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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed WindSolar Interconnection Workshop Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed WindSolar Interconnection Workshop May 21, 2013 8:00AM...

2

NREL: Wind Research - Utility Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Grid Integration Utility Grid Integration Photo of a wind farm in Lawton, Oklahoma where NREL researchers studied the impact of wind energy on farming system operations. NREL researchers analyzed research data collected from this wind farm in Lawton, Oklahoma, to determine the impacts of wind energy on systems operations. NREL researchers analyzed research data collected from this wind farm in Lawton, Oklahoma, to determine the impacts of wind energy on systems operations. The integration of wind energy into the electric generation industry's supply mix is one of the issues industry grapples with. The natural variability of the wind resource raises concerns about how wind can be integrated into routine grid operations, particularly with regard to the effects of wind on regulation, load following, scheduling, line voltage,

3

NREL: Wind Research - Utility Grid Integration Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Grid Integration Assessment Utility Grid Integration Assessment Photo of large power transmission towers set against a sunset. The national need for transmission improvements will have a direct impact on the effective use of renewable energy sources such as wind. For wind energy to play a larger role in supplying the nation's energy needs, integrating wind energy into the power grid of the United States is an important challenge to address. NREL's transmission grid integration staff collaborates with utility industry partners and provides data, analysis, and techniques to increase utility understanding of integration issues and confidence in the reliability of new wind turbines. For more information, contact Brian Parsons at 303-384-6958. Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities

4

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop May 21, 2013 8:00AM MDT to May 22, 2013 5:00PM MDT Golden, Colorado This two-day workshop will answer your questions about interconnecting wind and solar plants and other distributed generation applications to electric distribution systems while providing insight on integrating large-scale renewable generation into the transmission system. Held at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) state-of-the-art Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the first day and at the Western Area Power Administration's Electric Power Training Center (EPTC) on the second day, the workshop will provide an overview of wind and solar interconnection

5

Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-scale Wind Integration in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. INITIAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF UTILITY-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION IN HAWAII NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored...

6

Hawaii Utility Integration Initiatives to Enable Wind (Wind HUI) Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To advance the state and nation toward clean energy, Hawaii is pursuing an aggressive Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), 40% renewable generation and 30% energy efficiency and transportation initiatives by 2030. Additionally, with support from federal, state and industry leadership, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is focused on reducing Hawaii's carbon footprint and global warming impacts. To keep pace with the policy momentum and changing industry technologies, the Hawaiian Electric Companies are proactively pursuing a number of potential system upgrade initiatives to better manage variable resources like wind, solar and demand-side and distributed generation alternatives (i.e. DSM, DG). As variable technologies will continue to play a significant role in powering the future grid, practical strategies for utility integration are needed. Hawaiian utilities are already contending with some of the highest penetrations of renewables in the nation in both large-scale and distributed technologies. With island grids supporting a diverse renewable generation portfolio at penetration levels surpassing 40%, the Hawaiian utilities experiences can offer unique perspective on practical integration strategies. Efforts pursued in this industry and federal collaborative project tackled challenging issues facing the electric power industry around the world. Based on interactions with a number of western utilities and building on decades of national and international renewable integration experiences, three priority initiatives were targeted by Hawaiian utilities to accelerate integration and management of variable renewables for the islands. The three initiatives included: Initiative 1: Enabling reliable, real-time wind forecasting for operations by improving short-term wind forecasting and ramp event modeling capabilities with local site, field monitoring; Initiative 2: Improving operators situational awareness to variable resources via real-time grid condition monitoring using PMU devices and enhanced grid analysis tools; and Initiative 3: Identifying grid automation and smart technology architecture retrofit/improvement opportunities following a systematic review approach, inclusive of increasing renewables and variable distributed generation. Each of the initiative was conducted in partnership with industry technology and equipment providers to facilitate utility deployment experiences inform decision making, assess supporting infrastructure cost considerations, showcase state of the technology, address integration hurdles with viable workarounds. For each initiative, a multi-phased approach was followed that included 1) investigative planning and review of existing state-of-the-art, 2) hands on deployment experiences and 3) process implementation considerations. Each phase of the approach allowed for mid-course corrections, process review and change to any equipment/devices to be used by the utilities. To help the island grids transform legacy infrastructure, the Wind HUI provided more systematic approaches and exposure with vendor/manufacturers, hand-on review and experience with the equipment not only from the initial planning stages but through to deployment and assessment of field performance of some of the new, remote sensing and high-resolution grid monitoring technologies. HELCO became one of the first utilities in the nation to install and operate a high resolution (WindNet) network of remote sensing devices such as radiometers and SODARs to enable a short-term ramp event forecasting capability. This utility-industry and federal government partnership produced new information on wind energy forecasting including new data additions to the NOAA MADIS database; addressed remote sensing technology performance and O&M (operations and maintenance) challenges; assessed legacy equipment compatibility issues and technology solutions; evaluated cyber-security concerns; and engaged in community outreach opportunities that will help guide Hawaii and the nation toward more reliable adoption of clean energy resources. Resu

Dora Nakafuji; Lisa Dangelmaier; Chris Reynolds

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-Scale Wind Integration in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes an analysis, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in May 2010, of the economic characteristics of a particular utility-scale wind configuration project that has been referred to as the 'Big Wind' project.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Utility Wind Interest Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Interest Group Wind Interest Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Utility Wind Interest Group Place Reston, Virginia Zip VI 20195 Sector Wind energy Product The Utility Wind Interest Group (UWIG) is a non-profit corporation whose mission is to accelerate the appropriate integration of wind power into the electric system. References Utility Wind Interest Group[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Wind Interest Group is a company located in Reston, Virginia . References ↑ "Utility Wind Interest Group" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Wind_Interest_Group&oldid=352690" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

11

Colorado Public Utility Commission's Xcel Wind Decision  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2001 the Colorado Public Utility Commission ordered Xcel Energy to undertake good faith negotiations for a wind plant as part of the utility's integrated resource plan. This paper summarizes the key points of the PUC decision, which addressed the wind plant's projected impact on generation cost and ancillary services. The PUC concluded that the wind plant would cost less than new gas-fired generation under reasonable gas cost projections.

Lehr, R. L. (NRUC/NWCC); Nielsen, J. (Land and Water Fund of the Rockies); Andrews, S.; Milligan, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

Integration of large wind farms into utility grids (Part 1—Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—In this part of the paper the authors describe a newly developed model for doubly-fed induction wind generators (DFIG) that is suitable for transient stability studies. In this model the main performance characteristics of DFIG are included. The model is validated against a more detailed EMTPlevel model of such generation. The results suggest that the stability model has sufficient accuracy for representation of the electromechanical dynamics of interest in simulation studies for identifying critical operating conditions. Further analysis of these critical conditions may require the use of more detailed EMTP-level models. Index Terms — Wind turbine generators, wind energy, modeling wind farms. I.

Rodolfo J. Koessler; Senior Member; Srinivas Pillutla; Lan H. Trinh; David L. Dickm

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Wind Integration Datasets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Integration Datasets The Wind Integration Datasets provide energy professionals with a consistent set of wind profiles for the eastern United States and the western United...

14

Wind forecasting objectives for utility schedulers and energy traders  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind energy industry and electricity producers can benefit in a number of ways from increased wind forecast accuracy. Higher confidence in the reliability of wind forecasts can help persuade an electric utility to increase the penetration of wind energy into its operating system and to augment the capacity value of wind electric generation. Reliable forecasts can also assist daily energy traders employed by utilities in marketing the available and anticipated wind energy to power pools and other energy users. As the number of utilities with wind energy experience grows, and wind energy penetration levels increase, the need for reliable wind forecasts will likely grow as well. This period of wind energy growth also coincides with advances in computer weather prediction technology that could lead to more accurate wind forecasts. Thus, it is important to identify the type of forecast information needed by utility schedulers and energy traders. This step will help develop approaches to the challenge of wind forecasting that will result in useful products being supplied to utilities or other energy generating entities. This paper presents the objectives, approach, and current findings of a US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) initiative to develop useful wind forecasting tools for utilities involved with wind energy generation. The focus of this initiative thus far has been to learn about the needs of prospective utility users. NREL representatives conducted a series of onsite interviews with key utility staff, usually schedulers and research planners, at seven US utilities. The purpose was to ascertain information on actual scheduling and trading procedures, and how utilities could integrate wind forecasting into these activities.

Schwartz, M.N. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bailey, B.H. [AWS Scientific, Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to...

16

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. It was initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming (see study area map). WestConnect also includes utilities in California, but these were not included because California had already completed a renewable energy integration study for the state. This study was set up to answer questions that utilities, public utilities commissions, developers, and regional planning organizations had about renewable energy use in the west: (1) Does geographic diversity of renewable energy resource help mitigate variability; (2) How do local resources compare to out-of-state resources; (3) Can balancing area cooperation help mitigate variability; (4) What is the role and value of energy storage; (5) Should reserve requirements be modified; (6) What is the benefit of forecasting; and (7) How can hydropower help with integration of renewables? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and run by NREL with WestConnect as a partner organization. The study follows DOE's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, which did not find any technical barriers to reaching 20% wind energy in the continental United States by 2030. This study and its partner study, the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, performed a more in-depth operating impact analysis to see if 20% wind energy was feasible from an operational level. In DOE/NREL's analysis, the 20% wind energy target required 25% wind energy in the western interconnection; therefore, this study considered 20% and 30% wind energy to bracket the DOE analysis. Additionally, since solar is rapidly growing in the west, 5% solar was also considered in this study. The goal of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is to understand the costs and operating impacts due to the variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. This is mainly an operations study, (rather than a transmission study), although different scenarios model different transmission build-outs to deliver power. Using a detailed power system production simulation model, the study identifies operational impacts and challenges of wind energy penetration up to 30% of annual electricity consumption.

Lew, D.; Piwko, R.; Jordan, G.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.; Milligan, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Wind Power Integration: Exploring Impacts and Alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Integration: Exploring Impacts and Alternatives Assist. Prof. C sustainable sources of energy. The idea of harnessing wind energy has been there have been no less than fifteen in-depth wind integration studies

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Osage Municipal Utilities Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Facility Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Osage Municipal Utilities Developer Osage Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Osage Municipal Utilities Location West of Osage IA Coordinates 43.298363°, -92.84096° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.298363,"lon":-92.84096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

NREL: Wind Research - Grid Integration of Offshore Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Photograph of a wind turbine in the ocean. Located about 10 kilometers off the coast of Arklow, Ireland, the Arklow Bank offshore wind park consists of seven GE Wind 3.6-MW wind turbines. Much can be learned from the existing land-based integration research for handling the variability and uncertainty of the wind resource. Integration and Transmission One comprehensive grid integration study is the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), in which offshore wind scenarios were analyzed. Nearly 80 GW of offshore wind was studied in the highest penetration scenario. Specific offshore grid distribution and transmission solutions were identified, including cost estimates. With the Atlantic coast likely to lead the way in offshore wind power deployment, EWITS is a benchmark for

23

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) energy on the electric power system, the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. The goal is to understand the effects of variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. In the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 1, solar penetration was limited to 5%. Utility-scale PV was not included because of limited capability to model sub-hourly, utility-scale PV output . New techniques allow the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 to include high penetrations of solar - not only CSP and rooftop PV but also utility-scale PV plants.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy application study was performed by The Aerospace Corporation for the Wind Systems Branch of the Department of Energy. The objective was to identify integration problems for a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) placed into an existing conventional utility system. The integration problems included environmental, institutional and technical aspects as well as economic matters, but the emphasis was on the economics of wind energy. The Hawaiian Electric Company utility system on the island of Oahu was selected for the study because of the very real potential for wind energy on that island, and because of the simplicity afforded in analyzing that isolated utility.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

25

Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Western Wind and Solar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, one of the largest regional solar and wind integration studies to date, explores the...

27

Wind energy systems. Application to regional utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study developed a generic planning process that utilities can use to determine the feasibility of utilizing WECS (Wind Energy Conversion Systems) as part of their future mix of equipment. While this is primarily an economic process, other questions dealing with WECS availability, capacity credit, operating reserve, performance of WECS arrays, etc., had to be addressed. The approach was to establish the worth, or breakeven value, of WECS to the utility and to determine the impact that WECS additions would have on the utilities mix of conventional source.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Utility Scale Wind turbine Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Three Affiliated Tribes proposing to Department of Energy was nothing new to Denmark. National Meteorological Studies have proved that North Dakota has some of the most consistence wind resources in the world. The Three Affiliated Tribes wanted to assess their potential and become knowledgeable to developing this new and upcoming resource now valuable. By the Tribe implementing the Utility-scale Wind Turbine Project on Fort Berthold, the tribe has proven the ability to complete a project, and has already proceeded in a feasibility studies to developing a large-scale wind farm on the reservation due to tribal knowledge learned, public awareness, and growing support of a Nation wanting clean renewable energy. The tribe is working through the various measures and regulations with the want to be self-sufficient, independent, and marketable with 17,000 times the wind energy needed to service Fort Berthold alone.

Terry Fredericks

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Feasibility of utilizing wind energy in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the feasibility of utilizing wind energy to meet part of the energy demands related to pumping water and to generating electricity for the rural households in Thailand. The data for this study were divided into three different areas: (1) wind speed data, (2) the wind machine performance data, and (3) the rural energy demand data. The wind machine were divided into two categories of water-pumping windmills and electricity-generating wind machines. Three types of water pumping windmills and one type of electricity-generating wind machine were matched with the wind condition in Thailand. They were the multi-blade rotor, the sailwing rotor model (WE 002), the slow-speed sailwing rotor, and the Aerowatt model (1100 FP5G) respectively. It was concluded that, in Thailand: (1) the multiblade rotor and the sail-wing rotor (WE 002) windmill is suitable for pumping water for domestic use at 43 specified locations; (2) the slow-speed sailwing rotor windmill is suitable for pumping water for small irrigation at 32 specified locations; and (3) the Aerowatt model (1100 GP5G) is suitable for generating electricity for household use at 29 specified locations.

Jamkrajang, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration 9: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to improve grid performance and thereby aid in the integration of wind generation into the local electricity supply. Under the proposed action, DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability would provide cost shared funding for the project through American Reinvestment and Recovery Act

31

Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study -- Preliminary Findings: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, the development of wind datasets, the transmission analysis, and the results of wind integration analysis for four scenarios.

Corbus, D.; Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, B.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTROLYSIS-UTILITY ELECTROLYSIS-UTILITY INTEGRATION WORKSHOP Renaissance Suites at Flatirons, Broomfield, CO September 22-23, 2004 September 22, 2004 7:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 am Welcome and Overview of Workshop Goals, Pete Devlin, DOE/OHFCIT 8:45 am Review Agenda and Objectives, Shawna McQueen, Energetics 9:00 am Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation, Steve Cohen, Teledyne Energy Systems 9:20 am Electrolyzers Operating in Real-World Conditions, Rob Regan, DTE Energy Systems 9:40 am Break 10:00 am Technology Advancements and New Concepts, Dan Smith, GE Global Research 10:20 am DG and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector, Ed Torerro, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 10:40 am Electrolytic Hydrogen from a Blend of Nuclear- and Wind-Produced Electricity,

34

Nebraska Statewide Wind Integration Study: Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind generation resources in Nebraska will play an increasingly important role in the environmental and energy security solutions for the state and the nation. In this context, the Nebraska Power Association conducted a state-wide wind integration study.

EnerNex Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee; Ventyx, Atlanta, Georgia; Nebraska Power Association, Lincoln, Nebraska

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Arizona Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study.2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Wind Power Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary Full Title: Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power into Different Energy Systems Project ID: 124 Principal Investigator: Henrik Lund Purpose The analysis...

37

Calculating Wind Integration Costs: Separating Wind Energy Value from Integration Cost Impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurately calculating integration costs is important so that wind generation can be fairly compared with alternative generation technologies.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Survey of Wind Power Integration Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25% and reached almost 60,000 MW worldwide and 9150 MW in the United States during 2005, and the high growth rate is forecast to continue for several years. Wind generation is an intermittent resource and can't be dispatched. Therefore, large blocks of wind generation concentrated in a region can affect the operation of the electricity grid with regard to ancillary service requirements and cost. Because the numerous wind power integration stud...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Solar and Wind Energy Utilization and Project Development Scenarios |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization and Project Development Scenarios Utilization and Project Development Scenarios Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Solar and wind energy resources in Ethiopia have not been given due attention in the past. Some of the primary reasons for under consideration of these resources are lack of awareness of their potential in the country, the role they can have in the overall energy mix and the social benefits associated with them. Knowledge of the exploitable potential of these resources and identification of potential regions for development will help energy planners and developers to incorporate these resources as alternative means of supplying energy by conducting a more accurate techno-economic analysis which leads to more realistic economic projections. (Purpose): The ultimate objective of this study is to produce a document that comprises country background information on solar and wind energy utilization and project scenarios which present solar and wind energy investment opportunities to investors and decision makers. It is an integrated study with specific objectives of resource documentation including analysis of barriers and policies, identification of potential areas for technology promotion, and nationwide aggregation of potentials and benefits of the resource. The

40

Estimating the economic value of wind forecasting to utilities  

SciTech Connect

Utilities are sometimes reluctant to assign capacity value to wind plants because they are an intermittent resource. One of the potential difficulties is that the output of a wind plant may not be known in advance, thereby making it difficult for the utility to consider wind output as firm. In this paper, we examine the economics of an accurate wind forecast, and provide a range of estimates calculated by a production cost model and real utility data. We discuss how an accurate forecast will affect resource scheduling and the mechanism by which resource scheduling can benefit from an accurate wind forecast.

Milligan, M.R.; Miller, A.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Chapman, F. [Environmental Defense Fund, Oakland, CA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wind Integration Study Methods (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of common elements, differences, integration costs, and errors in integration analysis.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Solar and Wind Energy Utilization and Project Development Scenarios  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization and Project Development Scenarios

(Abstract):  Solar and wind energy resources in Ethiopia have not been given due attention in the past. Some of...

43

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa Sandra Halvatzis and David Keyser National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-53187 November...

44

Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

Pennell, W.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 12. Effect of Wind Integration and Resource Adequacy62 Table E-2. Estimates of Wind IntegrationAugust. Utility Wind Integration Group (UWIG), 2006. “

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Planning Your First Wind Power Project: A Primer for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most U.S. utilities, wind power is a new technology they need to understand in order to evaluate its use in their systems. This primer addresses questions commonly asked by utilities and the issues to be considered in bringing a wind power plant on-line.

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Western Wind Dataset  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Wind Dataset Western Wind Dataset Here you will find information about the Western Wind Dataset, including the methodology used to develop the dataset, the accuracy of the data, site selection, and power output. Alert! Important Note Obtain the Western Wind Dataset This dataset was originally created for the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. These data are modeled data and not actual measured data. Learn more about the datasets including the similarities and differences between the Eastern and Western datasets and the differences from the NREL state wind maps. Methodology 3TIER created the Western Dataset with oversight and assistance from NREL. Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models were used to essentially recreate the historical weather for the western U.S. for 2004, 2005, and 2006. The

48

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Oahu Wind Integration and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agreement. The agreement includes a commitment to integrate up to 400 megawatts (MW) of offshore wind energy from Molokai or Lanai and transmit it to Oahu via undersea cable...

49

Feasibility Study for a Hopi Utility-Scale Wind Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility for the generation of energy from wind and to parallel this work with the development of a tribal utility organization capable of undertaking potential joint ventures in utility businesses and projects on the Hopi reservation. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility for the generation of energy from wind and to parallel this work with the development of a tribal utility organization capable of undertaking potential joint ventures in utility businesses and projects on the Hopi reservation. Wind resource assessments were conducted at two study sites on Hopi fee simple lands located south of the city of Winslow. Reports from the study were recently completed and have not been compared to any existing historical wind data nor have they been processed under any wind assessment models to determine the output performance and the project economics of turbines at the wind study sites. Ongoing analysis of the wind data and project modeling will determine the feasibility of a tribal utility-scale wind energy generation.

Kendrick Lomayestewa

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Operations Speaker(s): Emma Stewart Date: March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar HostPoint of...

51

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analysis of Mesoscale Model Data for Wind Integration (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supports examination of implications of national 20% wind vision, and provides input to integration and transmission studies for operational impact of large penetrations of wind on the grid.

Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Wan, Y. H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and...

54

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Wind Logics, Inc. 2004. Wind Integration Study—Final Report.EnerNex Corp. 2006. Wind Integration Study for Public

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Understanding Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaics for Integration with the Electric Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , 2007. Utility Wind Integration and Operating ImpactThe Western Wind and Solar Integration Study . Golden, CO:Association, the Utility Wind Integration Group, and the

Mills, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding that wind integration costs are manageable,higher levels of wind integration is also critical if windanalysis of wind power’s integration costs and capacity

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Laramie County Community College: Utility-Scale Wind Energy Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utility-Scale Wind Energy Technology U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant EE0000538, provided a way ahead for Laramie County Community College (LCCC) to increase educational and training opportunities for students seeking an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) or Associate of Science (AS) degree in Wind Energy Technology. The DOE grant enabled LCCC to program, schedule, and successfully operate multiple wind energy technology cohorts of up to 20-14 students per cohort simultaneously. As of this report, LCCC currently runs four cohorts. In addition, the DOE grant allowed LCCC to procure specialized LABVOLT electronic equipment that directly supports is wind energy technology curriculum.

Douglas P. Cook

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Developer Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Location Wall Lake IA Coordinates 42.281965°, -95.094098° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.281965,"lon":-95.094098,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Lenox Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lenox Municipal Utilities Developer Lenox Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Lenox Municipal Utilities Location Lenox IA Coordinates 40.880592°, -94.559029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.880592,"lon":-94.559029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Stuart Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Stuart Municipal Utilities Developer Stuart Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Stuart Municipal Utilities Location Stuart IA Coordinates 41.493988°, -94.327403° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.493988,"lon":-94.327403,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

The EPRI/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program (TVP). This paper provides an overview of the TVP, its purpose and goals, and the participating utility projects. Improved technology has significantly reduced the cost of energy from wind turbines since the early 1980s. In 1992, turbines were producing electricity for about $0.07--$0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) (at 7 m/s [16 mph sites]), compared with more than $0.30/kWh in 1980. Further technology improvements were expected to lower the cost of energy from wind turbines to $0.05/kWh. More than 17,000 wind turbines, totaling more than 1,500 MW capacity, were installed in the US, primarily in California and Hawaii. The better wind plants had availabilities above 95%, capacity factors exceeding 30%, and operation and maintenance costs of $0.01/kWh. However, despite improving technology, EPRI and DOE recognized that utility use of wind turbines was still largely limited to turbines installed in California and Hawaii during the 1980s. Wind resource assessments showed that other regions of the US, particularly the Midwest, had abundant wind resources. EPRI and DOE sought to provide a bridge from utility-grade turbine development programs under way to commercial purchases of the wind turbines. The TVP was developed to allow utilities to build and operate enough candidate turbines to gain statistically significant operating and maintenance data.

Calvert, S.; Goldman, P. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); DeMeo, E.; McGowin, C. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Smith, B.; Tromly, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Utility-Scale Land-Based 80-Meter Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Maps & Data Maps & Data Printable Version Bookmark and Share Utility-Scale Land-Based Maps Wind Resource Potential Offshore Maps Community-Scale Maps Residential-Scale Maps Anemometer Loan Programs & Data Utility-Scale Land-Based 80-Meter Wind Maps The U.S. Department of Energy provides an 80-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind resource map for the United States with links to state wind maps. States, utilities, and wind energy developers use utility-scale wind resource maps to locate and quantify the wind resource, identifying potentially windy sites within a fairly large region and determining a potential site's economic and technical viability. A wind resource map of the United States. Washington wind map and resources. Oregon wind map and resources. California wind map and resources. Idaho wind map and resources. Nevada wind map and resources. Arizona wind map and resources. Utah wind map and resources. Montana wind map and resources. Wyoming wind map and resources. North Dakota wind map and resources. South Dakota wind map and resources. Nebraska wind map and resources. Colorado wind map and resources. New Mexico wind map and resources. Kansas wind map and resources. Oklahoma wind map and resources. Texas wind map and resources. Minnesota wind map and resources. Iowa wind map and resources. Missouri wind map and resources. Arkansas wind map and resources. Lousiana wind map and resources. Wisconsin wind map and resources. Michigan wind map and resources. Michigan wind map and resources. Illinois wind map and resources. Indiana wind map and resources. Ohio wind map and resources. Kentucky wind map and resources. Tennessee wind map and resources. Mississippi wind map and resources. Alabama wind map and resources. Georgia wind map and resources. Florida wind map and resources. South Carolina wind map and resources. North Carolina wind map and resources. West Virginia wind map and resources. Virginia wind map and resources. Maryland wind map and resources. Pennsylvania wind map and resources. Delaware wind map and resources. New Jersey wind map and resources. New York wind map and resources. Maine wind map and resources. Vermont wind map and resources. New Hampshire wind map and resources. Massachusetts wind map and resources. Rhode Island wind map and resources. Connecticut wind map and resources. Alaska wind map and resources. Hawaii wind map and resources.

64

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Hydropower Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) study of 20% Wind Energy by 2030 was conducted to consider the benefits, challenges, and costs associated with sourcing 20% of U.S. energy consumption from wind power by 2030. This study found that with proactive measures, no insurmountable barriers were identified to meet the 20% goal. Following this study, DOE and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted two more studies: the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) covering the eastern portion of the U.S., and the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) covering the western portion of the United States. The WWSIS was conducted by NREL and research partner General Electric (GE) in order to provide insight into the costs, technical or physical barriers, and operational impacts caused by the variability and uncertainty of wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power when employed to serve up to 35% of the load energy in the WestConnect region (Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming). WestConnect is composed of several utility companies working collaboratively to assess stakeholder and market needs to and develop cost-effective improvements to the western wholesale electricity market. Participants include the Arizona Public Service, El Paso Electric Company, NV Energy, Public Service of New Mexico, Salt River Project, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Cooperative, Tucson Electric Power, Xcel Energy and the Western Area Power Administration.

Acker, T.; Pete, C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Wind Energy and Power System Operations: A Review of Wind Integration Studies to Date  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the challenges associated with wind integration and summarizes the findings of the wind integration studies conducted over the course of the past five years.

DeCesaro, J.; Porter, K.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Distributed Photovoltaics: Utility Integration Issues and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper addresses industry involvement in distributed photovoltaic (PV) deployment and integration from a technical and business perspective. It considers evolving PV system technologies and markets, introduces distributed PV applications and initiatives being implemented by utilities and other industry participants, and identifies critical issues and opportunities facing the U.S. electric sector.

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

68

Documenting Wind Speed and Power Deficits behind a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-spatial-and-temporal-resolution radial velocity measurements surrounding a single utility-scale wind turbine were collected using the Texas Tech University Ka-band mobile research radars. The measurements were synthesized to construct the ...

Brian D. Hirth; John L. Schroeder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project This report provides an independent review included an initial evaluation of the technical configuration and capital costs of establishing an undersea cable system and examining impacts to the existing electric transmission systems as a result of interconnecting the islands. 50411.pdf More Documents & Publications Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project OAHU Wind Integration And Transmission Study: Summary Report, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

70

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS);  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project This report provides an independent review included an initial evaluation of the technical configuration and capital costs of establishing an undersea cable system and examining impacts to the existing electric transmission systems as a result of interconnecting the islands. 50414.pdf More Documents & Publications Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project OAHU Wind Integration And Transmission Study: Summary Report, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

71

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inc. , 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study, Volume I; Min-Parsons, B. Utility wind integration and operating impactthe 2005 New York Wind Integration Study (3), the 2006

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Vision for Wind Integration. White Paper.Planning (Xcel). 2006. Wind Integration Study Report OfCharles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group), Lynn Coles (

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Impact of Wind Power Integration on Fault Current Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a study on the impact of wind power integration on the grid fault current level due to various types of faults that might take place inside or outside of wind farms. Wind power is one of the renewable energy sources that has shown tremendous growth in recent years. The increasing integration of wind energy generation and other distributed renewable energy generation could change grid behavior under fault situations and influence system stability. Specifically, integration of addition...

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group) and Robertare the integration costs associated with wind power. The

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms Far off the shores for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective

76

Wind Power Integration: Smoothing Short-Term Power Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid growth of wind power generation, utility systems are beginning to feel the intermittent and variable nature of these wind resources in electricity transmission and distribution system operations. Both short-term power fluctuations resulting from gusty winds and longer term variations resulting from diurnal wind speed variations and shifting weather patterns can affect utility power delivery as well as grid operations. This report addresses the characteristics of short-term power fluctuatio...

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Wind Power Integration: Energy Storage for Firming and Shaping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid growth of wind power generation, utility systems are beginning to experience the intermittent and variable nature of wind resources in electricity transmission and distribution system operations. Both short-term power fluctuations resulting from gusty winds and longer term power output variations resulting from diurnal wind speed variations and shifting weather patterns can affect utility power delivery as well as grid operations. This report addresses the longer-term power variations of w...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nebraska Statewide Wind Integration Study: April 2008 - January 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind generation resources in Nebraska will play an increasingly important role in the environmental and energy security solutions for the state and the nation. In this context, the Nebraska Power Association conducted a state-wide wind integration study.

EnerNex Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee; Ventyx, Atlanta, Georgia; Nebraska Power Association, Lincoln, Nebraska

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Wind Power Integration Technology Assessment and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of power electronics, energy storage, and other wind integration technologies can mitigate the impacts of adding large blocks of wind generation and raise the amount of wind capacity that can be connected to the grid without adversely affecting grid reliability, reserve and regulation requirements, and ancillary service costs. The engineering and economic data and case studies presented in this report can be used to address the available wind integration technology options.

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integrated Nucleosynthesis in Neutrino Driven Winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although they are but a small fraction of the mass ejected in core-collapse supernovae, neutrino-driven winds (NDWs) from nascent proto-neutron stars (PNSs) have the potential to contribute significantly to supernova nucleosynthesis. In previous works, the NDW has been implicated as a possible source of r-process and light p-process isotopes. In this paper we present time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations of nucleosynthesis in the NDW which include accurate weak interaction physics coupled to a full nuclear reaction network. Using two published models of PNS neutrino luminosities, we predict the contribution of the NDW to the integrated nucleosynthetic yield of the entire supernova. For the neutrino luminosity histories considered, no true r-process occurs in the most basic scenario. The wind driven from an older $1.4 M_\\odot$ model for a PNS is moderately neutron-rich at late times however, and produces $^{87}$Rb, $^{88}$Sr, $^{89}$Y, and $^{90}$Zr in near solar proportions relative to oxygen. The wind fro...

Roberts, L F; Hoffman, R D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

82

UWIG Distributed Wind Impacts Analysis Tool Progress Report: Utility Wind Interest Group Distributed Wind Impacts Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed wind generation systems consist of small clusters of wind turbines located near small load centers and connected directly to the distribution system. Depending on the electrical characteristics of the distribution line, the type of wind turbine, and the relative locations of the interconnection to the distribution system, the substation, and customer connections, distributed wind generation can significantly affect the stability, power quality, and operations of the distribution line. As a re...

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

Operating Reserves and Wind Power Integration: An International Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of additional operating reserves in power systems with high wind penetration is attracting a significant amount of attention and research. Wind integration analysis over the past several years has shown that the level of operating reserve that is induced by wind is not a constant function of the installed capacity. Observations and analysis of actual wind plant operating data has shown that wind does not change its output fast enough to be considered as a contingency event. However, the variability that wind adds to the system does require the activation or deactivation of additional operating reserves. This paper provides a high-level international comparison of methods and key results from both operating practice and integration analysis, based on the work in International Energy Agency IEA WIND Task 25 on Large-scale Wind Integration. The paper concludes with an assessment of the common themes and important differences, along with recent emerging trends.

Milligan, M.; Donohoo, P.; Lew, D.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Lannoye, E.; Flynn, D.; O'Malley, M.; Miller, N.; Ericksen, P. B.; Gottig, A.; Rawn, B.; Frunt, J.; Kling, W. L.; Gibescu, M.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Robitaille, A.; Kamwa, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

10 Questions for a Wind & Solar Integration Analyst: Kirsten...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory (NREL) scientist Kirsten Orwig specializes in transmission and grid integration for wind and solar energy. She shared with us how her experiences in storm chasing...

85

Feasibility Studies on Integrating Offshore Wind Power with Oil Platforms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis is centered around the possibilities of integrating offshore wind power together with oil and gas platforms. The motivation behind this topic is… (more)

Årdal, Atle Rygg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Utilization of Wind Energy in the Galapagos Kurt Kornbluth, Ryohei Hinokuma, and Zach MacCaffrey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Wind Energy in the Galapagos Kurt Kornbluth, Ryohei Hinokuma, and Zach Mac to utilize the excess wind energy ·Cover at least 50 % (currently 41%) of load with newly installed wind turbines Problems · Mismatch between demand and wind generation · No Storage - All of the excess energy

California at Davis, University of

87

Survey of Wind Integration Study Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25% during 2006 and reached almost 74,000 MW worldwide by the end of the year. This rapid growth is forecasted to continue for several years and result in large regional concentrations of wind generation capacity. An increasing amount of this wind energy is expected to come from offshore wind plants, especially in Europe. Because wind generation is an intermittent resource, and can not be dispatched, wind energy will affect the operation of th...

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest New Crop (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop is a trifold brochure that strives to educate rural landowners and rural co-op utilities about the benefits of wind power development. It provides examples of rural utilities that have successful wind energy projects and supportive statements from industry members.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Operating Reserves and Wind Power Integration: An International Comparison; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a high-level international comparison of methods and key results from both operating practice and integration analysis, based on an informal International Energy Agency Task 25: Large-scale Wind Integration.

Milligan, M.; Donohoo, P.; Lew, D.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Lannoye, E.; Flynn, D.; O' Malley, M.; Miller, N.; Eriksen, P. B.; Gottig, A.; Rawn, B.; Gibescu, M.; Lazaro, E. G.; Robitaille, A.; Kamwa, I.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Integrated Wind Energy/Desalination System; General Electric Global Research  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with General Electric Global Research to explore wind power as a desirable option for integration with desalination technologies.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

Rodney Frehlich

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Wind Energy for Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wind Energy for Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Four 1.8-MW Vestas turbines owned by AMP-Ohio in Bowling Green, Ohio. Photo from Ohio Office of Energy Efficiency, NREL 14070 In the face of new and emerging market conditions, municipal utilities across the country find themselves at a crossroads. Load requirements are expected to continue increasing, while in many cases, existing supply contracts will end within the next few years. Further, customers throughout municipal utility service territories express consistently high levels of interest in renewable energy alternatives. In most cases, the preferred

94

July 29th -30th 2010 1Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy System Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 29th - 30th 2010 1Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy System Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy System Wind Integration Forum July 29th ­ 30th 2010, Portland Gitte Agersbæk Senior Engineer Energinet.dk #12;July 29th - 30th 2010 2Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy

95

How do Wind and Solar Power Affect Grid Operations: The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the scope of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, the development of wind and solar datasets, and the results to date on three scenarios.

Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Freeman, L.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Piwko, R.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

An Integral Field Spectroscopic Study of Galactic Winds in (U)LIRGs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I propose to carry out a multi-wavelength integral field study of galactic winds to determine the relationship between properties of winds and their hosts. The study of galactic scale winds is a new and growing field. Detailed studies of individual galaxies and their outflows are showing that galactic winds can have a profound effect on their host galaxies and may be part of the solution to several unsolved problems in galaxy evolution. My work will provide new insight into how galactic winds are formed and how they affect galaxy evolution by providing the first statistical study of several galactic wind and host galaxy properties. I will utilize the new WiFeS Integral field unit (IFU) at the Siding Spring Observatory as well as the integral field units on Mauna Kea. This will allow me to cover a wide wavelength range (from 300-24000 nm) and provide access to the entire sky. WiFeS will provide excellent wide-field optical spectra of nearby (U)LIRGS which I will use to determine the relationship between wind structure and spatially resolved host properties using optical emission lines resulting from wind-ISM interaction. My local sample will

Jeffrey Rich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Impact of Balancing Areas Size, Obligation Sharing, and Ramping Capability on Wind Integration: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines wind integration costs as a function of balancing area size to determine if the larger system size helps mitigate wind integration cost increases.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the costs and benefits of wind energy relative to itsbenefits, including better utilization of the transmission system and providing increased flexibility to integrate wind energy.

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Adaptive Control of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Operating in Region 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many challenges exist for the efficient and safe operation of wind turbines due to the difficulty in creating accurate models of their dynamic characteristics and the turbulent conditions in which they operate. A promising new area of wind turbine research is the application of adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to problems where the plant model is not well known and the plant operating conditions are unpredictable. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed and reject step disturbances, which model the uniform wind disturbance across the wind turbine rotor. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. To improve controller performance, we use an extension of the Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control (DMRAC) approach to regulate turbine rotational speed and to accommodate step disturbances. The turbine simulation models the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine that has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved generator speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the baseline PI pitch controller. The adaptive controller demonstrated robustness to modeling errors and changes in system parameters.

Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.; Wright, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Wind Power for Municipal Utilities. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Brochure.  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Clean energy has a bright future. Today a growing number Clean energy has a bright future. Today a growing number of public utilities are harvesting a new source of homegrown energy. From Massachusetts to California, more than two dozen municipal utilities have wind power in their energy mix. Wind energy is attractive for many reasons: * Wind energy is clean and renewable. * Wind energy is economically competitive. * Wind energy reduces energy price risks. Unlike coal, natural gas, or oil, the "fuel" for a wind turbine will always be free. * Wind energy is popular with the public. A RECORD YEAR - Wind power is booming. Worldwide, a record 3,800 megawatts (MW) were installed in 2001. These sleek, impressive wind turbines have closed the cost gap with conventional power plants. Depending on size and location, wind farms produce electricity for 3-6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Phase 2 (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes the scope and results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Lefton, S.; Kumar, N.; Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one-page, two-sided fact sheet presents high-level summary results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

Not Available

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Impacts Analysis For Avian Cumulative Impacts Analysis For Avian Resources From Proposed Wind Projects In Sherman County, Washington CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS FOR AVIAN RESOURCES FROM PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS IN SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON FINAL REPORT March 2006 Prepared For: Bonneville Power Administration 905 NE 11th Avenue Portland, Oregon, 97232 Prepared By: David Young, Kimberly Bay, & Victoria Poulton Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc. 2003 Central Avenue Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001 CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ............................................................................. 1 2.0 METHODS ...............................................................................................................................

106

Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

107

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Hummon, M.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wind power and electric utilities: a review of the problems and prospects. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of windpower poses a variety of problems for utilities primarily due to the uncontrollability of the power source and the high degree of variability of the wind. Differences in the dynamic behavior of the wind and of utility load patterns and the problems that arise from these differences are described. Utility capacity expansion methods and modifications to them to incorporate the characteristics of wind machines into the analytic procedure are outlined and results from initial studies employing these modifications are reviewed. These results indicate that, in general, storage devices are too expensive to be purchased by utilities if they serve mainly to balance the output of the wind machines; wind machines tend to supplant purchases of conventional baseload capacity but require additional peaking units; and the economic value of wind machines to utilities is composed of savings in both fuel and capacity related expenditures for conventional equipment.

Davitian, H

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage iterations. We demonstrate our method in simulations with various wind scenarios and prices for energy. INTRODUCTION Today, wind power is the most important renewable energy source. For the years to come, many

110

Integrating Wind, Solar and Demand Response into Energy Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are under pressure from federal and state assemblies to derive increasingly large percentages of their electricity from resources that are "renewable". This translates into large scale rollout of wind and solar generation, and perhaps biomass. The chief motivation for these laws seems to be reduction in greenhouse gases, particularly carbon. A primary concern is that the largest of these, wind and solar, are extremely variable in output and appear difficult to predict. This project ad...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Optimization of Utility-Scale Wind-Hydrogen-Battery Systems: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional utility-scale wind energy systems are not dispatchable; that is, the utility cannot instantaneously control their power output. Energy storage, which can come in many forms, is needed to add dispatchability to a wind farm. This study investigates two options: batteries and hydrogen.

Fingersh, L. J.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Wind and Solar Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 Preprint D. Lew, G. Brinkman, E. Ibanez, and B.-M. Hodge National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. King RePPAE To be presented at the 11th Annual International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power into Power Systems as Well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Power Plants Conference Lisbon, Portugal November 13-15, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-56217 September 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of

113

Utility-Scale Wind Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Economic Development. Accessed September 27, 2013. References "U.S. Department of Energy. 2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications"...

114

IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 2: Participant Case Studies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

Acker, T.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Characterizing Inflow Conditions Across the Rotor Disk of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multi-megawatt utility-scale wind turbines operate in a turbulent, thermally-driven atmosphere where wind speed and air temperature vary with height. Turbines convert the wind's momentum into electrical power, and so changes in the atmosphere across the rotor disk influence the power produced by the turbine. To characterize the inflow into utility scale turbines at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado, NREL recently built two 135-meter inflow monitoring towers. This poster introduces the towers and the measurements that are made, showing some of the data obtained in the first few months of operation in 2011.

Clifton, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Kelley, N.; Scott, G.; Jager, D.; Schreck, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study -- Preliminary Findings: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05 05 September 2009 Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study - Preliminary Findings Preprint D. Corbus, M. Milligan, and E. Ela National Renewable Energy Laboratory M. Schuerger Energy Systems Consulting Services B. Zavadil EnerNex Corp. To be presented at the 8th International Workshop on Large Scale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Farms Bremen, Germany October 14-15, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

118

Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 1.03: Utilities guide  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that was developed under the direction of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This Utilities Guide explains how to operate utility programs that are supplied as a part of the IBS. These utility programs are chiefly for managing and manipulating various kinds of IBS data and system administration files. Many of the utilities are for creating, editing, converting, or displaying map data and other data that are related to geographic location.

Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Pottier, M.C.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electric Power Research Institute Utility Wind Turbine Verification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the DOE EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) and the Turbine Verification and Technology Transfer Projects funded by the program between 1994 and 2004.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

120

Technical and Economic Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

&spv0&st0&srp1&stateKS. vii Table ES-1. Turbine Performance and Economics, Including Job Creation Estimates 5 Annual Cost Savings (year) Payback Period (years) Wind System...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigates the impacts of high penetrations of wind and solar power into the Western Interconnection of the United States. WWSIS2 builds on the Phase 1 study but with far greater refinement in the level of data inputs and production simulation. It considers the differences between wind and solar power on systems operations. It considers mitigation options to accommodate wind and solar when full costs of wear-and-tear and full impacts of emissions rates are taken into account. It determines wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts. New data sets were created for WWSIS2, and WWSIS1 data sets were refined to improve realism of plant output and forecasts. Four scenarios were defined for WWSIS2 that examine the differences between wind and solar and penetration level. Transmission was built out to bring resources to load. Statistical analysis was conducted to investigate wind and solar impacts at timescales ranging from seasonal down to 5 minutes.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B.-M.; King, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Benefit of Regional Energy Balancing Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in various wide-area balancing schemes to help integrate wind have generated significant interest. As we have shown in past work, large balancing areas not only help with wind integration, but can also increase the efficiency of operations in systems without wind. Recent work on the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) has found that combining balancing over the WestConnect footprint will increase the efficiency of commitment and dispatch at wind penetrations ranging from 10-20% of annual electricity demand, and will be essential for high penetrations and small balancing areas. In addition the Northwest Wind Integration Action Plan recommended balancing area cooperation as a method to help integrate the large potential wind development. In this paper we investigate the potential impact of a proposed Energy Imbalance Service on the ability of the non-market portions of Western Electricity Coordinating Councils (WECC) United States footprint to integrate wind energy. We will utilize data adapted from the WWSIS for the Western Interconnection. The analysis uses time-synchronized wind and load data to evaluate the potential for ramp requirement reduction that could be achieved with combined operation. Chronological analysis and ramp duration analysis quantify the benefit in terms of not only the ramp sizes, but the frequency of the potentially avoided ramps that must be managed by the non-wind generation fleet. Multiple approaches that can be used to achieve these benefits will also be suggested in the paper. We also suggest other approaches that can help achieve much of the benefit of full consolidation without requiring the physical consolidation of balancing areas.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Integrated Wind Energy/Desalination System: October 11, 2004 -- July 29, 2005  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the feasibility of multiple concepts for integrating wind turbines and reverse osmosis desalination systems for water purification.

GE Global Research

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Operations Speaker(s): Emma Stewart Date: March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote The interconnection process can be a laborious and expensive process for both utilities and developers. High PV penetration levels create a number of challenges for the management and operation of the utility grid. This study presents work being completed in Hawaii to improve and innovate the interconnect process, separating perceived issues from real technical concerns. Existing interconnection methods and standards such as IEEE 1547, Hawaii Rule 14H and California Rule 21 are evaluated in emerging high penetration scenarios. These rules define a 15% DG penetration level as a

127

Integrating Energy Efficiency and Demand Response into Utility Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the methods in which utilities integrate their supply-side and demand-side resources to meet their generating resource requirements. The major steps in developing a resource plan are reviewed, including the alternative methods currently employed. Finally, the report presents the results of a short survey that was administered to the advisors in Energy Utilization. The results show that methods are more sophisticated than 20 years ago, but more could be accomplished in ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 1: Issues, Impacts, and Economics of Wind and Hydropower Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

Acker, T.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Value of electrical heat boilers and heat pumps for wind power integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Value of electrical heat boilers and heat pumps for wind power integration Peter Meibom Juha of using electrical heat boilers and heat pumps as wind power integration measures relieving the link\\ZRUGV wind power, integration, heat pumps, electric heat boilers ,QWURGXFWLRQ 3UREOHP RYHUYLHZ The Danish

130

Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Utilities Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Utilities Guide explains how you can use the IBS utility programs to manage and manipulate various kinds of IBS data. These programs include utilities for creating, editing, and displaying maps and other data that are referenced to geographic location. The intended audience for this document are chiefly data managers but also system managers and some emergency management planners and analysts.

Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Williams, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bower, J.C. [Bower Software Services, Kennewick, WA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Final Technical Report Laramie County Community College: Utility-Scale Wind Energy Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Utility-Scale Wind Energy Technology U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant EE0000538, provided a way ahead for Laramie County Community College (LCCC) to increase educational and training opportunities for students seeking an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) or Associate of Science (AS) degree in Wind Energy Technology. The DOE grant enabled LCCC to program, schedule, and successfully operate multiple wind energy technology cohorts of up to 20-14 students per cohort simultaneously. As of this report, LCCC currently runs four cohorts. In addition, the DOE grant allowed LCCC to procure specialized LABVOLT electronic equipment that directly supports is wind energy technology curriculum.

Douglas P. Cook

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More August 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars August 21: Live Webinar on the 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Program The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled "2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications" on Wednesday,

133

Integrated Design of Chemical Processes and Utility Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pinch concept for integrated heat recovery networks has recently become established in chemical process design. This paper presents an overview of the concept and shows how it has now been extended to total process design (reactors, separators, etc.) and to the task of interfacing processes with their utility systems (furnaces, steam levels, turbines, etc.)

Linnhoff, B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored an Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop in Broomfield, Colorado September 22-23, 2004. Attendees included representatives from utilities and energy companies, researchers, and government officials. Water electrolysis is a leading candidate for hydrogen production as the U.S. begins the transition to a hydrogen economy. Ideally, electrolysis will be able to provide hydrogen fuel for at least 20% of our light duty fleet; at prices competitive with traditional fuels and other hydrogen production pathways, using domestically available resources; and without adverse impacts to the environment. To be successful, the utility sector must play a vital role in identifying opportunities to diversify electricity generation and markets and begin to look at transportation fuel as a high priority business opportunity for the future. This workshop was held to identify the opportunities and challenges facing the widespread deployment of electrolysis based hydrogen production in the U.S.

135

Optimal site selection and sizing of distributed utility-scale wind power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As electric market product unbundling occurs, sellers in the wholesale market for electricity will find it to their advantage to be able to specify the quantity of electricity available and the time of availability. Since wind power plants are driven by the stochastic nature of the wind itself, this can present difficulties. To the extent that an accurate wind forecast is available, contract deviations, and therefore penalties, can be significantly reduced. Even though one might have the ability to accurately forecast the availability of wind power, it might not be available during enough of the peak period to provide sufficient value. However, if the wind power plant is developed over geographically disperse locations, the timing and availability of wind power from these multiple sources could provide a better match with the utility`s peak load than a single site. There are several wind plants in various stages of planning or development in the US. Although some of these are small-scale demonstration projects, significant wind capacity has been developed in Minnesota, with additional developments planned in Wyoming and Iowa. As these and other projects are planned and developed, there is a need to perform analysis of the value of geographically diverse sites on the efficiency of the overall wind plant. In this paper, the authors use hourly wind-speed data from six geographically diverse sites to provide some insight into the potential benefits of disperse wind plant development. They provide hourly wind power from each of these sites to an electric reliability simulation model. This model uses generating plant characteristics of the generators within the state of Minnesota to calculate various reliability indices. Since they lack data on wholesale power transactions, they do not include them in the analysis, and they reduce the hourly load data accordingly. The authors present and compare results of their methods and suggest some areas of future research.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Unit commitment with wind power generation: integrating wind forecast uncertainty and stochastic programming.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a computational framework for integrating the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulations that account for wind power uncertainty. We first enhance the WRF model with adjoint sensitivity analysis capabilities and a sampling technique implemented in a distributed-memory parallel computing architecture. We use these capabilities through an ensemble approach to model the uncertainty of the forecast errors. The wind power realizations are exploited through a closed-loop stochastic unit commitment/energy dispatch formulation. We discuss computational issues arising in the implementation of the framework. In addition, we validate the framework using real wind speed data obtained from a set of meteorological stations. We also build a simulated power system to demonstrate the developments.

Constantinescu, E. M.; Zavala, V. M.; Rocklin, M.; Lee, S.; Anitescu, M. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Univ. of Chicago); (New York Univ.)

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

137

Strategic planning in electric utilities: Using wind technologies as risk management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights research investigating the ownership of renewable energy technologies to mitigate risks faced by the electric utility industry. Renewable energy technology attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead time, modularity, and investment reversibility are discussed. Incorporating some of these attributes into an economic evaluation is illustrated using a municipal utility`s decision to invest in either wind generation or natural gas based generation. The research concludes that wind and other modular renewable energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, have the potential to provide decision makers with physical risk-management investments.

Hoff, T E [Pacific Energy Group, Stanford, CA (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Yannick Degeilh, Justine Descloux, George Gross  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Resources Yannick Degeilh, Justine is key to providing the means of better harnessing wind energy potential. This paper proposes Wind is a clean and renewable source of energy with zero fuel costs. However, wind generation outputs

Gross, George

139

New Report: Integrating Variable Wind Energy into the Grid | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report: Integrating Variable Wind Energy into the Grid Report: Integrating Variable Wind Energy into the Grid New Report: Integrating Variable Wind Energy into the Grid December 19, 2011 - 2:00pm Addthis The Energy Department and Alstom Grid announce the availability of a new report on integrating wind energy into the electrical grid. | Image source: The Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations Report. The Energy Department and Alstom Grid announce the availability of a new report on integrating wind energy into the electrical grid. | Image source: The Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations Report. Charlton I. Clark Integration Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program

140

Wind Power Integration via Aggregator-Consumer Coordination: A Game Theoretic Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Power Integration via Aggregator-Consumer Coordination: A Game Theoretic Approach Chenye Wu@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract--Due to the stochastic nature of wind power, its large-scale integration into the power grid-side resources via pricing in order to tackle the intermittency and fluctuations in wind power generation

Huang, Jianwei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Wind Integration Forum June 6, 2011 Action Items Update December, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Integration Forum June 6, 2011 Action Items Update December, 2011 The action items from the June 6 Wind Integration Steering Committee are repeated below, followed by brief summaries of progress concern over possible impacts on grid stability from the growing wind fleet. BPA will report back

142

Systems and methods for an integrated electrical sub-system powered by wind energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various embodiments relate to systems and methods related to an integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system including a wind power source, an electrically-powered sub-system coupled to and at least partially powered by the wind power source, the electrically-powered sub-system being coupled to the wind power source through power converters, and a supervisory controller coupled to the wind power source and the electrically-powered sub-system to monitor and manage the integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system.

Liu, Yan (Ballston Lake, NY); Garces, Luis Jose (Niskayuna, NY)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

NREL: Wind Research - Systems Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-Aided Engineering Systems Engineering Controls Analysis Testing Utility Grid Integration Assessment Wind Resource Assessment Projects Facilities Research Staff Working...

144

How Do High Levels of Wind and Solar Impact the Grid? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a brief introduction to the scope of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), inputs and scenario development, and the key findings of the study.

Lew, D.; Piwko, D.; Miller, N.; Jordan, G.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

WINS: Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

During the two-year project period, the project team has engaged in the development of WINS and applied it to several congestion and wind integration studies. In summary, researches in this project on wind integration include (1) Development of WINS; (2) Transmission Congestion Analysis in the Eastern Interconnection; (3) Analysis of 2030 Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern Interconnection; (4) Large-scale Analysis of 2018 Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern U.S. Interconnection. The education activities in this project on wind energy include (1) Wind Energy Training Facility Development; (2) Wind Energy Course Development. The research resulted in 33 papers, 9 presentations, 9 PhD degrees, 4 MS degrees, and 7 awards.

Shahidehpour, Mohamamd

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Operating Reserve Implication of Alternative Implementations of an Energy Imbalance Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the past few years, there has been significant interest in alternative ways to manage power systems over a larger effective electrical footprint. Large regional transmission organizations in the Eastern Interconnection have effectively consolidated balancing areas, achieving significant economies of scale that result in a reduction in required reserves. Conversely, in the Western Interconnection there are many balancing areas, which will result in challenges if there is significant wind and solar energy development in the region. A recent proposal to the Western Electricity Coordinating Council suggests a regional energy imbalance service (EIS). To evaluate this EIS, a number of analyses are in process or are planned. This paper describes one part of an analysis of the EIS's implication on operating reserves under several alternative scenarios of the market footprint and participation. We improve on the operating reserves method utilized in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study and apply this modified approach to data from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Installer Issues: Integrating Distributed Wind into Local Communities (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A presentation for the WindPower 2006 Conference in Pittsburgh, PA, regarding the issues facing installer of small wind electric systems.

Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The integration of climatic data sets for wind resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One barrier to wind energy development, in many regions of the world, is the lack of reliable information about the spacial distribution of the wind energy resource. The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program`s wind resource assessment group is to improve the characterization of the wind resource in many of these regions in support of U.S. wind energy industry. NREL provides wind resource assessments for our clients in the form of reports, atlases, and wind resource maps. The assessments estimate the level of the wind resource, at wind turbine hub heights (typically 30m to 50m above ground level), for locations exposed to the prevailing winds.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

innovati nNREL Confirms Large Potential for Grid Integration of Wind, Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovati nNREL Confirms Large Potential for Grid Integration of Wind, Solar Power To fully harvest the nation's bountiful wind and solar resources, it is critical to know how much electrical power from at adding enough wind and solar power capacity to the grid to produce 35% of the WestConnect's electricity

151

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Side Management for Wind Power Integration in Microgrid Using Dynamic Potential Game Theory the intermittency in wind power generation. Our focus is on an isolated microgrid with one wind turbine, one fast supply and demand in an isolated microgrid [2], which is an important concept for renewable energy

Huang, Jianwei

152

A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES BY NICOLAS BENOIT the energy output of a wind farm in a single location and of those in multiple locations. In this way, we for such planning tools. The incorporation of the wind energy model requires the extension of the widely used

Gross, George

153

EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (Denmark) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denmark) Denmark) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EWIS European wind integration study Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

154

EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (Czech Republic)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study (Smart Grid Project) (Czech Republic) study (Smart Grid Project) (Czech Republic) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EWIS European wind integration study Country Czech Republic Coordinates 49.817493°, 15.472962° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.817493,"lon":15.472962,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (Portugal) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portugal) Portugal) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EWIS European wind integration study Country Portugal Coordinates 39.095963°, -8.217773° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.095963,"lon":-8.217773,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

156

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation accompanies Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, a follow-on to Phase 1, which examined the operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation on the electric power system in the West and was one of the largest variable generation studies to date. High penetrations of variable generation can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 calculated these costs and emissions, and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of variable generation on the fossil-fueled fleet. The presentation highlights the scope of the study and results.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Kumar, N.; Lefton, S.; Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.; King, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Reliable, Lightweight Transmissions For Off-Shore, Utility Scale Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to reduce the technical risk for a hydrostatic transmission based drivetrain for high-power utility-size wind turbines. A theoretical study has been performed to validate the reduction of cost of energy (CoE) for the wind turbine, identify risk mitigation strategies for the drive system and critical components, namely the pump, shaft connection and hydrostatic transmission (HST) controls and address additional benefits such as reduced deployment costs, improved torque density and improved mean time between repairs (MTBR).

Jean-Claude Ossyra

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

Mobile integrated temporary utility system. Innovative technology summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mobile Integrated Temporary Utility System (MITUS) integrates portable electrical power along with communications and emergency alarm and lighting capabilities to provide safe, centralized power to work areas that need to be de-energized for decommissioning work. MITUS consists of a portable unit substation; up to twenty portable kiosks that house the power receptacles, communications, and emergency alarm and lighting systems; and a central communications unit. This system makes sequential decommissioning efforts efficient and cost-effective by allowing the integrated system to remain intact while being moved to subsequent work sites. Use of the MITUS also eliminates the need to conduct zero-energy tests and implement associated lock-out/tag-out procedures at partially de-energized facilities. Since the MITUS is a designed system, it can be customized to accommodate unique facility conditions simply by varying kiosks and transformer configurations. The MITUS is an attractive alternate to the use of portable generators with stand-alone communications and emergency system. It is more cost-effective than upgrading or reconfiguring existing power distribution systems.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions Impacts of Cycling and Ramping Are Relatively Small The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. It examines the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) energy on the electric power system. The goal is to understand the effects of and investigate mitigation options for the variability and uncertainty of wind and solar. Phase 1 Research Phase 1 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS1) found no technical barriers to the integration of high penetrations of wind and solar power in the Western Interconnection power system if certain changes to opera- tional practices are made. The two most important changes

160

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Integrated Wind-Onsite Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Electric Power Research Institute project was to investigate the benefits of directly integrated energy storage and wind generation. The ability to store wind energy could provide higher wind farm capacity factors, improved locational marginal prices during high wind periods, and increased production tax credit benefits. The project's Phase I objective was to identify the most promising energy storage (ES) options available at this time. Technologies investigated included many batter...

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

understanding of the operational impacts of wind integration and how wind power forecast is being used today. The identified practices from a broad group of utilities can be...

163

Integrating High Penetrations of Solar in the Western United States: Results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This poster presents a summary of the results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2.

Bird, L.; Lew, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Electrolysis-Utility Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miller, Atomic Energy of Canada Wind in the Electricity Infrastructure, Mark McGree, Xcel Energy Hydrogen at the Fueling Station, Steven Schlasner, Conoco Phillips Electrolysis...

166

An approach to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a probabilistic approach based on the convolution technique to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems supplying loads. Expressions are developed to obtain the duration curve for the power injected into the utility grid. The energy injected into the grid and drawn from it to supply the load during the study period can be calculated from this duration curve. The load model employed enables the study period to range from one year to one particular hour-of-day, thus allowing the inclusion of the time-value of energy as appropriate in economic assessments.

Abouzahr, I.; Ramakumar, R. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess the potential for the application of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (a field of interconnected WTGs denoted in this report by the acronym WECS) in a specific utility contest to gain advance information concerning their economic feasibility; their optional problems; the criteria and procedures for site selection; environmental impacts; legal, social, and other problems; and the balance of cost and benefits from the point of view of the consumer and the utility. This study addresses the circumstances of the Hawaiian Electric Company operations onthe Island of Oahu.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

How do Wind and Solar Power Affect Grid Operations: The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study; Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17 17 September 2009 How do Wind and Solar Power Affect Grid Operations: The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Preprint D. Lew and M. Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory G. Jordan, L. Freeman, N. Miller, K. Clark, and R. Piwko GE To be presented at the 8th International Workshop on Large Scale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Farms Bremen, Germany October 14-15, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

169

Record of Decision - Klondike III/ Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project - 10-25-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE) 1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects,

170

10 Questions for a Wind & Solar Integration Analyst: Kirsten Orwig |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Questions for a Wind & Solar Integration Analyst: Kirsten Orwig 10 Questions for a Wind & Solar Integration Analyst: Kirsten Orwig 10 Questions for a Wind & Solar Integration Analyst: Kirsten Orwig March 31, 2011 - 4:58pm Addthis Scientist Kirsten Orwig Scientist Kirsten Orwig Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Working at the intersection of renewable energy technologies and meteorology, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) scientist Kirsten Orwig specializes in transmission and grid integration for wind and solar energy. She shared with us how her experiences in storm chasing led her to this position at NREL and why understanding meteorology is important for advancing reliable solar and wind energy. Q: What prompted you to specialize in a scientific field? Kirsten Orwig: Growing up I was always fascinated with natural phenomena,

171

Large-Scale Wind Integration Studies in the United States: Preliminary Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, is managing two large-scale wind integration studies. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) covers the footprint of WestConnect, a group of transmission owners that covers most of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and Wyoming. The Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) covers a large part of the Eastern Interconnection, and leverages a large-scale transmission study known as the Joint Coordinated System Plan (JCSP). Both studies analyze the impact of 20-30% wind energy penetration within the study footprint based on energy. This paper discusses key results that have emerged so far from each study, focusing primarily on simulation results based on hourly production simulations. Results from both studies show that high wind penetrations can be successfully integrated into the power system, but depend on sufficient transmission and significant changes in operations.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Freeman, L.; Zavadil, B.; Schuerger, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oahu Wind Integration and Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-50411 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada NREL Technical Monitor: David Corbus

175

QuikSCAT Impacts on Coastal Forecasts and Warnings: Operational Utility of Satellite Ocean Surface Vector Wind Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reports on the operational utility of ocean surface vector wind (SVW) data from Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) observations in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast ...

Ralph F. Milliff; Peter A. Stamus

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Utility of Radiosonde Wind Data in Representing Climatological Variations of Tropospheric Temperature and Baroclinicity in the Western Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility of the thermal wind equation (TWE) in relating tropospheric (850–300 hPa) wind and temperature on climatological time scales is assessed, based on data from 59 radiosonde stations in the western tropical Pacific during 1979–2004. ...

Robert J. Allen; Steven C. Sherwood

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Integrating Wind and Solar Energy in the U.S. Bulk Power System: Lessons from Regional Integration Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two recent studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have examined the impacts of integrating high penetrations of wind and solar energy on the Eastern and Western electric grids. The Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), initiated in 2007, examined the impact on power system operations of reaching 20% to 30% wind energy penetration in the Eastern Interconnection. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the operational implications of adding up to 35% wind and solar energy penetration to the Western Interconnect. Both studies examined the costs of integrating variable renewable energy generation into the grid and transmission and operational changes that might be necessary to address higher penetrations of wind or solar generation. This paper identifies key insights from these regional studies for integrating high penetrations of renewables in the U.S. electric grid. The studies share a number of key findings, although in some instances the results vary due to differences in grid operations and markets, the geographic location of the renewables, and the need for transmission.

Bird, L.; Lew, D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NREL: Wind Research - Design Review and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-Aided Engineering Systems Engineering Controls Analysis Testing Utility Grid Integration Assessment Wind Resource Assessment Projects Facilities Research Staff Working...

179

Compressed Air Energy Storage To Support Wind Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind generators produce much of their energy during off-peak time periods and their output has high power fluctuations which cause different types of unit commitment and dispatch problems. Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) plants with large amounts of bulk energy storage capability can shift large amounts off-peak energy from wind generators to more price advantageous on-peak time periods; and, CAES can smooth out the power fluctuations from wind generators so that grid operators can resolve ramping a...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (Netherlands...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jun 2007 Oct 2009 References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview The project aims to work with all the relevant stakeholders especially representatives of wind generation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (Germany...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jun 2007 Oct 2009 References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview The project aims to work with all the relevant stakeholders especially representatives of wind generation...

182

EWIS European wind integration study (Smart Grid Project) (United...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jun 2007 Oct 2009 References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview The project aims to work with all the relevant stakeholders especially representatives of wind generation...

183

Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Review of FRT Requirements for Integration of Wind Energy in China and Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is conducted on FRT ability of latest Grid Code requirements for wind farm integration between China and selected EU countries. The main causes of the differences are investigated. The author tried to predict the future trend of regulations ... Keywords: Grid Code, wind farm, fault ride-through

Zhang Yong; Guo Peiyuan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Large-Scale Wind Integration Studies in the United States: Preliminary Results; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is managing two large regional wind integration studies on behalf of the United States Department of Energy. These two studies are believed to be the largest ever undertaken in the United States.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Freeman, L.; Zavadil, B.; Schuerger, M.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy research, development, and deployment have reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies, increased wind energy system reliability and operability, lowered risk by validating performance and design, increased the understanding of the true impacts of wind energy on the U.S. electrical infrastructure, and expanded wind energy markets. A synopsis of research conducted on utility-scale wind turbines, small wind turbines, software, components, market development and grid integration are detailed.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Integration of alternative feedstreams for biomass treatment and utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for treating biomass composed of integrated feedstocks to produce fermentable sugars. One aspect of the methods described herein includes a pretreatment step wherein biomass is integrated with an alternative feedstream and the resulting integrated feedstock, at relatively high concentrations, is treated with a low concentration of ammonia relative to the dry weight of biomass. In another aspect, a high solids concentration of pretreated biomass is integrated with an alternative feedstream for saccharifiaction.

Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA); Friend, Julie (Claymont, DE); Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Hames, Bonnie (Westminster, CO)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

Utility Scale Renewables: Renewable and Efficiency Technology Integration (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PowerPoint presentation given by Dave Mooney at the NREL Industry Forum on renewable and efficiency technology integration.

Mooney, D.

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advancing Wind Integration Study Methodologies: Implications of Higher Levels of Wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report on the evolution of techniques to better model high penetrations (generally, 20% or more energy penetration) of wind energy.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Wan, Y. H.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Integration Costs: Are They Unique to Wind and Solar Energy? Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past several years, there has been considerable interest in assessing wind integration costs. This is understandable because wind energy does increase the variability and uncertainty that must be managed on a power system. However, there are other sources of variability and uncertainty that also must be managed in the power system. This paper describes some of these sources and shows that even the introduction of base-load generation can cause additional ramping and cycling. The paper concludes by demonstrating that integration costs are not unique to wind and solar, and should perhaps instead be assessed by power plant and load performance instead of technology type.

Milligan, M.; Hodge, B.; Kirby, B.; Clark, C.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

CHALLENGES OF INTEGRATING LARGE AMOUNTS OF WIND Jonathan D. Rose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-300 MW, with the largest coal and nuclear power plants rated at 2,000 to 3,000 MW. Although wind energy are meshed networks of transmission lines connecting together cities, towns, and power plants

Hiskens, Ian A.

193

Integrating wind turbines into the Orcas Island distribution system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research effort consists of two years of wind data collection and analysis to investigate the possibility of strategically locating a megawatt (MW) scale wind farm near the end of an Orcas Power and light Company (OPALCO) 25-kilovolt (kV) distribution circuit to defer the need to upgrade the line to 69 kV. The results of this study support the results of previous work in which another year of wind data and collection was performed. Both this study and the previous study show that adding a MW-scale wind farm at the Mt. Constitution site is a feasible alternative to upgrading the OPALCO 25-kV distribution circuit to 69 kV.

Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Roseville, CA (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Integrated resource planning Electric and gas utilities in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquisitions will be the important criteria. Resource planning at gas utilities IRP is just beginning to be applied to the natural gas industry. At gas utilities, called local distribution companies (LDCs and regulated differently. Natural gas is produced, transported, and distributed by three different sets

195

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of NewRenewable Generation in the Western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, markets for renewable generation--especially wind power--have grown substantially in recent years. This growth is typically attributed to technology improvements and resulting cost reductions, the availability of federal tax incentives, and aggressive state policy efforts. But another less widely recognized driver of new renewable generation is poised to play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in the late-1980s to mid-1990s, but relegated to lesser importance as many states took steps to restructure their electricity markets in the late-1990s, IRP has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions such as the western United States, where retail competition has failed to take root. As practiced in the United States, IRP is a formal process by which utilities analyze the costs, benefits, and risks of all resources available to them--both supply- and demand-side--with the ultimate goal of identifying a portfolio of resources that meets their future needs at lowest cost and/or risk. Though the content of any specific utility IRP is unique, all are built on a common basic framework: (1) development of peak demand and load forecasts; (2) assessment of how these forecasts compare to existing and committed generation resources; (3) identification and characterization of various resource portfolios as candidates to fill a projected resource deficiency; (4) analysis of these different ''candidate'' resource portfolios under base-case and alternative future scenarios; and finally, (5) selection of a preferred portfolio, and creation of a near-term action plan to begin to move towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarely considered seriously in utility IRP. In the western United States, however, the most recent resource plans call for a significant amount of new wind power capacity. These planned additions appear to be motivated by the improved economics of wind power, an emerging understanding that wind integration costs are manageable, and a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities. Equally important, utility IRPs are increasingly recognizing the inherent risks in fossil-based generation portfolios--especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation--and the benefits of renewable energy in mitigating those risks. This article, which is based on a longer report from Berkeley Lab,i examines how twelve investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the western United States--Avista, Idaho Power, NorthWestern Energy (NWE), Portland General Electric (PGE), Puget Sound Energy (PSE), PacifiCorp, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Nevada Power, Sierra Pacific, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)--treat renewable energy in their most recent resource plans (as of July 2005). In aggregate, these twelve utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. In reviewing these plans, our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable generation in the United States, and (2) to suggest possible improvements to the methods used to evaluate renewable generation as a resource option. As such, we begin by summarizing the amount and types of new renewable generation planned as a result of these twelve IRPs. We then offer observations about the IRP process, and how it might be improved to more objectively evaluate renewable resources.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wind energy systems application to regional utilities. [SERIES code; WINDS code; PHASES code; AVERAGE code; NETLOAD code; GENSYS code; PROCOST code; CAP6 code; EVEN code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology for analyzing the economic impact of WECS on a utility is described in Volume I of this report. The methodology requires extrapolating both historical utility load data and historical wind power into a year of analysis; calculating the total amount of funds made available in that year, as a result of the inclusion of wind power in the utility mix; and then estimating the present value of the total funds made available to the utility over the life of the WECS. To apply the methodology to a specific case, it was necessary to develop various computer programs. The following sections in this report list the programs developed for this study, briefly summarize their contents, and explain how they are used. Wherever possible, a typical input/output file is shown.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research study developed basic dynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the response behavior of a near-shore wind turbine structure with monopile, suction caisson, or gravity-based foundation systems. The marine soil conditions were modeled using apparent fixity level, Randolph elastic continuum, and modified cone models. The offshore wind turbine structures were developed using a finite element formulation. A two-bladed 3.0 megawatt (MW) and a three-bladed 1.5 MW capacity wind turbine were studied using a variety of design load, and soil conditions scenarios. Aerodynamic thrust loads were estimated using the FAST Software developed by the U.S Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Hydrodynamic loads were estimated using Morison’s equation and the more recent Faltinsen Newman Vinje (FNV) theory. This research study addressed two of the important design constraints, specifically, the angle of the support structure at seafloor and the horizontal displacement at the hub elevation during dynamic loading. The simulation results show that the modified cone model is stiffer than the apparent fixity level and Randolph elastic continuum models. The effect of the blade pitch failure on the offshore wind turbine structure decreases with increasing water depth, but increases with increasing hub height of the offshore wind turbine structure.

Aljeeran, Fares

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Wind Energy Integration in New Zealand Issue 1, Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Zealand energy sector continues to change, creating both challenges and opportunities. New wind generation proposals are being announced at an accelerating rate. As wind generation becomes an increasing part of the total generation mix, the intermittent nature of wind leads to new system management challenges and the possible need for paradigm changes in both expectations of developers and expectations of current industry participants. This publication helps us to look ahead and consider an electricity supply system with a different mix of generation. It is not intended to be conclusive, but provides some guidance at this early stage. It is a first step, with further work planned in a co-ordinated effort with the Electricity Commission, the System Operator (Transpower), and others. It is hoped that the contents will stimulate comment and discussion. You are encouraged to provide feedback on the document’s contents.

Albert De Geest; Liz Yeaman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Southern California Edison 32MWh Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, Southern California Edison , Southern California Edison Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage (TSP) Project Loïc Gaillac, Naum Pinsky Southern California Edison November 3, 2010 Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 2 © Copyright 2010, Southern California Edison Outline * Policy Challenges - The challenge/opportunity * Testing a Solution: Tehachapi Storage Project Overview - Description of the project & objectives - Operational uses - Conceptual layout 3 © Copyright 2010, Southern California Edison CA 2020: Energy Policy Initiatives Highlighting potential areas for storage applications: * High penetration of Solar and Wind generation - Executive order requiring 33% of generated electricity to come from

200

Economic impact of integrating photovoltaics with conventional electric utility operation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the parameters which impact the value of photovoltaics (PV) to the electric utility. We have, therefore, chosen the high, medium and low load days in winter (January) and summer (July). The daily peak load has varied from 5838 MW to 9712 MW. These six days are studied for reference (no PV), high, medium, low and intermittent PV output cases. Results from these 30 case studies are summarized in this paper. In order to study the impact of operating photovoltaic (PV) systems on the electric utility production cost (fuel and variable O and M) we have chosen the load profile of a southeastern utility and the PV output data from solar test facilities in Virginia and North Carolina. In order to incorporate the short-term variations we have used 10-minute resolution data for both load and PV output.

Rahman, S. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary S-1 Summary S-1 Summary In this Summary: * Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Affected Environment * Impacts This summary covers the major points of the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project proposed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project includes constructing a new double-circuit 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in northern Sherman County, Oregon. The new line would connect the Klondike III Wind Project and the Biglow Canyon Wind Farm to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. The project would also require expansion of BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation and a new 230-kV substation to integrate the two wind projects. As a federal agency, BPA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act

202

Conceptual Process Plant Utility Schemes with Hybrid Energy System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of Alternative energy Production from sun and wind power with storage can become an integral part of a process plant utility. This will facilitate reduced ...

203

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Record of Decision, October 25, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE)1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects, BPA will build and operate a 12-mile long, 230-kilovolt (kV) double-circuit transmission line between the wind projects and BPA's new 230-kV John Day Substation in Sherman County, Oregon. BPA will also expand its existing 500-kV John Day Substation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Virginia Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority The Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority is a public body, established for the purposes of facilitating, coordinating, and supporting the development, either by the Authority or by other qualified entities, of the offshore wind energy industry, offshore wind energy projects, and

205

Design for Process Integration and Efficient Energy Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today's energy availability and pricing structure has focused attention upon those design techniques which result in an improvement in the level of energy utilisation. Energy integration is one such technique, where this refers to the matching of opposite energy changes, in order to minimise the need for external energy supply or disposal. Many evaluations tend to consider a limited area within the overall system, and the broader inter-reactions or sensitivity to dynamic change may remain obscure. Also, processing plants are required to operate in a changing environment, where operating conditions may be far removed from the original design intent. Flexibility is therefore a key requirement for modern plant design. The application of energy integration tends to increase plant complexity, often with a consequential reduction in operating flexibility. This paper presents a methodology which enables the balance between energy integration and flexibility to be established.

James, A. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Integrating Offshore Wind Power and Multiple Oil and Gas Platforms to the Onshore Power Grid using VSC-HVDC Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis investigates the possibilities of integrating oil and gas platforms and offshore wind power to the onshore power grid. The main motivation for… (more)

Kolstad, Magne Lorentzen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Utilizing cable winding and industrial robots to facilitate the manufacturing of electric machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cable wound electric machines are used mainly for high voltage and direct-drive applications. They can be found in areas such as wind power, hydropower, wave power and high-voltage motors. Compared to conventional winding techniques, cable winding includes ... Keywords: Automated production, Electric machine assembly, Industrial robot, Powerformer, Stator winding, Wave energy converter

Erik Hultman; Mats Leijon

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Integrated Job Exposure Matrix for Electric Utility Workers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies and includes all exposure factors in a prototype job-exposure matrix (JEM) to inform utility professionals, exposure assessment experts, and epidemiologists about exposures other than electric and magnetic fields that should be considered when assessing health and safety issues related to work near electric facilities. The nature of exposures to these factors, the ordinal exposure ranking for most of the factors, and the methodology for establishing such determining ordinal exposur...

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

An Integrated Approach for Optimal Coordination of Wind Power and Hydro Pumping Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing wind power penetration in power systems represents a techno-economic challenge for power producers and system operators. Due to the variability and uncertainty of wind power, system operators require new solutions in order to increase the controllability of wind farm output. On the other hand, producers that include wind farms in their portfolio need to find new ways to boost their profits in electricity markets. This can be done by optimizing the combination of wind farms and storage so as to make larger profits when selling power (trading) and reduce penalties from imbalances in the operation. The present work describes a new integrated approach for analyzing wind-storage solutions that make use of probabilistic forecasts and optimization techniques to aid decision-making on operating such systems. The approach includes a set of three complementary functions suitable for use in current systems. A reallife system is studied, comprising two wind farms and a large hydro station with pumping capacity. Economic profits and better operational features can be obtained from the proposed cooperation between the wind farms and storage. The revenues are function of the type of hydro storage used and the market characteristics and several options are compared in this study. The results show that the use of a storage device can lead to a significant increase in revenue, up to 11 % (2010 data, Iberian market). Also, the

Edgardo D. Castronuovo; Julio Usaola; Ricardo Bessa; Manuel Matos; I. C. Costa; L. Bremermann; Jesus Lugaro; George Kariniotakis; Sophia Antipolis France

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evolution of Operating Reserve Determination in Wind Power Integration Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes different assumptions and methods utilized to calculate the amount of different types of reserves carried, and how these methods have evolved as more studies have been performed.

Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Lannoye, E.; Milligan, M.; Flynn, D.; Zavadil, B.; O'Malley, M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Integration of Utility Energy Management Technologies into Building Automation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges with managing peak demand are expected to worsen as de-carbonization, plant retirement, renewable integration, and electric vehicle rollouts unfold. One solution to this problem is in better management of the demand side. This study is focused on commercial buildings, which account for approximately 27% of all electricity used in the United States and have a large impact on demand since much of the consumption falls during business hours, which tend to correspond with peak demand windows. ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

NREL Energy Models Examine the Potential for Wind and Solar Grid Integration (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As renewable energy generating sources, such as wind turbines and solar power systems, reach high levels of penetration in parts of the United States, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is helping the utility industry to peer into the future. Using software modeling tools that the lab developed, NREL is examining the future operation of the electrical grid as renewable energy continues to grow.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Functional Definition for Communication and Control Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. A functional definition of DR for defining communication and control requirements in electric utility distribution systems is provided. The report is a tool that readers can use in developing communication and control strategies for DR in specific distribution systems.

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of wind turbine and related technology for both onshore and offshore applications and presents the results of an engineering and economic evaluation of the performance and cost of onshore and offshore wind power plants.

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

Integrating Distributed Resources into Electric Utility Distribution Systems: EPRI White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI white paper is about understanding electric power engineering issues related to integrating distributed resources (DR) into utility distribution systems. It is an overview designed for all stakeholders rather than a rigorous technical engineering guide. A major goal of the paper is to move discussion of integration issues toward solutions.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Utility-Scale Onshore Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the wind industry expands, two broad issues continue to drive innovation of turbine technology. First, while major wind turbine components are considered to be mature commercial technology, failures of gearboxes, blades, and other components continue to reduce the productivity of wind power plants. Second, as the industry grows, developers must increasingly look to develop sites with lower wind resources. This drives innovation of turbines that are not only reliable but also are designed ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Microsoft Word - Coyote Crest Wind Integration CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2011 8, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cherilyn Randall - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: G0313 Coyote Crest Wind Park Interconnection Request Budget Information: Work Order # 213848, Task 01 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 "Acquisition, installation, operation, and removal of communication systems, data processing equipment, and similar electronic equipment." B4.6: "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area..." Location: Lewis County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: In response to EverPower's interconnection request, BPA is

218

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-50414 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

219

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy Efficiency of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 An examination of how wind and solar power affect operations, costs, and emissions from fossil-fueled generators The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine. Changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding variable renewable generation such as wind and solar power affects the operation of the other types of power plants, and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions, but do those increases in costs and emissions from cycling negate the overall benefits of integrating renewables?

220

Multiple Timescale Dispatch and Scheduling for Stochastic Reliability in Smart Grids with Wind Generation Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating volatile renewable energy resources into the bulk power grid is challenging, due to the reliability requirement that at each instant the load and generation in the system remain balanced. In this study, we tackle this challenge for smart grid with integrated wind generation, by leveraging multi-timescale dispatch and scheduling. Specifically, we consider smart grids with two classes of energy users - traditional energy users and opportunistic energy users (e.g., smart meters or smart appliances), and investigate pricing and dispatch at two timescales, via day-ahead scheduling and realtime scheduling. In day-ahead scheduling, with the statistical information on wind generation and energy demands, we characterize the optimal procurement of the energy supply and the day-ahead retail price for the traditional energy users; in realtime scheduling, with the realization of wind generation and the load of traditional energy users, we optimize real-time prices to manage the opportunistic energy users so as...

He, Miao; Zhang, Junshan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) PV integration study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigates the effects that increased distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation would have on the Kauai Island Utility Co-op (KIUC) system operating requirements. The study focused on determining reserve requirements needed to mitigate the impact of PV variability on system frequency, and the impact on operating costs. Scenarios of 5-MW, 10-MW, and 15-MW nameplate capacity of PV generation plants distributed across the Kauai Island were considered in this study. The analysis required synthesis of the PV solar resource data and modeling of the KIUC system inertia. Based on the results, some findings and conclusions could be drawn, including that the selection of units identified as marginal resources that are used for load following will change; PV penetration will displace energy generated by existing conventional units, thus reducing overall fuel consumption; PV penetration at any deployment level is not likely to reduce system peak load; and increasing PV penetration has little effect on load-following reserves. The study was performed by EnerNex under contract from Sandia National Laboratories with cooperation from KIUC.

Ellis, Abraham; Mousseau, Tom (Knoxville, TN)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Techno-economic Optimization of Integrating Wind Power into Constrained Electric Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and environmental costs of wind integration into a natural gas combined-cycle and coal combined-cycle dominated ............................................................ 88 A.1 Calculation of Fuel Cost Coefficients for a Natural Gas Combined Cycle Facility A1. Data points and linear trend line for the thermal efficiency of a natural gas combined cycle

Victoria, University of

224

The integrated design of a permanent-magnet generator for small wind energy conversion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the integrated design, analysis and performance test of a 1.4 kW, radial-flux, permanent-magnet generator applied to small wind energy conversion system (WECS). In a small WECS, the three major components, i.e., turbine, generator ...

Min-Fu Hsieh; Yu-Han Yeh

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The sensitivity of wind technology utilization to cost and market parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study explores the sensitivity of future wind energy market penetration to available wind resources, wind system costs, and competing energy system fuel costs for several possible energy market evolution scenarios. The methodology for the modeling is described in general terms. Cost curves for wind technology evolution are presented and used in conjunction with wind resource estimates and energy market projections to estimate wind penetration into the market. Results are presented that show the sensitivity of the growth of wind energy use to key cost parameters and to some of the underlying modeling assumptions. In interpreting the results, the authors place particular emphasis on the relative influence of the parameters studied. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Dodd, H.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hock, S.M.; Thresher, R.W. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of investigations, including those conducted by The Aerospace Corporation and other contractors, have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggests the feasible deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. It is imperative that these integration issues be pursued in parallel with the development of each technology if the nation's electric utility systems are to effectively utilize these technologies in the near to intermediate term. Analyses of three of these issues are presented: utility information requirements, generation mix and production cost impacts, and rate structures in the context of photovoltaic units integrated into the utility system. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine blades are subjected to complex multiaxial stress states during operation. A review of the literature suggests that mixed mode fracture toughness can be significantly less than that of the tensile opening mode (Mode I), implying that fracture failure can occur at a much lower load capacity if the structure is subject to mixed-mode loading. Thus, it will be necessary to identify the mechanisms that might lead to failure in blade materials under mixed-mode loading conditions. Meanwhile, wind turbine blades are typically fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric materials, e.g. fiber glass composites. Due to the large degree of anisotropy in mechanical properties that is usually associated with laminates, the fracture behavior of these composite materials is likely to be strongly dependent on the loading conditions. This may further strengthen the need to study the effect of mixed-mode loading on the integrity and durability of the wind turbine blade composites. To quantify the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT). As a 2002 R&D 100 Award winner, SNTT is a novel fracture testing technology. SNTT has many advantages over conventional fracture toughness methods and has been used to determine fracture toughness values on a wide spectrum of materials. The current project is the first attempt to utilize SNTT on polymeric and polymer-based composite materials. It is expected that mixed-mode failure mechanisms of wind turbine blades induced by typical in-service loading conditions, such as delamination, matrix cracking, fiber pull-out and fracture, can be effectively and economically investigated by using this methodology. This project consists of two phases. The Phase I (FY2010) effort includes (1) preparation of testing material and testing equipment set-up, including calibration of associated instruments/sensors, (2) development of design protocols for the proposed SNTT samples for both polymer and composite materials, such as sample geometries and fabrication techniques, (3) manufacture of SNTT samples, and (4) fracture toughness testing using the SNTT method. The major milestone achieved in Phase I is the understanding of fracture behaviors of polymeric matrix materials from testing numerous epoxy SNTT samples. Totals of 30 epoxy SNTT samples were fabricated from two types of epoxy materials provided by our industrial partners Gougeon Brothers, Inc. and Molded Fiber Glass Companies. These samples were tested with SNTT in three groups: (1) fracture due to monotonic loading, (2) fracture due to fatigue cyclic loading, and (3) monotonic loading applied to fatigue-precracked samples. Brittle fractures were observed on all tested samples, implying linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis can be effectively used to estimate the fracture toughness of these materials with confidence. Appropriate fatigue precracking protocols were established to achieve controllable crack growth using the SNTT approach under pure torsion loading. These fatigue protocols provide the significant insights of the mechanical behavior of epoxy polymeric materials and their associated rate-dependent characteristics. Effects of mixed-mode loading on the fracture behavior of epoxy materials was studied. It was found that all epoxy samples failed in brittle tensile failure mode; the fracture surfaces always follow a 45o spiral plane that corresponded to Mode I tensile failure, even when the initial pitch angle of the machined spiral grooves was not at 45o. In addition, general observation from the fatigue experiments implied that loading rate played an important role determining the fracture behavior of epoxy materials, such that a higher loading rate resulted in a shorter fatigue life. A detailed study of loading rate effect will be continued in the Phase II. On the other hand, analytical finite element ana

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Integration of Xantrex HY-100 Hybrid Inverter with an AC Induction Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

Several issues must be addressed before solid-state inverters can be used in wind-diesel systems with larger wind turbines. This project addresses those issues by using a commercial hybrid inverter designed for PV-diesel systems and modifying the inverter for use with an AC induction wind turbine. Another approach would have entailed building an inverter specifically for use with an AC induction wind turbine, but that was beyond the scope of this project. The inverter chosen for this project was a Xantrex HY-100, an inverter designed for PV systems. The unit consists of an inverter/rectifier bridge, a generator interface contactor, a battery charge controller, a hybrid controller, and the associated control electronics. Details of the inverter may be found in Appendix A. A twofold approach was taken to integrating the existing inverter for use with an AC induction wind turbine: 1) development of a detailed model to model both steady-state and transient behavior of the system, and 2) modification and testing of the inverter with an induction wind turbine based on the modeling results. This report describes these two tasks.

Corbus, D.; Newcomb, C.; Friedly, S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Independent Power Independent Power Producer Financing Co-op Financing Cost of Energy (cents /kWh) 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 Installed Wind Turbine Capacity 2 MW 10 MW 50 MW 50 MW Without Federal incentives (current $) With Federal incentives (current $) WIND ECONOMICS AT A GLANCE Wind power is one of mankind's oldest energy sources. In 1700, the most powerful machines in Europe were Dutch windmills. During the 1930s, half a million windmills pumped water on the Great Plains. Today's wind turbine is a far cry from the old water pumpers. By using state-of-the-art engineering, wind turbine manufacturers have produced sleek, highly efficient machines that produce inexpensive electricity, and lots of it. Depending on their size and location, wind farms can produce electricity for 4-6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

230

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,GE Energy. 2011a. Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report.Corp. 2010. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

232

Wind in the Electricity Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis-Utility Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop September 22, 2004 Mark McGree Director Resource Planning Xcel Energy September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 2 Xcel Energy and Wind *Who we are? *Amount of wind? *Issues and Experiences September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 3 Xcel Energy Utilities *Northern States Power *Cheyenne Light *PSC of Colorado *Southwestern PSC September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 4 Wind on Xcel Energy Systems 1.8% 3.5% 165 SPS 2.0% 3.6% 222 PSCo 3.1% 5.8% 481 NSP 2004 Energy Penetration 2004 Capacity Penetration Contracted Wind System September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 5 Planned Wind on System 4.3% 9.0% 445 SPS 5.8% 10.2% 722 PSCo 6.5% 12.3% 1125 NSP 2010 Energy Penetration 2010 Capacity Penetration 2010 Wind System September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 6 Wind's Value *Cheapest resource with federal production tax credit - SPS

233

NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REL's wind energy research and development efforts at REL's wind energy research and development efforts at the National WInd Technology Center (NWTC) have contributed to numerous successes for the wind industry. In addition to helping its industry partners develop commercially successful wind turbines, NREL has developed award-winning components and modeling software. The Laboratory also engages in deployment activities that help schools, communities, and utilities understand the benefits of wind energy and how it can be successfully integrated into our nation's electrical system to provide for a cleaner, more secure energy future. NREL's successes in wind energy research, development, and deployment have: * Reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies

234

Utilization of Automatic Weather Station Data for Forecasting High Wind Speeds at Pegasus Runway, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced visibility due to blowing snow can severely hinder aircraft operations in the Antarctic. Wind speeds in excess of approximately 7–13 m s?1 can result in blowing snow. The ability to forecast high wind speed events can improve the safety ...

R. E. Holmes; C. R. Stearns; G. A. Weidner; L. M. Keller

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Wind Energy Management System Integration Project Incorporating Wind Generation and Load Forecast Uncertainties into Power Grid Operations  

SciTech Connect

The power system balancing process, which includes the scheduling, real time dispatch (load following) and regulation processes, is traditionally based on deterministic models. Since the conventional generation needs time to be committed and dispatched to a desired megawatt level, the scheduling and load following processes use load and wind power production forecasts to achieve future balance between the conventional generation and energy storage on the one side, and system load, intermittent resources (such as wind and solar generation) and scheduled interchange on the other side. Although in real life the forecasting procedures imply some uncertainty around the load and wind forecasts (caused by forecast errors), only their mean values are actually used in the generation dispatch and commitment procedures. Since the actual load and intermittent generation can deviate from their forecasts, it becomes increasingly unclear (especially, with the increasing penetration of renewable resources) whether the system would be actually able to meet the conventional generation requirements within the look-ahead horizon, what the additional balancing efforts would be needed as we get closer to the real time, and what additional costs would be incurred by those needs. In order to improve the system control performance characteristics, maintain system reliability, and minimize expenses related to the system balancing functions, it becomes necessary to incorporate the predicted uncertainty ranges into the scheduling, load following, and, in some extent, into the regulation processes. It is also important to address the uncertainty problem comprehensively, by including all sources of uncertainty (load, intermittent generation, generators’ forced outages, etc.) into consideration. All aspects of uncertainty such as the imbalance size (which is the same as capacity needed to mitigate the imbalance) and generation ramping requirement must be taken into account. The latter unique features make this work a significant step forward toward the objective of incorporating of wind, solar, load, and other uncertainties into power system operations. In this report, a new methodology to predict the uncertainty ranges for the required balancing capacity, ramping capability and ramp duration is presented. Uncertainties created by system load forecast errors, wind and solar forecast errors, generation forced outages are taken into account. The uncertainty ranges are evaluated for different confidence levels of having the actual generation requirements within the corresponding limits. The methodology helps to identify system balancing reserve requirement based on a desired system performance levels, identify system “breaking points”, where the generation system becomes unable to follow the generation requirement curve with the user-specified probability level, and determine the time remaining to these potential events. The approach includes three stages: statistical and actual data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of future grid balancing requirements for specified time horizons and confidence intervals. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on a histogram analysis incorporating all sources of uncertainty and parameters of a continuous (wind forecast and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and failures to start up) nature. Preliminary simulations using California Independent System Operator (California ISO) real life data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. A tool developed based on the new methodology described in this report will be integrated with the California ISO systems. Contractual work is currently in place to integrate the tool with the AREVA EMS system.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Guttromson, Ross T.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Integrating Wind into Transmission Planning: The Rocky Mountain Area Transmission Study (RMATS): Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans to expand the western grid are now underway. Bringing power from low-cost remote resources--including wind--to load centers could reduce costs for all consumers. But many paths appear to be already congested. Locational marginal price-based modeling is designed to identify the most cost-effective paths to be upgraded. The ranking of such paths is intended as the start of a process of political and regulatory approvals that are expected to result in the eventual construction of new and upgraded lines. This paper reviews the necessary data and analytical tasks to accurately represent wind in such modeling, and addresses some policy and regulatory issues that can help with wind integration into the grid. Providing wind fair access to the grid also (and more immediately) depends on tariff and regulatory changes. Expansion of the Rocky Mountain Area Transmission Study (RMATS) study scope to address operational issues supports the development of transmission solutions that enable wind to connect and deliver power in the next few years--much sooner than upgrades can be completed.

Hamilton, R.; Lehr, R.; Olsen, D.; Nielsen, J.; Acker, T.; Milligan, M.; Geller, H.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

OAHU Wind Integration And Transmission Study: Summary Report, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OAHU WIND INTEGRATION OAHU WIND INTEGRATION AND TRANSMISSION STUDY: SUMMARY REPORT NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

238

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Gary Jordan and Sundar Venkataraman GE Energy Schenectady, New York NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-54864 June 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Gary Jordan and Sundar Venkataraman GE Energy Schenectady, New York NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. KLFT-1-11349-01

239

OAHU Wind Integration And Transmission Study: Summary Report, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OAHU WIND INTEGRATION OAHU WIND INTEGRATION AND TRANSMISSION STUDY: SUMMARY REPORT NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

240

NREL Confirms Large Potential for Grid Integration of Wind, Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To fully harvest the nation's bountiful wind and solar resources, it is critical to know how much electrical power from these renewable resources could be integrated reliably into the grid. To inform the discussion about the potential of such variable sources, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched two key regional studies, examining the east and west sections of the U.S. power grid. The studies show that it is technically possible for U.S. power systems to integrate 20%-35% renewable electricity if infrastructure and operational improvements can be made.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An intelligent controller that increases battery life within hybrid energy storage systems for wind application was developed. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and simulation results are analyzed. A permanent magnet synchronous generator, coupled with a variable speed wind turbine, is connected to a power grid (14-bus system). A rectifier, a DC-DC converter and an inverter are used to provide a complete model of the wind system. An Energy Storage System (ESS) is connected to a DC-link through a DC-DC converter. An intelligent controller is applied to the DC-DC converter to help the Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) to regulate output power and also to control the operation of the battery and supercapacitor. This ensures a longer life time for the batteries. The detailed model is simulated in PSCAD/EMTP. Additionally, economic analysis has been done for different methods that can reduce the wind power output fluctuation. These methods are, wind power curtailment, dumping loads, battery energy storage system and hybrid energy storage system. From the results, application of single advanced HESS can save more money for wind turbines owners. Generally the income would be the same for most of methods because the wind does not change and maximum power point tracking can be applied to most systems. On the other hand, the cost is the key point. For short term and small wind turbine, the BESS is the cheapest and applicable method while for large scale wind turbines and wind farms the application of advanced HESS would be the best method to reduce the power fluctuation. The key outcomes of this project include a new intelligent controller that can reduce energy exchanged between the battery and DC-link, reduce charging/discharging cycles, reduce depth of discharge and increase time interval between charge/discharge, and lower battery temperature. This improves the overall lifetime of battery energy storages. Additionally, a new design method based on probability help optimize the power capacity specification for BESS and super-capacitors. Recommendations include experimental imp

David Wenzhong Gao

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Climatological Assessment of the Utility of Wind Machines for Freeze Protection in Mountain Valleys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of wind machines for frost protection is common in several large United States fruit producing areas. However, their potential usefulness in western Colorado's high elevation orchards has been uncertain due to the existence of terrain-...

Nolan J. Doesken; A. Richard Renquist

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Optimal Self Tuned Variable Structure Sliding Mode for Coordinated Wind-FC-Diesel Utilization Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and coordinated control strategy based on self tuned variable structure sliding mode dynamic controller for a wind–diesel-fuel cell renewable generation system with battery backup are discussed in this paper. The proposed hybrid scheme ... Keywords: Diesel-driven generator, Wind induction generator, PMDC motor drives, fuel cell, Backup Battery, Dynamic Filter Compensator, Green Power Filter, Multi Objective Particle Swarm Optimization MOPSO

Adel M. Sharaf; Adel A. A. El-Gammal

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Stability effects of frequency controllers and transmission line configurations on power systems with integration of wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the stability effects of the integration of wind power on multi-machine power systems. First, the small-signal stability effects of turbine governors connected to synchronous generators in the ...

Abdelhalim, Hussein Mohamed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Aeronautics All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be

246

Analysis of the value of battery storage with wind and photovoltaic generation to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an analysis to determine the economic and operational value of battery storage to wind and photovoltaic (PV) generation technologies to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) system. The analysis approach consisted of performing a benefit-cost economic assessment using established SMUD financial parameters, system expansion plans, and current system operating procedures. This report presents the results of the analysis. Section 2 describes expected wind and PV plant performance. Section 3 describes expected benefits to SMUD associated with employing battery storage. Section 4 presents preliminary benefit-cost results for battery storage added at the Solano wind plant and the Hedge PV plant. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations resulting from this analysis. The results of this analysis should be reviewed subject to the following caveat. The assumptions and data used in developing these results were based on reports available from and interaction with appropriate SMUD operating, planning, and design personnel in 1994 and early 1995 and are compatible with financial assumptions and system expansion plans as of that time. Assumptions and SMUD expansion plans have changed since then. In particular, SMUD did not install the additional 45 MW of wind that was planned for 1996. Current SMUD expansion plans and assumptions should be obtained from appropriate SMUD personnel.

Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues  

SciTech Connect

A number of investigations have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggest the deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. An important part of the DOE programs to develop new source technologies, in particular photovoltaic systems, is the experimental testing of complete or nearby complete power units. These experiments provide an opportunity to examine operational and integration issues which must be understood before widespread commercial deployment of these technologies can be achieved. Experiments may also be required to explicitly examine integration, operational, and control aspects of single and multiple new source technology power units within a utility system. An identification of utility information requirements, a review of planned experiments, and a preliminary determination of additional experimental needs and opportunities are presented. Other issues discussed include: (1) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on load duration curves and optimal generation mixes are considered; (2) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on utility production costs, with and without dedicated storage and with and without sellback, are analyzed; and (3) current utility rate structure experiments, rationales, policies, practices, and plans are reviewed.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Program on Technology Innovation: Bat Detection and Shutdown System for Utility-Scale Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although development of renewable energy sources is generally believed to be a sound environmental decision, wind power development has been criticized for posing potential threats to bats. The objective of this project is to develop and deploy an ultrasonic microphone array on a wind turbine. The array will detect bats near the turbine upon which it is deployed and automatically curtail operations when bats are detected in or near the rotor-swept area. The first two objectives of this project were to se...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

Operational, cost, and technical study of large windpower systems integrated with an existing electric utility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed wind energy assessment from the available wind records, and evaluation of the application of wind energy systems to an existing electric utility were performed in an area known as the Texas Panhandle, on the Great Plains. The study area includes parts of Texas, eastern New Mexico, the Oklahoma Panhandle and southern Kansas. The region is shown to have uniformly distributed winds of relatively high velocity, with average wind power density of 0.53 kW/m/sup 2/ at 30 m height at Amarillo, Texas, a representative location. The annual period of calm is extremely low. Three separate compressed air storage systems with good potential were analyzed in detail, and two potential pumped-hydro facilities were identified and given preliminary consideration. Aquifer storage of compressed air is a promising possibility in the region.

Ligon, C.; Kirby, G.; Jordan, D.; Lawrence, J.H.; Wiesner, W.; Kosovec, A.; Swanson, R.K.; Smith, R.T.; Johnson, C.C.; Hodson, H.O.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A simulation solution of the integration of wind power into an electricity generating network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To effectively harness the power of wind electricity generation, significant infrastructure challenges exist. First, the individual wind turbines must be sited and constructed as part of a wind farm. Second, the wind farm must be connected to the electricity ...

Thomas F. Brady

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A good integrated resource plan: Guidelines for electric utilities and regulators  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning helps utilities and state regulatory commissions consistently assess a broad range of demand and supply resources to meet customer energy-service needs cost-effectively. Key characteristics of this planning approach include: explicit consideration and fair treatment of a wide variety of demand and supply options, consideration of the environmental and other social costs of providing energy services, public participation in the development of the resource plan, and analysis of the uncertainties associated with different external factors and resource options. Integrated resource planning differs from traditional planning in the types and scope of resources considered, the owners of the resources, the organizations involved in resource planning, and the criteria for resource selection. This report presents suggestions to utilities on how to conduct such planning and what to include in their resource-planning reports. These suggestions are based on a review of about 50 resource plans as well as discussions with and presentations to regulators and utilities. The suggestions cover four broad topics; the technical competence with which the plan was developed; the adequacy, detail, and consistency (with the long-term plan) of the short-term action plan; the extent to which the interests of various stakeholders was considered, both in public participation in plan development and in the variety of resource plans developedand assessed; and the clarity and comprehensiveness of the utility`s report on its plan. Technical competence includes energy and demand forecasts, assessment of supply and demand resources, resource integration, and treatment of uncertainty. Issues associated with forecasts include forecasting approaches; links between the forecasts of energy use and peak demands; and links between the forecasts and the effects of past, present, and future demand-side management programs.

Hirst, E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An integrated approach to the utilization of low rank coals and biofuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While suggesting an integrated approach for utilization of inferior low rank coals for power in India, the importance of low temperature carbonization followed by retrieval of all value-based products has been stressed. It is further suggested that tar, obtained in the process, could be hydrogenated and fractionated in a central plant for conversion to hydrocarbons. High ash char, the principal product of pyrolysis, has been experimentally found to be amenable to beneficiation, yielding suitable fractions for power generation, briquetting, or blending. Experimental studies have shown that forest litters and agricultural wastes, containing significant proportions of spore, cuticle, and exine--considered as precursors of hydrocarbon-generating coal macerals--also yield large quantities of tar, ammonical liquor, and the principal product, char, which can be respectively utilized for the production of petroleum substitutes, value-based chemicals, and source material for blending, briquette making, and char-water slurries, opening up new avenues for fuel utilization and conservation.

Sen, S.; Sen, M. [Central Fuel Research Inst., Nagpur (India); Moitra, N. [Nagpur Univ. (India)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electric utility value determination for wind energy. Volume II. A user's guide. [WTP code; WEIBUL code; ROSEN code; ULMOD code; FINAM code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a method for determining the value of wind energy systems to electric utilities. It is performed by a package of computer models available from SERI that can be used with most utility planning models. The final output of these models gives a financial value ($/kW) of the wind energy system under consideration in the specific utility system. This volume, the second of two volumes, is a user's guide for the computer programs available from SERI. The first volume describes the value determination methodology and gives detailed discussion on each step of the computer modeling.

Percival, D.; Harper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

INTEGRAL detection of the pulsar wind nebula in PSR J1846-0258  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We communicate the detection of soft (20--200 keV) gamma-rays from the pulsar and pulsar wind nebula of PSR J1846-0258 and aim to identify the component of the system which is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. To pinpoint the source of gamma-ray emission we combine spectral information from the INTEGRAL gamma-ray mission with archival data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our analysis shows that the soft gamma-rays detected from PSR J1846-0258 include emission from both the pulsar and the pulsar wind nebula, but the measured spectral shape is dominated by the pulsar wind nebula. We further discuss PSR J1846-0258 in the context of rotation-powered pulsars with high magnetic field strengths and review the anomalously high fraction of spin-down luminosity converted into X- and gamma-ray emission in light of a possible overestimate of the distance to this pulsar.

V. A. McBride; A. J. Dean; A. Bazzano; A. J. Bird; A. B. Hill; A. De Rosa; R. Landi; V. Sguera; A. Malizia

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

INTEGRAL detection of the pulsar wind nebula in PSR J1846-0258  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We communicate the detection of soft (20--200 keV) gamma-rays from the pulsar and pulsar wind nebula of PSR J1846-0258 and aim to identify the component of the system which is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. To pinpoint the source of gamma-ray emission we combine spectral information from the INTEGRAL gamma-ray mission with archival data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our analysis shows that the soft gamma-rays detected from PSR J1846-0258 include emission from both the pulsar and the pulsar wind nebula, but the measured spectral shape is dominated by the pulsar wind nebula. We further discuss PSR J1846-0258 in the context of rotation-powered pulsars with high magnetic field strengths and review the anomalously high fraction of spin-down luminosity converted into X- and gamma-ray emission in light of a possible overestimate of the distance to this pulsar.

McBride, V A; Bazzano, A; Bird, A J; Hill, A B; De Rosa, A; Landi, R; Sguera, V; Malizia, A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A good integrated resource plan: Guidelines for electric utilities and regulators  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning helps utilities and state regulatory commissions consistently assess a broad range of demand and supply resources to meet customer energy-service needs cost-effectively. Key characteristics of this planning approach include: explicit consideration and fair treatment of a wide variety of demand and supply options, consideration of the environmental and other social costs of providing energy services, public participation in the development of the resource plan, and analysis of the uncertainties associated with different external factors and resource options. Integrated resource planning differs from traditional planning in the types and scope of resources considered, the owners of the resources, the organizations involved in resource planning, and the criteria for resource selection. This report presents suggestions to utilities on how to conduct such planning and what to include in their resource-planning reports. These suggestions are based on a review of about 50 resource plans as well as discussions with and presentations to regulators and utilities. The suggestions cover four broad topics; the technical competence with which the plan was developed; the adequacy, detail, and consistency (with the long-term plan) of the short-term action plan; the extent to which the interests of various stakeholders was considered, both in public participation in plan development and in the variety of resource plans developedand assessed; and the clarity and comprehensiveness of the utility's report on its plan. Technical competence includes energy and demand forecasts, assessment of supply and demand resources, resource integration, and treatment of uncertainty. Issues associated with forecasts include forecasting approaches; links between the forecasts of energy use and peak demands; and links between the forecasts and the effects of past, present, and future demand-side management programs.

Hirst, E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Political Economy of Wind Power in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of wind power, as the integration of wind power, and thecompany, found that the integration of wind power into the

Swanson, Ryan Landon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Wind/Hydro Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

260

Wind Energy Act (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Act (Maine) Wind Energy Act (Maine) Wind Energy Act (Maine) < Back Eligibility Developer Utility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Siting and Permitting The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the regulatory process for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Solar Integration National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study datasets greatly advanced the modeling of wind and solar power production...

263

Addressing System Integration Issues Required for the Developmente of Distributed Wind-Hydrogen Energy Systems: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind generated electricity is a variable resource. Hydrogen can be generated as an energy storage media, but is costly. Advancements in power electronics and system integration are needed to make a viable system. Therefore, the long-term goal of the efforts at the University of North Dakota is to merge wind energy, hydrogen production, and fuel cells to bring emission-free and reliable power to commercial viability. The primary goals include 1) expand system models as a tool to investigate integration and control issues, 2) examine long-term effects of wind-electrolysis performance from a systematic perspective, and 3) collaborate with NREL and industrial partners to design, integrate, and quantify system improvements by implementing a single power electronics package to interface wild AC to PEM stack DC requirements. This report summarizes the accomplishments made during this project.

Mann, M.D; Salehfar, H.; Harrison, K.W.; Dale, N.; Biaku, C.; Peters, A.J.; Hernandez-Pacheco: E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Analysis of potential benefits of integrated-gasifier combined cycles for a utility system  

SciTech Connect

Potential benefits of integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) units were evaluated for a reference utility system by comparing long range expansion plans using IGCC units and gas turbine peakers with a plan using only state of the art steam turbine units and gas turbine peakers. Also evaluated was the importance of the benefits of individual IGCC unit characteristics, particularly unit efficiency, unit equivalent forced outage rate, and unit size. A range of IGCC units was analyzed, including cases achievable with state of the art gas turbines and cases assuming advanced gas turbine technology. All utility system expansion plans that used IGCC units showed substantial savings compared with the base expansion plan using the steam turbine units.

Choo, Y.K.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development and Validation of WECC Variable Speed Wind Turbine Dynamic Models for Grid Integration Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes reduced-order, simplified wind turbine models for analyzing the stability impact of large arrays of wind turbines with a single point of network interconnection.

Behnke, M.; Ellis, A.; Kazachkov, Y.; McCoy, T.; Muljadi, E.; Price, W.; Sanchez-Gasca, J.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the European Wind Energy Conference held February 27--March 2, 2006, in Athens, Greece, showing grid impacts of wind power variability.

Parsons, B.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Utility Scale Wind Turbines on a Grid Connected Island Mohit Dua, Anthony L. Rogers, James F. Manwell,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of such a crane to the island is not feasible. Valmont's Wind Energy Structure [2] addresses this problem in the definition of renewable energy precludes the development of wind energy in the state. Both Maine. The levelized cost of electricity purchased was calculated for the present case (no wind energy) and with wind

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

268

Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Executive Summary, (WWSIS) May 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PREPARED FOR: PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy PREPARED BY: GE Energy MAY 2010 WESTERN WIND AND SOLAR INTEGRATION STUDY: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

269

NREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are supporting that development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of such floating wind turbines.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are supporting that development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of such floating wind turbines.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Urban and R ural Feeders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and case studies on a rural and an urban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for those feeders.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

Integration of Distributed Resources in the Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Suburba n Feeder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need to improve practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and initial case studies on a suburban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for that feeder.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Utilizing Load Response for Wind and Solar Integration and Power System Reliability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Responsive load is still the most underutilized reliability resource in North America. This paper examines the characteristics of concern to the power system, the renewables, and to the loads.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. Status of Centralized Wind Power Forecasting in NorthInterconnection Policies and Wind Power: A Discussion ofs first utility-scale wind power project. Credit: Klaus

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources  

SciTech Connect

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Markets to Facilitate Wind and Solar Energy Integration in the Bulk Power Supply: An IEA Task 25 Collaboration; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind and solar power will give rise to challenges in electricity markets regarding flexibility, capacity adequacy, and the participation of wind and solar generators to markets. Large amounts of wind power will have impacts on bulk power system markets and electricity prices. If the markets respond to increased wind power by increasing investments in low-capital, high-cost or marginal-cost power, the average price may remain in the same range. However, experiences so far from Denmark, Germany, Spain, and Ireland are such that the average market prices have decreased because of wind power. This reduction may result in additional revenue insufficiency, which may be corrected with a capacity market, yet capacity markets are difficult to design. However, the flexibility attributes of the capacity also need to be considered. Markets facilitating wind and solar integration will include possibilities for trading close to delivery (either by shorter gate closure times or intraday markets). Time steps chosen for markets can enable more flexibility to be assessed. Experience from 5- and 10-minute markets has been encouraging.

Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Soder, L.; Clark, C.; Pineda, I.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies, however, wind integration costs used in some of theestimated by recent wind integration studies is shown to theStudies Resource Plans Wind Integration Cost ($/MWh) Wind

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Characterizing the Impacts of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk Power System Operations Planning: Utility Wind Interest Group - Xcel Energy-North Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a case study evaluation of the impact of wind generation on electricity grid operations in the Xcel Energy-North service area around Minneapolis, Minnesota. The project's methodology and results will be useful when evaluating the operating impacts of wind generation at other locations.

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: The Effects of Wind and Solar PowerÂ…Induced Cycling on Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind and Solar Power- Wind and Solar Power- Induced Cycling on Wear-and-Tear Costs and Emissions Results From the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine. Changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding variable renewable generation such as wind and solar power affects the operation of conventional power plants, and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) was initiated to determine the wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts of cycling and to simulate grid operations to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar power on

282

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyPTC. Moreover, federal policy towards wind energy remainsand policy announcements demonstrate accelerated activity in the offshore wind energy

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyand absent supportive policies for wind energy. That said,

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effects of Integrating Wind Power on Transmission SystemInterconnection Policies and Wind Power: A Discussion ofof their database of wind power projects, and for providing

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Models Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are supporting that development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of such floating wind turbines. Coupling wind turbines and floating platforms requires complex computer models. Land- based wind turbines are designed and analyzed using simulation tools, called computer-aided engineering (CAE) design tools, that are capable of predicting a design's dynamic response to

287

Public Utilities (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities (Florida) Utilities (Florida) Public Utilities (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Florida Public Service Commission Chapter 366 of the Florida Statutes governs the operation of public utilities, and includes a section pertaining to cogeneration and small power production (366.051). This section establishes the state's support for incorporating cogenerators and small power producers into the grid, and directs the Public Service Commission to establish regulations and

288

Wind Energy Management System EMS Integration Project: Incorporating Wind Generation and Load Forecast Uncertainties into Power Grid Operations  

SciTech Connect

The power system balancing process, which includes the scheduling, real time dispatch (load following) and regulation processes, is traditionally based on deterministic models. Since the conventional generation needs time to be committed and dispatched to a desired megawatt level, the scheduling and load following processes use load and wind and solar power production forecasts to achieve future balance between the conventional generation and energy storage on the one side, and system load, intermittent resources (such as wind and solar generation), and scheduled interchange on the other side. Although in real life the forecasting procedures imply some uncertainty around the load and wind/solar forecasts (caused by forecast errors), only their mean values are actually used in the generation dispatch and commitment procedures. Since the actual load and intermittent generation can deviate from their forecasts, it becomes increasingly unclear (especially, with the increasing penetration of renewable resources) whether the system would be actually able to meet the conventional generation requirements within the look-ahead horizon, what the additional balancing efforts would be needed as we get closer to the real time, and what additional costs would be incurred by those needs. To improve the system control performance characteristics, maintain system reliability, and minimize expenses related to the system balancing functions, it becomes necessary to incorporate the predicted uncertainty ranges into the scheduling, load following, and, in some extent, into the regulation processes. It is also important to address the uncertainty problem comprehensively by including all sources of uncertainty (load, intermittent generation, generators’ forced outages, etc.) into consideration. All aspects of uncertainty such as the imbalance size (which is the same as capacity needed to mitigate the imbalance) and generation ramping requirement must be taken into account. The latter unique features make this work a significant step forward toward the objective of incorporating of wind, solar, load, and other uncertainties into power system operations. Currently, uncertainties associated with wind and load forecasts, as well as uncertainties associated with random generator outages and unexpected disconnection of supply lines, are not taken into account in power grid operation. Thus, operators have little means to weigh the likelihood and magnitude of upcoming events of power imbalance. In this project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a framework has been developed for incorporating uncertainties associated with wind and load forecast errors, unpredicted ramps, and forced generation disconnections into the energy management system (EMS) as well as generation dispatch and commitment applications. A new approach to evaluate the uncertainty ranges for the required generation performance envelope including balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration has been proposed. The approach includes three stages: forecast and actual data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of future grid balancing requirements for specified time horizons and confidence levels. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on a histogram analysis, incorporating all sources of uncertainties of both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures) nature. A new method called the “flying brick” technique has been developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation algorithm has been developed to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Guttromson, Ross T.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making...

290

3D Integral Field Observations of Ten Galactic Winds - I. Extended phase (>10 Myr) of mass/energy injection before the wind blows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 3D spectroscopic observations of a sample of 10 nearby galaxies with the AAOmega-SPIRAL integral field spectrograph on the 3.9m AAT, the largest survey of its kind to date. The double-beam spectrograph provides spatial maps in a range of spectral diagnostics: [OIII] 5007, H-beta, Mg-b, NaD, [OI] 6300, H-alpha, [NII] 6583, [SII] 6717, 6731. All of the objects in our survey show extensive wind-driven filamentation along the minor axis, in addition to large-scale disk rotation. Our sample can be divided into either starburst galaxies or active galactic nuclei (AGN), although some objects appear to be a combination of these. The total ionizing photon budget available to both classes of galaxies is sufficient to ionise all of the wind-blown filamentation out to large radius. We find however that while AGN photoionisation always dominates in the wind filaments, this is not the case in starburst galaxies where shock ionisation dominates. This clearly indicates that after the onset of star formation, there...

Sharp, R G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary and Project Overview (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

EnerNex Corporation; The Midwest ISO; Ventyx

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Voltage security assessment with high penetration levels of utility-scale doubly fed induction generator wind plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The interconnection requirements set forth by FERC in order 661-A mandate the operation of wind plants within a power factor range of 0.95 leading /… (more)

Konopinski, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Low Wind Speed Technologies Annual Turbine Technology Update (ATTU) Process for Land-Based, Utility-Class Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Low Wind Speed Technologies (LWST) Project comprises a diverse, balanced portfolio of industry-government partnerships structured to achieve ambitious cost of energy reductions. The LWST Project goal is: ''By 2012, reduce the cost of energy (COE) for large wind systems in Class 4 winds (average wind speed of 5.8 m/s at 10 m height) to 3 cents/kWh (in levelized 2002 dollars) for onshore systems.'' The Annual Turbine Technology Update (ATTU) has been developed to quantify performance-based progress toward these goals, in response to OMB reporting requirements and to meet internal DOE program needs for advisory data.

Schreck, S.; Laxson, A.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Investigation of transient models and performances for a doubly fed wind turbine under a grid fault  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the impacts of the integration of wind farms into utilities network, it is necessary to analyze the transient performances of wind turbine generation systems (WTGS) with the appropriate transient models. According to the grid ... Keywords: crowbar, doubly fed induction generator, drive train, transient performance, wind power

Mingyu Wang; Bin Zhao; Hui Li; Chao Yang; Renjie Ye; Z. Chen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference is used to restrict the application of the geophysical retrieval algorithms which are developed to handle specific atmospheric absorptive situations. An improved semi-empirical sea surface emissivity model is integrated into this refined D-matrix procedure that is being developed for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Radiometer (AMSR). The purpose of this work is to test the refined geophysical parameter retrieval methods using data from the Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I). When comparing the statistical performance of the TIWV, WS, and CLW retrieval methods presented to the statistical performance of published retrieval methods for each geophysical parameter, the retrieval methods developed for this study perform only slightly better. However, it is demonstrated that the new retrieval methods are more physically valid than the comparison retrieval methods. The utilization of the polarization difference of the 85 GHZ channels to restrict the application of specifically-derived retrieval algorithms proves to be a valuable and reliable geophysical parameter retrieval tool.

Manning, Norman Willis William

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission The Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act constitutes the main legislation in Virginia that pertains to the regulation of the state's electric utilities. The Act directs the State Corporation Commission to construct regulations for electric utilities, and contains information on

298

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) Gas and Electric Utilities Regulation (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation contains provisions for gas and electric utilities. As part of these regulations, electric utilities are required to file with the

299

Integrative modeling and novel particle swarm-based optimal design of wind farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the energy needs of the future, while seeking to decrease our carbon footprint, a greater penetration of sustainable energy resources such as wind energy is necessary. However, a consistent growth of wind energy (especially in the wake of unfortunate ...

Souma Chowdhury / Achille Messac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wind Sea and Swell Separation of 1D Wave Spectrum by a Spectrum Integration Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an earlier paper by Wang and Hwang, a wave steepness method was introduced to separate the wind sea and swell of the 1D wave spectrum without relying on external information, such as the wind speed. Later, the method was found to produce the ...

Paul A. Hwang; Francisco J. Ocampo-Torres; Héctor García-Nava

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wind Power Integration via Aggregator-Consumer Coordination: A Game Theoretic Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Interdisciplinary Information Sciences Tsinghua University Beijing, 100084, China Email: wucy years. Two most popular DG schemes are wind turbines (renewable powers), and combined heat and power plants (non-renewable powers) [1]. However, wind powers (and many other renewable energy resources

Wu, Chenye

302

Integration of plug-in electric vehicle charging and wind energy scheduling on electricity grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and wind energy are both key new energy technologies. However, they also bring challenges to the operation of the electricity grid. Charging a large number of PEVs requires a lot of grid energy, and scheduling wind energy ...

Chiao-Ting Li; Changsun Ahn; Huei Peng; Jing Sun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

1) INTRODUCTION Reliable and save grid integration of large-scale offshore wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these results with load profiles and conventional power generation will give insight into crossboarder flows production, forecasted wind power and deviations in the load forecast. Spatial forecast error smoothing. However, the accurate modeling of the vertical wind profile gains importance as in general much higher

Heinemann, Detlev

304

An Integrating Velocity–Azimuth Process Single-Doppler Radar Wind Retrieval Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the single-Doppler radar wind analysis methods, the velocity–azimuth display (VAD), velocity–azimuth process (VAP), and uniform-wind (UW) methods are widely used because of their simplicity. This paper shows that the VAD, VAP, and UW ...

Xudong Liang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ELECTRIC VEHICLE BASED BATTERY STORAGES FOR LARGE SCALE WIND POWER INTEGRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherent Energy and Environment System Analysis CHP Combined Heat and Power CPP Condensing Power Plant DPL system and the thermal based power systems of Europe through Germany. The Western part of Denmark includes 6500MW of wind power plants (4000MW from distributed onshore wind farms and 2500MW from offshore

Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna

306

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA

307

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilities Take Advantage of Lower Property Taxes 18 Listassuming a utility discount rate of 5.0%. Table 1 lists the

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief, Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Powering America Fact Sheet Series Powering America Fact Sheet Series Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief Wind for Schools Project Power System Brief This fact sheet provides an overview of the system components of a Wind Powering America Wind for Schools project. Wind Powering America's (WPA's) Wind for Schools project uses a basic system configuration for each school project. The system incorporates a single SkyStream(tm) wind turbine, a 70-ft guyed tower, disconnect boxes at the base of the turbine and at the school, and an interconnection to the school's electrical system. A detailed description of each system component is provided in this document. The local power cooperative or utility should be an integral part of

309

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with other proposed wind projects in the region. The low to high impacts to visual resources reflect the effect that the transmission line and the turbine strings from both wind projects would have on viewers in the local area, but this impact diminishes with distance from the project.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

NREL: Education Programs - KidWind Project and Wind Education...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KidWind Project and Wind Education in the Classroom: Wind Powering America Lessons Learned July 1, 2013 Integrating wind energy curricula into the classroom can seem like a...

311

Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites - Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To build increasingly larger, lightweight, and robust wind turbine blades for improved power output and cost efficiency, durability of the blade, largely resulting from its structural composites selection and aerodynamic shape design, is of paramount concern. The safe/reliable operation of structural components depends critically on the selection of materials that are resistant to damage and failure in the expected service environment. An effective surveillance program is also necessary to monitor the degradation of the materials in the course of service. Composite materials having high specific strength/stiffness are desirable for the construction of wind turbines. However, most high-strength materials tend to exhibit low fracture toughness. That is why the fracture toughness of the composite materials under consideration for the manufacture of the next generation of wind turbines deserves special attention. In order to achieve the above we have proposed to develop an innovative technology, based on spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) methodology, to effectively investigate the material performance of turbine blade composites. SNTT approach was successfully demonstrated and extended to both epoxy and glass fiber composite materials for wind turbine blades during the performance period. In addition to typical Mode I failure mechanism, the mixed-mode failure mechanism induced by the wind turbine service environments and/or the material mismatch of the composite materials was also effectively investigated using SNTT approach. The SNTT results indicate that the proposed protocol not only provides significant advance in understanding the composite failure mechanism, but also can be readily utilized to assist the development of new turbine blade composites.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Mandell, John [Montana State University; Agastra, Pancasatya [Montana State University

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Stratified Quasar Winds: Integrating X-ray and Infrared Views of Broad Absorption Line Quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasars are notable for the luminous power they emit across decades in frequency from the far-infrared through hard X-rays; emission at different frequencies emerges from physical scales ranging from AUs to parsecs. Each wavelength regime thus offers a different line of sight into the central engine and a separate probe of outflowing material. Therefore, obtaining a complete accounting of the physical characteristics and kinetic power of quasar winds requires a panchromatic approach. X-ray and infrared studies are particularly powerful for covering the range of interesting physical scales and ionization states of the outflow. We present a stratified wind picture based on a synthesis of multiwavelength research programs designed to constrain the nature of mass ejection from radio-quiet quasars. This wind comprises three zones: the highly ionized shielding gas, the UV broad absorption line wind, and the cold dusty outflow. The primary launching mechanism for the wind likely varies in each zone. While radiative acceleration on resonance lines dominates for the UV absorbing wind, the shielding gas may instead be driven by magnetic forces. Ultraviolet continuum radiative pressure, perhaps coupled with magnetic launching, accelerates a dusty outflow that obscures the inner broad line region in unification schemes.

S. C. Gallagher; J. E. Everett

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume IV. Final report, Appendix C: identification from utility visits of present and future approaches to integration of DSG into distribution networks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. As a result of visits to four utilities concerned with the use of DSG power sources on their distribution networks, some useful impressions of present and future approaches to the integration of DSGs into electrical distribution network have been obtained. A more extensive communications and control network will be developed by utilities for control of such sources for future use. Different approaches to future utility systems with DSG are beginning to take shape. The new DSG sources will be in decentralized locations with some measure of centralized control. The utilities have yet to establish firmly the communication and control means or their organization. For the present, the means for integrating the DSGs and their associated monitoring and control equipment into a unified system have not been decided.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk ofneeds. With natural gas prices expected to remain high forrisk (primarily natural gas price risk) in utility resourc e

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

portfolios – especially natural gas price risk and theutility needs. With natural gas prices expected to remainprice risk (primarily natural gas price risk) in utility

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western UtilityEmerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the WesternEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Office of Planning,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economic realities of using wind power to produce hydrogensource in California [2], wind power characteristics in manythe intermittency of wind power means that utilities must

Bartholomy, Obadiah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Berrendo Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Berrendo Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Berrendo Wind Energy Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80304 Sector Wind energy Product Colorado-based firm developing utility scale...

320

NREL: Wind Research - KidWind Project and Wind Education in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KidWind Project and Wind Education in the Classroom: Wind Powering America Lessons Learned July 1, 2013 Integrating wind energy curricula into the classroom can seem like a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wind energy: Program overview, FY 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Wind Energy Program assists utilities and industry in developing advanced wind turbine technology to be economically competitive as an energy source in the marketplace and in developing new markets and applications for wind systems. This program overview describes the commercial development of wind power, wind turbine development, utility programs, industry programs, wind resources, applied research in wind energy, and the program structure.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Technology  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power Technology Wind Power Technology Modern wind turbines have become sophisticated power plants while the concept of converting wind energy to electrical energy remains quite simple. Follow these links to learn more about the science behind wind turbine technology. Wind Power Animation An image of a scene from the wind power animation. The animation shows how moving air rotates a wind turbine's blades and describes how the internal components work to produce electricity. It shows small and large wind turbines and the differences between how they are used, as stand alone or connected to the utility grid. How Wind Turbines Work Learn how wind turbines make electricity; what are the types, sizes, and applications of wind turbines; and see an illustration of the components inside a wind turbine.

323

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report - 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study, Volume I,"M. Schuerger, "Wind Plant Integration: Costs, Status, and

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Maine's Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development statue provides an expedited permitting pathway for proposed wind developments in

325

Technology R&D Needs for Integrating High Penetrations of Variable Utility-Scale Renewable Power Sources into the Electric Power Inf rastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the North American electric energy resource portfolio continues to evolve, integrating large-scale renewable resources into the electric power infrastructure presents significant challenges. This is particularly true of variable renewable resources, such as wind and solar, which represent two of the most rapidly growing renewable resources being deployed. The root of this challenge lies in the inherent variability of wind and solar resources, which differentiates these from other renewable resource...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Integrated high speed intelligent utility tie unit for disbursed/renewable generation facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After experiencing the price hikes and rotating blackouts in California, the disbursed or distributed generation (DG) is considered as one of the most attractive alternatives for future utility industry. In addition to the conventional DG that uses fossil-fuel ...

Worakarn Wongsaichua / Wei-Jen Lee; Soontorn Oraintara

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Integral-Field Spectroscopy of the Post Red Supergiant IRC +10420: evidence for an axi-symmetric wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present NAOMI/OASIS adaptive-optics assisted integral-field spectroscopy of the transitional massive hypergiant IRC +10420, an extreme mass-losing star apparently in the process of evolving from a Red Supergiant toward the Wolf-Rayet phase. To investigate the present-day mass-loss geometry of the star, we study the appearance of the line-emission from the inner wind as viewed when reflected off the surrounding nebula. We find that, contrary to previous work, there is strong evidence for wind axi-symmetry, based on the equivalent-width and velocity variations of H$\\alpha$ and Fe {\\sc ii} $\\lambda$6516. We attribute this behaviour to the appearance of the complex line-profiles when viewed from different angles. We also speculate that the Ti {\\sc ii} emission originates in the outer nebula in a region analogous to the Strontium Filament of $\\eta$ Carinae, based on the morphology of the line-emission. Finally, we suggest that the present-day axisymmetric wind of IRC +10420, combined with its continued blueward evolution, is evidence that the star is evolving toward the B[e] supergiant phase.

Ben Davies; René D. Oudmaijer; Kailash C. Sahu

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Integral-Field Spectroscopy of the Post Red Supergiant IRC +10420: evidence for an axi-symmetric wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present NAOMI/OASIS adaptive-optics assisted integral-field spectroscopy of the transitional massive hypergiant IRC +10420, an extreme mass-losing star apparently in the process of evolving from a Red Supergiant toward the Wolf-Rayet phase. To investigate the present-day mass-loss geometry of the star, we study the appearance of the line-emission from the inner wind as viewed when reflected off the surrounding nebula. We find that, contrary to previous work, there is strong evidence for wind axi-symmetry, based on the equivalent-width and velocity variations of H$\\alpha$ and Fe {\\sc ii} $\\lambda$6516. We attribute this behaviour to the appearance of the complex line-profiles when viewed from different angles. We also speculate that the Ti {\\sc ii} emission originates in the outer nebula in a region analogous to the Strontium Filament of $\\eta$ Carinae, based on the morphology of the line-emission. Finally, we suggest that the present-day axisymmetric wind of IRC +10420, combined with its continued blueward...

Davies, Ben; Sahu, Kailash C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Impact of Wind Integration on Electricity Markets: A Chance-Constrained Nash Cournot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programming 1 Introduction Wind generation installation, as a renewable energy source, is growing at the rate of 30% annually, with a global installed capacity of 157,900 (MW) in 2009, and is widely used in Europe, Asia and the United states [1]. In some cases such as Alberta, Canada, interest for over 9000 MW of new

330

Wind Energy Program overview, Fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy research has two goals: (1) to gain a fundamental understanding of the interactions between wind and wind turbines; and (2) to develop the basic design tools required to develop advanced technologies. A primary objective of applied research activities is to develop sophisticated computer codes and integrate them into the design, testing, and evaluation of advanced components and systems, Computer models have become a necessary and integral part of developing new high-tech wind energy systems. A computer-based design strategy allows designers to model different configurations and explore new designs before building expensive hardware. DOE works closely with utilities and the wind industry in setting its applied research agenda. As soon as research findings become available, the national laboratories transfer the information to industry through workshops, conferences, and publications.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for renewable energy projects than for non-renewable ones.Non-Utility Generator Power Purchase Agreement Public Power Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Lightning Prediction Index that Utilizes GPS Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary weather forecast challenge at the Cape Canaveral Air Station and Kennedy Space Center is lightning. This paper describes a statistical approach that combines integrated precipitable water vapor (IPWV) data from a global positioning ...

Robert A. Mazany; Steven Businger; Seth I. Gutman; William Roeder

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

7th International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Farms Models for HLI analysis of power systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

export? BACKGROUND The last decade has seen a remarkable increase in the number of wind installations. In Europe, Denmark is amongst the leading countries in wind generation in terms of installed capacity the consequences and challenges of high rates of wind generation from both a technical and economic perspective

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

334

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

111. Seck, T. 2003. “GRE Wind Integration Study. ” PresentedGroup Technical Workshop: Wind Integration: Focus on theDepartment of Commerce: Wind Integration Study – Final

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Current Interconnection Practice and Unified Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for interconnecting them with electric utility distribution systems. An assessment of current practice is provided, and a unified approach is recommended to achieve greater consistency. This report is a tool that readers can use to simplify their efforts in resolving DR interconnection problems.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

ESB Networks Case Study on Distribution Volt-VAR Control Integrated with Wind Turbine Inverter Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key topic addressed in this Smart Grid Demonstration case study is how the decoupled reactive power capability of modern, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) wind farms can be used to actively control voltage at the point of common coupling. This was done within the context of assessing technologies that will allow higher penetration of renewable resources without violating voltage limits on local distribution systems.A trial was conducted, using a section of Ireland’s ESB ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from Major Wind Integration Studies Completed 2003-a mini- mum) show that wind integration costs are generallyA number of additional wind integration analyses are planned

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in comparing the costs of renewable energy across ownershipof low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy productionCost Recovery System Non-Utility Generator Power Purchase Agreement Public Power Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Wind energy manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives: The course introduces principles of wind power production, design of wind turbines, location and design of wind farms, control of turbines and wind farms, predictive modeling, diagnostics, operations and maintenance, condition monitoring, health monitoring and of turbine components and systems, wind farm performance optimization, and integration of wind power with a grid. The modeling and analysis aspect of the topics discussed in the class will be illustrated with examples and case studies. Textbook: References:

A. Vieira; Da Rosa; Fundamentals Renewable; Energy Processes; San Diego; Jacob Kirpes; Small Wind

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Peering through the stellar wind of IGR J19140+0951 with simultaneous INTEGRAL/RXTE observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the RXTE and INTEGRAL satellites simultaneously to observe the High Mass X-ray binary IGR J19140+0951. The spectra obtained in the 3--80 keV range have allowed us to perform a precise spectral analysis of the system along its binary orbit. The spectral evolution confirms the supergiant nature of the companion star and the neutron star nature of the compact object. Using a simple stellar wind model to describe the evolution of the photoelectric absorption, we were able to restrict the orbital inclination angle in the range 38--75 degrees. This analysis leads to a wind mass-loss rate from the companion star of ~5x 10e-8 Msun/year, consistent with an OB I spectral type. We have detected a soft excess in at least four observations, for the first time for this source. Such soft excesses have been reported in several HMXBs in the past. We discuss the possible origin of this excess, and suggest, based on its spectral properties and occurrences around the superior conjunction, that it may be explained as...

Prat, L; Hannikainen, D C; Shaw, S E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Peering through the stellar wind of IGR J19140+0951 with simultaneous INTEGRAL/RXTE observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the RXTE and INTEGRAL satellites simultaneously to observe the High Mass X-ray binary IGR J19140+0951. The spectra obtained in the 3--80 keV range have allowed us to perform a precise spectral analysis of the system along its binary orbit. The spectral evolution confirms the supergiant nature of the companion star and the neutron star nature of the compact object. Using a simple stellar wind model to describe the evolution of the photoelectric absorption, we were able to restrict the orbital inclination angle in the range 38--75 degrees. This analysis leads to a wind mass-loss rate from the companion star of ~5x 10e-8 Msun/year, consistent with an OB I spectral type. We have detected a soft excess in at least four observations, for the first time for this source. Such soft excesses have been reported in several HMXBs in the past. We discuss the possible origin of this excess, and suggest, based on its spectral properties and occurrences around the superior conjunction, that it may be explained as the reprocessing of the X-ray emission originating from the neutron star by the surrounding ionised gas.

L. Prat; J. Rodriguez; D. C. Hannikainen; S. E. Shaw

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section distinguishes between large (capacity 5,000 kW or more) and small (capacity of less than 5,000 kW) wind energy conversion systems (WECS), and regulates the siting of large conversion systems. The statute

343

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other utility-scale (>100 kW) wind turbines installed in thesales of small wind turbines, 100 kW and less in size, intoSales of Small Wind Turbines (? 100 kW) into the United

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other utility-scale (>100 kW) wind turbines installed in thesales of small wind turbines, 100 kW and less in size, intoSales of Small Wind Turbines (? 100 kW) into the United

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Definition: Commercial Scale Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scale Wind Commercial scale wind refers to wind energy projects greater than 100 kW. The electricity that is generated is sold.1 Also Known As Utility-Scale Wind Related Terms...

346

Integration of Wind Generation and Load Forecast Uncertainties into Power Grid Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new approach to evaluate the uncertainty ranges for the required generation performance envelope, including the balancing capacity, ramping capability and ramp duration is presented. The approach includes three stages: statistical and actual data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of future grid balancing requirements for specified time horizons and confidence intervals. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on a histogram analysis incorporating all sources of uncertainty and parameters of a continuous (wind forecast and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and failures to start up) nature. Preliminary simulations using California Independent System Operator (CAISO) real life data have shown the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Ma, Jian; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Loutan, Clyde; Guttromson, Ross T.

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy and Utility Project Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Utility Project Review and Utility Project Review Energy and Utility Project Review < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources The DNR's Office of Energy and Environmental Analysis is responsible for coordinating the review of all proposed energy and utility projects in the

348

Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

None

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

A GUI simulation system for integrating photovoltaic and wind units into power grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a design of simulation software developed in MATLAB environment and within a Graphical User Interface (GUI) framework for performance and economical assessment of Distributed Renewable Energy Systems as they get integrated in the ... Keywords: GUI, photovoltaic, renewable energy

Adel A. Ghandakly; Rostan Rodrigues

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

NWTC Transmission and Grid Integration (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth of alternative power sources, especially wind power, is creating challenges that affect the existing electric grid. To keep up with this rapid growth, researchers in the Transmission and Grid Integration Group provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance alternative energy and accelerate its integration into the nation's electrical grid. For example, we evaluate U.S. wind energy resources and collect and analyze data about the impact of wind development on the electrical grid. Researchers in the Transmission and Grid Integration Group offer assistance to utility industry partners in the following integration areas.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the costs and benefits of wind energy relative to itsfor the costs and benefits of wind energy relative to itsother benefits, lowers the costs of integrating wind energy.

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportAssociates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little10, 2010. David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Trade

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Long-Term Modeling of Wind Energy in the United States  

SciTech Connect

An improved representation of wind energy has been developed for the ObjECTS MiniCAM integrated assessment modeling framework. The first version of this wind model was used for the CCTP scenarios, where wind accounts for between 9% and 17% of U.S. electricity generation by 2095. Climate forcing stabilization policies tend to increase projected deployment. Accelerated technological development in wind electric generation can both increase output and reduce the costs of wind energy. In all scenarios, wind generation is constrained by its costs relative to alternate electricity sources, particularly as less favorable wind farm sites are utilized. These first scenarios were based on exogenous resource estimates that do not allow evaluation of resource availability assumptions. A more detailed representation of wind energy is under development that uses spatially explicit resource information and explicit wind turbine technology characteristics.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Wise, Marshall A.; Lurz, Joshua P.; Barrie, Daniel

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Geographic Information Systems in Support of Wind Energy Activities at NREL: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to further the development of wind energy resources in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program and its Wind Powering America Initiative. Some of the elements of NREL's GIS data used in wind energy activities include wind measurement sites, transmission lines, federal facility information, and modeled wind resources. More complex GIS analyses can define relationships among the mapped wind energy resources, potential energy load characterization, and utility integration problems. A GIS is an outstanding tool for wind energy activities because data can be readily updated and the results of the GIS analyses can be expressed as charts, tables, and maps. These outputs are in digital formats that allow the results of GIS analyses to be quickly and efficiently distributed to the wind energy industry.

Heimiller, D. M.; Haymes, S. R.

2001-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

360

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Wind Research Offshore Wind Research Photo of a European offshore wind farm. Early progress in European Offshore Wind Energy over the last decade provides a glimpse into the vast potential of the global offshore resource. For more than eight years, NREL has worked with the Department of Energy to become an international leader in offshore wind energy research. Capabilities NREL's offshore wind capabilities focus on critical areas that reflect the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the U.S. Department of Energy including: Offshore Design Tools and Methods Offshore Standards and Testing Energy Analysis of Offshore Systems Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Key Research NREL documented the status of offshore wind energy in the United States in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Application of Surface-Adjusted GOES Low-Level Cloud-Drift Winds in the Environment of Atlantic Tropical Cyclones. Part II: Integration into Surface Wind Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin—Madison recently (1997 season) began providing real-time Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) low-level cloud-drift winds in the ...

Jason P. Dunion; Samuel H. Houston; Christopher S. Velden; Mark D. Powell

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility Scale Wind Turbine,” with a preliminary author lista Utility Scale Wind Turbine” with a preliminary author listUtility Scale Wind Turbine Including Operational E?ects” with a preliminary author list

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site  

SciTech Connect

Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Learn About Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About Wind Power Locating Wind Power Getting Wind Power Installed Wind Capacity Wind for Schools Project Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Learn About Wind Learn about how wind energy generates power; where the best wind resources are; how you can own, host, partner with, and support wind power; and how and where wind energy has increased over the past decade. What Is Wind Power? Learn about how wind energy generates power, about wind turbine sizes and how wind turbines work, and how wind energy can be used. Also read examples of financial and business decisions. Where Is Wind Power? Go to maps to see the wind resource for utility-, community-, and residential-scale wind development. Or, see how much energy wind projects

365

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Ride-Through Capability Predictions for Wind Power Plants in the ERCOT Network: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility system operators and engineers now want a better understanding of the impacts of large wind farms on grid stability before the farms are interconnected to the grid. Utilities need wind farm electrical models and methods of analysis that will help them analyze potential problems of grid stability. Without the necessary tools and knowledge of the behavior of large wind power plants, utilities are reluctant to integrate more wind power into the grid. The dynamic models used in this paper were developed by Power Technologies Inc. (PTI), under subcontract from ERCOT. A three-phase fault on important buses will be tested, and the potential impact on wind farms will be investigated. Two methods, dynamic analysis and steady state analysis (Zbus prediction), will be used to predict the low voltage ride through capability of the wind farms. Comparison between the two methods will be presented.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Conto, J.; Donohoo, K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Wind energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Wind) (Redirected from Wind) Jump to: navigation, search Wind energy is a form of solar energy.[1] Wind energy (or wind power) describes the process by which wind is used to generate electricity. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical power. A generator can convert mechanical power into electricity[2]. Mechanical power can also be utilized directly for specific tasks such as pumping water. The US DOE developed a short wind power animation that provides an overview of how a wind turbine works and describes the wind resources in the United States. Contents 1 Wind Energy Basics 1.1 Equation for Wind Power 2 DOE Wind Programs and Information 3 Worldwide Installed Capacity 3.1 United States Installed Capacity 4 Wind Farm Development 4.1 Land Requirements

368

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage. Table A-1 lists the utility company, survey year, andRequested From Utility Participants v List of Figures and

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

High-energy particles in the wind nebula of pulsar B1509-58 as seen by INTEGRAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations with the INTEGRAL/IBIS telescope of the wind nebula powered by the young pulsar B1509-58 and we discuss the spatial and spectral properties of the unpulsed emission in the 20-200 keV energy band. The source extension and orientation along the northwest-southeast axis corresponds to the jet emission seen at keV and TeV energies. The hard X-ray spectrum is consistent with the earlier Beppo-SAX measurements. It follows a power law with a photon index alpha = -2.12 pm 0.05 up to 160 keV. A possible break at this energy is found at the 2.9 sigma confidence level. The 0.1-100 keV data are consistent with synchrotron aging of pairs in the jet and yield a magnetic field strength of 22-33 muG for a bulk velocity of 0.3-0.5c. The synchrotron cut-off energy thus corresponds to a maximum electron energy of 400-730 TeV.

M. Forot; W. Hermsen; M. Renaud; P. Laurent; I. Grenier; P. Goret; B. Khelifi; L. Kuiper

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Duke Energy Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project: 2013 Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical update is an interim report summarizing the status of Duke Energy’s Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project, which involves integrating a 36-MW battery energy storage system (BESS) from Xtreme Power with the152.6-MW Notrees Wind Farm. Xtreme Power’s solid lead-acid battery represents one of an emerging number of energy storage devices endowed with the potential to serve multiple value-added utility applications. ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development of Eastern Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets: March 3, 2008 -- March 31, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to provide wind resource inputs to the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

Brower, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Avista 2003 Wind RFP Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 2003 WIND RFP 7 2003 WIND RFP REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Wind Power Up To 50 MW Avista Corporation August 2003 Introduction Avista's 2003 Integrated Resource Plan ("IRP") includes wind within its acquisition strategy beginning in the 2008-10 timeframe. Based on this result, the IRP includes an action item for Avista to investigate wind integration issues. In support of an integration issues study, Avista is interested in purchasing up to 50 MW of nameplate wind capability over a term of between two and five years to gain operational experience with this innovative resource. Because the Company has identified a wind resource preference beginning in 2008, options for project

373

Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features  

SciTech Connect

Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Transmission Requirements for Off-Shore Wind Integration: A study of the merits of AC and HVDC transmission connection options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a study of two transmission technologies, AC and HVDC, that could be employed to connect a distant wind farm to the Great Britain (GB) electricity transmission system. A review of the GB electricity transmission system industry codes makes it clear that particular consideration must be given in the design stage to the power factor and voltage control requirements at the interface between the wind farm and the transmission system. The ability of the transmission link and the wind ...

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Wind Energy Systems Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Exemption Wind Energy Systems Exemption Eligibility Commercial Industrial Utility Savings For Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate None Program Information Start...

376

Offshore Wind Turbines and Their Installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Offshore winds tend to be higher, more constant and not disturbed by rough terrain, so there is a large potential for utilizing wind energy near to the sea. Compared with the wind energy converters onland, wind turbine components offshore will subject ... Keywords: renewable energy, wind power generation, offshore wind turbines, offshore installation

Liwei Li; Jianxing Ren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

Hualapai Tribal Nation

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

378

ANEMOS: Development of a Next Generation Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the objectives and the research work carried out in the frame of the ANEMOS project on short-term wind power forecasting. The aim of the project is to develop accurate models that substantially outperform current state-of-the-art methods, for onshore and offshore wind power forecasting, exploiting both statistical and physical modeling approaches. The project focus on prediction horizons up to 48 hours ahead and investigates predictability of wind for higher horizons up to 7 days ahead useful i.e. for maintenance scheduling. Emphasis is given on the integration of highresolution meteorological forecasts. For the offshore case, marine meteorology is considered as well as information by satellite-radar images. An integrated software platform, `ANEMOS', is developed to host the various models. This system will be installed by several utilities for on-line operation at onshore and offshore wind farms for prediction at a local, regional and national scale. The applications include different terrain types and wind climates, on- and offshore cases, and interconnected or island grids. The on-line operation by the utilities will allow validation of the models and an analysis of the value of wind prediction for a competitive integration of wind energy in the developing liberalized electricity markets in the EU.

Forecasting System For; G. Kariniotakis; J. Ottavi; U. Focken; M. Lange; J. Kintxo; J. Usaola; I. Sanchez; D. Mccoy; I. Marti H. Madsen; M. Collmann; A. Gig; G. Gonzales

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Wind characteristics for agricultural wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy utilization in agriculture can provide a potentially significant savings in fuel oil consumption and ultimately a cost savings to the farmer. A knowledge of the wind characteristics within a region and at a location can contribute greatly to a more efficient and cost-effective use of this resource. Current research indicates that the important wind characteristics include mean annual wind speed and the frequency distribution of the wind, seasonal and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction, and the turbulent and gustiness characteristics of the wind. Further research is underway to provide a better definition of the total wind resource available, improved methods for siting WECS and an improved understanding of the environment to which the WECS respond.

Renne, D. S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Wind power today  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Wind powering America: Vermont  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind resources in the state of Vermont show great potential for wind energy development according to the wind resource assessment conducted by the state, its utilities, and NREL. This fact sheet provides a brief description of the resource assessment and a link to the resulting wind resource map produced by NREL. The fact sheet also provides a description of the state's net metering program, its financial incentives, and green power programs as well as a list of contacts for more information.

NREL

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Wind powering America: Kansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind resources in the state of Kansas show great potential for wind energy development according to the wind resource assessment conducted by the Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program, UWIG, and DOE. This fact sheet provides a brief description of the resource assessment and description of the state's new educational wind kiosk as well as its green power program and financial incentives available for the development of renewable energy technologies. A list of contacts for more information is also included.

NREL

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Wind Power WIndfarm.Sunset.jpg Wind power is a form of solar energy.[1] Wind is caused by the uneven heating of the atmosphere by the sun, variations in the earth's surface, and rotation of the earth. Mountains, bodies of water, and vegetation all influence wind flow patterns[2], [3]. Wind energy (or wind power) describes the process by which wind is used to generate electricity. Wind turbines convert the energy in wind to electricity by rotating propeller-like blades around a rotor. The rotor turns the drive shaft, which turns an electric generator.[2] Three key factors affect the amount of energy a turbine can harness from the wind: wind speed, air density, and swept area.[4] Mechanical power can also be utilized directly for specific tasks such as

384

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Eastern Renewable Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transmission? How does geographic diversity of wind reduce wind integration costs? How do offshore and onshore wind power compare? What transmission is needed to facilitate higher...

385

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration,wind resource in which projects are located, as well as development, transmission, integration,

Wiser, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Northwest Wind Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foundation David Gates, NorthWestern Energy Terry Hudgens, PPM Energy Greg Jergeson, Montana Public Service Commission Jim Lobdell, Portland General Electric Eric Markell, Puget Sound Energy Louise McCarren, Western General Electric John Apperson, PacifiCorp Philip Augustin, Portland General Electric Jamie Austin, Pacifi

387

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Plant Integration: Costs, Status, and Issues," IEEE Power & Energy,wind power; the treatment of renewable energy in integrated resource planning; the cost

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands (Nebraska) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands (Nebraska) Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Board of Educational Lands and Funds These regulations govern the implementation and development of wind and

389

Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models Nils Siebert George.siebert@ensmp.fr, georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized today as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind generation in power systems. This paper deals

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

Wind Energy Assessment using a Wind Turbine with Dynamic Yaw Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this project was to analyze the wind energy potential over Lake Michigan. For this purpose, a dynamic model of a utility-scale wind… (more)

Pervez, Md Nahid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Benefit of Regional Energy Balancing Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection of the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis indicates the extent to which pooled regional dispatch for matching generation to load mitigates the costs and improves associated reliability, particularly in scenarios with high penetration of variable output resources, such as wind

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Wind Energy 101.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation on wind energy discusses: (1) current industry status; (2) turbine technologies; (3) assessment and siting; and (4) grid integration. There are no fundamental technical barriers to the integration of 20% wind energy into the nation's electrical system, but there needs to be a continuing evolution of transmission planning and system operation policy and market development for this to be most economically achieved.

Karlson, Benjamin; Orwig, Kirsten (NREL)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Techno-economic Modeling of the Integration of 20% Wind and Large-scale Energy Storage in ERCOT by 2030  

SciTech Connect

This study�¢����s objective is to examine interrelated technical and economic avenues for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grid to incorporate up to and over 20% wind generation by 2030. Our specific interests are to look at the factors that will affect the implementation of both high level of wind power penetration (> 20% generation) and installation of large scale storage.

Ross Baldick; Michael Webber; Carey King; Jared Garrison; Stuart Cohen; Duehee Lee

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program - Micro Wind Initiative...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View...

395

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program (Massachusetts) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special...

396

Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report - 2006 Minnesota Wind Integration Study Volume I.NREL). 2010. Eastern Wind Integration and TransmissionAvista Corporation Wind Integration Study. March. http://

Eto, Joseph H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Offshore Wind Research (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology Center (NWTC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Offshore Wind Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is internationally recognized for offshore wind energy research and development (R&D). Its experience and capabilities cover a wide spectrum of wind energy disciplines. NREL's offshore wind R&D efforts focus on critical areas that address the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). R&D efforts include: * Developing offshore design tools and methods * Collaborating with international partners * Testing offshore systems and developing standards * Conducting economic analyses * Characterizing offshore wind resources * Identifying and mitigating offshore wind grid integration challenges and barriers NREL documented the status of offshore wind energy in the United

398

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Makarov, Y. , 2007: Wind Integration Issues and So- lutionsexpectations, and integration strategy for any wind powerwind climate and variability. Site design and operation, as well as market integration

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards In July 2008, New Hampshire enacted legislation designed to prevent municipalities from adopting ordinances or regulations that place unreasonable limits or hinder the performance of wind energy systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. Such wind turbines must be used primarily to produce energy for on-site consumption. The law identifies a several

400

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Value of Wind Power Forecasting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study, building on the extensive models developed for the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), uses these WECC models to evaluate the operating cost impacts of improved day-ahead wind forecasts.

Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in the country of Armenia. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. The maps portray the wind resource with high-resolution (1-km2) grids of wind power density at 50-m above ground. The wind maps were created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a computerized wind mapping system that uses Geographic Information System (GIS) software.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Gone with the Wind - The Potential Tragedy of the Common Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Encourage Utilization of Wind Energy Resources, 27 TiEMiP.supra note 44, at 92; Wind Energy, Ri--NEWABLE ENEzRGY PoL'yformerly named British Wind Energy Association), http://

Lifshitz-Goldberg, Yaei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R; Goldman, P [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Integral Input-to-State Stability of the Drive-Train of a Wind Turbine Chen Wang and George Weiss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generating units based on a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), as shown in Figure 1, have been widely of the equations of a DFIG in the stator- flux reference frame shows that the electrical torque is C. Wang; #12; # $ Fig. 1. Control of a grid-connected wind-driven DFIG with back-to-back converters

Sontag, Eduardo

406

An Integrated System for the Study of Wind-Wave Source Terms in Finite-Depth Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment to study the spectral balance of the source terms for wind-generated waves in finite water depth was carried out in Lake George, Australia. The measurements were made from a shore-connected platform at varying water depths from ...

Ian R. Young; Michael L. Banner; Mark A. Donelan; Cyril McCormick; Alexander V. Babanin; W. Kendall Melville; Fabrice Veron

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Wind energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy in the wind into mechanical power. A generator can convert mechanical power into electricity2. Mechanical power can also be utilized directly for specific tasks such as...

408

NREL: Wind Research - WindPACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WindPACT WindPACT The Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technology (WindPACT) studies were conducted to assist industry by testing innovative components, such as advanced blades and drivetrains, to lower the cost of energy. Specific goals included: Foster technological advancements to reduce the cost of wind energy Determine probable size ranges of advanced utility-scale turbines over the next decade for U.S. application Evaluate advanced concepts that are necessary to achieve objectives of cost and size for future turbines Identify and solve technological hurdles that may block industry from taking advantage of promising technology Design, fabricate, and test selected advanced components to prove their viability Support wind industry through transfer of technology from

409

Alaska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska/Wind Resources Alaska/Wind Resources < Alaska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alaska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

410

Wyoming/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Wind Resources Wyoming/Wind Resources < Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wyoming Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

411

Nevada/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada/Wind Resources Nevada/Wind Resources < Nevada Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nevada Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

412

Kansas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Wind Resources Kansas/Wind Resources < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kansas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

413

Nebraska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Wind Resources Nebraska/Wind Resources < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nebraska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

414

Alabama/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Wind Resources Alabama/Wind Resources < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alabama Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

415

Florida/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Wind Resources Florida/Wind Resources < Florida Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Florida Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

416

Vermont/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Wind Resources Vermont/Wind Resources < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Vermont Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

417

Wisconsin/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin/Wind Resources Wisconsin/Wind Resources < Wisconsin Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wisconsin Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

418

Idaho/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Wind Resources Idaho/Wind Resources < Idaho Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Idaho Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

419

Missouri/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Wind Resources Missouri/Wind Resources < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Missouri Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

420

Iowa/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Wind Resources Iowa/Wind Resources < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Iowa Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Maryland/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Wind Resources Maryland/Wind Resources < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Maryland Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

422

Massachusetts/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Wind Resources Massachusetts/Wind Resources < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Massachusetts Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

423

Minnesota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Wind Resources Minnesota/Wind Resources < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Minnesota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

424

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources Pennsylvania/Wind Resources < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Pennsylvania Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

425

Hawaii/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Wind Resources Hawaii/Wind Resources < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Hawaii Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

426

Washington/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington/Wind Resources Washington/Wind Resources < Washington Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Washington Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

427

Louisiana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Wind Resources Louisiana/Wind Resources < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Louisiana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

428

Oregon/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Wind Resources Oregon/Wind Resources < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Oregon Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

429

Kentucky/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Wind Resources Kentucky/Wind Resources < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kentucky Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

430

Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allow integration with the existing grid and wind resourceWind Generation Operating Experience: CAISO Perspective and Experience”, February 2005, California Energy Commission Workshop on Transmission-Renewables Integration

Bartholomy, Obadiah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Tutorial of Wind Turbine Control for Supporting Grid Frequency through Active Power Control: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio and wind turbines become larger and more expensive, wind turbine control systems play an ever more prominent role in the design and deployment of wind turbines. The goals of traditional wind turbine control systems are maximizing energy production while protecting the wind turbine components. As more wind generation is installed there is an increasing interest in wind turbines actively controlling their power output in order to meet power setpoints and to participate in frequency regulation for the utility grid. This capability will be beneficial for grid operators, as it seems possible that wind turbines can be more effective at providing some of these services than traditional power plants. Furthermore, establishing an ancillary market for such regulation can be beneficial for wind plant owner/operators and manufacturers that provide such services. In this tutorial paper we provide an overview of basic wind turbine control systems and highlight recent industry trends and research in wind turbine control systems for grid integration and frequency stability.

Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Laks, J.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.; Dunne, F.; Churchfield, M.; Pao, L.; Johnson, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Tutorial of Wind Turbine Control for Supporting Grid Frequency through Active Power Control: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio and wind turbines become larger and more expensive, wind turbine control systems play an ever more prominent role in the design and deployment of wind turbines. The goals of traditional wind turbine control systems are maximizing energy production while protecting the wind turbine components. As more wind generation is installed there is an increasing interest in wind turbines actively controlling their power output in order to meet power setpoints and to participate in frequency regulation for the utility grid. This capability will be beneficial for grid operators, as it seems possible that wind turbines can be more effective at providing some of these services than traditional power plants. Furthermore, establishing an ancillary market for such regulation can be beneficial for wind plant owner/operators and manufacturers that provide such services. In this tutorial paper we provide an overview of basic wind turbine control systems and highlight recent industry trends and research in wind turbine control systems for grid integration and frequency stability.

Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Laks, J.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.; Dunne, F.; Churchfield, M.; Pao, L.; Johnson, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Wind Plant Ramping Behavior  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the increasing wind penetrations, utilities and operators (ISOs) are quickly trying to understand the impacts on system operations and planning. This report focuses on ramping imapcts within the Xcel service region.

Ela, E.; Kemper, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy in the Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Provi and BP Energy in the Wind - Exploring Basic Electrical Concepts by Modeling Wind Turbines Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, aerodynamics, weather/climatology, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: High School Small groups: 2 students Time: Introductory packet will take 2-3 periods. Scientific investigation will take 2-3 periods. (45-50 minute periods) Summary: Students explore basic electrical concepts. Students are introduced to electrical concepts by using a hand held generator utilizing a multimeter, modeling, and designing a wind turbine in a wind tunnel (modifications are given if a wind tunnel is not available). Students investigate how wind nergy is used as a renewable energy resource. e

435

NREL: Wind Research - DOE Kicks Off Inaugural Collegiate Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version DOE Kicks Off Inaugural...

436

The Optimal Bulk Wind Differential Depth and the Utility of the Upper-Tropospheric Storm-Relative Flow for Forecasting Supercells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of 4 yr of Rapid Update Cycle-2 (RUC-2) derived soundings in proximity to radar-observed supercells and nonsupercells is conducted in an effort to answer two questions: 1) over what depth is the fixed-layer bulk wind differential (BWD;...

Adam L. Houston; Richard L. Thompson; Roger Edwards

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Comment on "Air Emissions Due to Wind and Solar Power" and Supporting Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. On methodology for modelling wind power impact on powerwith Large Amounts of Wind Power; VTT Working Paper 82,The Effects of Integrating Wind Power on Transmission System

Mills, Andrew D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Making Biopower Work for Utilities: A Rationale for Near-Term Investment in Integrated Biomass Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the feasibility studies of six very different integrated biomass power systems suggests potentially large future payoffs from near-term R&D. At this time, when biomass crops are more expensive than fossil fuels, it is the corollary benefits or coproducts associated with biomass power production that make the economics of a system work.

1996-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

439

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other utility-scale (>100 kW) wind turbines installed in thesales of small wind turbines 100 kW and less in size intoThe 100 kW cut-off between ‘small’ and ‘large’ wind turbines

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Montana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Montana/Wind Resources < Montana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Montana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility wind integration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ohio/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Ohio/Wind Resources < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Ohio Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

442

Small Wind Guidebook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

443

Unified Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) to Smart Grid Integration Approach within Automotive and Utility Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update is a status report on the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) Central Server Phase 1 project through 2013. The OEM Central Server is a server-based application that enables utilities to manage charging for the entire installed base of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) as controllable loads. The application uses a set of open, interoperable standards-based interfaces – either via aggregated, indirect Demand Response (DR) programs using Open Automated Demand Response ...

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility...

445

Fully coupled dynamic analysis of a floating wind turbine system .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of wind power is in a period of rapid growth worldwide and wind energy systems have emerged as a promising technology for utilizing… (more)

Withee, Jon E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's electricity integration research is conducted in state-of-the-art facilities. These facilities assist industry in the development of power systems and address the operational challenges of full system integration. The Energy Systems Integration Facility can be used to design, test, and analyze components and systems to enable economic, reliable integration of renewable electricity, fuel production, storage, and building efficiency technologies with the U.S. electricity delivery infrastructure. New grid integration capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center will allow testing of many grid integration aspects of multi-megawatt, utility-scale variable renewable generation and storage technologies. The Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility can be used to characterize,

447

New England Wind Forum: Interviews with Wind Industry Stakeholders and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Small Wind Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Interviews With Wind Industry Stakeholders and Pioneers in New England The New England Wind Forum will interview different stakeholders actively shaping the wind power landscape in New England and wind pioneers to examine how they have laid the groundwork for today's New England wind energy market. Stephan Wollenburg, Green Energy Program Director of Energy Consumers Alliance of New England January 2013 A Panel of Seven Offer Insight into the Evolving Drivers and Challenges Facing Wind Development in New England June 2011 John Norden, Manager of Renewable Resource Integration, Independent System Operator-New England September 2010 Angus King, Former Governor of Maine and Co-Founder of Independence Wind

448

Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

Bruce A. Wright

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

449

20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final Report for '20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia'. The objective of this project was to examine the obstacles and constraints to the development of wind energy in West Virginia as well as the obstacles and constraints to the achievement of the national goal of 20% wind by 2030. For the portion contracted with WVU, there were four tasks in this examination of obstacles and constraints. Task 1 involved the establishment of a Wind Resource Council. Task 2 involved conducting limited research activities. These activities involved an ongoing review of wind energy documents including documents regarding the potential for wind farms being located on reclaimed surface mining sites as well as other brownfield sites. The Principal Investigator also examined the results of the Marshall University SODAR assessment of the potential for placing wind farms on reclaimed surface mining sites. Task 3 involved the conducting of outreach activities. These activities involved working with the members of the Wind Resource Council, the staff of the Regional Wind Energy Institute, and the staff of Penn Future. This task also involved the examination of the importance of transmission for wind energy development. The Principal Investigator kept informed as to transmission developments in the Eastern United States. The Principal Investigator coordinated outreach activities with the activities at the Center for Business and Economic Research at Marshall University. Task 4 involved providing technical assistance. This task involved the provision of information to various parties interested in wind energy development. The Principal Investigator was available to answer requests from interested parties regarding in formation regarding both utility scale as well as small wind development in West Virginia. Most of the information requested regarded either the permitting process for wind facilities of various sizes in the state or information regarding the wind potential in various parts of the state. This report describes four sub-categories of work done by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at Marshall University under this contract. The four sub-projects are: (1) research on the impacts of wind turbines on residential property values; (2) research on the integration of wind energy in regional transmission systems; (3) review of state-based wind legislation in consideration of model new policy options for West Virginia; and (4) promotion of wind facilities on former surface mine sites through development of a database of potential sites.

Patrick Mann; Christine Risch

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minnesota statewide wind integration study. November 2006.of net load vs. load Wind integration studies are generallyIt would be very useful to wind integration studies if this

Coughlin, Katie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Wind Program Commercial Wind Program Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Public Entities: $100,000 Non-Public Entities: $67,000 Program Info Funding Source Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Start Date 05/2011 Expiration Date 08/01/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on applicant type (public vs. non-public) and grant type (site assessment, feasibility study, onsite wind monitoring, acoustic studies, and business planning)

452

Final Report for Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final Report for ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America'': This project, ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop'', helped stimulate wind development by rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities in Colorado. To date most of the wind power development in the United States has been driven by large investor-owned utilities serving major metropolitan areas. To meet the 5% by 2020 goal of the Wind Powering America program the 2,000 municipal and 900 rural electric cooperatives in the country must get involved in wind power development. Public power typically serves rural and suburban areas and can play a role in revitalizing communities by tapping into the economic development potential of wind power. One barrier to the involvement of public power in wind development has been the perception that wind power is more expensive than other generation sources. This project focused on two ways to reduce the costs of wind power to make it more attractive to public power entities. The first way was to develop a revenue stream from the sale of green tags. By selling green tags to entities that voluntarily support wind power, rural coops and munis can effectively reduce their cost of wind power. Western Resource Advocates (WRA) and the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) worked with Lamar Light and Power and Arkansas River Power Authority to develop a strategy to use green tags to help finance their wind project. These utilities are now selling their green tags to Community Energy, Inc., an independent for-profit marketer who in turn sells the tags to consumers around Colorado. The Lamar tags allow the University of Colorado-Boulder, the City of Boulder, NREL and other businesses to support wind power development and make the claim that they are ''wind-powered''. This urban-rural partnership is an important development for the state of Colorado's rural communities get the economic benefits of wind power and urban businesses are able to claim the environmental benefits. The second method to reduce the cost of wind power we investigated involved access to cheap capital. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives have access to low-interest loan programs and frequently finance projects through the sale of revenue bonds, but we were interested in the possibility for small businesses and community banks to provide equity and debt for wind projects. We worked with Boulder Community Hospital to explore their interest in partnering with other businesses and individuals to help catalyze the first community-owned wind project in Colorado. We also met with and gained interest from the independent community banks for the idea of wind power. These small banks may be restricted by lending limits, but are an integral part of rural communities and are very interested in the economic development opportunities wind power presents for small towns. This project was successful in getting six rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities to purchase more than 25 MW of wind power in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska. These utilities also announced plans to explore an additional 100 MW or more of wind power development over the next few years. Finally, munis and coops in New Mexico began exploring wind power by offering small green power programs to their customers. WRA believes the lessons learned from this project will assist other municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives as they develop wind projects.

Susan Innis; Randy Udall; Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

454

Wind Energy Update  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Energy Update Wind Powering America January 2012 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Evolution of Commercial Wind Technology NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Small (≤100 kW) Homes Farms Remote Applications (e.g. water pumping, telecom sites, icemaking) Midscale (100-1000 kW) Village Power Hybrid Systems Distributed Power Large, Land-based (1-3 MW) Utility-scale wind farms Large Distributed Power Sizes and Applications Large, Offshore (3-7 MW) Utility-scale wind farms, shallow coastal waters No U.S. installations NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Capacity & Cost Trends As of January 2012 (AWEA) 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 $- $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200

455

Wind turbine cost of electricity and capacity factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently designed to minimize the cost of electricity at the wind turbine (the busbar cost) in a given wind regime, ignoring constraints on the capacity factor (the ratio of the average power output to the maximum power output). The trade-off between these two quantities can be examined in a straightforward fashion; it is found that the capacity factor can be increased by a factor of 30 percent above its value at the cost minimum for a ten percent increase in the busbar cost of electricity. This has important implications for the large-scale integration of wind electricity on utility grids where the cost of transmission may be a significant fraction of the cost of delivered electricity, or where transmission line capacity may be limited.

Cavallo, A.J. [Cavallo (A.J.), Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Wind/Water Nexus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z