric HbI. Xenon (Xe) and organic halide binding experiments, along with computational analysis presented here, reveal protein cavities as potential ligand migration routes. Time-resolved crystallographic experiments show that photodissociated carbon monoxide (CO) docks within 5 ns at the distal pocket B site and at more remote Xe4 and Xe2 cavities. CO rebinding is not affected by the presence of dichloroethane within the major Xe4 protein cavity, demonstrating that this cavity is not on the major exit pathway. The crystal lattice has a substantial influence on ligand migration, suggesting that significant conformational rearrangements may be required for ligand exit. Taken together, these results are consistent with a distal histidine gate as one important ligand entry and exit route, despite its participation in the dimeric interface.

  10. Characterization of metal surfaces irradiated by a long-pulse KrF excimer laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarnet, T.; Montagne, J.E.; Inglesakis, G.; Autric, M. (Inst. of Fluid Mechanics, Marseille (France). Laser-Matter Interaction Group); Barrallier, L.; Barreau, G. (Ecole Nationale Superieure d'Arts et Metiers, Aix-en-Provence (France). Mecasurf Lab.)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic samples were irradiated by a long-pulse ([tau] > 300 ns) KrF laser. The experiments were performed with an energy density of 0.3--120 J cm[sup [minus]2] and a power density of 1--400 MW cm[sup [minus]2]. The samples investigated were pure aluminum, aluminum alloy, low-alloy constructional steel and titanium alloy. They were polished to obtain a roughness of 10 < Ra < 0.08 [mu]m and stress-relief heat-treated for some residual stress measurements. The characterization of the irradiated metal surfaces was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), roughness analyzers, a microhardness tester and X-ray diffraction (XRD) residual stress apparatus. The improvement or deterioration in the mechanical properties of the metallic samples and some potential applications are discussed.

  11. KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Physics, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui-shi, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu [Tosoh SGM Corp., 4555 Kaisei-cho, Shunan-shi, Yamaguchi 746-0006 (Japan)

    2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

  12. Status of double beta decay experiments using isotopes other than Xe-136

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Pandola

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a lepton-number violating process predicted by many extensions of the standard model. It is actively searched for in several candidate isotopes within many experimental projects. The status of the experimental initiatives which are looking for the neutrinoless double beta decay in isotopes other than Xe-136 is reviewed, with special emphasis given to the projects that passed the R&D phase. The results recently released by the experiment GERDA are also summarized and discussed. The GERDA data give no positive indication of neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 and disfavor in a model-independent way the long-standing observation claim on the same isotope. The lower limit reported by GERDA for the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 is T1/2 > 2.1e25 yr (90% C.L.), or T1/2 > 3.0e25 yr, when combined with the results of other Ge-76 predecessor experiments.

  13. The $^{136}$Xe + $^{208}$Pb reaction: A test of models of multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, J S; Loveland, W; Zhu, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Carpenter, M P; Greene, J P; Janssens, R V F; Lauritsen, T; McCutchan, E A; Sonzogni, A A; Chiara, C J; Harker, J L; Walters, W B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The yields of over 200 projectile-like fragments (PLFs) and target-like fragments (TLFs) from the interaction of (E$_{c.m.}$=450 MeV) $^{136}$Xe with a thick target of $^{208}$Pb were measured using Gammasphere and off-line $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy, giving a comprehensive picture of the production cross sections in this reaction.The measured yields were compared to predictions of the GRAZING model and the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner using a quantitative metric, the theory evaluation factor, {\\bf tef}. The GRAZING model predictions are adequate for describing the yields of nuclei near the target or projectile but grossly underestimate the yields of all other products. The predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner correctly describe the magnitude and maxima of the observed TLF transfer cross sections for a wide range of transfers ($\\Delta$Z = -8 to $\\Delta$Z = +2). However for $\\Delta$Z =+4, the observed position of the maximum in the distribution is four neutrons richer than the predicted maximum. The pre...

  14. The $^{136}$Xe + $^{208}$Pb reaction: A test of models of multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Barrett; R. Yanez; W. Loveland; S. Zhu; A. D. Ayangeakaa; M. P. Carpenter; J. P. Greene; R. V. F. Janssens; T. Lauritsen; E. A. McCutchan; A. A. Sonzogni; C. J. Chiara; J. L. Harker; W. B. Walters

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The yields of over 200 projectile-like fragments (PLFs) and target-like fragments (TLFs) from the interaction of (E$_{c.m.}$=450 MeV) $^{136}$Xe with a thick target of $^{208}$Pb were measured using Gammasphere and off-line $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy, giving a comprehensive picture of the production cross sections in this reaction.The measured yields were compared to predictions of the GRAZING model and the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner using a quantitative metric, the theory evaluation factor, {\\bf tef}. The GRAZING model predictions are adequate for describing the yields of nuclei near the target or projectile but grossly underestimate the yields of all other products. The predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner correctly describe the magnitude and maxima of the observed TLF transfer cross sections for a wide range of transfers ($\\Delta$Z = -8 to $\\Delta$Z = +2). However for $\\Delta$Z =+4, the observed position of the maximum in the distribution is four neutrons richer than the predicted maximum. The predicted yields of the neutron-rich N=126 nuclei exceed the measured values by two orders of magnitude. Correlations between TLF and PLF yields are discussed.

  15. {ldalove,jbyoo}@konkuk.ac.kr pSET2TC6: A Translation Tool to Standardize the Output Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pSET : pSET2TC6 O , {ldalove,jbyoo}@konkuk.ac.kr pSET2TC6: A Translation Tool' . PLCVerifier pSET PLCopen XML pSET2TC6 . . 1. pSET (POSAFE-Q Software Engineering Tool] . ASCII `*.ld' PLCopen TC6 (PLCopen Technical Commit 6) [8] XML . 2011 Vol.38, No.2(B) #12

  16. Relativistic MR-MP calculations of the energy levels and transition probabilities in Ni- to Kr-like Pt ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana, Juan A., E-mail: santanajuan@berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Ishikawa, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yishikawa@uprrp.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 23346, San Juan, PR 00931 (United States); Träbert, Elmar, E-mail: traebert@astro.rub.de [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany) [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Physics Division, LLNL, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni- to Kr-like Pt ions have been studied by relativistic multi-reference Møller–Plesset many-body perturbation theory calculations. Energy levels and lifetimes of low-lying excited states within the n=4 complex are reported for each ion. Wavelengths and transition probabilities for the strongest electric-dipole transitions are compared with available experimental data. Synthetic radiative spectra are shown for various wavelength regions.

  17. Magnetic moments of Coulomb excited $2^{+}_{1}$ states for radioactive beams of $^{132,134,136}$Te and $^{138}$Xe isotopes at REX-ISOLDE Status Report on the Experiment IS415 at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and Neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; Speidel, K H; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Balabanski, D L; Behrens, T; Georgiev, G; Gerber, J P; Gernhäuser, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Leske, J; Lo Bianco, G; Lutter, R; Maier-Komor, P; Modamio, V; Schielke, S; Walker, J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic moments of Coulomb excited $2^{+}_{1}$ states for radioactive beams of $^{132,134,136}$Te and $^{138}$Xe isotopes at REX-ISOLDE

  18. Isospin transport in 84Kr+112,124Sn reactions at Fermi energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Piantelli; G. Casini; A. Olmi; S. Barlini; M. Bini; S. Carboni; P. R. Maurenzig; G. Pasquali; G. Poggi; A. A. Stefanini; R. Bougault; N. LeNeindre; O. Lopez; M. Parlog; E. Vient; E. Bonnet; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; D. Gruyer; E. Rosato; G. Spadaccini; M. Vigilante; B. Borderie; M. F. Rivet; M. Bruno; L. Morelli; M. Cinausero; M. Degerlier; F. Gramegna; T. Marchi; R. Alba; C. Maiolino; D. Santonocito; T. Kozik; T. Twarog

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Isospin transport phenomena in dissipative heavy ion collisions have been investigated at Fermi energies with a beam of 84Kr at 35AMeV. A comparison of the /Z of light and medium products forward-emitted in the centre of mass frame when the beam impinges on a n-poor 112Sn and a n-rich 124Sn targets is presented. Data were collected by means of a three-layer telescope with very good performances in terms of mass identification (full isotopic resolution up to Z about 20 for ions punching through the first detector layer) built by the FAZIA Collaboration and located just beyond the grazing angle for both reactions. The /Z of the decay products emitted when the n-rich target is used is always higher than that associated to the n-poor one. Since the detector was able to measure only fragments coming from the QuasiProjectile decay and/or neck emission, the observed behaviour can be ascribed to the isospin diffusion, driven by the isospin gradient between QuasiProjectile and QuasiTarget. Moreover, for light fragments the /Z as a function of the lab velocity of the fragment increases when we move from the QuasiProjectile velocity to the centre of mass (neck zone). This effect can be interpreted as an evidence of isospin drift driven by the density gradient between the QuasiProjectile zone (at normal density) and the more diluted neck zone.

  19. Numerical analysis of similarity of barrier discharges in the 0.95 Ne/0.05 Xe mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avtaeva, S. V.; Kulumbaev, E. B. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Established dynamic regimes of similar (with a scale factor of 10) barrier discharges in the 0.95 Ne/0.05 Xe mixture are simulated in a one-dimensional drift-diffusion model. The similarity is examined of barrier discharges excited in gaps of lengths 0.4 and 4 mm at gas pressures of 350 and 35 Torr and dielectric layer thicknesses of 0.2 and 2 mm, the frequencies of the 400-V ac voltage applied to the discharge electrodes being 100 and 10 kHz, respectively.

  20. Comparing the Performance of Blue Gene/Q with Leading Cray XE6 and InfiniBand Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerbyson, Darren J.; Barker, Kevin J.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Three types of systems dominate the current High Performance Computing landscape: the Cray XE6, the IBM Blue Gene, and commodity clusters using InfiniBand. These systems have quite different characteristics making the choice for a particular deployment difficult. The XE6 uses Cray’s proprietary Gemini 3-D torus interconnect with two nodes at each network endpoint. The latest IBM Blue Gene/Q uses a single socket integrating processor and communication in a 5-D torus network. InfiniBand provides the flexibility of using nodes from many vendors connected in many possible topologies. The performance characteristics of each vary vastly along with their utilization model. In this work we compare the performance of these three systems using a combination of micro-benchmarks and a set of production applications. In particular we discuss the causes of variability in performance across the systems and also quantify where performance is lost using a combination of measurements and models. Our results show that significant performance can be lost in normal production operation of the Cray XT6 and InfiniBand Clusters in comparison to Blue Gene/Q.

  1. Pattern recognition techniques to reduce backgrounds in the search for the {sup 136}Xe double beta decay with gaseous TPCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iguaz, F. J.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; Gómez, H.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzon, G.; Segui, L.; Tomas, A. [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)] [Laboratorio de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of the neutrinoless double beta decay may provide essential information on the nature of neutrinos. Among the current experimental approaches, a high pressure gaseous TPC is an attractive option for the search of double beta decay due to its good energy resolution and the detailed topological information of each event. We present in this talk a detailed study of the ionization topology of the {sup 136}Xe double beta decay events in a High Pressure Xenon TPC, as well as that of the typical competing backgrounds. We define some observables based on graph theory concepts to develop automated discrimination algorithms. Our criteria are able to reduce the background level by about three orders of magnitude in the region of interest of the {sup 136}Xe Q{sub ??} for a signal acceptance of 40%. This result provides a quantitative assessment of the benefit of topological information offered by gaseous TPCs for double beta decay search, and proves that it is a promising feature in view of future experiments in the field. Possible ideas for further improvement in the discrimination algorithms and the dependency of these results with the gas diffusion and readout granularity will be also discussed.

  2. Atomistic modeling of intrinsic and radiation-enhanced fission gas (Xe) diffusion in UO2 +/- x: Implications for nuclear fuel performance modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovanni Pastore; Michael R. Tonks; Derek R. Gaston; Richard L. Williamson; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of non-stoichiometry (i.e. UO2x), under both out-of-pile (no irradiation) and in-pile (irradiation) conditions. This was achieved by first deriving expressions for the activation energy that account for the type of trap site that the fission gas atoms occupy, which includes the corresponding type of mobile cluster, the charge state of these defects and the chemistry acting as boundary condition. In the next step DFT calculations were used to estimate migration barriers and internal energy contributions to the thermodynamic properties and calculations based on empirical potentials were used to estimate defect formation and migration entropies (i.e. pre-exponentials). The diffusivities calculated for out-of-pile conditions as function of the UO2x nonstoichiometrywere used to validate the accuracy of the diffusion models and the DFT calculations against available experimental data. The Xe diffusivity is predicted to depend strongly on the UO2x non-stoichiometry due to a combination of changes in the preferred Xe trap site and in the concentration of uranium vacancies enabling Xe diffusion, which is consistent with experiments. After establishing the validity of the modeling approach, it was used for studying Xe diffusion under in-pile conditions, for which experimental data is very scarce. The radiation-enhanced Xe diffusivity is compared to existing empirical models. Finally, the predicted fission gas diffusion rates were implemented in the BISON fuel performance code and fission gas release from a Risø fuel rod irradiation experiment was simulated. 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Measurement of the complete nuclide production and kinetic energies of the system 136Xe + hydrogen at 1 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Napolitani; K. -H. Schmidt; L. Tassan-Got; P. Armbruster; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; V. Henzl; D. Henzlova; A. Kelic; R. Pleskac; M. V. Ricciardi; C. Schmitt; O. Yordanov; L. Audouin; M. Bernas; A. Lafriaskh; F. Rejmund; C. Stephan; J. Benlliure; E. Casarejos; M. Fernandez Ordonez; J. Pereira; A. Boudard; B. Fernandez; S. Leray; C. Villagrasa; C. Volant

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extensive overview of production cross sections and kinetic energies for the complete set of nuclides formed in the spallation of 136Xe by protons at the incident energy of 1 GeV per nucleon. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the FRagment Separator (GSI, Darmstadt). Slightly below the Businaro-Gallone point, 136Xe is the stable nuclide with the largest neutron excess. The kinematic data and cross sections collected in this work for the full nuclide production are a general benchmark for modelling the spallation process in a neutron-rich nuclear system, where fission is characterised by predominantly mass-asymmetric splits.

  4. Limit on Neutrinoless ?? Decay of Xe-136 from the First Phase of KamLAND-Zen and Comparison with the Positive Claim in Ge-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KamLAND-Zen Collaboration

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the first phase of the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment, corresponding to an exposure of 89.5 kg yr of Xe-136. We obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of T_{1/2}^{0{\

  5. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Di [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin (China); Song, Le, E-mail: songle@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Xiong [School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Kajiyama, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.

  6. Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water$-$Xe system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasilii I. Artyukhov; Alexander Yu. Pulver; Alex Peregudov; Igor Artyuhov

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We study the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a possible instability of clathrate at cryogenic temperatures and conversion to an amorphous phase comprised of "xenon + hydration shell" Xe$\\cdot$(H$_{2}$O)$_{21.5}$ clusters. Simulations of ice$-$xenon solution interface in equilibrium and during ice growth reveal the effects of xenon on the ice$-$liquid interface, where adsorbed xenon causes roughening of ice surface but does not preferentially form clathrate. These results provide evidence against the ice-blocker mechanism of xenon cryoprotection.

  7. Electron Transport Coefficients and Scattering Cross Sections in CH4, HBr and in Mixtures of He and Xe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasic, Olivera M. [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have applied a standard swarm procedure in order to obtain electron scattering cross sections and transport coefficients that provide a data base for plasma modeling. In case of CH4 the dissociative excitation cross sections from binary collision experiments were renormalized by fitting the measured excitation coefficients with our calculations. In case of HBr we have produced a complete set of cross sections based on available data from the literature, with some extrapolations. We have also tested the cross sections in He-Xe mixtures and the application of Blanc's law and common mean energy procedure in calculating drift velocities in by comparison with recent measurements. Finally, a well tested Monte Carlo code was used in wide range of both DC and RF electric and magnetic fields in order to calculate a number of transport coefficients in case of CH4 and HBr.

  8. A hybrid model for studying nuclear multifragmentation around Fermi energy domain: Case for central collision of Xe on Sn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallik, S; Gupta, S Das

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data for central collisions of $^{129}$Xe on $^{119}$Sn at beam energies of (a) 32 MeV/nucleon, (b) 39 MeV/nucleon, (c) 45 MeV/nucleon and (d) 50 MeV/nucleon are compared with results calculated using a hybrid model. We use a transport model (BUU) to obtain the excitation energy per nucleon in the center of mass of the multifragmenting system. The canonical thermodynamic model is then used to determine the temperature which would lead to this excitation energy. With this temperature we use the canonical thermodynamic model to calculate various experimental data such as multiplicities of different composites, probability distribution of the largest cluster etc. Agreement with data establishes the validity of the model.

  9. A hybrid model for studying nuclear multifragmentation around Fermi energy domain: Case for central collision of Xe on Sn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mallik; G. Chaudhuri; S. Das Gupta

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data for central collisions of $^{129}$Xe on $^{119}$Sn at beam energies of (a) 32 MeV/nucleon, (b) 39 MeV/nucleon, (c) 45 MeV/nucleon and (d) 50 MeV/nucleon are compared with results calculated using a hybrid model. We use a transport model (BUU) to obtain the excitation energy per nucleon in the center of mass of the multifragmenting system. The canonical thermodynamic model is then used to determine the temperature which would lead to this excitation energy. With this temperature we use the canonical thermodynamic model to calculate various experimental data such as multiplicities of different composites, probability distribution of the largest cluster etc. Agreement with data establishes the validity of the model.

  10. Deformation of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei produced with the SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam and studied with EXOGAM + DIAMANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redon, N.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Rosse, B.; Stezowski, O. [IPN Lyon, IN2P3/CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Prevost, A. [IPN Lyon, IN2P3/CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CSNSM Orsay, IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Nolan, P.J.; Andreoiu, C.; Boston, A.J.; Descovich, M.; Evans, A.O.; Gros, S.; Norman, J.; Page, R.D.; Paul, E.S.; Rainovski, G.; Sampson, J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); France, G. de; Casandjian, J. M. [GANIL, B.P. 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France)] [and others

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei has been investigated in the first experiment with the EXOGAM gamma array coupled to the DIAMANT light charged particle detector using radioactive beam of 76Kr delivered by the SPIRAL facility. Very neutron-deficient Pr, Nd and Pm isotopes have been populated at rather high spin by the reaction 76Kr + 58Ni at a beam energy of 328 MeV. We report here the first results of this experiment.

  11. Distribution of the 83Rb/83mKr activity on vacuum evaporated samples examined with the Timepix position sensitive detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Venos; J. Jakubek; O. Dragoun; S. Pospisil

    2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of vacuum evaporated 83Rb/83mKr sources of low-energy conversion electrons, which are under development for monitoring the energy scale stability of the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment KATRIN, were examined by the Timepix pixel detector exhibiting the position resolution of at least 55 microm. No distinct local inhomogeneities in the surface distribution of 83Rb/83mKr were observed. The source diameter derived from the recorded image agrees within 5 % with that expected from evaporation geometry. More precise determination of the actual source diameter is complicated by Compton scattered electrons caused by 83Rb gamma-rays.

  12. Annual Summary Report Calendar Year 2000 for the 100-HR-3, 100-KR-4, and 100-NR-2 Operable Units and Pump-and-Treat Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. B. Mitchem

    2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual progress and performance evaluation report discusses the groundwater remedial actions in the 100 Area, including the interim actions at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units, and also discusses the expedited response action in the 100-NR-2 operable unit.

  13. Influence of Ar/Kr ratio and pulse parameters in a Cr-N high power pulse magnetron sputtering process on plasma and coating properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Theiß, Sebastian; Trieschmann, Jan; Brugnara, Ricardo Henrique, E-mail: brugnara@iot.rwth-aachen.de [Surface Engineering Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Preissing, Sven; Hecimovic, Ante [Institute of Experimental Physics II, Research Department Plasmas with Complex Interactions, Ruhr-University Bochum, D- 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Krypton is sometimes used in physical vapor deposition processes due to its greater atomic mass and size compared to argon, which leads to a lower gas incorporation and may have beneficial effects on kinetics of the coating growth. In this paper, the authors investigate the plasma composition and properties of deposited high power pulse magnetron sputtering Cr-N coatings for discharges with various Ar/Kr ratios and for various pulse lengths of 40??s, 80??s, and 200??s, keeping the average discharge power constant. The results show that an addition of Kr influences the discharge process by altering the ignition and peak values of the discharge current. This influences the metal ion generation and growth conditions on the substrate by reducing the nucleation site densities, leading to a predominantly columnar grow. However, the deposition rate is highest for an Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. The integral of the metal ion and atom emission exhibits the same trend, having a maximum for Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. By decreasing the pulse length, the deposition rate of coatings decreases, while the hardness increases.

  14. Archaeological Excavation Report for Proposed Well 199-K-131 in Support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woody, Dave M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An archaeological excavation was conducted at the site of proposed groundwater monitoring well 199-K-131 in support of the 100-KR-4 Pump-and-Treat Project between June 2 and 3, 2004. Excavations confirmed that there were no intact cultural deposits at the proposed well location. This report was prepared to document the findings of the test excavation.

  15. Copyright The Korean Space Science Society 33 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093-1409 Research Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Copyright © The Korean Space Science Society 33 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093.29.1.033 Development of CINEMA Mission Uplink Communication System NayoungYoon1 , SeyoungYoon1 ,Yongho Kim2 , Jiwon University, Yongin 446-701, Korea 3 Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94705

  16. Laser diagnostic experiments on KrF laser ablation plasma-plume dynamics relevant to manufacturing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Ching, C.H.; Lash, J.S.; Lindley, R.A. (Intense Energy Beam Interaction Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review is given of the potential applications of laser ablation in the automotive and electronics manufacturing industries. Experiments are presented on KrF laser ablation of three materials relevant to manufacturing applications: aluminum metal vs aluminum--nitride (AlN) and alumina (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) ceramics. Plasma and neutral-atom diagnostic data are presented from resonant-holographic-interferometry, dye-laser-resonance-absorption photography, and HeNe laser deflection. Data show that plasma electron densities in excess of 10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3] exist in the ablation of AlN, with lower densities in Al and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Aluminum neutral and ion expansion velocities are in the range of cm/[mu]s. Ambipolar electric fields are estimated to be 5--50 V/cm.

  17. Two source emission behavior of projectile fragments alpha in 84^Kr interactions at around 1 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Singh; Ramji Pathak; V. Singh

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of projectile fragments alpha has been studied in 84^Kr interactions with nuclei of the nuclear emulsion detector composition at relativistic energy below 2 GeV per nucleon. The angular distribution of projectile fragments alpha in terms of transverse momentum could not be explained by a straight and clean-cut collision geometry hypothesis of Participant - Spectator (PS) Model. Therefore, it is assumed that projectile fragments alpha were produced from two separate sources that belong to the projectile spectator region differing drastically in their temperatures. It has been clearly observed that the emission of projectile fragments alpha are from two different sources. The contribution of projectile fragments alpha from contact layer or hot source is a few percent of the total emission of projectile fragments alphas. Most of the projectile fragments alphas are emitted from the cold source.

  18. Vibrational spectra and structures of bare and Xe-tagged cationic Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savoca, Marco; Langer, Judith; Dopfer, Otto, E-mail: dopfer@physik.tu-berlin.de, E-mail: fielicke@physik.tu-berlin.de; Fielicke, André, E-mail: dopfer@physik.tu-berlin.de, E-mail: fielicke@physik.tu-berlin.de [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Harding, Dan J. [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Tammannstr. 6, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrational spectra of Xe-tagged cationic silicon oxide clusters Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} with n = 3–5 and m = n, n ± 1 in the gas phase are obtained by resonant infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} clusters are produced in a laser vaporization ion source and Xe complexes are formed after thermalization to 100 K. The clusters are subsequently irradiated with tunable light from an IR free electron laser and changes in the mass distribution yield size-specific IR spectra. The measured IRMPD spectra are compared to calculated linear IR absorption spectra leading to structural assignments. For several clusters, Xe complexation alters the energetic order of the Si{sub n}O{sub m}{sup +} isomers. Common structural motifs include the Si{sub 2}O{sub 2} rhombus, the Si{sub 3}O{sub 2} pentagon, and the Si{sub 3}O{sub 3} hexagon.

  19. Seoul National UniversitySeoul National University http://bp.snu.ac.kr1 The Effect of TiCl4-Treated TiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    TiO2 Compact Layer on the Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell #12;Seoul National UniversitySeoul National University http://bp.snu.ac.kr Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell 2 Schematic Diagram of the Electron Flow by the TiO2 compact layer. Electrolyte Hydrolysis of TiCl4 Solution Dye-Coated TiO2 Back Electron Transfere

  20. Copyright The Korean Space Science Society 23 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093-1409 Research Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , Electron, MAgnetic fields (CINEMA) is a space science mission with three identical CubeSats. ThreeCopyright © The Korean Space Science Society 23 http://janss.kr pISSN: 2093-5587 eISSN: 2093.29.1.023 Thermal Analysis of TRIO-CINEMA Mission JaegunYoo1 , Ho Jin1 , Jongho Seon1 ,Yun-Hwang Jeong2 , David

  1. Production of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei in reactions induced by 136Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV on a beryllium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Benlliure; M. Fernandez-Ordonez; L. Audouin; A. Boudard; E. Casarejos; J. E. Ducret; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; D. Henzlova; V. Henzl; A. Kelic; S. Leray; P. Napolitani; J. Pereira; F. Rejmund; M. V. Ricciardi; K. -H. Schmidt; C. Schmitt; C. Stephan; L. Tassan-Got; C. Volant; C. Villagrasa; O. Yordanov

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Production cross sections of medium-mass neutron-rich nuclei obtained in the fragmentation of 136Xe projectiles at 1 A GeV have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) at GSI. 125Pd was identified for the first time. The measured cross sections are compared to 238U fission yields and model calculations in order to determine the optimum reaction mechanism to extend the limits of the chart of the nuclides around the r-process waiting point at N=82.

  2. Limit on Lorentz and CPT violation of the bound Neutron Using a Free Precession 3He/129Xe co-magnetometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Gemmel; W. Heil; S. Karpuk; K. Lenz; Yu. Sobolev; K. Tullney; M. Burghoff; W. Kilian; S. Knappe-Grüneberg; W. Müller; A. Schnabel; F. Seifert; L. Trahms; U. Schmidt

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the search for Lorentz violating sidereal variations of the frequency difference of co-located spin-species while the Earth and hence the laboratory reference frame rotates with respect to a relic background field. The co-magnetometer used is based on the detection of freely precessing nuclear spins from polarized 3He and 129Xe gas samples using SQUIDs as low-noise magnetic flux detectors. As result we can determine the limit for the equatorial component of the background field interacting with the spin of the bound neutron to be bn < 3.7 x 10^{-32} GeV (95 C.L.).

  3. Intel® Advisor XE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or effectiveness of any optimization on microprocessors not manufactured by Intel. Microprocessor-dependent optimizations in this product are intended for use with Intel...

  4. Cray XE Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site OfficeCourse Clusters CourseN N O V

  5. Cray XE6 Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of Energy CarlsbadWinter Cray BugIOXE6Cray

  6. Compatibility of technologies with regulations in the waste management of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Part I. Initial information base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kolba, V.M.; Steindler, M.J.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the information base that was collected and reviewed in preparation for carrying out an analysis of the compatibility with regulations of waste management technologies for disposal of H-3, I-129, C-14, and Kr-85. Based on the review of this literature, summaries are presented here of waste-form characteristics, packaging, transportation, and disposal methods. Also discussed are regulations that might apply to all operations involved in disposal of the four nuclides, including the processing of irradiated fuel in a fuel reprocessing plant, packaging, storage, transport, and final disposal. The compliance assessment derived from this information is reported in a separate document. 309 references.

  7. An apparatus to manipulate and identify individual Ba ions from bulk liquid Xe K. Twelker, S. Kravitz, M. Montero Dez, G. Gratta, W. Fairbank Jr., J. B. Albert, D. J. Auty, P. S. Barbeau, D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    . Kravitz, M. Montero Díez, G. Gratta, W. Fairbank Jr., J. B. Albert, D. J. Auty, P. S. Barbeau, D. Beck, C to manipulate and identify individual Ba ions from bulk liquid Xe K. Twelker,1 S. Kravitz,1 M. Montero Díez,1,a

  8. Quasi-elastic peak lineshapes in adsorbate diffusion on nearly flat surfaces at low coverages: the motional narrowing effect in Xe on Pt(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Martinez-Casado; J. L. Vega; A. S. Sanz; S. Miret-Artes

    2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-elastic helium atom scattering measurements have provided clear evidence for a two-dimensional free gas of Xe atoms on Pt(111) at low coverages. Increasing the friction due to the surface, a gradual change of the shape of the quasi-elastic peak is predicted and analyzed for this system in terms of the so-called motional narrowing effect. The type of analysis presented here for the quasi-elastic peak should be prior to any deconvolution procedure carried out in order to better extract information from the process, e.g. diffusion coefficients and jump distributions. Moreover, this analysis also provides conditions for the free gas regime different than those reported earlier.

  9. First result of the experimental search for the 9.4 keV solar axion reactions with Kr-83 in the copper proportional counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. M. Gavrilyuk; A. M. Gangapshev; A. V. Derbin; V. V. Kazalov; H. J. Kim; Y. D. Kim; V. V. Kobychev; V. V. Kuzminov; Luqman Ali; V. N. Muratova; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich; D. A. Semenov; D. A. Tekueva; S. P. Yakimenko; E. V. Unzhakov

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental search for solar hadronic axions is started at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the Institute for Nuclear Researches Russian Academy of Science. It is assumed that axions are created in the Sun during M1-transition between the first thermally excited level at 9.4 keV and the ground state in Kr-83. The experiment is based on axion detection via resonant absorption process by the same nucleus in the detector. The big copper proportional counter filled with krypton is used to detect signals from axions. The experimental setup is situated in the deep underground low background laboratory. No evidence of axion detection were found after the 26.5 days data collection. Resulting new upper limit on axion mass is m_{A} < 130 eV at 95% C.L.

  10. Multifragmentation and the Phase Transition: A Systematic Study of the MF of 1A GeV Au, La, and Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. K. Srivastava

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic analysis of the multifragmentation (MF) in fully reconstructed events from 1A GeV Au, La and Kr collisions with C has been performed. This data is used to provide a definitive test of the variable volume version of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). A single set of SMM parameters directly determined by the data and the semi-empiricalmass formula are used after the adjustable inverse level density parameter, $\\epsilon_{o}$ is determined by the fragment distributions. The results from SMM for second stage multiplicity, size of the biggest fragment and the intermediate mass fragments are in excellent agreement with the data. Multifragmentation thresholds have been obtained for all three systems using SMM prior to secondary decay. The data indicate that both thermal excitation energy $E_{th}^{*}$ and the isotope ratio temperature $T_{He-DT}$ decrease with increase in system size at the critical point. The breakup temperature obtained from SMM also shows the same trend as seen in the data. The SMM model is used to study the nature of the MF phase transition. The caloric curve for Kr exhibits back-bending (finite latent heat) while the caloric curves for Au and La are consistent with a continuous phase transition (nearly zero latent heat) and the values of the critical exponents $\\tau$, $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$, both from data and SMM, are close to those for a 'liquid-gas' system for Au and La. We conclude that the larger Coulomb expansion energy in Au and La reduces the latent heat required for MF and changes the nature of the phase transition. Thus the Coulomb energy plays a major role in nuclear MF.

  11. Large-scale calculations of the double-? decay of 76Ge, 130Te, 136Xe, and 150Nd in the deformed self-consistent Skyrme quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mustonen, M. T.; Engel, J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the axially deformed Skyrme quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) together with the SkM? energy-density functional, both as originally presented and with the time-odd part adjusted to reproduce the Gamow-Teller resonance energy in 208Pb, to calculate the matrix elements that govern the neutrinoless double-? decay of 76Ge, 130Te, 136Xe, and 150Nd. Our matrix elements in 130Te and 136Xe are significantly smaller than those of previous QRPA calculations, primarily because of the difference in pairing or deformation between the initial and the final nuclei. In 76Ge and 150Nd, our results are similar to those of less computationally intensive QRPA calculations. We suspect the 76Ge result, however, because we are forced to use a spherical ground state, even though our mean-field theory indicates a deformed minimum.

  12. van der Waals-corrected Density Functional Theory simulation of adsorption processes on transition-metal surfaces: Xe and graphene on Ni(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DFT/vdW-WF2s1 method, recently developed to include the van der Waals interactions in the Density Functional Theory and describe adsorption processes on metal surfaces by taking metal-screening effects into account, is applied to the case of the interaction of Xe and graphene with a transition-metal surface, namely Ni(111). In general the adsorption of rare-gas atoms on metal surfaces is important because is prototypical for physisorption processes. Moreover, the interaction of graphene with Ni(111) is of particular interest for practical applications (efficient and large-scale production of high-quality graphene) and, from a theoretical point of view, is particularly challenging, since it can be described by a delicate interplay between chemisorption and physisorption processes. The first-principles simulation of transition metals require particular care also because they can be viewed as intermediate systems between simple metals and insulating crystals. Even in these cases the method performs well as d...

  13. Beta-decay properties of neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Ru, and Pd isotopes from deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sarriguren

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-decay properties of even and odd-A neutron-rich Ge, Se, Kr, Sr, Ru, and Pd isotopes involved in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process are studied within a deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The underlying mean field is described self-consistently from deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock calculations with pairing correlations. Residual interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels are also included in the formalism. The isotopic evolution of the various nuclear equilibrium shapes and the corresponding charge radii are investigated in all the isotopic chains. The energy distributions of the Gamow-Teller strength as well as the beta-decay half-lives are discussed and compared with the available experimental information. It is shown that nuclear deformation plays a significant role in the description of the decay properties in this mass region. Reliable predictions of the strength distributions are essential to evaluate decay rates in astrophysical scenarios.

  14. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  15. Why the xE distribution triggered by a leading particle does not measure the fragmentation function but does measure the ratio of the transverse momenta of the away-side jet to the trigger-side jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard-scattering of point-like constituents (or partons) in p-p collisions was discovered at the CERN-ISR in 1972 by measurements utilizing inclusive single or pairs of hadrons with large transverse momentum ($p_T$). It was generally assumed, following Feynman, Field and Fox, as shown by data from the CERN-ISR experiments, that the $p_{T_a}$ distribution of away side hadrons from a single particle trigger [with $p_{T_t}$], corrected for of fragmentation would be the same as that from a jet-trigger and follow the same fragmentation function as observed in $e^+ e^-$ or DIS. PHENIX attempted to measure the fragmentation function from the away side $x_E\\sim p_{T_a}/p_{T_t}$ distribution of charged particles triggered by a $\\pi^0$ in p-p collisions at RHIC and showed by explicit calculation that the $x_E$ distribution is actually quite insensitive to the fragmentation function. Illustrations of the original arguments and ISR results will be presented. Then the lack of sensitivity to the fragmentation function will be explained, and an analytic formula for the $x_E$ distribution given, in terms of incomplete Gamma functions, for the case where the fragmentation function is exponential. The away-side distribution in this formulation has the nice property that it both exhibits $x_E$ scaling and is directly sensitive to the ratio of the away jet $\\hat{p}_{T_a}$ to that of the trigger jet, $\\hat{p}_{T_t}$, and thus can be used, for example, to measure the relative energy loss of the two jets from a hard-scattering which escape from the medium in A+A collisions. Comparisons of the analytical formula to RHIC measurements will be presented, including data from STAR and PHENIX, leading to some interesting conclusions.

  16. Intel® Advisor XE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin andInterimInvoking

  17. XE6_Tips_022011.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0 3ray(qAbsorptionFor m

  18. XE6_Tips_09302010.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0 3ray(qAbsorptionFor

  19. Measuring Diffusivity in Supercooled Liquid Nanoscale Films using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for which these equations are valid and demonstrate their utility using amorphous methanol with Ar, Kr, Xe, and CH4 as probe gases. The approach offers a new method by which...

  20. Search for 2{nu}{beta}{beta} Decay of {sup 130}Te to the First Excited State of {sup 130}Xe with an Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizouni, L. K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States); University of South Carolina, 712 Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Aalseth, C. E.; Erikson, L. E.; Hossbach, T. W.; Keillor, M. E.; Orrell, J. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Avignone, F. T. III [University of South Carolina, 712 Main St., Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of searching for zero-neutrino double-beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay is to probe an absolute neutrino mass scale suggested by the mass-splitting parameters observed by neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, observation of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay is an explicit instance of Lepton-number non-conservation. A sensitive measurement of two-neutrino double-beta (2{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay can provide critical input to Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) calculations of the nuclear matrix elements in models similar to those used to extract the absolute neutrino mass from (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay experiments. Tellurium-130, an even-even nucleus, can undergo 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay to the first 0+ excited state of {sup 130}Xe producing three possible {gamma}-ray cascades as it transitions to the ground state. The Cascades detector is a high purity germanium (HPGe) crystal array consisting of two ultra-low-background copper cryostats each housing a hexagonal array of seven crystals. The project is currently being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA (USA), and aims to obtain very high {gamma}-ray detection efficiency while utilizing highly effective and low-background shielding. GEANT4 simulations of the detector are performed for a {sup 130}Te sample in order to determine the optimum size and geometry of the source for maximum detection efficiency and predict its sensitivity for measuring 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay to the first 0+ excited state of {sup 130}Xe. These simulations are validated with calibration sources and presented.

  1. Dissertation submitted to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    separation of Ar from Kr reduced the offset of air equilibrated water standards (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) to 2 isotopes, 222 Rn and SF6 were used for dating, while stable water isotopes and excess air allow setup was optimised, now allowing to quantify absolute noble gas amounts. Successful cryogenic

  2. Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

  3. Analysis of Beta-Decay Rates for Ag108, Ba133, Eu152, Eu154, Kr85, Ra226 And Sr90, Measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt from 1990 to 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Sturrock; Ephraim Fischbach; Jere Jenkins

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of measurements of the beta-decay rates of Ag108, Ba133, Eu152, Eu154, Kr85, Ra226, and Sr90 acquired at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt from 1990 through 1995. Although the decay rates vary over a range of 165 to 1 and the measured detector current varies over a range of 19 to 1, the detrended and normalized current measurements exhibit a sinusoidal annual variation with amplitude in the small range 0.068% to 0.088% (mean 0.081%, standard deviation 0.0072%, an 11{\\sigma} rejection of the zero-amplitude hypothesis) and phase-of-maximum in the small range 0.062 to 0.083 (January 23 to January 30). In comparing these results with those of other related experiments that yield different results, it may be significant that this experiment, at a standards laboratory, seems to be unique in using a 4{\\pi} detector. These results are compatible with a solar influence, and appear not to be compatible with an experimental or environmental influence. It is possible that Ba133 measurements are subject also to a non-solar (possibly cosmic) influence.

  4. Hopper, NERSC's Cray XE6 System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) HarmonicbetandEnergy 2010 A File Storage Updates

  5. Summary Report on the Volatile Radionuclide and Immobilization Research for FY2011 at PNNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Matyas, Josef; Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2011, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogen-based aerogels (i.e., chalcogels). A silica aerogel was tested at ORNL for total I2 sorption capacity. It was determined to have 48 mass% capacity while having little physisorbed I2 (I2 not taken up in the aerogel pores). For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated and a new MOF with about 8 mass% capacity for Xe and Kr. The selectivity can be changed from Xe > Kr to Xe < Kr simply by lowering the temperature below 0 C. A patent disclosure has been filed. Lastly, silicon carbide (SiC) was loaded with Kr. The diffusion of Kr in SiC was found to be less than detectable at 500 C.

  6. jjaeminn@kaist.ac.kr, hongshin@kaist.ac.kr, moonzoo@cs.kaist.ac.kr (concurrent program)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    '2009. pp.53~62 [3] Ehud Trainin, Yarden Nir-Buchbinder, Rachel Tzoref-Brill, Aviad Zlotnick, Shmuel Ur

  7. 693 jmoh@bi.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the bandwidth problem for dense graphs in average. In Section 3 we 2 #12; observe some to the bandwidth related

  8. Masses of Kr-76 and K-74

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moltz, D. M.; Toth, K. S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Neese, R. E.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Since that time, we have begun a systematic study of the light neutron-deficient iso- . topes of rubidium and krypton to determine accu- rate beta endpoints with an intrinsic germanium detector. (Earlier plastic scintillator measurements have been...

  9. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 201800 (China); Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D. [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  10. Translational energy dependence of reaction mechanism: Xe++CH4?XeH++CH3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, G. D.; Strattan, L. W.; Cole, C. L.; Hierl, Peter M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the products. The results suggest that reaction proceeds via the formation of a long?lived complex at low collision energies (below 0.5 eV) and by a direct mechanism approaching spectator stripping at higher energies....

  11. Cray XE6 Architecture John Shalf NERSC XE6 User Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of Energy CarlsbadWinter Cray BugIOXE6

  12. Cosmic ray exposure histories of Apollo 14, Apollo 15, and Apollo 16 rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugster, O.; Eberhardt, P.

    1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith exposure history of six rocks returned by the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions is studied based on the cosmogenic noble gas isotopes. For each sample, the complete set of all stable noble gas isotopes and the radiaoctive isotope Kr-81 were measured. Kr-81-Kr exposure ages are calculated for rocks for which a single-stage exposure can be demonstrated. A two-stage model exposure history is derived for multistage-exposure basalt 14310 based on the amounts and isotopic ratios of the cosmogenic noble gases. The apparent Kr-81-Kr age, the depth-sensitive isostopic ratios, and fission Xe-136 results lead to the conclusion that this sample was preexposed 1.75 AE ago to cosmic rays for a duration of 350 m.y. Basalt 15058 and anorthosite 15415 also reveal multistage exposures. 44 references.

  13. (Perturbational) @bi.snu.ac.kr btzhang@cse.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . [5] Eisen, M.B., Spellman, P.T., Brown, P.O., and Botstein, D., Cluster analysis and display. 407, p. 651, 2000. [7] Tavazoie, S., Huges, J.D., Campbell, M.J., Cho, R.J., and Church, G Wide Web, Science, vol. 287, p. 2115a, 2000. [4] DeRisi, J.L., Iyer, V.R., and Brown, P.O., Exploring

  14. Adsorption Isotherms for Xenon and Krypton using INL HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Veronica J. Rutledge; Jack D. Law

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of adsorption isotherms compliments the scale-up of off-gas processes used to control the emission of encapsulated radioactive volatile fission and activation products released during Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) reprocessing activities. A series of experiments were conducted to obtain capacity results for varying Kr and Xe gas concentrations using HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN engineered form sorbents. Gas compositions for Kr ranged from 150-40,000 ppmv and 250-5020 ppmv for Xe in a helium balance. The experiments were all performed at 220 K at a flowrate of 50 sccm. Acquired capacities were then respectively fit to the Langmuir equation using the Langmuir linear regression method to obtain the equilibrium parameters Qmax and Keq. Generated experimental adsorption isotherms were then plotted with the Langmuir predicted isotherms to illustrate agreement between the two. The Langmuir parameters were provided for input into the OSPREY model to predict breakthrough of single component adsorption of Kr and Xe on HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN sorbents at the experimental conditions tested. Kr and Xe capacities resulting from model breakthrough predictions were then compared to experimental capacities for model validation.

  15. Systematics of cross sections for target K-vacancy production in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yong

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross sections for K-shell ionization by heavy ions have been determined from the measurements of target K x-ray yields. The measurements were performed with Ar, Kr, and Xe ions at energies from 2.5 to 25 MeV/amu and self-supported metallic foil...

  16. The I*(2P1/2)-I*(2P1/2) Contact Pair Emission in Condensed Media: A Molecular Spring-Gauge for Cavity Sizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    rare gas matrixes of Ar, Kr, and Xe.2 We recognize that these condensed phase emission spectraThe I*(2P1/2)-I*(2P1/2) Contact Pair Emission in Condensed Media: A Molecular Spring-Rg potentials. The analysis yields a refined I*I* potential and provides a calibration curve to readout

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C7,supplCmentau Journal de Physique 111,Vol. 1,dkembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -' for the Ar-Xe laser and near 0.02 cm-I for the He-Ne-Kr laser. Based on the result of gain measurements and the concepti- ons of perfomances of these lasers [1,21, authors report on computer models of the e-beam Ar

  18. Energies and E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates for states of the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3}, 2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rynkun, P., E-mail: pavel.rynkun@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Information Technologies, Lithuanian University of Educational Science, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jönsson, P. [Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 20506 Malmö (Sweden)] [Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 20506 Malmö (Sweden); Gaigalas, G. [Department of Physics and Information Technologies, Lithuanian University of Educational Science, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania) [Department of Physics and Information Technologies, Lithuanian University of Educational Science, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vilnius University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, A. Goštauto 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Froese Fischer, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8420 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8420 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on relativistic wavefunctions from multiconfiguration Dirac–Hartree–Fock and configuration interaction calculations, E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates, weighted oscillator strengths, and lifetimes are evaluated for the states of the (1s{sup 2})2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3},2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in all nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX. The wavefunction expansions include valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects through single–double multireference expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. The computed energies agree very well with experimental values, with differences of only 300–600 cm{sup ?1} for the majority of the levels and ions in the sequence. Computed transitions rates are in close agreement with available data from MCHF-BP calculations by Tachiev and Froese Fischer [G.I. Tachiev, C. Froese Fischer, A and A 385 (2002) 716].

  19. Gas phase 129Xe NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Lana G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 l l Dynamic NMR microscopy of gas phase Poiseuille flowmetal vapors and noble gases can be used to efficientlypolarize the nuclei ofthe noble-gas atoms. As a result, the

  20. ar xe o2: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stellar decay rates of 128I and only marginally affected by the specific stellar neutron flux. For this reason it represents an important test for He-shell burning in AGB...

  1. ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN 136Xe BOMBARDMENTS OF 249Cf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregorich, K.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    onto the column in HHO. or HCl in a volume of lessin about 50ul of a 0.1M HHO_ solution. The walls of tha

  2. New Features of the Hopper XE6 - Differences from Franklin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNew AdvancesNewNewEnergyAs

  3. Thermal Diffuse Scattering of Low-Energy Electrons from Xe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KESMODEL, LL; WETTE, FWD; Allen, Roland E.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reciprocal lattice rods. The results are presented in the form of both contour curves and intensity profiles. Several interesting features are apparent, including (i) anisotropies about the reciprocal lattice rods, (ii) differences in intensity... at reciprocal lat- tice points, the TDS is distributed throughout all of reciprocal space. In the case of scattering from a surface, the Bragg scattering is concen- trated at "reciprocal lattice rods" associated with the two-dimensional reciprocal lattice...

  4. Configuration of Hopper, NERSC's Cray XE6 System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization andComputer SimulationsConcentratingAstrophysics

  5. *, **LG, *** {kilmd55, sky6174, carecano}@ccl.snu.ac.kr, jsno@snu.ac.kr, habchung@hongik.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No, Jong-Seon

    National Univ., **LG Electronic, ***Hongik Univ. , (soft-decision-and-forward: SDF) . (signal-to-noise ratio: SNR) , . . [1] SDF (maximum-likelihood: ML) , [2] (pairwise error probability: PEP) . SDF SNR , . 1 . . 1 1 (source: S

  6. 2013 2 2013 2 www.business.kaist.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Min H.

    - 2 ( ) KAIST ( ) 1 KAIST OPI 1 KAIST . 7. / / . 8. . 1) File Upload OPI TEST - (6.11()) 2 - OPI 2) 2 ( ) . (, .) 3) 3 / IELTS 6.5 / PTE 56 / OPI 7 . - , . 6) KAIST KAIST TOEFL, TOEIC, TEPS, IELTS, PTE

  7. KAIST {jmcho, yjoh, jbyoo, cha}@salmosa.kaist.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framework for Nuclear-Domain (KSDFN) Jaemyung Cho, Younju Oh, Junbeom You, and Sungdeok Cha Dept. of EECS, Div. Of CS, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology , . . , . , . 1. (Reactor Protect System) , , , . Safety-Critical System[1

  8. PLC 149 ekjee@dependable.kaist.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jee, Eunkyoung

    PLC 149 21 : : 2007 4 11 2008 1 25 : : : ekjee , . , . , , , . : 35 3(2008.3) PLC (A Structural Testing Strategy for PLC Programs Specified by Function Block Diagram) (Eunkyoung Jee) (Seungjae Jeon) (Sungdeok Cha) (PLC: Programmable Logic

  9. Hanford Site - 100-KR-4 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneralGuiding Documents and

  10. 2nd Else Kröner-Fresenius Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,FNeed more4 3.2 3.6 3.72nd

  11. *woogin@yonsei.ac.kr, **hysong@yonsei.ac.kr A Study on the Video Quality Improvement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Hong-Yeop

    University TVCATV, TV, IPTV, DMB, . (Standard, Jimmy jib, Hand held, Dolly)() . . 1 . 4~5 Standard Jimmy jib( ), Hand held(), Dolly( ) . Hand held . . Hand held ZOOM IN, OUT ZOOM OUTZOOM IN . Jimmy jib . Jimmy jibHandheld Hand held

  12. Small doped 3 He clusters: A systematic quantum chemistry approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    numerically exact calculations for Imp­3 He Imp Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and SF6 complexes show that a modest set of 15 of the SF6 3 He 2 cluster, where fermionic statistics comes into play in the orbital part of the helium to dissociation into 3 He SF6­3 He. The applicability of the new method to larger systems is discussed. © 2001

  13. Positron annihilation with core and valence electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, D G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\gamma$-ray spectra for positron annihilation with the core and valence electrons of the noble gas atoms Ar, Kr and Xe is calculated within the framework of diagrammatic many-body theory. The effect of positron-atom and short-range positron-electron correlations on the annihilation process is examined in detail. Short-range correlations, which are described through non-local corrections to the vertex of the annihilation amplitude, are found to significantly enhance the spectra for annihilation on the core orbitals. For Ar, Kr and Xe, the core contributions to the annihilation rate are found to be 0.55\\%, 1.5\\% and 2.2\\% respectively, their small values reflecting the difficulty for the positron to probe distances close to the nucleus. Importantly however, the core subshells have a broad momentum distribution and markedly contribute to the annihilation spectra at Doppler energy shifts $\\gtrsim3$\\,keV, and even dominate the spectra of Kr and Xe at shifts $\\gtrsim5$\\,keV. Their inclusion brings the theoretical ...

  14. Molecular interactions with ice: Molecular embedding, adsorption, detection, and release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, K. D.; Langlois, Grant G.; Li, Wenxin; Sibener, S. J., E-mail: s-sibener@uchicago.edu [The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Killelea, Daniel R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Loyola University Chicago, 1068 W. Sheridan Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60660 (United States)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of atomic and molecular species with water and ice is of fundamental importance for chemistry. In a previous series of publications, we demonstrated that translational energy activates the embedding of Xe and Kr atoms in the near surface region of ice surfaces. In this paper, we show that inert molecular species may be absorbed in a similar fashion. We also revisit Xe embedding, and further probe the nature of the absorption into the selvedge. CF{sub 4} molecules with high translational energies (?3 eV) were observed to embed in amorphous solid water. Just as with Xe, the initial adsorption rate is strongly activated by translational energy, but the CF{sub 4} embedding probability is much less than for Xe. In addition, a larger molecule, SF{sub 6}, did not embed at the same translational energies that both CF{sub 4} and Xe embedded. The embedding rate for a given energy thus goes in the order Xe > CF{sub 4} > SF{sub 6}. We do not have as much data for Kr, but it appears to have a rate that is between that of Xe and CF{sub 4}. Tentatively, this order suggests that for Xe and CF{sub 4}, which have similar van der Waals radii, the momentum is the key factor in determining whether the incident atom or molecule can penetrate deeply enough below the surface to embed. The more massive SF{sub 6} molecule also has a larger van der Waals radius, which appears to prevent it from stably embedding in the selvedge. We also determined that the maximum depth of embedding is less than the equivalent of four layers of hexagonal ice, while some of the atoms just below the ice surface can escape before ice desorption begins. These results show that energetic ballistic embedding in ice is a general phenomenon, and represents a significant new channel by which incident species can be trapped under conditions where they would otherwise not be bound stably as surface adsorbates. These findings have implications for many fields including environmental science, trace gas collection and release, and the chemical composition of astrophysical icy bodies in space.

  15. Laser plasma cryogenic target on translating substrate for generation of continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amano, Sho [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To generate continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses with various wavelengths from laser-produced plasmas, a one-dimensionally translating substrate system with a closed He gas cryostat that can continuously supply various cryogenic targets for ?10 Hz laser pulses has been developed. The system was successfully operated at a lowest temperature of 15 K and at a maximum up-down speed of 12 mm/s. Solid Ar, Kr, and Xe layers were formed, and their growth rates and the laser crater sizes on them were studied. By optimization of the operational parameters in accordance with our design rule, it was shown that stable output power was achieved continuously from the plasma emission at frequencies of 1–10 Hz. The average soft X-ray and EUV powers obtained were 19 mW at 3.2 nm, 33 mW at 10.0 nm, and 66 mW at 10.8 nm, with 10% bandwidths, from the Ar, Kr, and Xe solid targets, respectively, with a laser power of 1 W. We will be able to achieve higher frequencies using a high beam quality laser that produces smaller craters, and can expect higher powers. Although only Ar, Kr, and Xe gases were tested in this study, the target system achieved a temperature of 15 K and can thus solidify almost all target gases, apart from H and He, and can continuously supply the solid target. The use of various target materials will enable expansion of the EUV and soft X-ray emission wavelength range.

  16. Determination of the minimum masses of heavy elements in the envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Ulysse Marboeuf; Jonathan I. Lunine; Yann Alibert; Leigh N. Fletcher; Glenn S. Orton; Francoise Pauzat; Yves Ellinger

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the minimum mass of heavy elements required in the envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn to match the observed oversolar abundances of volatiles. Because the clathration efficiency remains unknown in the solar nebula, we have considered a set of sequences of ice formation in which the fraction of water available for clathration is varied between 0 and 100 %. In all the cases considered, we assume that the water abundance remains homogeneous whatever the heliocentric distance in the nebula and directly derives from a gas phase of solar composition. Planetesimals then form in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure condensates in proportions fixed by the clathration efficiency. A fraction of Kr and Xe may have been sequestrated by the H3+ ion in the form of stable XeH3+ and KrH3+ complexes in the solar nebula gas phase, thus implying the formation of at least partly Xe- and Kr-impoverished planetesimals in the feeding zones of Jupiter and Saturn. These planetesimals were subsequently accreted and vaporized into the hydrogen envelopes of Jupiter and Saturn, thus engendering volatiles enrichments in their atmospheres, with respect to hydrogen. Taking into account both refractory and volatile components, and assuming plausible molecular mixing ratios in the gas phase of the outer solar nebula, we show that it is possible to match the observed enrichments in Jupiter and Saturn, whatever the clathration efficiency. Our calculations predict that the O/H enrichment decreases from 6.7 to 5.6 times solar (O/H) in the envelope of Jupiter and from 18.1 to 15.4 times solar (O/H) in the envelope of Saturn with the growing clathration efficiency in the solar nebula.

  17. mgkang@bi.snu.ac.kr, btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr An analysis for Purpose of Visiting via GPS Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . , . . . [6]. (10035348, ), (0421-20110032, , Videome) BK21- IT. [1] Blei, D.M., Ng, A.Y., JordanPNAS(2004) 5228-5235 [6] Blei, D.M., Lafferty, J.D.: Dynamic Topic Models. InICML(2006) 113-120 [7] Matlab

  18. e-mail : bdlee@bi.snu.ac.kr, btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr Efficient Method for Image Representation Using Topic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoul National University . . k-means , k] . [8] , . . , . k-means k k LDA . k-means , k-means LDA . 3

  19. G G G G G G dlxotjr0321@naver.com, hyjang@bi.snu.ac.kr, btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Andrew Blake [3] "Depth-Encoded Hough Voting for Joint Object Detection and Shape Recovery", Min Sun1, Gary Bradski2, Bing-Xin Xu1, Silvio Savarese1 [4]"A skeleton based shape matching and recovery approach

  20. A Design for a Compact Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manard, M.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a prototype, compact time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) is described. The system primarily consists of an ion acceleration/focusing/steering assembly (AFSA), an 8 cm field-free region, a 4 cm, dual-stage reflectron and a miniature microchannel plate detector. Consequently, the resulting flight length of the system is 12 cm. The system has been designed with the capability to sample directly from atmosphere at ambient pressures. This is accomplished through the use of an electrodynamic ion funnel, housed in an intermediate-vacuum chamber that is coupled to the inlet of the TOF chamber. TOF spectra were obtained using noble gases (Ar, Kr and Xe) as test chemicals. These measured flight times were used to probe the performance of the instrument. A temporal resolution (tflight/?t) of approximately 125, acquired using 129Xe+, has been measured for the system.

  1. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V. [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Li, Zhiying [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  2. Oregon State University nuclear chemistry progress report, August 1, 1992--July 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, W.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics related to nuclear chemistry: Element 110; synthesis of heavy nuclei with complete fusion reactions involving radioactive nuclear beams; the interaction of 21--44 MeV/nucleon Xe with Au; MeV/nucleon {sup 86}Kr with {sup 197}Au; intermediate energy Ar-Th collisions; target-like fragments from the interaction of 29 MeV/nucleon {sup 208}Pb with {sup 197}Au; the intermediate of 22 and 32 MeV/nucleon {sup 16}O with {sup 197}Au; Au projectile fragmentation at 20 MeV/nucleon; relativistic heavy ion research; and pulse height defect measurements for very heavy ions.

  3. Determination of lithium ion--rare gas potentials from total cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak-Dingels, P.; Rajan, M.S.; Gislason, E.A.

    1982-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Total cross sections have been measured for Li/sup +/ ions scattered by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the range Etheta/sub R/ = 5--1000 eV deg. Here E is the laboratory energy of the Li/sup +/ beam, and theta/sub R/ is the resolution angle of the apparatus. The cross sections have been inverted to obtain accurate estimates of the potential V(R) over a wide range of R including the attractive well region. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental work on these systems.

  4. Measurements of ultra-low-energy electron scattering cross sections of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitajima, M.; Shigemura, K.; Kurokawa, M. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 152-8551 Tokyo (Japan); Odagiri, T. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 102-8554 Tokyo, Japan and Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 152-8551 Tokyo (Japan); Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 102-8554 Tokyo (Japan); Ito, K. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, 305-0801 Tsukuba (Japan)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new experimental technique for the total cross section measurements of ultra-low energy electron collisions with atoms and molecules utilizing the synchrotron radiation is presented. The technique employs a combination of the penetrating field technique and the threshold photoionization of rare gas atoms using the synchrotron radiation as an electron source in order to produce a high resolution electron beam at very low energy. Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the energy region from extremely low electron energy to 20 eV are presented.

  5. Analysis of fission gas release kinetics by on-line mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerega, Y.; Reynard-Carette, C. [Univ. of Provence, Laboratoire Chimie Provence, UMR 6264, Avenue escadrille Normandie - Niemen, F-13397 Marseille (France); Parrat, D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carette, M. [Univ. of Provence, Laboratoire Chimie Provence, UMR 6264, Avenue escadrille Normandie - Niemen, F-13397 Marseille (France); Brkic, B. [Univ. of Liverpool, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Lyoussi, A.; Bignan, G. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Janulyte, A.; Andre, J. [Univ. of Provence, Laboratoire Chimie Provence, UMR 6264, Avenue escadrille Normandie - Niemen, F-13397 Marseille (France); Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Taylor, S. [Univ. of Liverpool, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The release of fission gas (Xe and Kr) and helium out of nuclear fuel materials in normal operation of a nuclear power reactor can constitute a strong limitation of the fuel lifetime. Moreover, radioactive isotopes of Xe and Kr contribute significantly to the global radiological source term released in the primary coolant circuit in case of accidental situations accompanied by fuel rod loss of integrity. As a consequence, fission gas release investigation is of prime importance for the nuclear fuel cycle economy, and is the driven force of numerous R and D programs. In this domain, for solving current fuel behavior understanding issues, preparing the development of new fuels (e.g. for Gen IV power systems) and for improving the modeling prediction capability, there is a marked need for innovations in the instrumentation field, mainly for: . Quantification of very low fission gas concentrations, released from fuel sample and routed in sweeping lines. Monitoring of quick gas release variations by quantification of elementary release during a short period of time. Detection of a large range of atomic masses (e.g. H{sub 2}, HT, He, CO, CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), together with a performing separation of isotopes for Xe and Kr elements. Coupling measurement of stable and radioactive gas isotopes, by using in parallel mass spectrometry and gamma spectrometry techniques. To fulfill these challenging needs, a common strategy for analysis equipment implementation has been set up thanks to a recently launched collaboration between the CEA and the Univ. of Provence, with the technological support of the Liverpool Univ.. It aims at developing a chronological series of mass spectrometer devices based upon mass filter and 2D/3D ion traps with Fourier transform operating mode and having increasing levels of performances to match the previous challenges for out-of pile and in-pile experiments. The final objective is to install a high performance online mass spectrometer coupled to a gamma spectrometer in the fission product laboratory of the future Jules Horowitz Material Test Reactor. An intermediate step will consist of testing first equipment on an existing experimental facility in the LECA-STAR Hot Cell Laboratory of the CEA Cadarache. This paper presents the scientific and operational stakes linked to fission gas issues, resumes the current state of art for analyzing them in nuclear facilities, then presents the skills gathered through this collaboration to overcome technological bottlenecks. Finally it describes the implementation strategy in nuclear research facilities of the CEA Cadarache. (authors)

  6. Calculations of dynamic stresses in the envelopes of pulsed Xe flashlamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdener, F.R.; Platt, E.A.; Erlandson, A.C.; Frank, D.N.; Gelinas, R.J.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Larson, D.W.; Sinz, K.H.

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have modeled dynamic stresses in the envelopes of pulsed xenon flashlamps, treating stresses produced by three different sources: the heating of the envelope by the plasma; the pressure rise of the xenon gas; and magnetic forces, due to currents flowing in nearby lamps. The heat-induced stresses were calculated by the finite element method, using uniform heating rates for the inside surface of the envelope that were inferred from flashlamp radiant efficiency measurements. Pressure-induced stresses were calculated analytically, using empirical relationships for temperature and pressure in terms of current density. Magnetically-induced stresses were also calculated analytically, for flashlamps packed parallel to each other in linear arrays.

  7. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

  8. Melting behavior of heterogenous atomic clusters: Gapless coexisting phases in ,,ArXe...13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswamy, Ram

    Phase­change behavior in small clusters has been exten- sively studied in the past few years as the finite system ana- logue of bulk phase transitions.1­13 Phase transitions in bulk material differ from phase changes in finite systems in sev- eral important ways. In finite systems, there can be phenom- ena

  9. Stable formation of ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels in Xe cluster targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, Alex B.; Racz, Ervin; Khan, Shahab F.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; McCorkindale, John C.; Boguta, John; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K. [Laboratory for X-ray Microimaging and Bioinformatics, Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7059 (United States); KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization of relativistic and ponderomotive self-channeling of ultra-powerful 248 nm laser pulses launched in underdense plasmas with an appropriate longitudinal gradient in the electron density profile located at the initial stage of the self-channeling leads to (1) stable channel formation and (2) highly efficient power compression producing power densities in the 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3} range. The comparison of theoretical studies with experimental results involving the correlation of (a) Thomson images of the electron density with (b) x-ray images of the channel morphology demonstrates that more than 90% of the incident 248 nm power can be trapped in stable channels and that this stable propagation can be extended to power levels significantly exceeding the critical power of the self-channeling process.

  10. Laser action in para-quaterphenyl vapor pumped by XeCl* laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilova, V.I.; Degtyarenko, K.M.; Gruzinskii, V.V.; Kopylova, T.N.; Maier, G.V.; Tarasenko, V.F.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach is proposed to the search for active media involving a theoretical study of the spectral, luminescence, and lasing properties of organic molecules. Laser action was obtained in gas-phase para-quaterphenyl (lambda/sub l/=361.5 nm) with a low threshold pumping level (1.1 MW/cm/sup 2/). The lasing capacity of some substituted forms of para-quaterphenyl is predicted.

  11. New Tools for Chemically Directed Glycoproteomics and Xe-based MRI Contrast Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palaniappan, Krishnan K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hyperCEST response of unlabeled MDA-MB-231 and Jurkat cellsbound the cell surface of MDA-MB-231 cells.. . . . . . .EGFR-CryA biosensor is spe- cific to MDA-MB-231. . . . . . .

  12. New Tools for Chemically Directed Glycoproteomics and Xe-based MRI Contrast Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palaniappan, Krishnan K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    centrifuged prior to injection to pellet insoluble material.centrifuged prior to injection to pellet insoluble material.centrifuged prior to injection to pellet insoluble material.

  13. Pore-structure determinations of silica aerogels by {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy and imaging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, D. M.; Gerald, R. E., II; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silica aerogels represent a new class of open-pore materials with pore dimensions on a scale of tens of nanometers, and are thus classified as mesoporous materials. In this work, we show that the combination of NMR spectroscopy and chemical-shift selective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can resolve some of the important aspects of the structure of silica aerogels. The use of xenon as a gaseous probe in combination with spatially resolved NMR techniques is demonstrated to be a powerful, new approach for characterizing the average pore structure and steady-state spatial distributions of xenon atoms in different physicochemical environments. Furthermore, dynamic NMR magnetization transfer experiments and pulsed-field gradient (PFG) measurements have been used to characterize exchange processes and diffusive motion of xenon in samples at equilibrium. In particular, this new NMR approach offers unique information and insights into the nanoscopic pore structure and microscopic morphology of aerogels and the dynamical behavior of occluded adsorbates. MRI provides spatially resolved information on the nature of the flaw regions found in these materials. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for magnetization transfer among the bulk and occluded xenon phases indicate xenon-exchange rate constants on the order of 1 s-1 for specimens having volumes of 0.03 cm3. PFG diffusion measurements show evidence of anisotropic diffusion for xenon occluded within aerogels, with nominal self-diffusivity coefficients on the order of D= 10-3cm2/s.

  14. Web Documents for Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRatesAboutWeatherizationMaterials

  15. Presentations from Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical InformationProcess andPresentations

  16. Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUserHadoopon-package memoryACML

  17. Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in $^{136}$Xe with EXO-200 |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item you requested, OSTI IDAudio Search in use

  18. Agenda for Using the Cray XE6 Training at NERSC February 7-8, 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highly

  19. Franklin XT4 to Hopper XE6 Katie Antypas and Helen He NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy Forrestal GarageD.Charge

  20. me.postech.ac.kr Department of Mechanical Engineering Introducing POSTECH_04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Wokyung

    education, fostering advanced research, and the industrial application of scientific research. POSTECH intelligent robot research center in Korea, the Pohang Institute of Intelligent Robotics. And with 4th development, transforming the industrial city of Pohang to a city of Science and technology. POSTECH

  1. Processes for Removal and Immobilization of 14C, 129I, and 85Kr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Henager, Charles H.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Matyas, Josef; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Weber, William J.; Zheng, Feng

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a white paper covering the results of a literature search and preliminary experiments on materials and methods to remove and immobilize gaseous radionuclided that come from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

  2. Full-Time MBA (Global ), Part-Time Master www.business.kaist.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Min H.

    .8) . (, , ) 6. : 1 TOEFL, TOEIC, TEPS, IELTS, PTE 1 - 2 ( ) KAIST ( ) 1 KAIST OPI 1) . TOEFL, TOEIC, TEPS, IELTS, PTE - (2013. 4. 29()) 2 ( ) - . KAIST OPI TEST - (2013. 4. 29()) 2 - . - OPI 2) 2 ( ) . (, .) 3) 3

  3. , kimthun, ryu, yang)@mythos.yonsei.ac.kr Preprocessing Methods for Improving Prediction Accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Sung-Bong

    ) . , . , . 1. [1] , . k-Nearest Neighbor(k-NN) [2] . k-Means [3] . , , k-Means k-NN . k-Means , . , . (rank-Nearest Neighbor (1) a k , k (2) . 2.3. k-Means k-Means , k . a k (3

  4. Numerical study and validation of one swirling flame , Sren K. Kr, Chungen Yin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Department of Energy Technology Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstræde 101, 9220 Aalborg, Denmark Abstract-7]. The reliable experimental data are used as model database in TNF and reference for modelling studies. Large

  5. {jmoh, btzhang}@scai.snu.ac.kr Kernel Perceptron Boosting for Effective Learning of Imbalanced Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' train test earn 32.4% 34.6% grain 4.7% 4.2% crude 4.2% 5.2% 3 . 3 F1 ( / ) F1 earn crude grain MLP 97.5 . 4.3. 1 `earn' , `crude' . 2 . , . . 5. . . , . (BR-2-1-G-06) BK21 [1] N. Cristianini and J. S

  6. Engineering of Absorbing Gaskets Between Metal Marina Y. Koledintseva, Sandeep K.R. Chandra,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    for conductive gaskets, even when the conductive particles are embedded in a polymer such as fluorosilicone emissions and improve immunity of electronic equipment is considered. An analytical model of a composite overlapping metal plates and an engineered gasket composite material in the place of the overlap are presented

  7. Microsoft Word - LATEST_Final Report_KR_v03_2_22.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation...

  8. Molecular Computational Methods for Pattern Completion , btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DNA Computing (Probabilistic Library Model, PLM) [6,7] . 0 9 UCI machine learning;2 207 2: library true . 2. PLM 2.1 PLM PLM order term clause library . library false . 2.2 PLM . - 1. random training set subsampling library - 2. training set library

  9. , btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr Boosted DNA Computing for Evolutionary Graphical Structure Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLM (Probabilistic Library Model PLM PLM DNA bead seperation PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) PLM PLM DNA DNA PLM PLM PLM PLM DNA PLM PLM evolutionary graph structure PLM DNA &$$) Jc`" '& Bc" %6 #12

  10. Reproducible Features of Congested Highway Traffic C.F. Daganzo and K.R. Smilowitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daganzo, Carlos F.

    accumulations between detectors vary with flow in a predictable way, and that a macroscopic kinematic wave] and the kinematic wave (KW) continuum theory of [3] and [4]. As a result, more complicated theories that allow

  11. Nuclear waste processing based on FOOF and KrF sub 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.C.; Blum, T.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of oxygen fluoride compounds and krypton difluoride show great promise in recovering and purifying plutonium and other actinides from nuclear waste and residues. Since 1983, a significant effort has been expended in three main areas of research; one area is the characterization of the reactive species and the fluorination reaction chemistry with various actinides. The second area is to develop efficient production methods for the active chemicals. The third area is actually in demonstrating application of these fluorinating agents to actinides recovery and purification. Substantial progress has been made in all three areas and some of the highlights in their research effort is discussed. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. PromSearch 22 , bhkim, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) (TSS) . 300bp , . , (TATA box, Inr, GC box, CAAT box) DPE(downstream promoter elementInspector . PromSearch TSS (downstream) bp , PromSearch . 3.2 22 [7] 22 gene start) PromSearch . . [7] . (TSS) (downstream) 555bp

  13. Market-Based Incentives for Green Building Alternatives K.R. Grosskopf, Ph.D.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    be addressed. Key Words Best management practices (BMPs), demand-side management, externalities, rebates for developing market-based initiatives to stimulate demand-side conservation. This approach is founded on the principal that reducing water use and subsequent wastewater discharge through demand-side or "user

  14. Microsoft Word - LATEST_Final Report_KR_v03_2_22.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8CO6AboutEFCOGSave theSeptember

  15. Effects of impurity atoms and molecules on the lifetime of antiprotonic helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T; Hayano, R S; Iwasaki, M; Nakamura, S N; Tamura, H; Ito, T M; Kawachi, A; Nishida, N; Higemoto, M; Ito, Y; Morita, N; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Schmid, W; Hoffmann, J; Eades, John

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed annihilation time spectra of antiprotons (DATS) in room temperature helium gas have been studied as a function of the concentration of admixed noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) as well as molecular gases (N_2,O_2,H_2) at the low energy antiproton ring (LEAR) at CERN. The DATS were a superposition of two exponential components, one with lifetime of several 100 ns and the other with lifetime 1 to 3 \\mus. They showed a shorter average lifetime (T_{av}) than DATS of pure helium. Ne, Ar, and Kr were found to affect T_{av} only slightly even in concentrations up to 20\\%, while Xe showed a much stronger influence. In the case of molecular gases the presence of N_2 influenced the DATS much less than O_2 and H_2 which destroyed the metastability almost completely in concentrations of 100 ppm and less. The decay rate of the slow component of DATS was found to exhibit a linear relation to the number density of the admixture. From this a collisional destruction (``quenching'') cross section \\sigma_q was extracted. No ...

  16. First-principles calculations of the stability and incorporation of helium, xenon and krypton in uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Beeler; B. Good; S. Rashkeev; M. Baskes; M. Okuniewski

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While metallic fuels have a long history of reactor use, their fundamental physical and thermodynamic properties are not well understood. Many metallic nuclear fuels are body-centered cubic alloys of uranium that swell under fission conditions, creating fission product gases such as helium, xenon and krypton. In this paper, helium, xenon, and krypton point defects are investigated in the a and ? phases of metallic uranium using first principles calculations. A density functional theory (DFT) framework is utilized with projector augmented-wave (PAW) pseudopotentials. Formation and incorporation energies of He, Xe, and Kr are calculated at various defect positions for the prediction of fission gas behavior in uranium. In most cases, defect energies follow a size effect, with helium incorporation and formation energies being the smallest. The most likely position for the larger Xe and Kr atoms in uranium is the substitutional site. Helium atoms are likely to be found in a wide variety of defect positions due to the comparable formation energies of all defect configurations analyzed. This is the first detailed study of the stability and incorporation of fission gases in uranium.

  17. Vibrational relaxation of matrix-isolated CH/sub 3/F and HCl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have been performed on CH/sub 3/F and HCl as a function of host matrix and temperature. Temporally and spectrally resolved infrared fluorescence was used to monitor the populations of both the initially excited state and the lower lying levels which participate in the relaxation process. For CH/sub 3/F, relaxation from any of the levels near 3.5 ..mu.., i.e. the CH stretching fundamentals or bend overtones, occurs via rapid (< 5 ns) V ..-->.. V transfer to 2..nu../sub 3/ with subsequent relaxation of the ..nu../sub 3/ (CF stretch) manifold. Lifetimes of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ were determined through overtone, ..delta..V = 2, and fundamental fluorescence. These lifetimes show a dramatic dependence on host lattice, an increase of two orders of magnitude in going from Xe and Ar matrices. Lifetimes depend only weakly on temperature. The relaxation of 2..nu../sub 3/ and ..nu../sub 3/ is consistent with a model in which production of a highly rotationally excited guest via collisions with the repulsive wall of the host is the rate limiting step. For HCl, lifetimes of v = 1,2,3 have been determined. In all hosts, the relaxation is non-radiative. For a given vibrational state, v, the relaxation rate increases in the series k(Ar) < k(Kr) < k(Xe). The dependence of the relaxation rate; on v is superlinear in all matrices, the deviation from linearity increasng in the order Ar < Kr < Xe. The relaxation rates become more strongly temperature dependent with increasing vibrational excitation. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which complex formation introduces the anisotropy necessary to induce a near resonant V ..-->.. R transition in the rate limiting step.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a new structure of gas hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Ehm, Lars [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Klug, Dennis D [National Research Council of Canada; Parise, John B [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Yang, Ling [ORNL; Martin, Dave [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ripmeester, John [National Research Council of Canada; Moudrakovski, Igor [National Research Council of Canada; Ratcliffe, Chris [National Research Council of Canada

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atoms and molecules 0.4 0.9 nm in diameter can be incorporated in the cages formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules making up the crystalline solid clathrate hydrates. There are three structural families of these hydrates , known as sI, sII and sH, and the structure usually depends on the largest guest molecule in the hydrate. Species such as Ar, Kr, Xe and methane form sI or sII hydrate, sH is unique in that it requires both small and large cage guests for stability. All three structures, containing methane, other hydrocarbons, H2S and CO2, O2 and N2 have been found in the geosphere, with sI methane hydrate by far the most abundant. At high pressures (P > 0.7 kbar) small guests (Ar, Kr, Xe, methane) are also known to form sH hydrate with multiple occupancy of the largest cage in the hydrate. The high-pressure methane hydrate of sH has been proposed as playing a role in the outer solar system, including formation models for Titan , and yet another high pressure phase of methane has been reported , although its structure remains unknown. In this study, we report a new and unique hydrate structure that is derived from the high pressure sH hydrate of xenon. After quench recovery at ambient pressure and 77 K it shows considerable stability at low temperatures (T < 160 K) and is compositionally similar to the sI Xe clathrate starting material. This evidence of structural complexity in compositionally similar clathrate compounds indicates that thermodynamic pressure temperature conditions may not be the only important factor in structure determination, but also the reaction path may have an important effect.

  19. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.Use of US croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gasesovercome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil. Proc. Natl.

  20. Measurement of a magnetic-dipole transition probability in Xe32+ using an electron-beam ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serpa, F. G.; Morgan, C. A.; Meyer, E. S.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Trabert, E.; Church, David A.; Takacs, E.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the transition wavelength remains in the 320- to 400-nm range for 54plasma diagnostic tool. Our measurement of the transition probability yields 465(30) s(-1), corresponding to a lifetime of 2.15(14) ms, in good...

  1. Xe chemical shift measurements on a single crystal surface H.J. Jaansch *, P. Gerhard, M. Koch, D. Stahl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as to understand the numerous phenomena occurring in catalytic reactions, corrosion, or lubrication phenomena. Many;diffusion phenomena and electric field gradients at surfaces. These experiments use highly polarized lithium

  2. Infrared studies in free standing crystals: N,O-doped Xe and Ar W. G. Lawrence and V. A. Apkarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    . INTRODUCTION Rare-gas crystals grown in retractable molds, under pressure and temperature conditions that allow seal is used as the feed through for the glass tube. By sliding the tube through the "0'`-ring seal introduced slowly, at a back pressure of a few Torr, until a visible seal is made between the mold

  3. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of Ge76, Se82, Mo100 and Xe136 to excited 0^+ states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Simkovic; M. Nowak; W. A. Kaminski; A. A. Raduta; Amand Faessler

    2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrinoless double beta decay transition to the first excited 0^+ collective final state is examined for A=76, 82, 100 and 136 nuclei by assuming light and heavy Majorana neutrino exchange mechanisms as well as the trilinear R-parity violating contributions. Realistic calculations of nuclear matrix elements have been performed within the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation. Transitions to the first excited two-quadrupole phonon 0^+ state are described within a boson expansion formalism and alternatively by using the operator recoupling method. We present the sensitivity parameters to different lepton number violating signals, which can be used in planning the neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay to the first excited state 0^+_1 is by a factor of 10 to 100 larger than that of the transition to the ground state.

  4. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gando, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactor accident in Marchof detector materials by Fukushima fallout, which includeCo are not detected near Fukushima or our soil samples, we

  5. Quantity of 135I Released from the AGR 1, AGR 2, and AGR 3/4 Experiments and Discovery of 131I at the FPMS Traps during the AGR-3/4 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn Scates

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of three Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). From 2006 through 2014, these experiments supported the development and qualification of the new U.S. tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Each AGR experiment consisted of multiple fueled capsules, each plumbed for independent temperature control using a mix of helium and neon gases. The gas leaving a capsule was routed to individual Fission Product Monitor (FPM) detectors. For intact fuel particles, the TRISO particle coatings provide a substantial barrier to fission product release. However, particles with failed coatings, whether because of a minute percentage of initially defective particles, those which fail during irradiation, or those designed to fail (DTF) particles, can release fission products to the flowing gas stream. Because reactive fission product elements like iodine and cesium quickly deposit on cooler capsule components and piping structures as the effluent gas leaves the reactor core, only the noble fission gas isotopes of Kr and Xe tend to reach FPM detectors. The FPM system utilizes High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors coupled with a thallium activated sodium iodide NaI(Tl) scintillator. The HPGe detector provides individual isotopic information, while the NaI(Tl) scintillator is used as a gross count rate meter. During irradiation, the 135mXe concentration reaching the FPM detectors is from both direct fission and by decay of the accumulated 135I. About 2.5 hours after irradiation (ten 15.3 minute 135mXe half lives) the directly produced 135mXe has decayed and only the longer lived 135I remains as a source. Decay systematics dictate that 135mXe will be in secular equilibrium with its 135I parent, such that its production rate very nearly equals the decay rate of the parent, and its concentration in the flowing gas stream will appear to decay with the parent half life. This equilibrium condition enables the determination of the amount of 135I released from the fuel particles by measurement of the 135mXe at the FPM following reactor shutdown. In this paper, the 135I released will be reported and compared to similar releases for noble gases as well as the unexpected finding of 131I deposition from intentional impure gas injection into capsule 11 of experiment AGR 3/4.

  6. Partial doubly differential cross sections for multiple ionization of argon, krypton, and xenon atoms by electron impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhry, M.A.; Duncan, A.J.; Hippler, R.; Kleinpoppen, H.

    1989-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial doubly differential cross sections for multiple ionization d/sup 2/sigma/sup (n)//dE d..cap omega.. of argon, krypton, and xenon by electron impact have been measured as a function of incident electron energy and ejected electron energy, for argon up to Ar/sup 4+/, for krypton up to Kr/sup 5+/, and for xenon up to Xe/sup 8+/. Incident electron energies between 0.5 and 10 keV were used, while the electrons ejected at an angle of 90/sup 0/ to the incident electron direction were detected with energies between 20 and 270 eV. The doubly differential cross section (sum of partial doubly differential cross sections) for ionization for each gas has been compared with experimental data in the literature.

  7. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux—For various gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia) [Centre for Plasma Research, INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper derived benchmarks for deuteron beam fluence and flux in a plasma focus (PF) [S. Lee and S. H. Saw, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112703 (2012)]. In the present work we start from first principles, derive the flux equation of the ion beam of any gas; link to the Lee Model code and hence compute the ion beam properties of the PF. The results show that, for a given PF, the fluence, flux, ion number and ion current decrease from the lightest to the heaviest gas except for trend-breaking higher values for Ar fluence and flux. The energy fluence, energy flux, power flow, and damage factors are relatively constant from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2} but increase for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe due to radiative cooling and collapse effects. This paper provides much needed benchmark reference values and scaling trends for ion beams of a PF operated in any gas.

  8. Calibration of a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) with high detection threshold to search for rare events in cosmic rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dey; D. Gupta; A. Maulik; Sibaji Raha; Swapan K. Saha; D. Syam; J. Pakarinen; D. Voulot; F. Wenander

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated a commercially available polymer for its suitability as a solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD). We identified that polymer to be polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and found that it has a higher detection threshold compared to many other widely used SSNTDs which makes this detector particularly suitable for rare event search in cosmic rays as it eliminates the dominant low Z background. Systematic studies were carried out to determine its charge response which is essential before any new material can be used as an SSNTD. In this paper we describe the charge response of PET to 129Xe, 78Kr and 49Ti ions from the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN, present the calibration curve for PET and characterize it as a nuclear track detector.

  9. Multiple ionization of noble gases by swift H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in breakup and nonbreakup collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigaud, G.M.; Luna, H.; Montenegro, E.C. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22452-970 (Brazil); Sant'Anna, M.M.; Santos, A.C.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); McGrath, C.; Shah, M.B. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cavalcanti, E.G. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22780-160 (Brazil)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured multiple-ionization yields of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe targets by 1.0 MeV/amu H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ions for both the dissociative and nondissociative channels. Except for the case of the breakup of the H{sub 2}{sup +} into two protons, we have also determined the absolute cross sections for the multiple ionization of the targets. The ratios of multiple to single ionization for the nondissociative channel are similar to those for equivelocity protons, which, however, are consistently smaller than those for the breakup channels, for all charge states and targets. A simple analysis, based on the independent particle model, considering postcollisional time-delayed ionization for the Ne and Ar targets, evinces the importance of these mechanisms in the target multiple ionization and of the antiscreening in collisions where the projectile electron undergoes a transition.

  10. Interrogation and control of condensed phase chemical dynamics with linearly chirped pulses: I2 in solid Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Interrogation and control of condensed phase chemical dynamics with linearly chirped pulses: I2, Irvine, California 92717 Received 19 October 1995; accepted 30 January 1996 The effect of linearly pulse chirp, is a measure of the controllability of the evolving dynamics. In the particular case

  11. MESURE AU COMPTEUR PROPORTIONNEL DU RAPPORT captureL/captureK DU 79Kr Par MICHEL LANGEVIN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    measured by use of a mixture of the radia- tive element with propane in a proportional counter. Some details are given on experimental pro- cedure and results. LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ET LE RADIUM. TOME 16 très faible de photons K soit absorbée. Nous avons utilisé à cet effet un remplissage de propane, gaz

  12. ---Home Yahoo! Help My Yahoo! http://asia.news.yahoo.com/041102/kyodo/d863kr500.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2, 17:04 PM Japan, EU, others to discuss nuclear fusion reactor next week Japan, the European where they will build the world's first prototype nuclear fusion reactor, Japan's science ministry said are together working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project will meet next Tuesday

  13. Programme Committee Member 1. KR 2014, 14th International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toni, Francesca

    with the 9th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. Toronto, Canada, 10 May­8 September 2012 9. ECAI 2012, 20th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence Montpellier, France 27 Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems Paris, France, 16­17 December 2010 17. JELIA 2010, 12th European Conference

  14. Plasmonic photovoltaics K.R. Catchpole1,2, S. Pillai2, M.A. Green2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    Australia 3California Institute of Technology (CALTECH) Pasadena, California, USA #12;UNSW Why Solar of the worlds energy using 8% efficient photovoltaics. The Solar Resource Average solar irradiance, W/m2. #12? The size of the resource. The small black dots show the area of solar panels needed to generate all

  15. {jskim, cylee, eskim, btzhang}@bi.snu.ac.kr Characterization of Actors in TV Drama via Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    notations. But for loops, we don't. Instead, we [2] look at what specifications a loop refines. We take

  16. Copyright(c)2002 by Seoul National University Library. All rights reserved.(http://library.snu.ac.kr)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - . . . . . DNA PLM . DNA DNA , . #12;Copyright(c)2002 - . 5000 30 . 65% 80% . : , DNA , PLM, , : 2003-23195 #12;Copyright(c)2002 by Seoul

  17. A Cargo Inspection System for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Based on Associated Particle Neutron Generators and Liquid-Kr Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koltick, David S.; Kane, Steven Z. [Purdue University Applied Physics Laboratory 740 Navco Dr., Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility analysis is presented of a cargo inspection system based on neutron-induced fission followed by the coincident detection of multiple prompt fission gamma rays as a signature of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The system does not require gamma ray spectroscopy and would be capable of distinguishing U-238 from U-235 using the ratio of signals from two modes of detection: thermal neutron capture induced fission and fast neutron-induced fission. The system utilizes two deuterium-tritium (DT) associated particle neutron generators, each capable of 10{sup 9} neutrons/s at 14.1 MeV, with sub-nanosecond timing resolution ZnO:Ga alpha detectors. The expected {approx}1 MeV prompt gamma rays are detected using liquid krypton (LKr) detectors with sub-nanosecond timing resolution ({approx}600 ps) and high detection efficiency. The expected SNM signal and randomly correlated background rates are discussed using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  18. Magnetic field modulated dust streams from Jupiter in interplanetary space Alberto Flandes a,, Harald Kr uger b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    Magnetic field modulated dust streams from Jupiter in interplanetary space Alberto Flandes a, MD 20742-2421, USA e Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA a r to allow the planet's magnetic field to accelerate them away from the planet, where they are subsequently

  19. Reply to the comments of Dr. K.R. Rushton on ``Steady flow to a horizontal drain in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    , 174­185 Mazda Kompani-Zare a,*, Hongbin Zhan b,1 a Desert Management Department, School of Agriculture

  20. KR Smith/N Bruce, et al. Millions dead: how do we know and what does it mean? Web supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    ...........................................................................................................................7 2.2 MODELING HOUSEHOLD EXPOSURES TO AIR POLLUTION FROM SOLID FUEL COMBUSTION IN RURAL HOUSEHOLDS......................................................................................................5 2. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT............................................................................................................................................7 2.1 GLOBAL ESTIMATES OF SOLID FUEL USE

  1. HEPEX9505014 DESY 95086 ISSN 04189833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 2 , U. Kr¨uger 11 , U. Kr¨u

  2. ADMISSIONS GUIDE FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    http://me.kaist.ac.kr 3002 Aerospace Engineering http://ae.kaist.ac.kr 3702 Ocean Systems Engineering http://kaist-ocean.or.kr/ 1505 Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering http://cbe.kaist.ac.kr/ 3904://gsnt.kaist.ac.kr/ 1102 Biological Sciences http://bio.kaist.ac.kr/index_eng.htm 2605 Bio & Brain Engineering http

  3. OFDM PAPR Blind SLM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No, Jong-Seon

    OFDM PAPR Blind SLM *, *, *, *, * *, ** joohs@ccl.snu.ac.kr, hsjbest@ccl.snu.ac.kr, lucidream@ccl.snu.ac.kr, jsno@snu.ac.kr, djshin@hanyang.ac.kr New Blind SLM with Low Complexity for PAPR- power ratio) . SLM (SI; side information) . m- sequence blind SLM

  4. Strong-Field Excitation of Liquid and Solid Xe Using Intense Femtosecond Pulses M. Pettersson, R. Zadoyan, J. Eloranta, N. Schwentner,| and V. A. Apkarian*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    -axis spectral profile of the excitonic emission. I. Introduction With the accessibility of lasers with ultra-short in the extreme limits to laser fusion.13 In bulk applications, the important distinctions arise from as supercontinuum generation15 or ablation,16 and clearly must play an integral part in the design of controlled

  5. Dependence of cross sections for multi-electron loss by 6 mev/amu xe18+ ions on target atomic number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Yong

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed to use heavy ion beams with energies around 10 MeV/amu, masses around 200, and average charges of 1+ as a driver for inertial fusion reactor. Current designs require the beams to travel through a region where the background gas...

  6. FASTGRASS: A mechanistic model for the prediction of Xe, I, Cs, Te, Ba, and Sr release from nuclear fuel under normal and severe-accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rest, J.; Zawadzki, S.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary physical/chemical models that form the basis of the FASTGRASS mechanistic computer model for calculating fission-product release from nuclear fuel are described. Calculated results are compared with test data and the major mechanisms affecting the transport of fission products during steady-state and accident conditions are identified.

  7. DESY 96046 hepex/9603009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨amerk¨amper 9 , M.W. Krasny 7;30 , H. Krehbiel 12 , D. Kr¨ucker 2 , U. Kr¨uger 12 , U. Kr¨uner­Marquis

  8. arXiv:hepex/9908059 DESY99107 ISSN 04189833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . KrË?amerkË?amper 7 , M.W. Krasny 28 , H. Krehbiel 10 , D. KrË?ucker 25 , K. KrË?uger 10 , A. KË?upper 33

  9. DESY 98148 ISSN 04189833 October 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 25 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 26 , K. Kr¨uger 11 , A. K

  10. DESY 94154 ISSN 04189833 August 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 24 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 2 , U. Kr¨uger 11 , U. Kr¨uner­Marquis 11 , J

  11. hepex/9504004 hepex/9504004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 24 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 2 , U. Kr¨uger 11 , U

  12. PREPRINTS9506001 DESY 95081 ISSN 04189833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 24 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 2 , U. Kr¨uger 11 , U

  13. Observation of Hard Processes in Rapidity Gap Events in flp Interactions at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 24 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 2 , U. Kr¨uger 11 , U

  14. Radiochemistry as a (rho)R Diagnostic with the RAGS Gas Collection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S L; Shaughnessy, D A; Schneider, D H; Stoeffl, W; Moody, K J; Cerjan, C; Stoyer, M A; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Hoffman, R

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiochemical diagnostic techniques such as gas-phase capsule debris analysis may prove to be successful methods for establishing the success or failure of ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Samples in the gas phase offer the most direct method of collection by simply pumping out the large target chamber following a NIF shot. The target capsules will be prepared with dopants which will produce radioactive noble gas isotopes upon activation with neutrons. We have designed and constructed the Radchem Apparatus for Gas Sampling (RAGS) in order to collect post-shot gaseous samples for NIF capsule diagnostics. The design of RAGS incorporates multiple stages intended to purify, transfer, and count the radioactive decays from gaseous products synthesized in NIF experiments. At the moment the dopant of choice is {sup 124}Xe, which will undergo (n,{gamma}) and (n, 2n) reactions to produce {sup 125}Xe and {sup 123}Xe. The half-lives of each are on the order of multiple hours and are suitable for long-term gamma-counting. These isotopes and the rest of the gases evolved in a NIF shot will be drawn through the NIF turbo pumps, past the temporarily shuttered cryo pumps (to aid our collection efficiency), and towards the first main portion of the RAGS system: the pre-cleaner. The pre-cleaner will consist of a water removal system, a series of heated getter cartridges to remove most other impurities such as N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, etc., and a residual gas analyzer (RGA) to monitor vacuum quality. The noble gases will flow through the precleaner and into the second stage of the system: the cryo collector. This cryo collector consists of a main cryo head for noble gas collection which will operate for approximately five minutes post-shot. Afterwards a valve will close and isolate the pre-cleaner, while the cryo head warms to release the Xe gas to one of two locations - either a second cryo station for in-situ gamma counting, or to a small cooled gas bottle for removal and counting. Additional capabilities of the RAGS system include a noble gas calibration apparatus attached to the NIF target chamber, which will be operated hours pre-shot to determine collection efficiency through the whole RAGS system via the signal detected from the RGA. Also it is possible there will be the addition of a helium puff system to drive the Xe through the pre-cleaner and collection stations. It is also likely that multiple cryo collection stations will be built into the system in the future to fractionate and collect other noble gases such as Kr, Ar, and possibly Ne. A prototype pre-cleaner has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and is in the testing phases. The information learned in this testing will help collaborators at Sandia National Laboratory that are building and delivering the systems that will be deployed at NIF. The LBNL testing so far has demonstrated that radioactive fission gases can be flowed through the system with and without carrier gases of air and/or He, and the activity can be collected on an activated charcoal sample. Further testing in the upcoming months will hopefully yield more information about any presence of Xe in the water removed from the system, and commissioning of a small cryo cooler as well.

  15. United states Department of t he Interior, J. A. Kr ug, Secr et ary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day , Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .L O.S. i n London. *F. L. 206 Fish Proc essi~ r achi nery, F . L. 207 Q,uick Freezing and Cold storage of Fisheri es, Dr. G. A. Reay, Department of Scientific and Industrial Resear ch, and Lt . H. :w.. L . Farrer, Herring Industry Board, for the British Inte lligenc e Objectives Sub- Committee , 32 Bryanstone Square

  16. United States Department of the Interior, J .A. Kr , Secretary Fish and Jildli!e Service, Albert M. Day, Dir c or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of preparing and preserving fish by freezing, improved means of trans- portation, and more adequate local. In addition, wartime scarcities of several foods and postwar increases in meat prices resulted in increased of meats, chicken and turkey, ice cream, butter, fresh deciduous fruits, fresh vegetables, sweet potatoes

  17. Programme Committee Membership by CLArg Members (since 2007) 1. KR 2014, 14th International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toni, Francesca

    in Multi-Agent Systems collocated with the 9th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Conference on Logic Programming Budapest, Hungary 4­8 September 2012 9. ECAI 2012, 20th European Conference European Conference on Logics in Artificial Intelligence Helsinki, Finland, 13­15 September 2010 18. COMMA

  18. Temperature and Scaling Studies from Projectile Fragmentation of 86,78Kr+64,58Ni at 35 MeV/A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuenschel, Sara K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    reconstruction in both charge and mass. A new thermometer for nuclear fragmentation studies has been derived and is presented here. In this thermometer, the temperature is obtained from fluctuations of the transverse momentum. The proton transverse momentum...

  19. {yjoh, jmcho, jbyoo, sdcha}@salmosa.kaist.ac.kr A Technique to Specify and Analyze Reactive and Real-Time Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Abstract Writing requirements in formal notation for a safety-critical system can improve software quality propose a formal specification approach used to describe the nuclear control system. The approach is based

  20. Extended version of paper in KR-2010 NYU CIMS Technical Report: TR2010-926 The Temporal Logic of Token Causes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Bud

    to determine what is responsible for a pa- tient's symptoms, why a stock plummeted in value, or the reason the type-level relationship has been instantiated and take into account that we may wish to also assess

  1. A Finite Volume Approach For Contingent Claims R. Zvan \\Lambda , P.A. Forsyth y , and K.R. Vetzal z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    A Finite Volume Approach For Contingent Claims Valuation R. Zvan \\Lambda , P.A. Forsyth y , and K presents a nonconservative finite volume approach for solving two­ dimensional contingent claims valuation problems. The finite volume method is more flexible than finite difference schemes which are often

  2. Temperature and Scaling Studies from Projectile Fragmentation of 86,78Kr+64,58Ni at 35 MeV/A. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wuenschel, Sara K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many observables have been developed to study the effects of the two component nature of nuclei. This dissertation has experimentally probed caloric curves as well as scaling observables for their dependence on the asymmetric portion of the nuclear...

  3. Received January 1978; revised October 1979; accepted December 1. Avery, K.R., and Avery, C.A. Design and development of an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraser, Christopher W.

    language. Proc. Amer. Statistical Assn., Statistical Comptg. Section, 1976, pp. 126-129. 5. Buchness, R the DATATRAN language. Proc. Comptr. Sci. and Statistics: 10th Ann. Symp. on the Interface, Nat. Bureau, Calif., 1980. 14. Ling, R.F. Constraints in the design and implementation of interactive statistical

  4. Near-Intrinsic Energy Resolution for 30 to 662 keV Gamma Rays in a High Pressure Xenon Electroluminescent TPC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Català, J.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for neutrinoless double beta decay, Riv. NuovoSearch for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in Xe Xe with EXO-

  5. Department of Industrial and Management Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Wokyung

    @postech.ac.kr 054-279-2195 Purdue Univ., Ph.D. /, kjk@postech.ac.kr 054-279-2208 Rensselaer Polytechnic Ins

  6. DESY 93137 ISSN 04189833 October 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Korn 8 , P. Kostka 33 , S.K. Kotelnikov 24 , M.W. Krasny 6;28 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 2 , U. Kr

  7. DESY 99094 ISSN 04189833 Forward Meson Production at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .W. Krasny 28 , H. Krehbiel 10 , J. Kroseberg 36 , D. KrË?ucker 37 , K. KrË?uger 10 , A. KË?upper 33 , T. Kuhr

  8. DESY 00085 ISSN 04189833 Inclusive Photoproduction of Neutral Pions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , M.W. Krasny 28 , H. Krehbiel 10 , J. Kroseberg 37 , D. KrË?ucker 38 , K. KrË?uger 10 , A. KË?upper 33

  9. Does socioeconomic disparity in cancer incidence vary across racial/ethnic groups?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Daixin; Morris, Cyllene; Allen, Mark; Cress, Rosemary; Bates, Janet; Liu, Lihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bauer KR, Brown M, Cress RD, Parise CA, Caggiano V (2007)M, Tsodikov A, Bauer KR, Parise CA, Caggiano V (2008) The

  10. Actinide Production in the Reaction of Heavy Ions withCurium-248

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, K.J.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical experiments were performed to examine the usefulness of heavy ion transfer reactions in producing new, neutron-rich actinide nuclides. A general quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic mechanism is proposed, and the utility of this method as opposed to other methods (e.g. complete fusion) is discussed. The relative merits of various techniques of actinide target synthesis are discussed. A description is given of a target system designed to remove the large amounts of heat generated by the passage of a heavy ion beam through matter, thereby maximizing the beam intensity which can be safely used in an experiment. Also described is a general separation scheme for the actinide elements from protactinium (Z = 91) to mendelevium (Z = 101), and fast specific procedures for plutonium, americium and berkelium. The cross sections for the production of several nuclides from the bombardment of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 18}O, {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Xe projectiles at several energies near and below the Coulomb barrier were determined. The results are compared with yields from {sup 48}Ca and {sup 238}U bombardments of {sup 248}Cm. Simple extrapolation of the product yields into unknown regions of charge and mass indicates that the use of heavy ion transfer reactions to produce new, neutron-rich above-target species is limited. The substantial production of neutron-rich below-target species, however, indicates that with very heavy ions like {sup 136}Xe and {sup 238}U the new species {sup 248}Am, {sup 249}Am and {sup 247}Pu should be produced with large cross sections from a {sup 248}Cm target. A preliminary, unsuccessful attempt to isolate {sup 247}Pu is outlined. The failure is probably due to the half life of the decay, which is calculated to be less than 3 minutes. The absolute gamma ray intensities from {sup 251}Bk decay, necessary for calculating the {sup 251}Bk cross section, are also determined.

  11. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Nicolas R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, Troy [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, Mitchell [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jubin, Robert T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Strachan, Denis M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thallapally, Praveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing. These can evolve in volatile species in the reprocessing facility off-gas streams, depending on the separations and reprocessing technologies that are used. Radionuclides that have been identified as “volatile radionuclides” are noble gases (most notably isotopes of Kr and Xe); 3H; 14C; and 129I. Radionuclides that tend to form volatile species that evolve into reprocessing facility off-gas systems are more challenging to efficiently control compared to radionuclides that tend to stay in solid or liquid phases. Future used fuel reprocessing facilities in the United States can require efficient capture of some volatile radionuclides in their off-gas streams to meet regulatory emission requirements. In aqueous reprocessing, these radionuclides are most commonly expected to evolve into off-gas streams in tritiated water [3H2O (T2O) and 3HHO (THO)], radioactive CO2, noble gases, and gaseous HI, I2, or volatile organic iodides. The fate and speciation of these radionuclides from a non-aqueous fuel reprocessing facility is less well known at this time, but active investigations are in progress. An Off-Gas Sigma Team was formed in late FY 2009 to integrate and coordinate the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) activities directed towards the capture and sequestration of the these volatile radionuclides (Jubin 2012a). The Sigma Team concept was envisioned to bring together multidisciplinary teams from across the DOE complex that would work collaboratively to solve the technical challenges and to develop the scientific basis for the capture and immobilization technologies such that the sum of the efforts was greater than the individual parts. The Laboratories currently participating in this effort are Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). This article focuses on control of volatile radionuclides that evolve during aqueous reprocessing of UNF. In particular, most of the work by the Off-gas Sigma Team has focused on the capture and sequestration of 129I and 85Kr, mainly because, as discussed below, control of 129I can require high efficiencies to meet regulatory requirements, and control of 85Kr using cryogenic processing, which has been the technology demonstrated and used commercially to date, can add considerable cost to a reprocessing facility.

  12. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Treatment of high-level wastes from the IFR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, T.R.; Lewis, M.A.; Newman, A.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is being developed as a future commercial power source that promises to have important advantages over present reactors, including improved resource conservation and waste management. The spent metal alloy fuels from an IFR will be processed in an electrochemical cell operating at 500{degree}C with a molten chloride salt electrolyte and cadmium metal anode. After the actinides have been recovered from several batches of core and blanket fuels, the salt cadmium in this electrorefiner will be treated to separate fission products from residual transuranic elements. This treatment produces a waste salt that contains the alkali metal, alkaline earth, and halide fission products; some of the rare earths; and less than 100 nCi/g of alpha activity. The treated metal wastes contain the rest of the fission products (except T, Kr, and Xe) small amounts of uranium, and only trace amounts of transuranic elements. The current concept for the salt waste form is an aluminosilicate matrix, and the concept for the metal waste form is a corrosion-resistant metal alloy. The processes and equipment being developed to treat and immobilize the salt and metal wastes are described.

  14. Treatment of high-level wastes from the IFR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, T.R.; Lewis, M.A.; Newman, A.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is being developed as a future commercial power source that promises to have important advantages over present reactors, including improved resource conservation and waste management. The spent metal alloy fuels from an IFR will be processed in an electrochemical cell operating at 500{degree}C with a molten chloride salt electrolyte and cadmium metal anode. After the actinides have been recovered from several batches of core and blanket fuels, the salt cadmium in this electrorefiner will be treated to separate fission products from residual transuranic elements. This treatment produces a waste salt that contains the alkali metal, alkaline earth, and halide fission products; some of the rare earths; and less than 100 nCi/g of alpha activity. The treated metal wastes contain the rest of the fission products (except T, Kr, and Xe) small amounts of uranium, and only trace amounts of transuranic elements. The current concept for the salt waste form is an aluminosilicate matrix, and the concept for the metal waste form is a corrosion-resistant metal alloy. The processes and equipment being developed to treat and immobilize the salt and metal wastes are described.

  15. Advancement of isotope separation for the production of reference standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared Horkley; Christopher McGrath; Andrew Edwards; Gaven Knighton; Kevin Carney; Jacob Davies; James Sommers; Jeffrey Giglio

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) operates a mass separator that is currently producing high purity isotopes for use as internal standards for high precision isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In 2008, INL began the revival of the vintage 1970’s era instrument. Advancements thus far include the successful upgrading and development of system components such as the vacuum system, power supplies, ion-producing components, and beam detection equipment. Progress has been made in the separation and collection of isotopic species including those of Ar, Kr, Xe, Sr, and Ba. Particular focuses on ion source improvements and developments have proven successful with demonstrated output beam currents of over 10 micro-amps 138Ba and 350nA 134Ba from a natural abundance source charge (approximately 2.4 percent 134Ba). In order to increase production and collection of relatively high quantities (mg levels) of pure isotopes, several advancements have been made in ion source designs, source material introduction, and beam detection and collection. These advancements and future developments will be presented.

  16. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  17. Theoretical direct WIMP detection rates for transitions to nuclear excited states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergados, J D; Pirinen, P; Srivastava, P C; Kortelainen, M; Suhonen, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent WMAP and Planck data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Many extensions of the standard model provide dark matter candidates, in particular Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Thus the direct dark matter detection is central to particle physics and cosmology. Most of the research on this issue has hitherto focused on the detection of the recoiling nucleus. In this paper we study transitions to the excited states, possible in some nuclei, which have sufficiently low lying excited states. Examples considered previously were the first excited states of $^{127}$I and $^{129}$Xe. We examine here $^{83}$Kr, which offers some kinematical advantages and is currently considered as a possible target. We find appreciable branching ratios for the inelastic scattering mediated by the spin cross sections, with an inelastic event rate of $4.4\\times 10^{-4}$kg$^{-1}$d$^{-1}$. So, the extra signature of the gamma ra...

  18. Heavy Residue Isoscaling as a Probe of the Symmetry Energy of Hot Fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Souliotis; D. V. Shetty; A. Keksis; E. Bell; M. Jandel; M. Veselsky; S. J. Yennello

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The isoscaling properties of isotopically resolved projectile residues from peripheral collisions of 86Kr (25 MeV/nucleon), 64Ni (25 MeV/nucleon) and 136Xe (20 MeV/nucleon) beams on various target pairs are employed to probe the symmetry energy coefficient of the nuclear binding energy. The present study focuses on heavy projectile fragments produced in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions near the onset of multifragment emission E*/A = 2-3 MeV). For these fragments, the measured average velocities are used to extract excitation energies. The excitation energies, in turn, are used to estimate the temperatures of the fragmenting quasiprojectiles in the framework the Fermi gas model. The isoscaling analysis of the fragment yields provided the isoscaling parameters "alpha" which, in combination with temperatures and isospin asymmetries provided the symmetry energy coefficient of the nuclear binding energy of the hot fragmenting quasiprojectiles. The extracted values of the symmetry energy coefficient at this excitation energy range (2-3 MeV/nucleon) are lower than the typical liquid-drop model value ~25 MeV corresponding to ground-state nuclei and show a monotonic decrease with increasing excitation energy. This result is of importance in the formation of hot nuclei in heavy-ion reactions and in hot stellar environments such as supernova.

  19. Improved Ion Resistance for III-V Photocathodes in High Current Guns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulhollan, Gregory, A.

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The two photocathode test systems were modified, baked and recommissioned. The first system was dedicated to ion studies and the second to electron stimulated recovery (ESR) work. The demonstration system for the electron beam rejuvenation was set up, tested and demonstrated to one of the SSRL team (Dr. Kirby) during a site visit. The requisite subsystems were transferred to SSRL, installed and photoemission studies conducted on activated surfaces following electron beam exposure. Little surface chemistry change was detected in the photoemission spectra following the ESR process. The yield mapping system for the ion (and later, the electron beam rejuvenation) studies was implemented and use made routine. Ion species and flux measurements were performed for H, He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe ions at energies of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kV. Gas induced photoyield measurements followed each ion exposure measurement. These data permit the extraction of photoyield induced change per ion (by species) at the measured energies. Electron beam induced rejuvenation was first demonstrated in the second chamber with primary electron beam energy and dependency investigations following. A Hiden quadrupole mass spectrometer for the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) measurements was procured. The UHV test systems needed for subsequent measurements were configured, baked, commissioned and utilized for their intended purposes. Measurements characterizing the desorption products from the ESD process and secondary electron (SE) yield at the surfaces of negative electron affinity GaAs photocathodes have been performed. One US Utility Patent was granted covering the ESR process.

  20. Electronic temperatures, densities, and plasma x-ray emission of a 14.5 GHz electron-cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumberidze, A.; Szabo, C. I.; Indelicato, P.; Isac, J.-M.; Le Bigot, E.-O. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6 Case 74, 4, Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Trassinelli, M.; Adrouche, N.; Haranger, F.; Lamour, E.; Merot, J.; Prigent, C.; Rozet, J.-P.; Vernhet, D. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a systematic study of the bremsstrahlung emission from the electrons in the plasma of a commercial 14.5 GHz electron-cyclotron resonance ion source. The electronic spectral temperature and the product of ionic and electronic densities of the plasma are measured by analyzing the bremsstrahlung spectra recorded for several rare gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) as a function of the injected power. Within our uncertainty, we find an average temperature of {approx_equal}48 keV above 100 W, with a weak dependency on the injected power and gas composition. Charge state distributions of extracted ion beams have been determined as well, providing a way to disentangle the ionic density from the electronic density. Moreover x-ray emission from highly charged argon ions in the plasma has been observed with a high-resolution mosaic-crystal spectrometer, demonstrating the feasibility for high-precision measurements of transition energies of highly charged ions, in particular, of the magnetic dipole (M1) transition of He-like of argon ions.

  1. Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) Furnace for Post-Irradiation Heating Tests of VHTR Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A Demkowicz; Paul Demkowicz; David V Laug

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract –Fuel irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination are currently in progress as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Fuels Development and Qualification Program. The PIE campaign will include extensive accident testing of irradiated very high temperature reactor fuel compacts to verify fission product retention characteristics at high temperatures. This work will be carried out at both the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, beginning with accident tests on irradiated fuel from the AGR-1 experiment in 2010. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested at INL to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000°C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, Eu, and I) and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  2. Bose-Einstein correlations in hadron-pairs from lepto-production on nuclei ranging from hydrogen to xenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HERMES Collaboration; A. Airapetian; N. Akopov; Z. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; W. Augustyniak; R. Avakian; A. Avetissian; E. Avetisyan; S. Belostotski; N. Bianchi; H. P. Blok; A. Borissov; V. Bryzgalov; J. Burns; M. Capiluppi; G. P. Capitani; E. Cisbani; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; W. Deconinck; R. De Leo; E. De Sanctis; M. Diefenthaler; P. Di Nezza; M. Düren; G. Elbakian; F. Ellinghaus; E. Etzelmüller; R. Fabbri; A. Fantoni; L. Felawka; S. Frullani; G. Gapienko; V. Gapienko; J. Garay García; F. Garibaldi; G. Gavrilov; V. Gharibyan; F. Giordano; S. Gliske; M. Hartig; D. Hasch; Y. Holler; I. Hristova; Y. Imazu; A. Ivanilov; H. E. Jackson; S. Joosten; R. Kaiser; G. Karyan; T. Keri; E. Kinney; A. Kisselev; V. Korotkov; V. Kozlov; P. Kravchenko; V. G. Krivokhijine; L. Lagamba; L. Lapikás; I. Lehmann; P. Lenisa; A. López Ruiz; W. Lorenzon; X. -G. Lu; B. -Q. Ma; D. Mahon; N. C. R. Makins; Y. Mao; B. Marianski; A. Martinez de la Ossa; H. Marukyan; Y. Miyachi; A. Movsisyan; M. Murray; A. Mussgiller; E. Nappi; Y. Naryshkin; A. Nass; M. Negodaev; W. -D. Nowak; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Perez-Benito; A. Petrosyan; P. E. Reimer; A. R. Reolon; C. Riedl; K. Rith; G. Rosner; A. Rostomyan; J. Rubin; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Salomatin; A. Schäfer; G. Schnell; B. Seitz; T. -A. Shibata; V. Shutov; M. Stahl; M. Stancari; M. Statera; J. J. M. Steijger; S. Taroian; A. Terkulov; R. Truty; A. Trzcinski; M. Tytgat; Y. Van Haarlem; C. Van Hulse; D. Veretennikov; V. Vikhrov; I. Vilardi; S. Wang; S. Yaschenko; Z. Ye; S. Yen; B. Zihlmann; P. Zupranski

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bose-Einstein correlations of like-sign charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic electron and positron scattering are studied in the HERMES experiment using nuclear targets of $^1$H, $^2$H, $^3$He, $^4$He, N, Ne, Kr, and Xe. A Gaussian approach is used to parametrize a two-particle correlation function determined from events with at least two charged hadrons of the same sign charge. This correlation function is compared to two different empirical distributions that do not include the Bose-Einstein correlations. One distribution is derived from unlike-sign hadron pairs, and the second is derived from mixing like-sign pairs from different events. The extraction procedure used simulations incorporating the experimental setup in order to correct the results for spectrometer acceptance effects, and was tested using the distribution of unlike-sign hadron pairs. Clear signals of Bose-Einstein correlations for all target nuclei without a significant variation with the nuclear target mass are found. Also, no evidence for a dependence on the invariant mass W of the photon-nucleon system is found when the results are compared to those of previous experiments.

  3. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  4. Deposition of refractory metal films by rare-gas halide laser photodissociation of metal carbonyls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, D.K.; Steinfeld, J.I.; Sethi, D.S.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Films of Cr, Mo, and W on quartz, Pyrex, Suprasil, and Al substrates were deposited by photodissociation of the respective hexacarbonyls using focused and pulsed radiation from rare-gas halide lasers. Cr was deposited by dissociation of Cr(CO)/sub 6/ using XeF (308 nm), KrF (249 nm), and ArF (193 nm) lasers. Mo and W were deposited from their respective hexacarbonyls at 249 and 193 nm. Pulse energies varied between 8 and 12 mJ. Pulse rates of 10--60 Hz were used. The pulse duration was about 10 ns. Depositions with substrates both parallel and perpendicular to the excimer radiation were attempted. Only in the case of perpendicular configuration were strongly adherent films observed. The deposition rates for thicknesses up to 3000 A appeared to be independent of the pulse rate for all three metals. The films exhibited strong adhesion to the substrate. Scanning electron microscope photographs of the films revealed the presence of continuous metal layers. Auger and x-ray analyses of the films indicated contamination from carbon and oxygen. The source of these impurities is most likely to be CO produced in the decarbonylation of the parent hexacarbonyl. Adhesion to the substrate is apparently enhanced by laser stimulated generation of strong binding sites on the surface.

  5. Excitation and emission spectra of rubidium in rare-gas thin-films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilja Gerhardt; Brian Sin; Takamasa Momose

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the optical properties of atoms in solid state matrices, the absorption, excitation and emission spectra of rubidium doped thin-films of argon, krypton and xenon were investigated in detail. A two-dimensional spectral analysis extends earlier reports on the excitation and emission properties of rubidium in rare-gas hosts. We found that the doped crystals of krypton and xenon exhibit a simple absorption-emission relation, whereas rubidium in argon showed more complicated spectral structures. Our sample preparation employed in the present work yielded different results for the Ar crystal, but our peak positions were consistent with the prediction based on the linear extrapolation of Xe and Kr data. We also observed a bleaching behavior in rubidium excitation spectra, which suggests a population transfer from one to another spectral feature due to hole-burning. The observed optical response implies that rubidium in rare-gas thin-films is detectable with extremely high sensitivity, possibly down to a single atom level, in low concentration samples.

  6. Saturn's internal structure and carbon enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Yann Alibert; Willy Benz

    2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the clathrate hydrate trapping theory to calculate the enrichments in O, N, S, Xe, Ar and Kr compared to solar in Saturn's atmosphere. For this, we calibrate our calculations using two different carbon abundance determinations that cover the domain of measurements published in the last decades: one derived from the NASA $Kuiper$ Airborne Observatory measurements and the other obtained from the Cassini spacecraft observations. We show that these two different carbon abundances imply quite a different minimum heavy element content for Saturn. Using the Kuiper Airborne Observatory measurement for calibration, the amount of ices accreted by Saturn is found to be consistent with current interior models of this planet. On the other hand, using the Cassini measurement for calibration leads to an ice content in the planet's envelope which is higher than the one derived from the interior models. In this latter case, reconciling the interior models with the amount of C measured by the Cassini spacecraft requires that significant differential sedimentation of water and volatile species have taken place in Saturn's interior during its lifetime.

  7. Hadron attenuation in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation of hadron attenuation in deep inelastic scattering off complex nuclei in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment. The analysis is carried out in the framework of a probabilistic coupled-channel transport model based on the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, which allows for a treatment of the final-state interactions beyond simple absorption mechanisms. Furthermore, our event-by-event simulations account for the kinematic cuts of the experiments as well as the geometrical acceptance of the detectors. We calculate the multiplicity ratios of charged hadrons for various nuclear targets relative to deuterium as a function of the photon energy {nu}, the hadron energy fraction z{sub h}=E{sub h}/{nu}, and the transverse momentum p{sub T}. We also confront our model results on double-hadron attenuation with recent experimental data. Separately, we compare the attenuation of identified hadrons ({pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and p) on {sup 20}Ne and {sup 84}Kr targets with the data from the HERMES Collaboration and make predictions for a {sup 131}Xe target. At the end we turn towards hadron attenuation on {sup 63}Cu nuclei at EMC energies. Our studies demonstrate that (pre-)hadronic final-state interactions play a dominant role in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment while our present approach overestimates the attenuation at EMC energies.

  8. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K. [Reactor Safety and Analysis, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Nabhkiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai Maharashtra 400094 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  9. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 3, Inorganic instrumental methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods cover: C in solutions, F (electrode), elements by atomic emission spectrometry, inorganic anions by ion chromatography, Hg in water/solids/sludges, As, Se, Bi, Pb, data calculations for SST (single shell tank?) samples, Sb, Tl, Ag, Pu, O/M ratio, ignition weight loss, pH value, ammonia (N), Cr(VI), alkalinity, U, C sepn. from soil/sediment/sludge, Pu purif., total N, water, C and S, surface Cl/F, leachable Cl/F, outgassing of Ge detector dewars, gas mixing, gas isotopic analysis, XRF of metals/alloys/compounds, H in Zircaloy, H/O in metals, inpurity extraction, reduced/total Fe in glass, free acid in U/Pu solns, density of solns, Kr/Xe isotopes in FFTF cover gas, H by combustion, MS of Li and Cs isotopes, MS of lanthanide isotopes, GC operation, total Na on filters, XRF spectroscopy QC, multichannel analyzer operation, total cyanide in water/solid/sludge, free cyanide in water/leachate, hydrazine conc., ICP-MS, {sup 99}Tc, U conc./isotopes, microprobe analysis of solids, gas analysis, total cyanide, H/N{sub 2}O in air, and pH in soil.

  10. First Results from XENON100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    (Columbia): First Results from XENON100 11 Design for Electric Field · hexagonal electrode meshes · cathode-13 irrelevant · but 85Kr beta decays (687keV), natural abundance 85Kr/Kr ~ 10-11 · use dedicated distillation column to get Kr to ~100ppt level The Other Noble Gas in Xenon Firestone #12;Rafael F. Lang (Columbia

  11. Curcumin-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles Coating onto Metal Stent by EPD Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2007, Vol. 28, No. 3 397 Curcumin-Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    @plaza.snu.ac.kr Received December 4, 2006 Restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) continues

  12. Development of a small selenium barrier layer photovoltaic cell 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruett, George Richard

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +lkt Rfl&t4 ~ + ~ ~ ~ s ~ s ~ o ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ I PO4NNQ QLffOWOO 1ORWQO j1388$44@4El ~ ~ ~ o ~ o ~ RI04INRRRli 7OSIIS QXQ4%~ ~ 8 0 I ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 0 The ~oct af this Qaeestiguticu uus te develop a uotbcd by shish a osaXX selsakuu barbar Xsyer photovoltaic... cell night be undo sith a high degree uf reprccbccibility, This prost uus chosen because u ssoXX ooll could nct bo obtained frsn o~tuX firnoo snd these fiona guard the secrete of tho prcchetkoa of the photovoltaic ceXX very null Photovoltaic oa...

  13. Development of a small selenium barrier layer photovoltaic cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruett, George Richard

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +lkt Rfl&t4 ~ + ~ ~ ~ s ~ s ~ o ~ ~ ~ I ~ ~ I PO4NNQ QLffOWOO 1ORWQO j1388$44@4El ~ ~ ~ o ~ o ~ RI04INRRRli 7OSIIS QXQ4%~ ~ 8 0 I ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 0 The ~oct af this Qaeestiguticu uus te develop a uotbcd by shish a osaXX selsakuu barbar Xsyer photovoltaic... cell night be undo sith a high degree uf reprccbccibility, This prost uus chosen because u ssoXX ooll could nct bo obtained frsn o~tuX firnoo snd these fiona guard the secrete of tho prcchetkoa of the photovoltaic ceXX very null Photovoltaic oa...

  14. Xe films on a decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystalline surface Wahyu Setyawan,1 Nicola Ferralis,2 Renee D. Diehl,2 Milton W. Cole,2 and Stefano Curtarolo1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    D. Diehl,2 Milton W. Cole,2 and Stefano Curtarolo1, * 1Department of Mechanical Engineering 2005; revised manuscript received 9 May 2006; published 28 September 2006 The grand canonical Monte of the decagonal Al73Ni10Co17 quasicrystal QC using the grand canonical Monte Carlo sim

  15. De Mey, P., P. Craig, F. Davidson, C.A. Edwards, Y. Ishikawa, J.C. Kindle, R. Proctor, K.R. Thompson, J. Zhu, and the GODAE Coastal and Shelf Seas Working Group (CSSWG) Community.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , reduction in the abundance of exploitable living marine resources, and public health problems associated), numerical modeling and prediction in coastal and shelf seas benefited from development of state, harmful algal blooms, beach erosion · Maritime safety and efficiency: iceberg drift, search and rescue

  16. DESY 98--210 ISSN 0418--9833 December 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .W. Krasny 29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. KrË?ucker 26 , K. KrË?uger 11 , A. KË?upper 34 , H. KË?uster 2 , M. Kuhlen 26

  17. DESY 97098 hepex/9706002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27

  18. DESY 96215 hepex/9610006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27

  19. DESY 96215 ISSN 04189833 October 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , H. K¨uster 22 , M. Kuhlen

  20. DESY 97082 hepex/9705014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , A. K¨upper 35 , H. K¨uster 22

  1. DESY 97164 ISSN 04189833 Measurement of the Inclusive DiJet Cross Section in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , A. K¨upper 35 , H

  2. DESY 97179 ISSN 04189833 Low Q 2 Jet Production at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , A. K¨upper 35 , H

  3. DESY 98-169 ISSN 04189833 October 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¤¥¤ , P. Kostka % , S.K. Kotelnikov ¥ , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper ¢ , M.W. Krasny ¥§¦ , H. Krehbiel ¤¥¤ , D. Kr

  4. DESY 97042 ISSN 04189833 A Measurement of the Proton Structure Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , A. K¨upper 35 , H

  5. DESY 98092 ISSN 0418-9833 August 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper8 , M.W. Krasny28 , H. Krehbiel10 , D. Kr¨ucker25 , A. K¨upper34 , H. K¨uster20 , M

  6. DESY 99-126 Measurement of Open Beauty Production at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .W. Krasny ¢ , H. Krehbiel VdP , J. Kroseberg S , D. Kr¨ucker GW , K. Kr¨uger V P , A. K¨upper £ , T. Kuhr V

  7. DESY 98087 ISSN 04189833 MultiJet Event Rates in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kostka 35 , S.K. Kotelnikov 25 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 26

  8. DESY 98063 ISSN 04189833 Observation of Events with an Isolated High Energy Lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . KrË?amerkË?amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. KrË?ucker 26 , A. KË?upper 34 , H. KË?uster 21

  9. DESY 99010 ISSN 04189833 February 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .W. Krasny 29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. KrË?ucker 26 , K. KrË?uger 11 , A. KË?upper 34 , H. KË?uster 2 , M. Kuhlen 26

  10. DESY 97228 ISSN 04189833 Photoproduction of /(2S) Mesons at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , A. K¨upper 35 , H

  11. Inhaltsverzeichnis 2 Development of a device for experimental stent coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    , Guido Schropa, Jakob Krüger, Alexander Krump Purpose: The project describes the development process Bornmann, Guido Schropa, Jakob Krüger, Alexander Krump Aufgabenstellung: Die vorliegende Projektarbeit

  12. NITROGEN BALANCE IN INTENSIVE AGRICULTURE IN THE NORTH CHINA PLAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuming; Hu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Jiabao; Chen, Deli

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chen DL, White RE, Chalk PM, Heng LK, Fisher R, Helyar KR.NIAES , 1994. pp. 209-234. Heng LK, White RE, Helyar KR,water balance (SWB) model (Heng et al. 2001) were conducted.

  13. Quenching of krypton atoms in the metastable 5s ({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state in collisions with krypton and helium atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zayarnyi, D A; L'dov, A Yu; Kholin, I V [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the absorption probe method to study the processes of collisional quenching of the metastable 5s [3/2]{sup o}{sub 2}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state of the krypton atom in electron-beam-excited high-pressure He – Kr mixtures with a low content of krypton. The rate constants of plasma-chemical reactions Kr* + Kr + He ? Kr*{sub 2}+He [(2.88 ± 0.29) × 10{sup -33} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}], Kr* + 2He ? HeKr* + He [(4.6 ± 1.3) × 10{sup -36} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}] and Kr* + He ? products + He [(1.51 ± 0.15) × 10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}] are measured for the first time. The rate constants of similar reactions in the Ar – Kr mixture are refined. (active media)

  14. System size effects and N/Z dependence of balance energy for different isotopic series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aman D. Sood; Sakshi Gautam

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the N/Z dependence of energy of vanishing flow or balance energy for different isotopic series of various system masses like Ca+Ca, Ni+Ni, Zr+Zr, Sn+Sn and Xe+Xe. We find that balance energy decreases with N/Z of the system and follows a linear behaviour. The slope of N/Z dependence is steeper for lighter systems like Ca+Ca and less for heavier ones like Xe+Xe.

  15. CESM Tutorial NCAR Earth System Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannay, Cécile

    ­ NCAR IBM - titan ­ ORNL Cray XK6 - hopper ­ NERSC Cray XE6 - edison ­ NERSC Cray Cascade - bluewaters

  16. March 4, 2013 R&D towards large-liquid scintillator detectors and measurement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of experiments to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136 Xe. The first such experiment, known

  17. A class of ejecta transport test problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerberg, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buttler, William T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydro code implementations of ejecta dynamics at shocked interfaces presume a source distribution function ofparticulate masses and velocities, f{sub 0}(m, v;t). Some of the properties of this source distribution function have been determined from extensive Taylor and supported wave experiments on shock loaded Sn interfaces of varying surface and subsurface morphology. Such experiments measure the mass moment of f{sub o} under vacuum conditions assuming weak particle-particle interaction and, usually, fully inelastic capture by piezo-electric diagnostic probes. Recently, planar Sn experiments in He, Ar, and Kr gas atmospheres have been carried out to provide transport data both for machined surfaces and for coated surfaces. A hydro code model of ejecta transport usually specifies a criterion for the instantaneous temporal appearance of ejecta with source distribution f{sub 0}(m, v;t{sub 0}). Under the further assumption of separability, f{sub 0}(m,v;t{sub 0}) = f{sub 1}(m)f{sub 2}(v), the motion of particles under the influence of gas dynamic forces is calculated. For the situation of non-interacting particulates, interacting with a gas via drag forces, with the assumption of separability and simplified approximations to the Reynolds number dependence of the drag coefficient, the dynamical equation for the time evolution of the distribution function, f(r,v,m;t), can be resolved as a one-dimensional integral which can be compared to a direct hydro simulation as a test problem. Such solutions can also be used for preliminary analysis of experimental data. We report solutions for several shape dependent drag coefficients and analyze the results of recent planar dsh experiments in Ar and Xe.

  18. Modeling the Jovian subnebula: II - Composition of regular satellites ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Yann Alibert

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the evolutionary turbulent model of Jupiter's subnebula described by Alibert et al. (2005a) to constrain the composition of ices incorporated in its regular icy satellites. We consider CO2, CO, CH4, N2, NH3, H2S, Ar, Kr, and Xe as the major volatile species existing in the gas-phase of the solar nebula. All these volatile species, except CO2 which crystallized as a pure condensate, are assumed to be trapped by H2O to form hydrates or clathrate hydrates in the solar nebula. Once condensed, these ices were incorporated into the growing planetesimals produced in the feeding zone of proto-Jupiter. Some of these solids then flowed from the solar nebula to the subnebula, and may have been accreted by the forming Jovian regular satellites. We show that ices embedded in solids entering at early epochs into the Jovian subdisk were all vaporized. This leads us to consider two different scenarios of regular icy satellites formation in order to estimate the composition of the ices they contain. In the first scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals that have been produced in Jupiter's feeding zone without further vaporization, whereas, in the second scenario, icy satellites were accreted from planetesimals produced in the Jovian subnebula. In this latter case, we study the evolution of carbon and nitrogen gas-phase chemistries in the Jovian subnebula and we show that the conversions of N2 to NH3, of CO to CO2, and of CO to CH4 were all inhibited in the major part of the subdisk. Finally, we assess the mass abundances of the major volatile species with respect to H2O in the interiors of the Jovian regular icy satellites. Our results are then compatible with the detection of CO2 on the surfaces of Callisto and Ganymede and with the presence of NH3 envisaged in subsurface oceans within Ganymede and Callisto.

  19. Dissolver Off-gas Hot Operations Authorization (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The head-end processing of the Coupled-End-to-End (CETE) Demonstration includes fuel receipt, fuel disassembly, exposure of fuel (e.g., by segmenting the fuel pins), voloxidation of the fuel to separate tritium, and fuel dissolution. All of these processing steps with the exception of the dissolution step will be accomplished in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) (Building 3525). The final headend step will be performed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (Building 7920). The primary purpose of the fuel dissolution step is to prepare the solid fuel for subsequent liquid separations steps. This is accomplished by dissolving the fuel solids using nitric acid. During the dissolution process gases are evolved. Oxides of nitrogen are the primary off-gas components generated by the reactions of nitric acid and the fuel oxides however, during the dissolution and sparging of the resulting solution, iodine, C-14 as carbon dioxide, xenon, and krypton gasses are also released to the off-gas stream. The Dissolver Off-gas treatment rack provides a means of trapping these volatile fission products and other gases via various trapping media. Specifically the rack will recover iodine on a solid sorbent bed, scrub NOx in a water/acid column, scrub CO{sub 2} in a caustic scrubber column, remove moisture with solid sorbent drier beds and recover Xe and Kr using solid absorbent beds. The primary purpose of this experimental rack and the off-gas rack associated with the voloxidation equipment located at IFEL is to close the material balances around the volatile gases and to provide an understanding of the impacts of specific processing conditions on the fractions of the volatile components released from the various head-end processing steps.

  20. Method for introduction of gases into microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA); Rosencwaig, Allan (Danville, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing small hollow glass spheres filled with a gas by introduction of the gas during formation of the hollow glass spheres. Hollow glass microspheres having a diameter up to about 500.mu. with both thin walls (0.5 to 4.mu.) and thick walls (5 to 20.mu.) that contain various fill gases, such as Ar, Kr, Xe, Br, DT, H.sub.2, D.sub.2, He, N.sub.2, Ne, CO.sub.2, etc. in the interior thereof, can be produced by the diffusion of the fill gas or gases into the microsphere during the formation thereof from a liquid droplet of glass-forming solution. This is accomplished by filling at least a portion of the multiple-zone drop-furnace used in producing hollow microspheres with the gas or gases of interest, and then taking advantage of the high rate of gaseous diffusion of the fill gas through the wall of the gel membrane before it transforms into a glass microsphere as it is processed in the multiple-zone furnace. Almost any gas can be introduced into the inner cavity of a glass microsphere by this method during the formation of the microsphere provided that the gas is diffused into the gel membrane or microsphere prior to its transformation into glass. The process of this invention provides a significant savings of time and related expense of filling glass microspheres with various gases. For example, the time for filling a glass microballoon with 1 atmosphere of DT is reduced from about two hours to a few seconds.

  1. Sequestration of noble gases by H3+ in protoplanetary disks and outer solar system composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Francoise Pauzat; Yves Ellinger; Cecilia Ceccarelli

    2007-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the efficiency of the noble gases sequestration by the ion H3+ in the form of XH3+ complexes (with X = argon, krypton or xenon) in gas phase conditions similar to those encountered during the cooling of protoplanetary disks, at the epoch of icy planetesimals formation. We show that XH3+ complexes form very stable structures in the gas phase and that their binding energies are much higher than those involved in the structures of X-H2O hydrates or pure X-X condensates. This implies that, in presence of H3+ ions, argon, krypton or xenon are likely to remain sequestrated in the form of XH3+ complexes embedded in the gas phase rather than forming ices during the cooling of protoplanetary disks. The amount of the deficiency depends on how much H3+ is available and efficient in capturing noble gases. In the dense gas of the mid-plane of solar nebula, H3+ is formed by the ionization of H2 from energetic particles, as those in cosmic rays or those ejected by the young Sun. Even using the largest estimate of the cosmic rays ionization rate, we compute that the H3+ abundance is two and three orders of magnitude lower than the xenon and krypton abundance, respectively. Estimating the ionization induced by the young Sun, on the other hand, is very uncertain but leaves the possibility to have enough H3+ to make krypton and xenon trapping efficent. Finally, additional source of H3+ formation may be provided by the presence of a nearby supernova, as discussed in the literature. Recent solar system observations show a deficiency of Ar, and, even more, of Kr and Xe in Titan and in comets. In this article, we consider the possibility that this deficiency is caused by the afore-mentioned process, namely trapping of those noble gases by H3+ ions in the solar nebula.

  2. Solid Earth, 3, 5361, 2012 www.solid-earth.net/3/53/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    , The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA Correspondence to: K. Ramachandran (kr@utulsa.edu) Received: 17

  3. Krypton charge exchange cross sections for Hall effect thruster models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hause, Michael L. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02159 (United States); Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Following discharge from a Hall effect thruster, charge exchange occurs between ions and un-ionized propellant atoms. The low-energy cations produced can disturb operation of onboard instrumentation or the thruster itself. Charge-exchange cross sections for both singly and doubly charged propellant atoms are required to model these interactions. While xenon is the most common propellant currently used in Hall effect thrusters, other propellants are being considered, in particular, krypton. We present here guided-ion beam measurements and comparisons to semiclassical calculations for Kr{sup +} + Kr and Kr{sup 2+} + Kr cross sections. The measurements of symmetric Kr{sup +} + Kr charge exchange are in good agreement with both the calculations including spin-orbit effects and previous measurements. For the symmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr reaction, we present cross section measurements for center-of-mass energies between 1 eV and 300 eV, which spans energies not previously examined experimentally. These cross section measurements compare well with a simple one-electron transfer model. Finally, cross sections for the asymmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr {yields} Kr{sup +} + Kr{sup +} reaction show an onset near 12 eV, reaching cross sections near constant value of 1.6 A{sup 2} with an exception near 70-80 eV.

  4. -DNA 1217 BK21-IT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - DNA 1217 BK21-IT, (MEC) (NRL) . . : : : : syshin@bi.snu.ac.kr ihlee@bi.snu.ac.kr btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr 2004 9 16 2005 10 14 - DNA (DNA Sequence Design using -Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm) (Soo-Yong Shin) (In-Hee Lee) (Byoung-Tak Zhang) DNA

  5. CAMPUS LIFE w w w . d g i s t . a c . k r

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://ice.dgist.ac.kr 053)785-6301~3 http://robot.dgist.ac.kr 053)785-6201~3 http://energy.dgist.ac.kr 053)785-1942 · , · ·, ·· · 053)785-5131~2 ·, ·, · ·· ·· · · ·, , OT, · 053)785-5151~5 · 053)785-1161 · 053 & Technology 11 : · http://ems.dgist.ac.kr · http://ice.dgist.ac.kr · http://robot

  6. The Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinski, M. J. [Stanford University Physics Department, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The EXO Collaboration is actively pursuing both liquid-phase and gas-phase Xe detector technologies with scalability to the ton-scale. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe is especially attractive because of the possibility of tagging the resulting Ba daughter ion, eliminating all sources of background other than the two neutrino decay mode. EXO-200, the first phase of the project, is a liquid Xe time projection chamber with 200 kg of Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe. EXO-200, which does not include Ba-tagging, will begin taking data in 2009, with two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4x10{sup 25} years. This corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV.

  7. Distilling two-atom distance information from intensity-intensity correlation functions RID A-5077-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Jun-Tao; Evers, Joerg; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can express the steady state of the first- and second-order correlation functions of the radiation field as follows: DISTILLING TWO-ATOM DISTANCE INFORMATION? PHYSICAL REVIEW A 74, 043820 #1;2006#2; 043820-3 G#1;1#2;#1;R,t#2;SS = X + X#19; cos#1;k...R? ? r12#2; + iX#3; sin#1;kR? ? r12#2; , #1;29#2; and G#1;2#2;#1;R1,R2,#17;#2;SS = #3;X + X#19; cos#1;kR? 1 ? r12#2; + iX#3; sin#1;kR? 1 ? r12#2;#4;#3;X + X#19; cos#1;kR? 2 ? r12#2; + iX#3; sin#1;kR? 2 ? r12#2;#4; + #6; j=1 15 Pjeqj j#17;. #1;30#2...

  8. Higher dimensions Max flow min cut in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duval, Art

    -negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex is zero; and |xe| e. Value of flow is x0. Duval: net flow at each vertex is zero; and |xe| e. Value of flow is x0. Definition Cut is minimal set

  9. Higher dimensions Max flow min cut in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duval, Art

    , and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe| e. Value-negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex, except S and T, is zero; and |xe of flow xe (non-negative number, and direction) to each edge such that: net flow at each vertex is zero

  10. Presentation to National Academy IFE Comitttee 29 January 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to velocities of 300 km/sec Hot fuel Cold fuel Laser Power time foot drive DT ice ablator ~ 2 to 4 mm · Simple implosion Aspect ratio = diameter/wall thickness #12;KrF Light helps the target physics (2) · KrF has most-drive target designs 1.50 0.5 1 2 2.5 3 0 100 200 300 Target Gain Laser Energy (MJ) Shock ignition with Kr

  11. Data:50066cd6-6f0a-4736-abde-c337186047ff | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    xeRegulatoryRegulatory%20PDFsMeSection5.pdf https:www.xcelenergy.comAboutUsRates&RegulationsRates,Rights&ServiceRulesMNRegulatoryRatesandTariffs Source...

  12. Noble gases in the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindle, T.D. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA)); Garrison, D.H.; Hohenberg, C.M.; Nichols, R.H.; Olinger, C.T. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA)); Goswami, J.N. (Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of noble gases in whole rock samples of the howardites Bholghati and Kapoeta and grain-size separates of Kapoeta yield evidence for excesses of the Xe isotopes {sup 129}Xe, {sup 131}Xe, {sup 132}Xe, {sup 134}Xe, and {sup 136}Xe in a low-temperature component, similar to lunar excess fission Xe. Such a component may be able to provide chronometric information if the relative abundances of radioactive progenitors ({sup 129}I, {sup 244}Pu, and {sup 238}U) can be determined, but the isotopic spectra we obtain are not sufficiently precise to do so. Eucritic clast BH-5 in Bholghati contains Xe produced in situ by the decay of {sup 244}Pu. Calculated fission Xe retention ages are 30-70 Ma after the formation of the solar system, consistent with the apparent presence of {sup 146}Sm decay products. Both the clast and the matrix of Bholghati have K-Ar ages of about 2 Ga, suggesting a common thermal event at least that recently.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodson, B.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r I- t of silica aerogels by Xe-129 NMR spectroscopy andcatalysts, ceramics, aerogels, food products, and antiquatedxenon penetration within an aerogel sample as a function of

  14. Aerial Measurement of Radioxenon Concentration off the West Coast of Vancouver Island following the Fukushima Reactor Accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, L E; Fortin, R; Carson, J M; Saull, P R B; Coyle, M J; Van Brabant, R A; Buckle, J L; Desjardins, S M; Hall, R M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, on March 20th, 2011, Natural Resources Canada conducted aerial radiation surveys over water just off of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Dose-rate levels were found to be consistent with background radiation, however a clear signal due to Xe-133 was observed. Methods to extract Xe-133 count rates from the measured spectra, and to determine the corresponding Xe-133 volumetric concentration, were developed. The measurements indicate that Xe-133 concentrations on average lie in the range of 30 to 70 Bq/m3.

  15. assessing double acid-etched: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Xenon Time-Projection Chamber' (NEXT) is intended to investigate the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe, which requires a severe suppression of potential backgrounds;...

  16. Aerial Measurement of Radioxenon Concentration off the West Coast of Vancouver Island following the Fukushima Reactor Accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. E. Sinclair; H. C. J. Seywerd; R. Fortin; J. M. Carson; P. R. B. Saull; M. J. Coyle; R. A. Van Brabant; J. L. Buckle; S. M. Desjardins; R. M. Hall

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, on March 20th, 2011, Natural Resources Canada conducted aerial radiation surveys over water just off of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Dose-rate levels were found to be consistent with background radiation, however a clear signal due to Xe-133 was observed. Methods to extract Xe-133 count rates from the measured spectra, and to determine the corresponding Xe-133 volumetric concentration, were developed. The measurements indicate that Xe-133 concentrations on average lie in the range of 30 to 70 Bq/m3.

  17. Sieci bayesowskie w adaptacji i optymalizacji schematw zachowa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechler, Pawel

    . Rozdzial ten zawiera równie opis algorytmu Chena. W Rozdziale 3 mona znale krótkie podsumowanie wyników

  18. DESY 97108 ISSN 04189833 Evolution of ep Fragmentation and Multiplicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Korbel 11 , P. Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11

  19. DESY 97095 ISSN 04189833 Photoproduction of K 0 and \\Lambda at HERA and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , S.D. Kolya 23 , V. Korbel 11 , P. Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny

  20. DESY 94248 ISSN 04189833 December 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , M. Korn 8 , P. Kostka 35 , S.K. Kotelnikov 24 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H. Krehbiel

  1. DESY 98--204 ISSN 0418--9833 December 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Korbel 11 , P. Kostka 35 , S.K. Kotelnikov 25 , T. KrË?amerkË?amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 29 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D

  2. DESY 00-085 ISSN 0418-9833 Inclusive Photoproduction of Neutral Pions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Korbel10 , P. Kostka35 , S.K. Kotelnikov24 , M.W. Krasny28 , H. Krehbiel10 , J. Kroseberg37 , D. Kr

  3. DESY 96160 hepex/9608011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 , P. Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D.

  4. DESY 00187 ISSN 04189833 December 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 , M.W. Krasny 28 , H. Krehbiel 10 , J. Kroseberg 37 , K. KrË?uger 10 , A. KË?upper 33 , T. Kuhr 11

  5. DESY 99-094 ISSN 0418-9833 Forward -Meson Production at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Kostka ¢ , S.K. Kotelnikov% ¢ , M.W. Krasny% ¤ , H. Krehbiel ¥§¦ , J. Kroseberg , D. Kr¨ucker £ , K

  6. DESY 97082 ISSN 04189833 Proton Dissociative ae and Elastic OE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    23 , V. Korbel 11 , P. Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H

  7. hepex/9506001 DESY 95081 ISSN 04189833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , M. Korn 8 , P. Kostka 35 , S.K. Kotelnikov 24 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H. Krehbiel

  8. DESY 99-091 ISSN 0418-9833 Measurements of Transverse Energy Flow in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D. Kolya 21 , V. Korbel 10 , P. Kostka 34 , S.K. Kotelnikov 24 , T. Kramerkamper 7 , M.W. Krasny 28 , H

  9. array antenna applications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 182 EEL 4461 Antenna Systems 1. Catalog Description (3...

  10. adaptive antenna radio-fiber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 498 IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS, VOL. 13,...

  11. Coating af ventilationskomponenter PSO 338-080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ventilation, energiadfærd, energioptimering, vedligehold ISBN 87-991436-2-3 Pris Kr. 75,00 inkl. 25% moms

  12. Disparities in Emergency Department Quality of Care among Patients with and without Coronary Heart Disease Diagnoses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sammartinova, Jitka

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KR, Link CL, Grant RW, Marceau LD, McKinlay JB. Is certaintyNN, Link CL, Luftey KL, Marceau LD, McKinlay JB. Disparities

  13. Feasibility, reliability, and clinical validity of the Test of Attentional Performance for Children (KiTAP) in Fragile X syndrome (FXS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genet 2007, 144:517-532. 30. Van der Molen KJ, HuizingaM, Huizinga HM, Ridderinkhof KR, Van der Molen MW, Hamel BJ,

  14. antiguided vertical-cavity lasers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advantages for direct drive. KrFs demonstrated performance is competitive with solid state lasers as a high-rep-rate durable, efficient IFE driver. (on several important...

  15. addressable vertical-cavity laser: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advantages for direct drive. KrFs demonstrated performance is competitive with solid state lasers as a high-rep-rate durable, efficient IFE driver. (on several important...

  16. Koedinger, K.R., Pavlik, P., McLaren, B.M., & Aleven, V. (2008). Is it Better to Give than to Receive? The Assistance Dilemma as a Fundamental Unsolved Problem in the Cognitive Science of Learning and Instruction. In B. C. Love, K. McRae, & V. M. Sloutsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaren, Bruce Martin

    that we remain far from a precise and sound scientific response. We believe this "Assistance Dilemma-instruction measures: transfer, long-term retention, or accelerated future learning. Because time is so valuable that increases immediate performance or reduces mental effort. Thus, a change that may put greater demands

  17. Yager, P.L., R.M. Sherrell, S.E. Stammerjohn, A.-C. Alderkamp, O. Schofield, E.P. Abrahamsen, K.R. Arrigo, S. Bertilsson, D.L. Garay, R. Guerrero, K.E. Lowry, P.-O. Moksnes, K. Ndungu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for dramatic heat and air-sea gas exchange, greater light penetra- tion, and air-sea access for birds;Oceanography | September 2012 41 Sarmiento et al., 2004). The efficiency of the biological pump in high

  18. Reduced xenon diffusion for quantitative lung studythe role of SF6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Reduced xenon diffusion for quantitative lung studyĞthe role of SF6 Ross W. Mair,1 * Dominik, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), on 129 Xe NMR and diffusion. We found that the contribution of SF6 to 129 Xe T1 relaxation in a 1:1 xenon/oxygen mixture is negligible up to 2 bar of SF6 at standard temperature

  19. A ROBUST ABSOLUTE DETECTION EFFICIENCY CALIBRATION METHOD UTILIZING BETA/GAMMA COINCIDENCE SIGNATURES AND ISOTOPICALLY PURIFIED NEUTRON ACTIVATED RADIOXENON ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to calibrate the absolute efficiency of gas cell radiations detectors have utilized a number of methodologies which allow adequate calibration but are time consuming and prone to a host of difficult-to-determine uncertainties. A method that extrapolates the total source strength from the measured beta and gamma gated beta coincidence signal was developed in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It has become clear that it is possible to achieve more consistent results across a range of isotopes and a range of activities using this method. Even more compelling is the ease with which this process can be used on routine samples to determine the total activity present in the detector. Additionally, recent advances in the generation of isotopically pure radioxenon samples of Xe-131m, Xe-133, and Xe-135 have allowed these measurement techniques to achieve much better results than would have been possible before when using mixed isotopic radioxenon source. This paper will discuss the beta/gamma absolute detection efficiency technique that utilizes several of the beta-gamma decay signatures to more precisely determine the beta and gamma efficiencies. It will than compare these results with other methods using pure sources of Xe-133, Xe-131m, and Xe-135 and a Xe-133/Xe-133m mix.

  20. The role of lattice excitation in Si etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Michael Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemistries of fluorine, F?, and xenon difluoride, XeF?, with clean Si are basically the same, while their chemistries diverge dramatically past I ML F coverage. With a clean Si surface, F? and XeF? react utilizing an ...

  1. Two Dimensional Hybrid Model of a Miniaturized Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @laplace.univ-tlse.fr. § Research Physicist, PPPL, Princeton, yraitses@pppl.gov. ** Research Physicist, Tri Alpha Energy Inc experimentally has been carefully studied and can be attributed to double charged ions. The low energy ions voltage W = electron-wall effective energy loss coefficient x, r = axial, radial coordinate Xe+ , Xe2

  2. Electronic desorption of alkyl monolayers from silicon by very highly charged ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -assembled alkyl monolayers SAM on Si 111 .13 AFM images of SAMs after exposure to Xe41 and Au63 show craters ions, like Xe41 and Th73 . Atomic force microscope images show craters from single ion impacts be used to modify surfaces at very low impact energies. Impact energies are limited by the image charge

  3. FARADAY ROTATION, MAGNETIC FIELDS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backer, Don

    K xe ~ 104 ; Carbon+ { WPIM: T ~ 0.5 x 104 K xe ~ 0.1 ­ 0.9; Soft XR (from HIM), Stellar UV FIFTH GSR 238+00+09 Lindblad's Ring the Local Bubble Their observed properties differ enormously. Let

  4. Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, R.B.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

  5. Time-reversal invariance violation measurement using polarized neutron scattering from polarized xenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinghan Chu

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed to use polarized neutrons scattering from a hyperpolarized 131Xe gaseous target in order to measure time-reversal violation effect in baryon processes with nucleons. This article provides a brief introduction, historical review, and possible methods to construct a hyperpolarized 131Xe gaseous target.

  6. Thermodynamic Investigations of Aqueous Ternary Complexes for Am/Cm Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leggett, Christina Joy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rn]5f 6 7s 2 [Rn]5f 5 Europium [Xe]4f 7 6s 2 [Xe]4f 6Promethium Samarium Europium Gadolinium Terbium DysprosiumTable 3.1), and divalent europium and ytterbium have half-

  7. A Preliminary Experimental Study on Haptic Teleoperation of Mobile Robot with Variable Force Feedback Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    industrial constructions, etc. In all these application examples human-robot interfaces play the key role and its application for e-mail:ildar.info@gmail.com e-mail:jhryu@kut.ac.kr e-mail:robot@dgist.ac.kr O Y XA Preliminary Experimental Study on Haptic Teleoperation of Mobile Robot with Variable Force

  8. National Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Methane Hydrates Energy Storage · Nanoscale Electrode Materials for Batteries Energy Conversion potential to meet the IFE requirements Electra KrF Laser (NRL) = 248 nm (fundamental) Gas Laser Mercury target performance #12;What is a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) Laser? · Gas Laser--Excimer (Excited Dimer

  9. 11/6/2005 Copyright 2005 by Benjamin Grosof and Mike Dean. All Rights Reserved 1 WELCOME! to the ISWC-2005 Tutorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    · Overview and Get Acquainted A. Core -- KR Languages and Standards B. Tools -- SweetRules, Jena, cwm) Databases (SQL, XQuery, RDF) API's on Web (WSDL, SOAP) #12;11/6/2005 Copyright 2005 by Benjamin Grosof Dean. All Rights Reserved 6 Outline of Part A. A. Core -- KR Languages and Standards 1. Intro 2

  10. Transactions of the Korean Nuclear Society Autumn Meeting PyeongChang, Korea, October 25-26, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwangjo

    and Control Dept., Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, {k407kyd,dikim}@kins.re.kr *** Reactor Engineering Research Dept., Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, k148jch@kins.re.kr 1. Introduction Recently computers (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety). 2.1 Cyber Security and Security Policy Cyber security is a flexible

  11. Journal of Research and Practice in Information Technology, Vol. 42, No. 3, August 2010 255 FBDVerifier: Interactive and Visual Analysis of Counter-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : gypark@kaeri.re.kr Poonghyun Seong Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute Diagram Eunkyoung Jee1 Div. of Computer Science, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology University Republic of Korea Email: scha@korea.ac.kr Kwangyong Koh Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering

  12. A Bayesian Algorithm for In Vitro Molecular Evolution of Pattern Classifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the whole library of molecules a probabilistic pattern classification device. In this paper we develop}@bi.snu.ac.kr http://bi.snu.ac.kr/ Abstract. We use molecular computation to solve pattern classification problems. DNA molecules encode data items and the DNA library rep- resents the empirical probability

  13. SYSTEM FRAMEWORK AND ITS APPLICATION IN MOBILE RFID SERVICE NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    @security.re.kr + dhwon@security.re.kr Mobile RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) is a newly emerging technology which uses the mobile phone as an RFID reader with a wireless technology and provides new valuable services and wireless internet. UHF Mobile RFID technology is based on ISO/IEC 18000-6C can share UHF RFID tags used

  14. Effect of Grain Boundaries on Krypton Segregation Behavior in Irradiated Uranium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billy Valderrama; Lingfeng He; Hunter B. Henderson; Janne Pakarinen; Brian Jaques; Jian Gan; Darryl P. Butt; Todd R. Allen; Michele V. Manuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission products, such as krypton (Kr), are known to be insoluble within UO2, segregating towards grain boundaries, eventually leading to a lowering of the thermal conductivity and fuel swelling. Recent computational studies have identified that differences in grain boundary structure have a significant effect on the segregation behavior of fission products. However, experimental work supporting these simulations is lacking. Atom probe tomography was used to measure the Kr distribution across grain boundaries in UO2. Polycrystalline depleted-UO2 samples was irradiated with 0.7 and 1.8 MeV Kr-ions and annealed to 1000, 1300, and 1600°C for 1 hour to produce a Kr-bubble dominated microstructure. The results of this work indicate a strong dependence of Kr concentration as a function of grain boundary structure. Temperature also influences grain boundary chemistry with greater Kr concentration evident at higher temperatures, resulting in a reduced Kr concentration in the bulk. While Kr migration is active at elevated temperatures, no changes in grain size or texture were observed in the irradiated samples.

  15. Test of potential homogeneity in the KATRIN gaseous tritium source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rysavy

    2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    83mKr is supposed to be used to study the properties of the windowless gaseous tritium source of the experiment KATRIN. In this work we deduce the amount of 83mKr which is necessary to determine possible potential inhomogeneities via conversion-electron-line broadening.

  16. , Karinne Ramrez Amaro3 , Michael Beetz3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * 1 , 2 , 2 , Karinne Ramírez Amaro3 , Michael Beetz3 , 1,2 {cylee, jkim, eskim} @ bi.snu.ac.kr, ramirezk@in.tum.de, beetz@cs.tum.edu, btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr 1 , 2 , 3 Learning and Generation of Human 3 , Michael Beetz 3 , Byoung-Tak Zhang 1,2 1 Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Seoul

  17. Power-consumption minimization mechanism for heterogeneous multi-cell cellular network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @mmlab.snu.ac.kr, {tkkwon, yhchoi } @snu.ac.kr Abstract With growing concern of global warming, decreasing of CO2 emission. Introduction Many works point out that global warming is a major concern of modern world. The energy], Information and Communication Technology (ICT) causes about 2% of total CO2 emission of the world. Various

  18. Multi-piconet Formation to Increase Channel Utilization in IEEE 802.15.3 High-Rate WPAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tae-Jin

    .15.3 WPAN. 1 Introduction Recently, we have witnessed a noticeable increase of personal devices. The devices physical cables. Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPANs) can con- nect various personal devices within}@ece.skku.ac.kr {jsd, hslee75, tgkwon, chojw}@keti.re.kr Abstract. IEEE 802.15.3 high-rate Wireless Personal Area

  19. STM Tip Catalyzed Adsorption of Thiol Molecules at the Nanometer Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sehun

    .ac.kr; sehun-kim@kaist.ac.kr Abstract: The tungsten oxide covered tungsten (W) tip of a scanning tunneling is the critical functional group for this catalysis and the catalytic material is the tungsten oxide layer, for the delicate production and manipulation of molecular devices, the ability to site-selectively control adsorp

  20. Alternative Bench Standards: Sample Production Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. R. Mann; T. P. Houghton; M. G. Watrous; J. G. Eisenmenger; R. K. Hague

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL has prepared four standards representing krypton concentrations of 1.1X, 1.54X, 10X and 100X the reported atmospheric value of 70 dpm 85Kr per cubic centimeter of Kr gas at 25 degrees C (ie. 1.1X is 1.1 x 70, or 77 dpm 85Kr per cubic centimeter of Kr gas at 25 degrees C). A t-zero date and time of January 1, 2012 at 1200 Zulu was used for all standards. The Alternative Bench Standards (ABS) of 1.1X, 1.54X, 10X and 100X, are designated by titles of ABS-A, ABS-B, ABS C and ABS-D, respectively. The concentration of Kr in air is 1.14 ppm.

  1. Detection of high-energy heavy ions using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takechi, Seiji; Morinaga, Shin-ya; Kurozumi, Atsuma [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Murakami, Takeshi; Uchihori, Yukio [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co., Ltd., Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of a radiation detector fabricated with stacks of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) elements were studied by irradiating it with a 400 MeV/n xenon (Xe) beam for various beam pulse durations. This detector is referred to as the multilayered detector (MD). To understand the production mechanism behind the output voltage obtained from the MD, measurement of the spatial distribution of the output signals generated in the MD was attempted. It was found that the amplitude observed was dependent on the number of Xe ions per unit time and the amount of ionization loss energy of Xe ions in PZT.

  2. Adsorption of atmospheric organic pollutants by carbonaceous adsorbents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, James Bowlin McCoy

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) May 1981 ABSTRACT Adsorption of Atmospheric Organic Pollutants by Carbonaceous Adsorbents. (May 1981) James Bowlin McCoy Coley, B. S. , East Texas State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. S. Giam The adsorption of atmospheric.../80 mesh) Retention Data of Ethane on Ambersorb XE-348 (50/80 mesh) Retention Data of Propane on Ambersorb XE-348 (50/80 mesh) Specific Retention Volumes (V 's) at 25'C for the 8 30 33 34 37 Compounds Analyzed on Ambersorb XE-348 (50/80 mesh). 39...

  3. Bernoulli 16(4), 2010, 926952 DOI: 10.3150/09-BEJ244

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yimin

    (1997) proved that dimP X(E) = 1 H DimHd E a.s., (1.4) where dimP denotes packing dimension and Dims E

  4. Team Flag Football Golf Indoor Soccer Bowling Dodgeball FALL TOTAL Floor Hockey Basketball Outdoor Soccer Softball Kickball Spring Total Year End Total The Hot Mines Chicks 20 5 10 20 30 85 30 15 25 10 10 90 175

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redemption 2 10 10 0 10 umadbro? 10 10 0 10 Fish Tank 10 10 0 10 HIMYM 5 5 10 0 10 Sofa Kings XE 5 5 5 5 10

  5. Dielectronic Recombination Cross-Sections of Fluorinelike Xenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewitt, D. R.; Schneider, D.; Chen, M. H.; Schneider, M. B.; Church, David A.; Weinberg, G.; Sakurai, M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of relative dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections for fluorinelike xenon (Xe45+) are presented. Recombination takes place in an electron-beam ion trap, where decay rates are obtained as the ions recombine with beam electrons...

  6. Hopper Featured Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the file transfers. The xfer queue on Hopper is being implemented on a local batch server (hopper06), which is separate from the main batch server on the main Hopper XE. So...

  7. Negative continuum effects on the twophoton decay rates of hydrogenlike ions Andrey Surzhykov1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xe53+ and uranium U91+ ions. We found that for a correct evaluation of the total and energy of two­photon emission. To explore these effects, therefore, theoretical investigations based on Dirac

  8. 1349.ps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 14, 2006 ... is based on the well-known fact that k + |F| = n for every forest F of G ... If we replace the integrity constraints xe ? {0,1} by the trivial con-.

  9. Evidence for a narrow |S| =1 baryon state at a mass of 1528 MeV in quasireal photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scattered o# neutrons in a carbon nucleus. Both the mass of the particle and the width of the particle peak a 1986 data set from low­energy K + Xe collisions in a xenon bubble chamber. They also found evidence

  10. Optical Spectroscopy: Condensed Matter and Magnetic Science,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    633nm, 785nm, 1064nm, visible argon-ion lines, various NIR diode lines Xe lamp and tungsten blackbody lamp Acton 300i, 500i spectrometers Princeton Instruments backthinned...

  11. tamain_form_gulm.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TICS36;hexagons: FASA data34; squares: 32MeVu Xe+Sn INDRA data10 ; triangles: ISIS data13. This figure has been prepared by M. D'Agostino20, 39. 6 Charge or mass...

  12. Ab initio study of MXe{sub n}{sup +} (M=Cu, Ag, and Au; n=1,2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xinying; Cao Xue [School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, dissociation energies, and populations of the title species were studied at Hartree-Fock (HF), second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2), and coupled-cluster singles-doubles (triples) [CCSD(T)] levels. The electron correlation effects and relativistic effects on the geometry and stability were investigated at the CCSD(T) level. Both effects stabilize title species. The populations analyses show that M-Xe bonding is dominated by electrostatic interactions and the best theoretical estimate of the dissociation energies are 1.104 and 2.260 eV for AuXe{sup +} and AuXe{sub 2}{sup +}, respectively. The Cu and Ag are weakly bonded to Xe compared to Au.

  13. Nodal and anti-nodal quasiparticles in the CMR oxide (La,Sr)3Mn2O7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waals- Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, NL- 1081 XE Amsterdam, 2 BESSY spectroscopy (ARPES) at BESSY AB band 30 K (metallic state) 95 K (metallic) 145 K (insulator) 7

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Study of Collective Interaction Control...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the FEL of SCSS With the 13TH Laser Harmonic of a Ti: Sa Laser Produced in Xe Gas G. Lambert, T. Shintake, SPring-8RIKEN Concept Coherent Plasma Oscillation in a Drift Section...

  15. antimony 136: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    few compounds have been... Linder, Donald Ernst 1964-01-01 76 Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136 Xe with EXO-200 Physics Websites Summary: Search for Neutrinoless...

  16. annealing prototype demonstration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: NEXT-100 experiment aims at searching the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the Xe-136 isotope using a TPC filled with a 100 kg of high-pressure...

  17. DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201100129 GasSurface Interactions on Quasicrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    DOI: 10.1002/ijch.201100129 Gas­Surface Interactions on Quasicrystals Stefano Curtarolo,[a] Wahyu-energy electron dif- fraction (LEED) and grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) was performed for Xe adsorption

  18. Free-standing Al[subscript x]Ga[subscript 1?x]As heterostructures by gas-phase etching of germanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Garrett D.

    We outline a facile fabrication technique for the realization of free-standing Al[subscript x]Ga[subscript 1?x]As heterostructures of arbitrary aluminum content. Utilizing xenon difluoride (XeF[subscript 2]) we rapidly and ...

  19. A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER FOR PRODUCTION OF NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI ( 136 Xe Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's weekly \\Green Sheet," 30 July 1999 #12; c Thomas W. O'Donnell 2000 All

  20. astatine halides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as Ar Neumark, Daniel M. 378 May 1, 1989 Vol. 14, No. 9 OPTICS LETTERS 441 Solid-state XeF(D-X)laser at 286nm Chemistry Websites Summary: in excess of 6 cm- 1 ....

  1. actinium halides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as Ar Neumark, Daniel M. 413 May 1, 1989 Vol. 14, No. 9 OPTICS LETTERS 441 Solid-state XeF(D-X)laser at 286nm Chemistry Websites Summary: in excess of 6 cm- 1 ....

  2. MARMOT Enhanced

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To develop mechanistic models for fuel thermal conductivity, the Fuel team used supercells up to 55 nm long to determine the thermal conductivity of UO2 with Xe incorporated.

  3. Optimized Synthesis of an Orthogonally Protected Glucosamine SynthesisofanOrthogonallyProtectedGlucosamineJess M. Hernndez-Torres, Siong-Tern Liew, Jihane Achkar, Alexander Wei*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Alexander

    : 1437-210X,E;2002,0,04,0487,0490,ftx,en;M14101SS.pdf. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York ISSN preparation of monosaccharide precursors with orthogonal protecting group systems. Although nu- merous

  4. Trinity / NERSC-8 SSP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acquisitions is also available. Reference SSP The reference SSP calculation for the Trinity NERSC-8 benchmark suite on the NERSC CRAY XE6 "Hopper" system appears below. In the...

  5. the World Wide Web

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    W.J. Luckas and K.R. Perkins, Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1987. 36. H. George, "Control of Heavy Loads at Nuclear Power Plants," U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission,...

  6. Aerobic and Anaerobic Transformations of Pentachlorophenol in Wetland Soils Elisa M. D'Angelo* and K. R. Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    . of Agronomy, Univ. of Kentucky, N-122 Agricultural Sci. Bldg. North, Lexington, KY 40546-0091; and K.R. Reddy), availability of electron acceptors (Haggblom et al., 1993), electron donors (Ku- watsuka and Igarashi, 1975

  7. July/August 200412 21 (nanotechnology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Man

    , . (1999) , (1999- 2000) (2000-2001) , 2001 . (jimankim@ajou.ac.kr) Nanoporous Materials (Mesoporous Material) 1. . #12; July/August 2004 13 1 nm 30 nm . , .[3-6] . (nanochemistry) (nanotechnology), (supramolecular chemistry

  8. Characterization of the Biosynthetic Pathway of Fungal Aromatic Polyketides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yanran

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    act KR with the anthraquinone emodin and suggested that actacid 52 which is the anthraquinone precursor of the well-fren minimal PKS, the anthraquinone compound 63 is formed

  9. Laser development for laser fusion applications. Research progress report, October 1978-September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this report period, emphasis has been directed toward the advanced development of the HF, KrF, Se(/sup 1/S)-Se(/sup 3/P), and the chemically pumped iodine laser systems.

  10. Spin Out Company Petroc Technologies Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    of laboratory measurements, numerical reservoir simulation and mathematical modelling services. Petroc's history Permeability (kr) Measurement. 6 Sour gas (H2 S) EOR 7 Alkaline Surfactant Polymer (ASP) Flooding. Distinctly covered: · Petrophysics · Reservoir Studies · Carbon Dioxide Injection and Underground Storage · Numerical

  11. Simulation of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, T. J.

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [ K.?R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen ...

  12. DESY 94220 ISSN 04189833 November 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Korbel 11 , M. Korn 8 , P. Kostka 35 , S.K. Kotelnikov 24 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H

  13. DESY 98-063 ISSN 0418-9833 Observation of Events with an Isolated High Energy Lepton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .W. Krasny ¢¦© , H. Krehbiel §¨§ , D. Kr¨ucker ¢¦ , A. K¨upper ¡ , H. K¨uster ¢!§ , M. Kuhlen ¢¦ , T. Kurca

  14. hepex/9506002 DESY 95102 ISSN 04189833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Korbel 11 , M. Korn 8 , P. Kostka 35 , S.K. Kotelnikov 25 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;29 , H

  15. DESY 96163 ISSN 04189833 August 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;41 , S.D. Kolya 23 , V. Korbel 11 , P. Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny

  16. DESY 98029 ISSN 04189833 Hadron Production in Diffractive DeepInelastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .W. Krasny 30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , A. K¨upper 35 , H. K¨uster 22 , M. Kuhlen 27 , T. KurŸca 36

  17. DESY 98076 ISSN 04189833 Dijet Event Rates in DeepInelastic Scattering at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H. Krehbiel 11 , D. Kr¨ucker 27 , A. K¨upper 35 , H. K¨uster 22 , M. Kuhlen

  18. DESY 98210 ISSN 04189833 December 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Korbel ¤¥¤ , P. KostkaT ¡ , S.K. Kotelnikov( ¡ , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper ¢ , M.W. Krasny( £ , H. Krehbiel

  19. DESY 96224 ISSN 0418nnnn October 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .D. Kolya 23 , V. Korbel 11 , P. Kostka 36 , S.K. Kotelnikov 26 , T. Kr¨amerk¨amper 8 , M.W. Krasny 6;30 , H

  20. DESY-00-102 ISSN0418-9833 A SEARCH FOR EXCITED FERMIONS AT HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨©¨ , P. Kostka ¦ , S.K. Kotelnikov ¢£ , M.W. Krasny ¢¤§ , H. Krehbiel ¨¨ , J. Kroseberg ¥ , K. Kr

  1. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

  2. 4264 KOMPA, PARKER, AND PIMENTEL of the following reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    the HF kr/ko ratio and the DF k2/kl and kI/ko ratios to give a complete picture. Thus, the UF6-H2 system

  3. agrotehniliste vtete mju: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    @mju.ac.kr ABSTRACT In this paper we report on the mechanism of delamination in light-emitting diode (LED) packages The research efforts on GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs)...

  4. antibakteriaalsete veterinaarravimite mju: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    @mju.ac.kr ABSTRACT In this paper we report on the mechanism of delamination in light-emitting diode (LED) packages The research efforts on GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs)...

  5. armatuurterase korrodeerumise mju: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    @mju.ac.kr ABSTRACT In this paper we report on the mechanism of delamination in light-emitting diode (LED) packages The research efforts on GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs)...

  6. augmented laser beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important parameters KrF technology leads) Direct Laser Drive is a better choice for Energy Steve Obenschain 2010-01-01 2 Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam Physics Websites...

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Application of Grid in Computer Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    primære fokus er på server design til et Mass Multiplayer Online Game (MMOG). En MMOG kræver for mange ..............................................................................................................13 Grid compared to electric power

  8. antenna pifa utilizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 463 2 Fast neighbor positioning and medium access in wireless...

  9. acrf millimeter wave: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 63 Horn antenna design for BAN millimeter wave on-body...

  10. antenna radio-fiber access: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15...

  11. ac linear positioning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 187 The Square Root Law Requires a Linear Key Andrew D. Ker...

  12. antenna waveguide plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 53 A STUDY OF THE SYMMETRYOF FIELD PATTERNS OF ELLIPTIC HORNS...

  13. antenna accessories: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 444 2 Fast neighbor positioning and medium access in wireless...

  14. antenna proteins cp24: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 426 2 Fast neighbor positioning and medium access in wireless...

  15. antenna complexes protect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on LTCC Substrate for Millimeter-wave Applications Il Kwon Kim-0250, USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos...

  16. antennae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 408 2 Fast neighbor positioning and medium access in wireless...

  17. antennas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 408 2 Fast neighbor positioning and medium access in wireless...

  18. antenna theory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA kimik@yonsei.ac.kr Abstract- In this paper, one linear tapered slot antenna (LTSA), backed Tentzeris, Manos 458 2 Fast neighbor positioning and medium access in wireless...

  19. 0.25m CMOS LVDS(Low Voltage Differential Signaling) I/O interface circuits are designed. Designed interface circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo-Young

    Çб³Àü±â¡¤ÀüÀÚ°øÇĞ°ú * Çѱ¹ÀüÀÚÅë½Å¿¬±¸¿ø IP½ºÀ§ÄªÆÀ Tel: (02) 2123-2874 / bluewat@tera.yonsei.ac.kr 0.25¥ìm CMOS LVDS I

  20. Jour. Petrol. Soc. Korea Vol. 21, No. 2, p. 229~241, 2012 (LPO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Haemyeong

    Jour. Petrol. Soc. Korea Vol. 21, No. 2, p. 229~241, 2012 229 (LPO) * Rock Deformation@snu.ac.kr #12;230 J. Petrol. Soc. Korea Kohlstedt, 2000; Zhang and Karato, 1995

  1. Experiments Approved at the May 20-21, 2005 ATLAS PAC Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    case of A 71, Tz +- 12 71Br and 71Kr 5 1099 K. E. Rehm Measurement of the beta-delayed a Spectrum of 16N with a new Technique-4 10 1102 B. B. Back Subbarrier fusion of...

  2. The effect carbohydrate consumption on Argentine ants' nutritional ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Cheng T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ants. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 18, 111-an invasive mealybug. Ecology, 83, 2425-2438. Helms, K.R. &invasions. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, Kaplan,

  3. Shape coexistence and evolution in neutron-deficient krypton isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. J. Bai; X. M. Fu; C. F. Jiao; F. R. Xu

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Total Routhian Surface (TRS) calculations have been performed to investigate shape coexistence and evolution in neutron-deficient krypton isotopes ${}^{72,74,76}$Kr. The ground-state shape is found to change from oblate in ${}^{72}$Kr to prolate in ${}^{74,76}$Kr, in agreement with experimental data. Quadrupole deformations of the ground states and coexisting $0^{+}_{2}$ states as well as excitation energies of the latter are also well reproduced. While the general agreement between calculated moments of inertia and those deduced from observed spectra confirms the prolate nature of the low-lying yrast states of all three isotopes (except the ground state of ${}^{72}$Kr), the deviation at low spins suggests significant shape mixing. The role of triaxiality in describing shape coexistence and evolution in these nuclei is finally discussed.

  4. Algae Tile Data: 2004-2007, BPA-51; Preliminary Report, October 28, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple files containing 2004 through 2007 Tile Chlorophyll data for the Kootenai River sites designated as: KR1, KR2, KR3, KR4 (Downriver) and KR6, KR7, KR9, KR9.1, KR10, KR11, KR12, KR13, KR14 (Upriver) were received by SCS. For a complete description of the sites covered, please refer to http://ktoi.scsnetw.com. To maintain consistency with the previous SCS algae reports, all analyses were carried out separately for the Upriver and Downriver categories, as defined in the aforementioned paragraph. The Upriver designation, however, now includes three additional sites, KR11, KR12, and the nutrient addition site, KR9.1. Summary statistics and information on the four responses, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a Accrual Rate, Total Chlorophyll, and Total Chlorophyll Accrual Rate are presented in Print Out 2. Computations were carried out separately for each river position (Upriver and Downriver) and year. For example, the Downriver position in 2004 showed an average Chlorophyll a level of 25.5 mg with a standard deviation of 21.4 and minimum and maximum values of 3.1 and 196 mg, respectively. The Upriver data in 2004 showed a lower overall average chlorophyll a level at 2.23 mg with a lower standard deviation (3.6) and minimum and maximum values of (0.13 and 28.7, respectively). A more comprehensive summary of each variable and position is given in Print Out 3. This lists the information above as well as other summary information such as the variance, standard error, various percentiles and extreme values. Using the 2004 Downriver Chlorophyll a as an example again, the variance of this data was 459.3 and the standard error of the mean was 1.55. The median value or 50th percentile was 21.3, meaning 50% of the data fell above and below this value. It should be noted that this value is somewhat different than the mean of 25.5. This is an indication that the frequency distribution of the data is not symmetrical (skewed). The skewness statistic, listed as part of the first section of each analysis, quantifies this. In a symmetric distribution, such as a Normal distribution, the skewness value would be 0. The tile chlorophyll data, however, shows larger values. Chlorophyll a, in the 2004 Downriver example, has a skewness statistic of 3.54, which is quite high. In the last section of the summary analysis, the stem and leaf plot graphically demonstrates the asymmetry, showing most of the data centered around 25 with a large value at 196. The final plot is referred to as a normal probability plot and graphically compares the data to a theoretical normal distribution. For chlorophyll a, the data (asterisks) deviate substantially from the theoretical normal distribution (diagonal reference line of pluses), indicating that the data is non-normal. Other response variables in both the Downriver and Upriver categories also indicated skewed distributions. Because the sample size and mean comparison procedures below require symmetrical, normally distributed data, each response in the data set was logarithmically transformed. The logarithmic transformation, in this case, can help mitigate skewness problems. The summary statistics for the four transformed responses (log-ChlorA, log-TotChlor, and log-accrual ) are given in Print Out 4. For the 2004 Downriver Chlorophyll a data, the logarithmic transformation reduced the skewness value to -0.36 and produced a more bell-shaped symmetric frequency distribution. Similar improvements are shown for the remaining variables and river categories. Hence, all subsequent analyses given below are based on logarithmic transformations of the original responses.

  5. Reliability of laser safety eye wear in the femtosecond regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3. M. Lenzner, J. Krüger, S. Sartania, Z. Cheng, C. Spielmann, G. Mourou, W. Kautek , F. Krausz and Laser Technology 33, 359 ­362 (2001). 6. S. Sartania, Z. Cheng, M. Lenzner, G. Tempea, C. Spielmann, F

  6. RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. Total fuel mix is 11% MOX + 89% U0 fuel with PuRadionuclide H U0 Fuel U0 + MOX Fuel 14C Kr I llO Other

  7. Graphene Assembly DOI: 10.1002/anie.201006240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that are suitable for nanoelectronics, energy storage/conversion, catalysis, composites, and other applications.[1-mail: sangouk.kim@kaist.ac.kr Prof. C. W. Bielawski Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry The University

  8. Pulsed Laser Deposition | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is composed of the following: An electro-polished stainless-steel chamber pumped via a turbo molecular pump and backed by a rotary scroll dry pump An excimer laser (KrF) for...

  9. A Neuronal Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates the Balance of Muscle Excitation and Inhibition in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in Caenorhabditis elegans Maelle Jospin1,2 , Yingchuan B. Qi3,4. , Tamara M. Stawicki4. , Thomas Boulin5. , Kim R TM, Boulin T, Schuske KR, et al. (2009) A Neuronal Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates the Balance

  10. ECE 3050 Analog Electronics Quiz 9 July 15, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

    for |Vo/Vi|. Alow = - RF R2 Ahigh = - RF R1kR2 pole = 1 (R1 + R2) C zero = 1 R1C High-pass shelving. 2-pass shelving. 1 #12;

  11. aluminum nitride insulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K-r grown by a modified Bridgman tech- nique,r6 Rollins, Andrew M. 27 Low-voltage organic thin film transistors with hydrophobic aluminum nitride film as gate insulator Materials...

  12. Characterizing population structure of cetaceans within an ecological context /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Alyson H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JD, Calambokidis J, Balcomb KC et al. (1996) Movement of aMorton AB, Palm RS, Balcomb KC (1998) Dietary specializationGH, Evenson JR, Flynn KR, Balcomb KC, Claridge DE, Bloedel

  13. Size classification of silicon nanocrystals Renato P. Camata,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    by exposing it to ionizing radiation from a sealed Kr85 source. Reactions with the ambipolar gas ions pre- dicted by Fuchs.11 Downstream from the neutralizer, the nanocrystal aero- sol is classified

  14. Volume 158,number 3,4 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS YJune 1989 ION MIGRATION FOLLOWING CHARGE TRANSFER REACTIONS IN RARE-GAS SOLIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    that photoinduced charge transfer processes in rare-gas solids, such as Xe+C& +2hv+ Xe+Cl- +Cl result in highly of photochemical processes in rare-gas solids is motivated in part by the fact that these sys- tems act as solvents crystals or rare-gas solids [ 2 1.In most studied processes, the rare-gas solid seems in- deed to act

  15. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  16. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF RADIOXENON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring changes in atmospheric radioxenon concentrations is a major tool in the detection of an underground nuclear explosion. Ground based systems like the Automated Radioxenon Sampler /Analyzer (ARSA), the Swedish Unattended Noble gas Analyzer (SAUNA) and the Automatic portable radiometer of isotopes Xe (ARIX), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes by processing and transferring samples into a high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector. The high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector makes these systems highly sensitive to the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe. The standard analysis uses regions of interest (ROI) to determine the amount of a particular radioxenon isotope present. The ROI method relies on the peaks of interest falling within energy limits of the ROI. Some potential problems inherent in this method are the reliance on stable detector gains and a fixed resolution for each energy peak. In addition, when a high activity sample is measured there will be more interference among the ROI, in particular within the 133Xe, 133mXe, and 131mXe regions. A solution to some of these problems can be obtained through spectral fitting of the data. Spectral fitting is simply the fitting of the peaks using known functions to determine the number and relative peak positions and widths. By knowing this information it is possible to determine which isotopes are present. Area under each peak can then be used to determine an overall concentration for each isotope. Using the areas of the peaks several key detector characteristics can be determined: efficiency, energy calibration, energy resolution and ratios between interfering isotopes (Radon daughters).

  17. International Workshop on The History of Magnetohydrodynamics Electromagnetic seawater flow control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Robert

    Laminar Boundary Layer with Lorentz force Re1 = 290 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 10.5010.5010.5010.50 y/mm u/B ­ Fluids, 2004, in press Oscillatory forces: Motivation 0.5 1 1.5 2 3 -10 -5 0 5 10 20 CL [°] baseline F Lorentz force configurations compared stationary: U xs xe CµEMHD = 1 2 · aj0B0 U2 · xe - xs c oscillatory

  18. Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

  19. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

  20. \\ 3D e 5 > (W@k`g V r7x^o= t6 x s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Kwon

    of core infrastructure in hydrogen industry. However, the experience of safety equipment in the hydrogen}@cs.yonsei.ac.kr iklee@yonsei.ac.kr Development of Web3D-based Virtual Reality System for Hydrogen Station Jong-Chul Yoon In this paper, we present the web3D-based virtual reality(VR) system for the safety education of the hydrogen

  1. Chemical abundances in the extremely carbon-rich and xenon-rich halo planetary nebula H4-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Masaaki [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tajitsu, Akito, E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: tajitsu@subaru.naoj.org [Subaru Telescope, NAOJ, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed detailed chemical abundance analysis of the extremely metal-poor ([Ar/H] ? –2) halo planetary nebula (PN) H4-1 based on the multi-wavelength spectra from Subaru/HDS, GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer/IRS and determined the abundances of 10 elements. The C and O abundances were derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs) and are almost consistent with abundances from recombination lines (RLs). We demonstrated that the large discrepancy in the C abundance between CEL and RL in H4-1 can be solved using the temperature fluctuation model. We reported the first detection of the [Xe III] ?5846 line in H4-1 and determination of its elemental abundance ([Xe/H] > +0.48). H4-1 is the most Xe-rich PN among the Xe-detected PNe. The observed abundances are close to the theoretical prediction by a 2.0 M {sub ?} single star model with an initially element rich ([r/Fe] = +2.0 dex) rapid neutron-capture process (r-process). The observed Xe abundance would be a product of the r-process in primordial supernovae. The [C/O]-[Ba/(Eu or Xe)] diagram suggests that the progenitor of H4-1 shares the evolution with carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP)-r/s and CEMP-no stars. The progenitor of H4-1 is presumably a binary formed in an r-process-rich environment.

  2. DOE-Imaging grant FG02-06ER15829, entitled "Developing Laser-Induced Re-Collision Electron Self-Diffraction" Brief summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igor V. Litvinyuk, and Itzik Ben-Itzhak

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our principal goal was the experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Key steps along the development of this experimental technique have been accomplished and reported in the publications listed in this brief report. We started with measuring 3D electron momenta spectra in aligned nitrogen and oxygen molecules. Chakra Maharjan (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) was a lead researcher on this project. Although Chakra succeeded in obtaining those spectra, we were scooped by the publication of identical results in Science by the NRC Ottawa group. Our results were never published as a refereed article, but became a part of Chakra's Ph.D. dissertation. That Science paper was the first experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Chakra also worked on wavelength dependence of 3D ATI spectra of atoms and molecules using tunable OPA pulses. Another Ph.D. student, Maia Magrakvelidze (her GRA was funded by the grant), started working on COLTRIMS experiments using OPA pulses (1800 nm wavelength). After some initial experiments it became apparent that COLTRIMS did not yield sufficient count rates of electrons in the high-energy part of the spectrum to see diffraction signatures with acceptable statistics (unfavorable scaling of the electron yield with laser wavelength was partly to blame). Nevertheless, Maia managed to use COLTRIMS and OPA to measure the angular dependence of the tunneling ionization rate in D{sub 2} molecules. Following the initial trial experiments, the decision was made to switch from COLTRIMS to VMI in order to increase the count rates by a factor of {approx}100, which may have given us a chance to see LIED. Research Associate Dr. Sankar De (his salary was funded by the grant), in collaboration with Matthias Kling's group (then at MPQ Garching), proceeded to design a special multi-electrode VMI spectrometer for capturing high-energy ATI electrons and to install it in place of COLTRIMS inside our experimental chamber. That apparatus was later used for the first demonstration of field-free orientation in CO using two-color laser pulses as well as for a series of other experiments, such as pump-probe studies of molecular dynamics with few-cycle laser pulses, control of electron localization in dissociating hydrogen molecules using two-color laser pulses, and ATI spectra of Xe ionized by two-color laser pulses. In parallel, Dipanwita Ray (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) worked on measuring angle-resolved ATI spectra of noble gases using a stereo-ATI phasemeter as a TOF electron spectrometer. She observed the angular diffraction structures in 3D ATI spectra of Ar, Kr and Xe, which were interpreted in terms of the Quantitative Rescattering theory newly developed by C.D. Lin. We also attempted to use a much more powerful OPA (five times more energy per pulse than the one we had at JRML) available at the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) in Montreal to observe LIED. Two visits to ALLS by the PI, Igor Litvinyuk, and one visit by the PI's Ph.D. student (Irina Bocharova) were funded by the grant. Though we failed to observe LIED (the repetition rate of the ALLS OPA was too low at only 100 Hz), this international collaboration resulted in several publications on other related subjects, such as the wavelength dependence of laser Coulomb explosion of hydrogen, the wavelength dependence of non-sequential double ionization of neon and argon, the demonstration of charge-resonance enhanced ionization in CO{sub 2}, and the study of non-elastic scattering processes in H{sub 2}. Theoretical efforts to account for the hydrogen Coulomb explosion experiment resulted in another paper by Maia Magrakvelidze as lead author. Although for various reasons we failed to achieve our main goal of observing LIED, we salute the recent success in this endeavor by Lou DiMauro's group (with theoretical support from our KSU colleague C.D. Lin) published in Nature, which validates our approach.

  3. The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba{sup +} ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe{sup +} ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice because the Xe plasma density peaks further upstream.

  4. XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

  5. Effect of Inert Gas Additive Species on Cl(2) High Density Plasma Etching of Compound Semiconductors: Part II. InP, InSb, InGaP and InGaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Hahn, Y.B.; Hays, D.C.; Jung, K.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the additive noble gases He, Ar and Xe on chlorine-based Inductively Coupled Plasma etching of InP, InSb, InGaP and InGaAs were studied as a function of source power, chuck power and discharge composition. The etch rates of all materials with C12/He and C12/Xe are greater than with C12/Ar. Etch rates in excess of 4.8 pndmin for InP and InSb with C12/He or C12/Xe, 0.9 pndmin for InGaP with C12/Xe, and 3.8 prdmin for InGaAs with Clz/Xe were obtained at 750 W ICP power, 250 W rf power, - 1570 C12 and 5 mTorr. All three plasma chemistries produced smooth morphologies for the etched InGaP surfaces, while the etched surface of InP showed rough morphology under all conditions.

  6. In-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of time-dependent Xenon-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Riede; Helmuth Boeck

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, it has been shown that the time dependent Xe-135 inventory in the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna, Austria can be measured via gamma spectrometry even in the presence of strong background radiation. It is focussing on the measurement of (but not limited to) the nuclide Xe-135. The time dependent Xe-135 inventory of the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna has been measured using a temporary beam line between one fuel element of the core placed onto the thermal column after shutdown and a detector system located just above the water surface of the reactor tank. For the duration of one week, multiple gamma ray spectra were recorded automatically, starting each afternoon after reactor shutdown until the next morning. One measurement series has been recorded over the weekend. The Xe-135 peaks were extracted from a total of 1227 recorded spectra using an automated peak search algorithm and analyzed for their time-dependent properties. Although the background gamma radiation present in the core after shutdown was large especially in the lower energy range, the Xe-135 peak located at 249.8 keV could be extracted from the most spectra where present and could be compared to theoretical calculations.

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, C I.; Ripmeester, J A.; Wang, Li Q.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Baumann, T; Satcher, J H.

    2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we report a detailed study of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels prepared under different processing conditions, [resorcinol]/[catalyst] (R/C) ratios in the starting sol-gel solutions, using continuous flow hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR in combination with solid-state 13C and two-dimensional wide-line separation (2D-WISE) NMR techniques. The degree of polymerization and the mobility of the cross-linking functional groups in RF aerogels are examined and correlated with the R/C ratios. The origin of different adsorption regions is evaluated using both co-adsorption of chloroform and 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. A hierarchical set of Xe exchange processes in RF aerogels is found using 2D EXSY 129Xe NMR. The exchange of Xe gas follows the sequence (from fastest to slowest): mesopores with free gas, gas in meso- and micro-pores, free gas with micropores, and, finally, among micropore sites. The volume-to-surface-area (Vg/S) ratios for aerogels are measured for the first time without the use of geometric models. The Vg/S parameter, which is related both to the geometry and the interconnectivity of the pore space, has been found to correlate strongly with the R/C ratio and exhibits an unusually large span: an increase in the R/C ratio from 50 to 500 results in about a 5-fold rise in Vg/S.

  8. Ejecta model development at pRad (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buttler, William T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Terrones, Guillermo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bainbridge, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hollander, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, David B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwiathowski, Kris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marr-Lyon, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nedrow, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, C L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stone, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tupa, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 2009 we fielded three explosively (HE) driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments at the LANSCE Proton Radiography Facility (pRad), and in August of 2009 we fielded one flyer plate experiment on the pRad 40 mm powder gun. One HE experiment was done in vacuum, and the other two within four atmospheres of noble gasses: Xe and Ne. These two gases were chosen to study the viscous effects on ejecta formation. It is unexpected, but the viscosity {eta} of Ne is twice that of Xe, and, due to the atomic mass difference between the two, the kinematic viscosity ({eta}/{rho}) of Ne is about ten times that of Xe. The results showed that ejecta formation is sensitively linked to the gas density, which implies that the Weber number is more important in ejecta formation than the Reynolds number.

  9. The atomic electric dipole moment induced by the nuclear electric dipole moment; the magnetic moment effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porsev, S G; Flambaum, V V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM (d_N) with the hyperfine interaction, the "magnetic moment effect". We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms 129Xe, 171Yb, 199Hg, 211Rn, and 225Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of 129Xe and 199Hg, we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d_N(129Xe)|< 1.1 * 10^{-21} |e|cm and |d_N(199Hg)|< 2.8 * 10^{-24} |e|cm.

  10. The atomic electric dipole moment induced by the nuclear electric dipole moment; the magnetic moment effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Porsev; J. S. M. Ginges; V. V. Flambaum

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM (d_N) with the hyperfine interaction, the "magnetic moment effect". We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms 129Xe, 171Yb, 199Hg, 211Rn, and 225Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of 129Xe and 199Hg, we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d_N(129Xe)|< 1.1 * 10^{-21} |e|cm and |d_N(199Hg)|< 2.8 * 10^{-24} |e|cm.

  11. Radioxenon detections in the CTBT International Monitoring System likely related to the announced nuclear test in North Korea conducted on February 12, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringbom, Anders; Axelssson, A.; Aldener, M.; Auer, M.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Fritioff, T.; Hoffman, Ian; Khrustalev, Kirill; Nikkinen, Mika; Popov, Vladimir Y.; Popov, Y.; Ungar, R. Kurt; Wotawa, G.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Observations of the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe and 131mXe collected at the IMS stations RN38 and RN58 on April 7-8, and April 12-13 2013, respectively, are unique with respect to the measurement history of these stations. Comparison of measured data with calculated isotopic ratios as well as analysis using atmospheric transport modeling indicate that it is likely that the xenon measured was created in the underground nuclear test conducted by North Korea on February 12, 2013, and released 7 weeks later. More than one release is required to explain all observations. The 131mXe source terms for each release were calculated to 7x1011 Bq, corresponding to about 1-10% of the total xenon inventory for a 10-kt explosion, depending on fractionation and release scenario. The observed ratios could not be used to obtain any information regarding the fissile material that was used in the test.

  12. Searching for E(5) behavior in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R.M.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Descovich, M.; Diamond, R.M; Fallon, P.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Mahmud, H.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Stephens, F.S.; Ward, D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of even-even nuclei with 30 {le} Z {le} 82, A {ge} 60 have been examined to find examples displaying the characteristics of E(5) critical-point behavior for the shape transition from a spherical vibrator to a triaxially soft rotor. On the basis of the known experimental state energies and E2 transition strengths, the best candidates that were identified are {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106,108}Cd, {sup 124}Te, {sup 128}Xe, and {sup 134}Ba. The closest agreement between experimental data and the predictions of E(5) is for {sup 128}Xe and for the previously suggested example of {sup 134}Ba. It is proposed that {sup 128}Xe may be a new example of a nucleus at the E(5) critical point.

  13. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  14. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities <Kr> using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability <Kr> to obtain the same spreading. Generally, <Kr> is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The <Kr> are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent <Kr>. Finally, the calculated <Kr> are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  15. Compression of ultrashort UV pulses in a self-defocusing gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berge, Luc [CEA-DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Koehler, Christian [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Skupin, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University, Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Optics, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compression of UV femtosecond laser pulses focused into a gas cell filled with Xe is reported numerically. With a large negative Kerr index and normal dispersion, Xe promotes temporal modulational instability (MI), which can be monitored to shorten approx100 fs pulses to robust, singly peaked waveforms exhibiting a fourfold compression factor. Combining standard MI theory with a variational approach allows us to predict the beam parameters suitable for efficient compression. At powers <=30 MW, nonlinear dispersion is shown to shift the pulse temporal profile to the rear zone.

  16. A revised model of the kidney for medical internal radiation dose calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Jyoti Shivabhai

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are frequently the organs receiving the highest level of radioactivity and, therefore, the largest radiation dose. Short lived radiopharmaceuticals, that are now injected in millicurie quantities in nuclear medicine for rapid-sequence imaging of the brain... radionuclides (Appendix B). 17 These include the following radionuclides presently used in nuclear medicine: P-32, Cr-51, Co-57, Ga-67, Tc-99m, In-ill, I-123, Xe-127, I-131, Xe-133, and T1-201. If the radionuclide emits penetrating radiation, the code...

  17. Calibration of ACS Prism Slitless Spectroscopy Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Larsen; M. Kuemmel; J. R. Walsh

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys is equipped with three prisms in the Solar Blind (SBC) and High Resolution (HRC) Channels, which together cover the 1150 - 3500 A range, albeit at highly non-uniform spectral resolution. We present new wavelength- and flux calibrations of the SBC (PR110L and PR130L) and HRC (PR200L) prisms, based on calibration observations obtained in Cycle 13. The calibration products are available to users via the ST-ECF/aXe web pages, and can be used directly with the aXe package. We discuss our calibration strategy and some caveats specific to slitless prism spectroscopy.

  18. Is there a Difference in Van Der Waals Interactions between Rare Gas Atoms Adsorbed on Metallic and Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, De-Li; Mandeltort, Lynn; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yates, John T Jr, Cole, Milton W Johnson,J Karl

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in polarizabilities of metallic (M) and semiconducting (S) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) might give rise to differences in adsorption potentials. We show from experiments and van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT) that binding energies of Xe adsorbed on M- and S-SWNTs are nearly identical. Temperature programmed desorption of Xe on purified M- and S-SWNTs give similar peak temperatures, indicating that desorption kinetics and binding energies are independent of the type of SWNT. Binding energies computed from vdW-corrected DFT are in good agreement with experiments.

  19. Medium mass fragment production due to momentum dependent interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kumar, Suneel [School of Physics and Material Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147 004, Punjab (India); Puri, Rajeev K. [Department of Physics, Punjab University, Chandigarh (India)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of system size and momentum dependent effects are analyzed in multifragmenation by simulating symmetric reactions of Ca+Ca, Ni+Ni, Nb+Nb, Xe+Xe, Er+Er, Au+Au, and U+U at incident energies between 50 MeV/nucleon and 1000 MeV/nucleon and over full impact parameter zones. Our detailed study reveals that there exists a system size dependence when the reaction is simulated with momentum dependent interactions. This dependence exhibits a mass power law behavior.

  20. Robust upper limit on the neutron single-particle energy of the $i_{13/2}$ orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Lei; H. Jiang

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The boundary of the neutron $i_{13/2}$ single-particle energy is investigated with exact shell-model calculations, where random two-body interactions are adopted to overcome the bias from effective interactions. Excitation energies of $3^-_1$ state in $^{134}$Te and $^{136}$Xe, as well as those of $13/2^+_1$ states in $^{135}$Te and $^{137}$Xe, are taken as touchstones of our samplings. A robust upper limit of $\\varepsilon_{i13/2}mixing of $i_{13/2}$ single-neutron configuration and $f_{7/2}\\otimes 3^-$ configuration in $13/2^+_1$ states of $N=83$ isotones.

  1. Practical application of optimization techniques to the design of integrated circuit building blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chong Hsu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    34 35 vm CHAPTER Page E. Worst-Case Measure Reduction V SOFTWARE SUPPORT A. Post-processor . B. Templates for Determining Operational Amplifier Spec- ifications . VI OPTIMIZATION OF IC BUILDING BLOCKS A. Analog Circuits 1. Operational... Variability minimization and "on target" design with variability minimization are defined respectively as min [V(y(x))) and min(VT(y(x), y )) respectively where: xeR xeR vee( )I = f e'f, le&de ? [f ef (e)de] (2. 31) (2. 32) and VT(y(x), y ) = J [y(x, 8...

  2. NdI dyLf da. 8005, df.df. Tddd AdySdj, dya>ddjT -560 080, ddTd ddTdfSd edddd AIdQdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    fy, vfHknku uohdj.k Hkkjrh; foKku vdkneh dh LFkkiuk lj lh oh jkeu }kjk 1934 esa gqbZ vkSj rHkh ls oV lkbal vlksfl,'ku }kjk izdkf'kr fd;k tkrk gS] Hkh vdkneh }kjk izcaf/kr dh tkrh gSA fiNys dbZ n'kdksa ls"Bk izkIr dj pqdh gSaA bl ekU;rk dh le;-le; ij dbZ ckj varjkZ"Vªh; vfHkdrkZvksa }kjk cuk, x, ekun.Mksa t

  3. Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

  4. OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 2: Designs, Assessments, and Comparisons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C. D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability, economics, and technology development needs.

  5. OSIRIS and SOMBRERO Inertial Fusion Power Plant Designs, Volume 1: Executive Summary & Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W. R.; Bieri, R. L.; Monsler, M. J.; Hendricks, C.D.; Laybourne, P.; Shillito, K. R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a comprehensive design study of two Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) electric power plants. Conceptual designs are presented for a fusion reactor (called Osiris) using an induction-linac heavy-ion beam driver, and another (called SOMBRERO) using a KrF laser driver. The designs covered all aspects of IFE power plants, including the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, balance-of-plant facilities, target fabrication, target injection and tracking, as well as the heavy-ion and KrF drivers. The point designs were assessed and compared in terms of their environmental & safety aspects, reliability and availability economics, and technology development needs.

  6. Emission Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions in Plasma of an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draganic, I. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Soria Orts, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); DuBois, R. [University of Missouri-Rolla, Physics Building, Rolla, MO 63409-0640 (United States); Shevelko, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fritzsche, S. [Department of Physics, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-St. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Zou, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Lab, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental study of magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in highly charged ions of argon (Ar9+, Ar10+, Ar13+ and Ar14+) and krypton (Kr18+ and Kr22+) are presented. The forbidden transitions of the highly charged ions in the visible and near UV range of the photon emission spectra have been measured with accuracy better than 1 ppm. Our measurements for the 'coronal lines' are the most accurate yet reported using an EBIT as a spectroscopic source of highly charged ions. These precise wavelength determinations provide a useful test and challenge for atomic structure calculations of many-electron systems.

  7. The regulation of CTP synthetase by pyrimidines in Salmonella typhimurium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Thomas Patrick

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-UMP Kinase Mutant Strains . . . ~ . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 27 IV The Effect of Varying Concentrations of Cytidine on CTP Synthetase Activity in Strain JL1269 29 The Effect of Pyrimidines on CTP Synthetase in Strains KD1275 and JL1269 30 VI Comparison... in this investigation were obtained from the stock collection of G. A. O'Donovan. 20 TABLE II LIST OF STRAINS Strain Genotype Growth Requirement LT2 ~B11 8 ~pr C138 ~D135 ~pE125 JL1018 KR4211 JL1269 KD1275 KD1104 KD1109 HD58 KR4812 wild type ~pC pyr...

  8. Some effects of differential amounts of response cost on human responding to unstructured stimuli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, James Vernon

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of punishment intensity during variable- t 1 1 f t J . 1 f th ~E' t 14~1 of Behavior, 1960, 3, 123-142. Baer, D. M. Escape and avoidance response of pre-school children to two schedules of reinforcement withdrawal. Journal of the ~E' t 1 A~l' f 7th ', 1969...), Knowledge of Results controls (KR), and No Treatment controls (NT), (d) treatment phase--incorrect responses resulted in loss of money for the Cost groups in these amounts: HC - 10 cents, MC ? 5 cents, LC - 1 cent. KR Ss received knowledge of incorrect...

  9. Conversion electrons used to monitor the energy scale of electron spectrometer near tritium endpoint - a simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rysavy

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the endpoint region of the tritium beta-decay spectrum provides good possibility to determine neutrino mass. This, however, needs a perfect monitoring of the spectrometer energy scale. A parallel measurement of electron line of known energy - in particular the 83mKr conversion K-line - may serve well to this purpose. The 83Rb decaying to 83mKr seems to be a very suitable radioactive source due to its halflife of 86.2 day. In this work, we determine the amount of 83Rb which is necessary for a successful monitoring.

  10. Perfusion measurement with Rubidium 81 to Krypton 81m ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beasley, Charles Ward

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WRITE & II!FV ~ 26) FQRM4T(' REPLACE OR AF'PING OAT* FILET (Rr(4&)'I 'rfrA1) READ( IDEV r 22 & IANS IF ( (IANS, AND. '377) . EQ, '122) ICNTR=O WRITE& IDEV r 145) FORMAT(' USE OLD SEITINGSr &N&; 'rf !A1) RE*D(IDEVr22) IANS IOLD=O IF? IANS. AND. '377... TO EQUI LI!3RIUM AND POINTS TAKEN FROM THE OBSERVED (4) RATIO DECLINE REAL TIME RB-81/KR-81M RATIO VERSUS PHANTOM FLOW 17 19 10 SYMBOLIC FORMAT QF RECTILINEAR PHANTOM SCANS, SHOWING THE RELATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF RB-81 AND KR-81M AT DIFFERENT FLOW...

  11. Eur. Phys. J. D 6, 8387 (1999) THE EUROPEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisica Springer-Verlag 1999 Dependence of cluster ion emission from uranium oxide surfaces on the charge for highly charged ion sputtering have been measured for a uranium oxide target for Xe44+ , Au63.46.+w Clusters, nanoparticles, and nanocrystalline materials ­ 82.65.-i Surface and interface chemistry

  12. 0 200 400 600 800 1000 SecondaryionIntensity(cts/sec)

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    Steckl, Andrew J.

    and contaminant concentrations. The 6600 D- SIMS system is equipped with Cs, O2, Ar, and Xe ion sources for a full are based on price per hour, in increments of an hour. Routine Services $300 Depth profile Cesium or oxygen contaminants and known dopants the presence and identity of the species can be confirmed. Rates are valid

  13. Numer. Math. 38, 309-332 (1982) Numerische 9 Springer-Verlag 1982

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    Pironneau, Olivier

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Diffusion Algorithm and Its Applications to the Navier-Stokes Equations O. Pironneau D6partement de Math6matiques, CSP the velocity of the flow at xe(2 and time t. Although it is not essential, we shall assume fo

  14. Thermal Loading of a Direct Drive Target in Rarefied Gas B. R. Christensen1

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    Tillack, Mark

    of the radiation and ion energy from the fusion event, and then slowly release it to the chamber wall and ion energy from the fusion event, and then slowly release it to the chamber wall. Unfortunately is to fill the reaction chamber with a gas, such as Xe, at low density. The gas will absorb much

  15. d Science Service Yeatwe L.ms.??-OE receipt

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    evoi2ii7.g of lhrch 11 tkere mas a gelltle rain, a ~ dit too was hailed 3ut 557 aext morni:ig Tninter t i c i a n Xoscoe Coilklin xe sankaalked from h i s office i n Ydl Street to h i s club hear Xadison

  16. Generalized dimensions of images of measures under Gaussian processes

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    Falconer, Kenneth

    ). The corresponding question for packing dimension dimP, where dimensions of images of sets can behave in a more Brownian motion, dimP X(E) = dimd P E a.s., where dims P E is the `packing dimension profile' of E

  17. Contributed papers Study of gas-fluidization dynamics with laser-polarized 129

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    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Gas fluidization is a process in which solid particles experience fluid-like suspension in an upward. Bubbles, or void spaces with volume much larger than that of a single particle, emerge when the gas flowContributed papers Study of gas-fluidization dynamics with laser-polarized 129 Xe Ruopeng Wanga

  18. Xavier Gr`acia _ Geometria Diferencial 2 _ Suplement d'`algebra _ 21 mar,c 2007* * 1

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    Gràcia, Xavier

    Xavier Gr`acia _ Geometria Diferencial 2 _ Suplement d'`algebra _ 21 mar,c 2007'o lineal "x:E manera s'obt'e una aplicaci'o linea* *l canSexemplesuinteressants,psobreose* *m que E t'e una base finita (ei). Llavors E*t'e l'anomenada base dual diverses q"uestions d'`algebra

  19. Investigation of collective radial expansion and stopping in heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies

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    Boyer, Edmond

    in central Xe+Sn reactions at Fermi energies. Performing a comparison between the predictions. INTRODUCTION Nuclear matter Equation of State (EoS) and transport properties play a fundamental role in the understanding of many aspects of nuclear physics and astrophysics. For instance, neutron star genesis

  20. The CsI Multi-GEM Photomultiplier A.Breskin 1

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    electron multipliers. The detector is filled with argon and other non-aging mixtures of Ar/Ne , Ar/Xe , Ar pixelized position sensitive photon detectors, capable of operation at high photon flux and under MHz frame for photon localization over very large sensitive areas and under high illumination flux. They offer single