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1

Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 25866 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1010/kWh Commercial: $0.0815/kWh Industrial: $0.0550/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority (Arizona).

2

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Coast Guard Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Land Management Federal Aviation Administration Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies 11 AAC 195.010: Anadromous Fish 17 AAC 15.021: Application for Utility Permit Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf

3

GRR/Section 14-AK-b - Alaska Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-AK-b - Alaska Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit GRR/Section 14-AK-b - Alaska Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-AK-b - Alaska Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit 14AKBAlaskaPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14AKBAlaskaPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

4

Nome Joint Utility Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Joint Utility Systems Joint Utility Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Nome Joint Utility Systems Place Alaska Utility Id 13642 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electrical Charge Residential Power Cost Equalization Average Rates Residential: $0.3600/kWh Commercial: $0.3310/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Nome_Joint_Utility_Systems&oldid=411195

5

3AK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OPERAiEO BY MARTIN MARIE,TA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.I Y. ,J,.- i .I Y. ,J,.- i - 3AK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OPERAiEO BY MARTIN MARIE,TA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. POST OFFICE BOX X OAK RIOGE. TENNESSEE 37631 July 20, 1984 Ms. Gale P. Turi Division of Remedial Action Projects Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy MS - NE24 Washington, D.C. 20545 Dear Ms. Turi: Radfoloafcal Survey of the Guterl Steel Fad1 ftya 1 o&a As requested, a visit was made to the Guterl Steel facility (formerly Simonds Saw and Steel) on July 9, 1984 to determine if there have been significant changes in the radiological status of the facility since the last survey. In general, measurements made during this survey are con- sistent with those made during the 1977 survey (ORNL) and a follow-up survey in 1981 (FBD). Significant amounts of contaminated material are present in the rolling

6

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AkWarm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AkWarm AkWarm AkWarm logo. Innovative, user-friendly, Windows-based software for home energy modeling. AkWarm is designed for weatherization assessment and the EPA Energy Star Home energy rating program. Features include: Graphical display of energy use by building component, improvement options analysis, design heat load, calculates CO2 emissions, and shows code compliance. Utility, weather data, and other libraries are maintained in a database library for easy updating. A separate database is available to archive all input and output data for detailed analysis of housing types, trends, amd energy use. Keywords home energy rating systems, home energy, residential modeling, weatherization Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Basic understanding of building construction, with a minimal level of

7

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Napakiak proposes to renovate/retrofit two buildings (Health Clinic and Community Center [former Transportation Building]) to become more energy efficient. Energy efficiency retrofits would include improvements to lighting systems, supplemental loads, air distribution systems, and/or heating and cooling systems, insulation, and windows/doors. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

9

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESP: A System Utilization Benchmark Adrian T. Wong, LeonidEffective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designedEffective System Performance (ESP) benchmark, which measures

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Utilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine whether municipalization would be a beneficial option for many California cities. Source: Bay Area Economic Forum. Establishing a Tribal Utility Authority Handbook Provides an introduction to electric utility operation and general guidance for the steps required to form a tribal utility authority. Funded by an economic development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development to the Ak-Chin Indian Community and its tribal utility authority, Ak-Chin Energy Services. Source: Leonard S. Gold, Utility Strategies Consulting Group,

11

Electric utility system master plan  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains the electric utility system plan and guidelines for providing adequate electric power to the various facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in support of the mission of the Laboratory. The topics of the publication include general information on the current systems and their operation, a planning analysis for current and future growth in energy demand, proposed improvements and expansions required to meet long range site development and the site`s five-year plan.

Erickson, O.M.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 Asheville, NC April 1996 Donald E. OsbornDavid E. Collier Sacramento Municipal Utility...

13

The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview  

SciTech Connect

Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Easley Combined Utility System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Easley Combined Utility System Easley Combined Utility System Jump to: navigation, search Name Easley Combined Utility System Place South Carolina Utility Id 6709 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Church electric service rate (Inside city limits) Commercial Church electric service rate (Outside city limits) Commercial Residential service rate (Inside city limits) Residential Residential service rate (Outside city limits) Residential

15

Weatherford Mun Utility System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mun Utility System Mun Utility System Jump to: navigation, search Name Weatherford Mun Utility System Place Texas Utility Id 20230 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General Service - 1 (Demand 20.00 - 200.00) Industrial Large General Service - 2 (Demand 200.00 -1000.00) Industrial Large General Service - 2* Industrial Large General Service - 3 (Demand 1000.00 or More) Industrial Large General Service - 3* Industrial MV Lighting Lighting Residential service Residential

16

ESP: a system utilization benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a new benchmark, called the Effective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designed to measure system-level performance, including such factors as job scheduling efficiency, handling of large jobs and shutdown-reboot times. ...

Adrian T. Wong; Leonid Oliker; William T. C. Kramer; Teresa L. Kaltz; David H. Bailey

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

GRR/Section 3-AK-c - Encroachment Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-c - Encroachment Permit GRR/Section 3-AK-c - Encroachment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-c - Encroachment Permit 03AKCEncroachmentOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities Regulations & Policies 17 AAC 10.011: Encroachments Authorized 17 AAC 10.012: Approval Requirements 17 AAC 15.011: Utility Permits Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKCEncroachmentOverview.pdf 03AKCEncroachmentOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative 3-AK-c.1 - Will the Developer Construct a Utility Within ADOT ROW or

18

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available T3E and SP systems at NERSC differ considerably insoftware. The Cray T3E at NERSC has recently demonstratedhours on 512 CPUs of the NERSC T3E. This time length was a

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

West Point Utility System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System System Jump to: navigation, search Name West Point Utility System Place Iowa Utility Id 20396 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service and Municipal Institutional service Large General Service Commercial Rural Resident and Farm All-Electric Residential Rural Resident and Farm Rate Residential Security Light - 150 Watt HPS Customer Owned Pole Lighting Security Light - 150 Watt HPS Utility Owned Pole Lighting Urban All-Electric Residential Rate Residential

20

Wind energy systems. Application to regional utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study developed a generic planning process that utilities can use to determine the feasibility of utilizing WECS (Wind Energy Conversion Systems) as part of their future mix of equipment. While this is primarily an economic process, other questions dealing with WECS availability, capacity credit, operating reserve, performance of WECS arrays, etc., had to be addressed. The approach was to establish the worth, or breakeven value, of WECS to the utility and to determine the impact that WECS additions would have on the utilities mix of conventional source.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Products based on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) technology offer a unique solution to today's energy conversion storage needs. PEM products have undergone continual development since the late 1950's for many diverse applications. Rooted in rigorous aerospace applications, this technology is now ''breaking away'' to provide commercial solutions to common power, energy, and industrial gas feedstock problems. Important developments in PEM electrolyzers and various energy conversion devices (e.g. engines and fuel cells) can now be combined to form the basis for a revolutionary energy storage system that provides a much needed link to renewable resources, and offers a credible alternative for off-grid power applications. This technology operates by converting electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen as part of a water electrolysis process when excess power is available. When the primary source of power is unavailable, chemical energy is converted into electrical energy through an external combustion heat engine or other energy conversion device. The Phase II portion of this program began in May of 2000. The goal of Phase II of the project was to cost reduce the hydrogen generator as a critical link to having a fully sustainable hydrogen energy system. The overall goal is to enable the link to sustainability by converting excess renewable power into hydrogen and having that hydrogen available for conversion back to power, on demand. Furthermore, the cost of the capability must be less the $1,000 per kW (electrical power into the generator) and allow for a variety of renewable technology inputs. This cost target is based on a production volume of 10,000 units per year. To that end, Proton undertook an aggressive approach to cost reduction activities surrounding the 6kW, 40 standard cubic foot per hour (scfh) HOGEN hydrogen generator. The electrical side of the system targeted a number of areas that included approaches to reduce the cost of the power supply and associated electronics as well as improving efficiency, implementing a circuit board to replace the discreet electrical components in the unit, and evaluating the system issues when operating the unit with a variety of renewable inputs. On the mechanical side of the system the targets involved creative use of manifolds to reduce components and plumbing, overall fitting reduction through layout simplification and welded tube assemblies, and the development of an inexpensive gas drying methodology to remove moisture and improve gas purity. Lastly, activities surrounding the electrolysis cell stack focused on lower cost stack compression approaches and cost reduction of critical components. The last year of this project focused on validating the cost reductions mentioned above and advancing these cost reductions forward into a larger hydrogen generator. This larger hydrogen generator is a 60kW, 380 scfh, HOGEN hydrogen generator. Most of these efforts were in the control board and manifold development areas. The results achieved over the life of this program are in line with the goals of the Department of Energy. Proton projects that the current design of the 40 scfh generator projected to a volume of 10,000 units per year would be in the range of $1,500 per kilowatt. Furthermore, continuing efforts on materials substitution and design enhancements over the next few years should bring the cost of the system to the $1,000 per kilowatt goal for a system of this size. This report provides the technical details behind the cost reduction efforts undertaken during the Phase II portion of the program.

Proton Energy Systems

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System  

SciTech Connect

Products based on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) technology offer a unique solution to today's energy conversion storage needs. PEM products have undergone continual development since the late 1950's for many diverse applications. Rooted in rigorous aerospace applications, this technology is now ''breaking away'' to provide commercial solutions to common power, energy, and industrial gas feedstock problems. Important developments in PEM electrolyzers and various energy conversion devices (e.g. engines and fuel cells) can now be combined to form the basis for a revolutionary energy storage system that provides a much needed link to renewable resources, and offers a credible alternative for off-grid power applications. This technology operates by converting electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen as part of a water electrolysis process when excess power is available. When the primary source of power is unavailable, chemical energy is converted into electrical energy through an external combustion heat engine or other energy conversion device. The Phase II portion of this program began in May of 2000. The goal of Phase II of the project was to cost reduce the hydrogen generator as a critical link to having a fully sustainable hydrogen energy system. The overall goal is to enable the link to sustainability by converting excess renewable power into hydrogen and having that hydrogen available for conversion back to power, on demand. Furthermore, the cost of the capability must be less the $1,000 per kW (electrical power into the generator) and allow for a variety of renewable technology inputs. This cost target is based on a production volume of 10,000 units per year. To that end, Proton undertook an aggressive approach to cost reduction activities surrounding the 6kW, 40 standard cubic foot per hour (scfh) HOGEN hydrogen generator. The electrical side of the system targeted a number of areas that included approaches to reduce the cost of the power supply and associated electronics as well as improving efficiency, implementing a circuit board to replace the discreet electrical components in the unit, and evaluating the system issues when operating the unit with a variety of renewable inputs. On the mechanical side of the system the targets involved creative use of manifolds to reduce components and plumbing, overall fitting reduction through layout simplification and welded tube assemblies, and the development of an inexpensive gas drying methodology to remove moisture and improve gas purity. Lastly, activities surrounding the electrolysis cell stack focused on lower cost stack compression approaches and cost reduction of critical components. The last year of this project focused on validating the cost reductions mentioned above and advancing these cost reductions forward into a larger hydrogen generator. This larger hydrogen generator is a 60kW, 380 scfh, HOGEN hydrogen generator. Most of these efforts were in the control board and manifold development areas. The results achieved over the life of this program are in line with the goals of the Department of Energy. Proton projects that the current design of the 40 scfh generator projected to a volume of 10,000 units per year would be in the range of $1,500 per kilowatt. Furthermore, continuing efforts on materials substitution and design enhancements over the next few years should bring the cost of the system to the $1,000 per kilowatt goal for a system of this size. This report provides the technical details behind the cost reduction efforts undertaken during the Phase II portion of the program.

Proton Energy Systems

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Port Nikiski, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nikiski, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Port Nikiski, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)...

24

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Russia (Dollars per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Russia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Russia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade...

25

GRR/Section 8-AK-a - Transmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-AK-a - Transmission 8-AK-a - Transmission < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 8-AK-a - Transmission 08AKATransmission.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 08AKATransmission.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under the Alaska Public Utilities Regulatory Act, transmission is included in Alaska's regulation of public utilities. According to AS 42.05.990(5), "public utility" or "utility" includes every corporation whether public, cooperative, or otherwise, company, individual, or association of

26

Recovery Act: Waste Energy Project at AK Steel Corporation Middletown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) began development of a project to beneficially utilize waste blast furnace topgas generated in the course of the iron-making process at AK Steel Corporations Middletown, Ohio works. In early 2010, Air Products was awarded DOE Assistance Agreement DE-EE002736 to further develop and build the combined-cycle power generation facility. In June 2012, Air Products and AK Steel Corporation terminated work when it was determined that the project would not be economically viable at that time nor in the foreseeable future. The project would have achieved the FOA-0000044 Statement of Project Objectives by demonstrating, at a commercial scale, the technology to capture, treat, and convert blast furnace topgas into electric power and thermal energy.

Joyce, Jeffrey

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electric utilities and residential solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-run incremental cost (LRIC) of providing electricity for solar heating and hot water systems is estimated for three utilities using a utility capacity expansion model and compared to the cost of providing electricity to electric-only systems. All investment, fuel and operating costs are accounted for. Hot water systems and combined heating and hot water systems are analyzed separately. It is found that the LRIC for solar backup is no more than the LRIC of electricity used for purely electric heating and hot water devices and also no more than the incremental cost of normal load growth. For the three utilities studied, there appears to be little basis for rate distinctions between solar devices using electric backup and electric-only heating and hot water devices. Off-peak storage heating and hot water devices have a much lower LRIC than the standard systems; again, there appears to be no basis for distinguishing between solar and electric off-peak devices. Compared to average cost pricing, incremental cost pricing offers considerable benefits to customers using solar and electric heat and hot water, especially if a separate lower rate is adopted for off-peak storage devices; these benefits can amount to several hundred dollars per year. Substantial savings in the use of oil and gas fuels can be achieved if residences using these fuels convert to solar systems, savings not necessarily achievable by a shift, instead, to electric systems.

Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

29

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

30

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

31

High slot utilization systems for electric machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new High Slot Utilization (HSU) Systems for electric machines enable the use of form wound coils that have the highest fill factor and the best use of magnetic materials. The epoxy/resin/curing treatment ensures the mechanical strength of the assembly of teeth, core, and coils. In addition, the first HSU system allows the coil layers to be moved inside the slots for the assembly purpose. The second system uses the slided-in teeth instead of the plugged-in teeth. The power density of the electric machine that uses either system can reach its highest limit.

Hsu, John S (Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Circuit Breaker Maintenance; Volume 1: Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers; Part 2: GE AK Models: Volume 1: Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers Pa rt 2: GE AK Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive guide will help utilities improve their maintenance of GE model AK circuit breakers. It consolidates industry guidelines, applicable standards, original equipment manufacturer recommendations, and hands-on experience relative to these circuit breakers. Ultimately, improved maintenance will increase reliability and reduce costs associated with corrective maintenance and equipment downtime.

1992-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

AOCS Official Method Ak 5-01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous Determination of Oil and Moisture Contents of Oilseeds Residues Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry AOCS Official Method Ak 5-01 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads DEFINI

34

AOCS Official Method Ak 2-92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Chlorophyll Content in Rapeseed/Canola (Colza) by Spectrometry AOCS Official Method Ak 2-92 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method, adopted fr

35

AOCS Official Method Ak 3-94  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil Content of Oilseeds by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance AOCS Official Method Ak 3-94 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method determines the oil content of rapesee

36

AOCS Official Method Ak 1-92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of Glucosinolate Content in Rapeseed and Canola by HPLC AOCS Official Method Ak 1-92 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads DEFINITION This method, adopted from Part 1

37

Galena Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

38

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Utility-Interconnected Photovoltaic Systems: Evaluating the Rationale for the Utility-Accessible External Disconnect Switch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utility-accessible alternating current (AC) external disconnect switch (EDS) for distributed generators, including photovoltaic (PV) systems, is a hardware feature that allows a utility?s employees to manually disconnect a customer-owned generator from the electricity grid. This paper examines the utility-accessible EDS debate in the context of utility-interactive PV systems for residential and small commercial installations. It also evaluates the rationale for EDS requirements.

Coddington, M.; Margolis, R.M.; Aabakken, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration: Educational Training and Research through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non-precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membranes Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes development of novel hydrogen...

42

Uniform System of Accounts for Gas Utilities (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes a uniform system of accounts and annual report filing requirements for natural gas utilities operating in Maine.

43

AOCS Recommended Practice Ak 4-95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous Determination of Oil and Moisture Contents of Oilseeds Using Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry AOCS Recommended Practice Ak 4-95 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads 339DD158D48E89A94ECC0763578B

44

"2012 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total" Total" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",16180,399144,41820,10.477422 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor Owned",6976,64788,18175,28.053035 "Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc","AK","Cooperative",7923,73956,42708,57.74785 "Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK","Municipal",30747,1100665,100959.2,9.1725639 "Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc","AK","Cooperative",1871,49580,5293,10.675676

45

Understanding Energy Storage Solutions and Capabilities on Utility Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread use of storage will require better grid integration tools to plan for the optimal size, use, and location of energy storage systems. Also important will be a coordinated effort between technology developers and utilities to ensure that storage systems are designed to adequately address utility needs. Utilities must understand the technical attributes and grid operational benefits of energy storage systems. Such operational benefits can also improve the definition of storage system functional r...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Net Metering Provider Farmington Electric Utility System Net metering rules developed by the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) apply to the state's investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities, which are not regulated by the commission, are exempt from the PRC rules but authorized to develop their own net metering programs. Farmington Electric, a municipal utility, offers net metering to residential customers with systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity.

47

Utility battery storage systems program report for FY 94  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1994.

Butler, P.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Specific systems studies of battery energy storage for electric utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. As a part of this program, four utility-specific systems studies were conducted to identify potential battery energy storage applications within each utility network and estimate the related benefits. This report contains the results of these systems studies.

Akhil, A.A.; Lachenmeyer, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jabbour, S.J. [Decision Focus, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States); Clark, H.K. [Power Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for...

50

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility & Commercial Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to utility, commercial, and rail applications of advanced energy storage systems are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - Application of Large-Scale ESS in AEP - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Park - Kent Holst, ISEP.pdf

51

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of clean energy systems (e.g., transport gasification, chemical looping). The application of these models will lead to a reduction in cost associated with the development...

52

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

flow conditions and prevention of compaction damage in deepwater production in offshore environments. The increased use of foamed cement systems in high-stress environments...

53

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies...

54

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technique to estimate hydraulic conductance in pores. * Constructing and simulating a multiphase system with regular and irregular geometries. * Improve the fidelity of physics...

55

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown,...

56

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5,000 Program Info Start Date 10/1/2010 State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solar window of 80% or more: $1.00/watt Provider Gainesville Regional Utilities '''''NOTE: Application targets for fiscal year 2013 have been met for the GRU Solar PV Rebate Program. The next round of applications are scheduled to open on October 1, 2013 pending approval of the GRU budget by the Gainesville City Commission.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) offers its customers a rebate to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Systems with solar windows of 80% or

57

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with larger volume CO2 injection systems such as at Cranfield, MS. GEO-SEQ is a public-private research and development partnership that delivers the technology and information...

58

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transport membrane (HTM) system separates H2 from coal-derived syngas after it has been produced via the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, which is a key part of this process. The...

59

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This allows researchers to conduct a wider range of transient simulations and to impose a load profile on the turbine in the system. The addition of a dSpace simulator has expanded...

60

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture for New and Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program plan: FY 1994--FY 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is addressing needed improvements so that the full benefits of these systems can be realized. A key element of the Program is the quantification of the benefits of batteries used in utility applications. The analyses of the applications and benefits are ongoing, but preliminary results indicate that the widespread introduction of battery storage by utilities could benefit the US economy by more than $26 billion by 2010 and create thousands of new jobs. Other critical elements of the DOE Program focus on improving the batteries, power electronics, and control subsystems and reducing their costs. These subsystems are then integrated and the systems undergo field evaluation. Finally, the most important element of the Program is the communication of the capabilities and benefits of battery systems to utility companies. Justifiably conservative, utilities must have proven, reliable equipment that is economical before they can adopt new technologies. While several utilities are leading the industry by demonstrating battery systems, a key task of the DOE program is to inform the entire industry of the value, characteristics, and availability of utility battery systems so that knowledgeable decisions can be made regarding future investments. This program plan for the DOE Utility Battery Storage Systems Program describes the technical and programmatic activities needed to bring about the widespread use of batteries by utilities. By following this plan, the DOE anticipates that many of the significant national benefits from battery storage will be achieved in the near future.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Utility battery storage systems. Program report for FY95  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1995.

Butler, P.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Optimizing the Day to Day Operation of Utility Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the 2002 IETC, Linnhoff March presented an overview of spreadsheet-based software packages to rigorously model site utility systems. Such models allow the user to plan future scenarios that might impact upon the system operation (energy saving projects, production changes, new equipment, future energy tariffs, etc). Indeed, since last year, the DOE has made utility system template models freely available to industrial users as reported elsewhere at the 2003 IETC. Until last year, most industrial applications of this utility system software were set up for planning purposes, largely off-line. More recently, these applications have become more sophisticated and can operate on-line in real time. They include complex optimization routines to ensure that the utility system is always being operated in the best possible way under any prevailing conditions of production, energy tariffs and other variables. These optimizer models typically reduce day-to-day utility system operating costs by between 2 and 5%.

Eastwood, A.; Bealing, C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Report for FY92  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the fiscal year 1992 activities of the, Utility Battery Storage Systems Program (UBS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Management (OEM). The UBS program is conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). UBS is responsible for the engineering development of integrated battery systems for use in utility-energy-storage (UES) and other stationary applications. Development is accomplished primarily through cost-shared contracts with industrial organizations. An important part of the development process is the identification, analysis, and characterization of attractive UES applications. UBS is organized into five projects: Utility Battery Systems Analyses; Battery Systems Engineering; Zinc/Bromine; Sodium/Sulfur; Supplemental Evaluations and Field Tests. The results of the Utility Systems Analyses are used to identify several utility-based applications for which battery storage can effectively solve existing problems. The results will also specify the engineering requirements for widespread applications and motivate and define needed field evaluations of full-size battery systems.

Butler, P.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Intelligent Transformer Monitoring System Utilizing Neuro-Fuzzy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Transformer Monitoring System Utilizing Neuro-Fuzzy Technique Approach Intelligent Center Intelligent Transformer Monitoring System Utilizing Neuro-Fuzzy Technique Approach Final Project transformers and circuit breakers off-line, in order to assess whether the equipment is operating normally

66

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program report for FY93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contract development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility-energy-storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1993.

Butler, P.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 1.03: Utilities guide  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that was developed under the direction of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This Utilities Guide explains how to operate utility programs that are supplied as a part of the IBS. These utility programs are chiefly for managing and manipulating various kinds of IBS data and system administration files. Many of the utilities are for creating, editing, converting, or displaying map data and other data that are related to geographic location.

Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Pottier, M.C.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action Speaker(s): Stephen Malloy V. Rory Jones Date: November 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne This presentation reviews a new software tool that recommends specific actions for homeowners and others to undertake to optimize their utility system configuration and operation. The tool, the "Utility System Optimizer" (USO), may be configured to optimize across all utilities (electricity, gas, water - and other fuels as propane, oil and wood) to meet objectives that are defined by the owner/operator (homeowner, retailer, etc.). Such objectives may be to maximize net wealth over time, to minimize carbon footprint for the best economics, to maximize health

69

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Transmission System: Loss Reduction and Utilization Enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI R&D program 172Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained Worldcomprises base research activities and a series of demonstration projects under the collaborative efforts led by EPRI, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and the transmission industry. The program's goal is to understand, through real-life examples, designs that can help build a more efficient transmission system. Base research and development activities under program P172 have set the foundation for the demons...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sacramento Municipal Utility District: Preparing its Distribution System for PEVs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2010, when a large-scale reintroduction of PEVs seemed imminent, SMUD embarked on a landmark distribution system analysis. The analysis pinpointed and monetized the utility's potential upgrade needs and alternatives. It also informed and enabled the utility to configure several rate pilots with current PEV customers. These analyses and pilots are the focus of this case study.

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

ENERGY EFFICIENT SYSTEM DESIGN AND UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This model as- sumes that the decision to transition to low power state can be made in only one state model assumes that a decision to transition into a lower-power state can be made upon each event, the whole system, or some of its components can be transitioned into low-power states using dynamic power

Simunic, Tajana

73

Evaluating Utility System Operations Using APLUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steam system at a recycled paper fiberboard plant in Texas was evaluated using APLUS. These simulations identified inefficiencies in the current operation and so suggested more efficient alternatives. The information provided by the client was used to develop heat and mass balances for the base case. The marginal cost analysis in APLUS was used to identify the high cost areas in operating the steam system. This analysis highlighted that the cost of power from the 200 psig steam driven back pressure turbine was a prohibitive $270/MWh. The 600 psig boiler and extraction turbine were found to be large enough to meet all the steam and power requirements of the plant. This required that a new 600 HP motor be bought to drive the paper machine currently driven by the back pressure turbine. Shifting the load in this manner resulted in annual savings of $590,000.

Pethe, S.; Singh, R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial 7 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to utility, commercial, and rail applications of advanced energy storage systems are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - Application of Large-Scale ESS in AEP - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Park - Kent Holst, ISEP.pdf

75

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Speaker(s): Katsuhiro Miura Date: January 27, 2012 - 10:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

76

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Utilities Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Utilities Guide explains how you can use the IBS utility programs to manage and manipulate various kinds of IBS data. These programs include utilities for creating, editing, and displaying maps and other data that are referenced to geographic location. The intended audience for this document are chiefly data managers but also system managers and some emergency management planners and analysts.

Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Williams, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bower, J.C. [Bower Software Services, Kennewick, WA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

Mountziaris, T. J.

79

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

System Utilization Benchmark on the Cray T3E  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization Benchmark on the Cray T3E Utilization Benchmark on the Cray T3E and IBM SP Adrian Wong, Leonid Oliker, William Kramer, Teresa Kaltz, and David Bailey National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA {atwong, loliker, wtkramer, tlkaltz, dhbailey}@lbl.gov Abstract. Obtaining maximum utilization of parallel systems continues to be an active area of research and development. This article outlines a new benchmark, called the Eflectiwe System Performance (ESP) test, designed to provide a utilization metric that is transferable between sys- tems and illuminate the effects of various scheduling parameters. Results with discussion are presented for the Cray T3E and IBM SP systems to- gether with insights obtained from simulation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Economic assessment of the utilization of lead-acid batteries in electric utility systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specific applications in which lead--acid batteries might be economically competitive on an electric utility system are identified. Particular attention is given to searching the Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE and G) system for installations of batteries which could defer or cancel costly transmission and/or distribution projects. Although the transmission and distribution data are based on specific applications on the PSE and G system, the generation data are based on a national reference system. The report analyzes and summarizes all costs and savings attributable to lead--acid batteries. 40 figures, 78 tables. (RWR)

Johnson, A.C.; Hynds, J.A.; Nevius, D.R.; Nunan, G.A.; Sweetman, N.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Capacity Utilization Study for Aviation Security Cargo Inspection Queuing System  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation study for an aviation security cargo inspection queuing system for material flow and accountability. The queuing model employed in our study is based on discrete-event simulation and processes various types of cargo simultaneously. Onsite measurements are collected in an airport facility to validate the queuing model. The overall performance of the aviation security cargo inspection system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, throughput, capacity utilization, subscribed capacity utilization, resources capacity utilization, subscribed resources capacity utilization, and number of cargo pieces (or pallets) in the different queues. These metrics are performance indicators of the system s ability to service current needs and response capacity to additional requests. We studied and analyzed different scenarios by changing various model parameters such as number of pieces per pallet, number of TSA inspectors and ATS personnel, number of forklifts, number of explosives trace detection (ETD) and explosives detection system (EDS) inspection machines, inspection modality distribution, alarm rate, and cargo closeout time. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures should reduce the overall cost and shipping delays associated with new inspection requirements.

Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL; Brumback, Daryl L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Speaker(s): Katsuhiro Miura Date: January 27, 2012 - 10:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Buildings have a large thermal capacity and it affects much on building thermal load for the HVAC system. The thermal mass can be utilized also to control the thermal load by storing thermal energy before HVAC operation. There are two ways to store thermal energy. One is by operating the HVAC system and the other is by natural ventilation, mainly at night. The latter could be combined with daily HVAC operation as a hybrid ventilation. Thermal mass storage is useful to decrease the hourly peak load and the daily thermal load and can be used for both cooling and heating purpose.

84

Modeling On-Site Utility Systems Using "APLUS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most energy saving schemes on industrial sites lead to reductions in the steam and/or power demands on an on-site utility system. Accurate knowledge of the marginal and incremental costs of the available levels of steam and shaft power from such systems is, therefore, essential for the correct economic evaluation of proposed retrofit schemes. Knowledge of marginal costs is also essential for continuous optimal operation of on-site utility systems. "APLUS" is an IBM-PC based software package developed for evaluation of marginal and incremental costs of on-site utilities. "APLUS" allows the user to configure steam/power systems using sets of predefined icons. Once a flowsheet has been configured, the program can be used to solve the heat and mass balance and to generate accurate marginal costs. An overview of the package and examples illustrating its applications are presented in this paper.

Ranade, S. M.; Jones, D. H.; Shrec, S. C.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS AK-TRIBE-CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- CENTRAL COUNCIL OF TLINGIT AND HAIDA INDIANS AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska propose to conduct energy audits of tribally owned facilities. Specific retrofit activities will be determined based on the results of the audits, and these retrofit activities will be submitted for appropriate NEPA review. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

86

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,127 - No Data...

87

Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Utility market and requirements for a solar thermophotovoltaic system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing need for clean affordable electric power generation in both the U.S. and internationally and solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) can meet the needs of this market. This paper investigates the utility grid market applicable to a solar thermophotovoltaic power generating system. It finds that a large international electrical market and a smaller U.S. electrical market exist today but the U.S. market will grow by the year 2005 to a level that would easily support the high production level required for solar systems to be cost effective. Factors which could influence this market and the system characteristics considered by utilities in selecting future power systems such as levelized energy cost, dispatchability, environmental, etc., for both the grid and remote market are discussed. The main competition for this market and the operating performance of this competition are described. A conceptual design of a STPV power system is presented, the operation is described, and how the performance meets the utility requirements is discussed. The relationship between the cost of the TPV conversion unit and the system efficiency of the STPV system is given for both the grid and remote markets that it must meet in order to be competitive. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Stone, K. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, 5301 Bolsa Avenue, Huntington Beach, California 92647 (United States); McLellan, S. [Arizona Public Service, P.O. Box 53999 Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

90

Utilities offer photovoltaic systems to remote residential customers  

SciTech Connect

From Idaho to Arizona and Nevada to Colorado, utilities across the U.S. are beginning to offer remote homeowners an option that may seem unusual today, but might be commonplace in the future. Would-be customers who do not live close to the electric grid may choose the option of photovoltaic (PV) systems to supply their electricity as an alternative to expensive line extension. These customers typically live and/or farm in rural sections of the country. Others own vacation homes far from towns or cities. Solar-powered energy systems have already proven successful for powering pumps to water livestock, and for lights and communications devices in locations far from established sources of electricity. Rather than receiving the customary electric bill for metered service, customers will pay a set rate to use the PV system, which the utility will own and maintain. The initial cost of purchasing the system can be much lower than extending the utility line (which can cost $20,000 a mile). From the utility's standpoint, it saves on investing in lines that stand to generate small profits because of the small load and resultant energy sales.

Van Arsdall, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Integrated Design of Chemical Processes and Utility Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pinch concept for integrated heat recovery networks has recently become established in chemical process design. This paper presents an overview of the concept and shows how it has now been extended to total process design (reactors, separators, etc.) and to the task of interfacing processes with their utility systems (furnaces, steam levels, turbines, etc.)

Linnhoff, B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Manufactured residential utility wall system (ResCore), overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self-contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the residential kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty and students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the US Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a ``layered`` manufacturing technique that allows each major component group--structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc.--to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, C.; Lau, T.M. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Manufactured Residential Utility Wall System (ResCore),  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty, students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the U.S. Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a layered manufacturing technique that allows each major component group: structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc. to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, Clark; Lau, Tin Man [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Utility interface requirements for a solar power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study specifies that the southern tier of the US (south of the 36th parallel) should be examined to see what problems might develop with the installation of a Satellite Power System (SPS) in the year 2000. One or more 5-GW SPS units could be installed in the utility systems of the southern states in the year 2000. The 345- and 500-kV transmission systems that will probably exist at that time could be readily extended to accommodate the SPS units. The operation of the units will present the utilities with new and difficult problems in system stability and frequency control. The problems will arise because a somewhat variable 5-GW output will be produced by a generator having no mechanical inertia. The unavoidable time lag in controlling the position of the energy beam at the receiving station may have a very critical effect on the stability of the utility systems. The maintenance problems associated with the energy-receiving device, a continuous structure covering more than 40 mi/sup 2/, must be given careful consideration. Repair of lightning damage while maintaining SPS operation may be the most critical requirement. Acquisition and preparation of the 90 mi/sup 2/ land required for the receiving antenna (rectenna) will create many new and difficult environmental problems.

Donalek, P.J.; Whysong, J.L.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

Wills, R.H. [Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Utilization of Advanced Conductors to Improve Transmission System Utilization and Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Entergy has recently carried out a project on utilization of an advanced conductor to solve a reliability issue related to components overloading at N-1 conditions. The 230-kV Line 195 (Hartburg Inland Orange McLewis Helbig) in Entergy's system is one of the primary sources into the Beaumont/Port Arthur area. The single contingency loss of 500-kV Line 547 (Cypress Hartburg) causes thermal overloads of this line. To prevent conditions from overloading and potential cascading effects, the power transmitted...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reference guide to small cogeneration systems for utilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers systems performance and cost data for selected smaller cogeneration systems, which are defined generally as those cogeneration systems in the range below 5 megawatts. The data presented in this guide are expected to be used in two main ways. First, the data can be used to extend the existing DEUS Computer Evaluation Model data base to the smaller cogeneration systems. Second, the data will serve as a general guide to smaller cogeneration systems for use by the utilities companies and others. The data pertain to the following cogeneration system: gas turbine with heat recovery boiler, back pressure and extraction/condensing steam turbine, combined cycle, internal combustion (reciprocating) engine, steam bottoming cycle using industrial process exhaust, and gas turbine topping cycle with standard industrial process steam generators. A no-cogeneration base case is included for comparison purposes.

Rodden, R.M.; Boyen, J.L.; Waters, M.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Materials selection guidelines for geothermal energy utilization systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual includes geothermal fluid chemistry, corrosion test data, and materials operating experience. Systems using geothermal energy in El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States are described. The manual provides materials selection guidelines for surface equipment of future geothermal energy systems. The key chemical species that are significant in determining corrosiveness of geothermal fluids are identified. The utilization modes of geothermal energy are defined as well as the various physical fluid parameters that affect corrosiveness. Both detailed and summarized results of materials performance tests and applicable operating experiences from forty sites throughout the world are presented. The application of various non-metal materials in geothermal environments are discussed. Included in appendices are: corrosion behavior of specific alloy classes in geothermal fluids, corrosion in seawater desalination plants, worldwide geothermal power production, DOE-sponsored utilization projects, plant availability, relative costs of alloys, and composition of alloys. (MHR)

Ellis, P.F. II; Conover, M.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

AK-TRIBE-ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title AK-TRIBE-ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: The Association of Village Council Presidents, Inc., (AVCP) proposes to renovate a steel-constructed building, built circa 1990 (First Avenue Building, US Survey 1002 Parcel 1, Lot 1), located in Bethel, Alaska, to an office building. Proposed building retrofits would include installation of an (EPA certified) wood-fired central boiler, a conventional (household size) energy efficient oil-fired boiler, a heat distribution

100

GRR/Section 9-AK-a - State Environmental Process | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 9-AK-a - State Environmental Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRSection9-AK-a-StateEnvironmentalP...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GRR/Section 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-AK-a -...

102

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mobile integrated temporary utility system. Innovative technology summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mobile Integrated Temporary Utility System (MITUS) integrates portable electrical power along with communications and emergency alarm and lighting capabilities to provide safe, centralized power to work areas that need to be de-energized for decommissioning work. MITUS consists of a portable unit substation; up to twenty portable kiosks that house the power receptacles, communications, and emergency alarm and lighting systems; and a central communications unit. This system makes sequential decommissioning efforts efficient and cost-effective by allowing the integrated system to remain intact while being moved to subsequent work sites. Use of the MITUS also eliminates the need to conduct zero-energy tests and implement associated lock-out/tag-out procedures at partially de-energized facilities. Since the MITUS is a designed system, it can be customized to accommodate unique facility conditions simply by varying kiosks and transformer configurations. The MITUS is an attractive alternate to the use of portable generators with stand-alone communications and emergency system. It is more cost-effective than upgrading or reconfiguring existing power distribution systems.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,856 1,908 1,915 1,913 1,915...

107

Ak-Chin Indian Community Biomass Feasiiblity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Study of the conversion of chicken litter to biogas for the production of energy. There was an additional requirement that after extracting the energy from the chicken litter the nutrient value of the raw chicken litter had to be returned to the Ak-Chin Farms for use as fertilizer in a form and delivery method acceptable to the Farm.

Mark A. Moser, RCM Digesters, Inc.; Mark Randall, Daystar Consulting, LLC; Leonard S. Gold, Ak-Chin Energy Services & Utility Strategies Consulting Group

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Feasible utility scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the latest design features and estimated costs of a 5000 MWh/1000 MW Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) plant. SMES is proposed as a commercially viable technology for electric utility load leveling. The primary advantage of SMES over other electrical energy storage technologies is its high net roundtrip efficiency. Other features include rapid availability and low maintenance and operating costs. Economic comparisons are made with other energy storage options and with gas turbines. In a diurnal load leveling application, a superconducting coil can be charged from the utility grid during off-peak hours. The ac grid is connected to the dc magnetic coil through a power conversion system that includes an inverter/rectifier. Once charged, the superconducting coil conducts current, which supports an electromagnetic field, with virtually no losses. During hours of peak load, the stored energy is discharged to the grid by reversing the charging process. The principle of operation of a SMES unit is shown in Fig. 1. For operation in the superconducting mode, the coil is maintained at extremely low temperature by immersion in a bath of liquid helium.

Loyd, R.J.; Schoenung, S.M.; Nakamura, T.; Lieurance, D.W.; Hilal, M.A.; Rogers, J.D.; Purcell, J.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Improved accounting of emissions from utility energy storage system operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing electric power systems to create the equivalent of new load-following plants that can rapidly respond to fluctuations in electricity demand and increase the flexibility of baseload generators. New energy storage systems using additional generation from existing plants can directly compete with new traditional sources of load-following and peaking electricity, yet this application of energy storage is not required to meet many of the Clean Air Act standards required of new electricity generators (e.g., coal- or gas-fired power plants). This study evaluates the total emissions that will likely result from the operation of a new energy storage facility when coupled with an average existing U.S. coal-fired power plant and estimates that the emission rates of SO{sub 2} and NOx will be considerably higher than the rate of a new plant meeting Clean Air Act standards, even accounting for the efficiency benefits of energy storage. This study suggests that improved emissions 'accounting' might be necessary to provide accurate environmental comparisons between energy storage and more traditional sources of electricity generation. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Paul Denholm; Tracey Holloway [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

File:INL-geothermal-ak.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ak.pdf ak.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska Geothermal Resources Size of this preview: 697 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 698 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,418 × 4,660 pixels, file size: 2.26 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaska Geothermal Resources Sources Idaho National Laboratory Authors Patrick Laney; Julie Brizzee Related Technologies Geothermal Creation Date 2003-11-01 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:21, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:21, 16 December 2010 5,418 × 4,660 (2.26 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

115

Conceptual Process Plant Utility Schemes with Hybrid Energy System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of Alternative energy Production from sun and wind power with storage can become an integral part of a process plant utility. This will facilitate reduced...

116

Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optimize across all utilities (electricity, gas, water - and other fuels as propane, oil and wood) to meet objectives that are defined by the owneroperator (homeowner,...

117

System average rates of U.S. investor-owned electric utilities : a statistical benchmark study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using multiple regression methods, we have undertaken a statistical "benchmark" study comparing system average electricity rates charged by three California utilities with 96 other US utilities over the 1984-93 time period. ...

Berndt, Ernst R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Overview of the US Department of Energy Utility Battery Storage Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories and its contractors. This program is specifically aimed at developing battery energy storage systems for electric utility applications commencing in the mid to late 1990s. One factory-integrated utility battery system and three battery technologies: sodium/sulfur, zinc/bromine, and lead-acid are being developed under this program. In the last few years the emphasis of this program has focused on battery system development. This emphasis has included greater interactions with utilities to define application requirements. Recent activities have identified specific applications of battery energy storage in certain utility systems and quantified the value of these applications to these utility companies. In part due to these activities, battery energy storage is no longer regarded by utilities as a load-leveling resource only, but as a multifunction, energy management resource.

Eaton, R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Akhil, A.; Butler, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurwitch, J. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Enhancing spectrum utilization through cooperation and cognition in wireless systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have seen a proliferation of wireless technologies and devices in recent years. The resulting explosion of wireless demand has put immense pressure on available spectrum. Improving spectrum utilization is therefore ...

Rahul, Hariharan Shankar, 1975-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

GRR/Section 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon GRRSection 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A control system for improved battery utilization in a PV-powered peak-shaving system  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic (PV) power systems offer the prospect of allowing a utility company to meet part of the daily peak system load using a renewable resource. Unfortunately, some utilities have peak system- load periods that do not match the peak production hours of a PV system. Adding a battery energy storage system to a grid-connected PV power system will allow dispatching the stored solar energy to the grid at the desired times. Batteries, however, pose system limitations in terms of energy efficiency, maintenance, and cycle life. A new control system has been developed, based on available PV equipment and a data acquisition system, that seeks to minimize the limitations imposed by the battery system while maximizing the use of PV energy. Maintenance requirements for the flooded batteries are reduced, cycle life is maximized, and the battery is operated over an efficient range of states of charge. This paper presents design details and initial performance results on one of the first installed control systems of this type.

Palomino, E [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiles, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

FACILITIES ENGINEER WEST CHICAGO Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvements, including all stages of project engineering: scope development, cost estimation, system designFACILITIES ENGINEER ­ WEST CHICAGO OVERVIEW: Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost estimation, system design, equipment sizing

Heller, Barbara

123

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Functional Definition for Communication and Control Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. A functional definition of DR for defining communication and control requirements in electric utility distribution systems is provided. The report is a tool that readers can use in developing communication and control strategies for DR in specific distribution systems.

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

124

Host Utility Study of System Operating Impacts of FACTS Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible AC Transmission system (FACTS) devices can enhance power system control via added economic transfers and increased security and reliability. This report assesses FACTS system impacts and identifies ways of improving system performance through centralized FACTS coordination and control.

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reliability of Electric Utility Distribution Systems: EPRI White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses what is known about electric power distribution system reliability and investigates whether there are generally available methods for performing reliability analysis for distribution systems. The theory of the reliability of general systems is well understood. A fundamental issue is whether an appropriate implementation of the theory exists in a form readily usable by distribution system planners and designers.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

GRR/Section 6-AK-a - Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-AK-a - Transportation GRR/Section 6-AK-a - Transportation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-AK-a - Transportation 06AKATransportationOversizeOverweight.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities Regulations & Policies 17 AAC 25: Operations, Wheeled Vehicles Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06AKATransportationOversizeOverweight.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 6-AK-a.1 to 6-AK-a.2 - Does the Load Exceed the Size or Weight Regulations for State Highway Transportation Established by 17 AAC 25?

127

Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989. Volume 1, Categorical summaries of FGD systems  

SciTech Connect

This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes  

SciTech Connect

This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Miley, Terri B.; Nichols, William E.; Strenge, Dennis L.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

129

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Designing an intelligent decision support system for human-centered utility management automation part 1: structures, problem formulation, solution methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a Decision Support System (DSS) to aid the electric utility management automation system. A brief history of DSS application in power systems is presented. The importance and role of DSS and decision making in utility management automation ... Keywords: computational intelligence, decision making, decision support, human-centered systems, neural networks, power distribution system, state estimation, systems design, utility management automation

Alireza Fereidunian; Caro Lucas; Hamid Lesani; Mansooreh Zangiabadi

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Load-shape modeling in southeastern utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Load models are tools which have a wide range of application in the electric-utility industry. Some uses include monitoring load-management policies and helping with on-line commitment problems. The output from a load model can be placed in a suitable software environment where daily load curves are computed and displayed. Also, load models can be extended to perform forecasting functions. A weather sensitive load model that takes into account both weekdays and weekends on an hourly basis has been developed and applied to load shape modeling and short term forecasting on three southeastern electric utilities. A software package associated with the load modeling theory was developed and tested. This load-modeling program computes the daily load curve in terms of identifiable components. The program uses historical hourly load data to compute coefficients related to load components including base, growth, seasonal and weather. These coefficients can be used in a mathematical model to compute an estimate of the daily load curve with load values for each hour of the day. The load-modeling procedure described employs a linear least squares method for computing coefficients in the mathematical model.

Lebby, G.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Superconducting energy storage development for electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Model SMES experiments performed at LASL show that magnetic energy storage in a superconducting magnet is a viable alternate to energy storage methods which are being built today. It is a fast responding device, i.e., milliseconds, and efficient method which does not require electric energy be converted to mechanical form for storage. Component tests on a model SMES system include 12 pulse converter, automatic and manual converter power control system, and high current superconductors have been performed to evaluate and develop systems which could be used on the 100 MJ SMES system that has been designed. Test circuits have been designed and used for economical and nondestructive testing of magnets for superconductor performance and evaluation. A closed-loop model SMES system has been developed and built to study the electrical characteristics of the system. Initial test results were obtained for a symmetrically and asymmetrically triggered twelve-pulse converter. The asymmetrically triggered bridge shows the lower reactive power requirement, but a more distorted line current. Future converter tests and studies will be required to clearly identify the better circuit. A converter optimization study will include an evaluation of costs for harmonic filtering and power factor correction. Tests with the automatic control system show that a SMES system has switching times between the charging and discharging mode of about a cycle and a half. This makes the system very attractive for power system stabilization.

Turner, R.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy application study was performed by The Aerospace Corporation for the Wind Systems Branch of the Department of Energy. The objective was to identify integration problems for a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) placed into an existing conventional utility system. The integration problems included environmental, institutional and technical aspects as well as economic matters, but the emphasis was on the economics of wind energy. The Hawaiian Electric Company utility system on the island of Oahu was selected for the study because of the very real potential for wind energy on that island, and because of the simplicity afforded in analyzing that isolated utility.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

135

Patient-Wandering System Disabled by Broken Utility Powerline Clamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Case Study describes EPRI's investigation into malfunctions of the patient-wandering system (PWS) at an assisted-living center in Tennessee.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Urban and R ural Feeders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and case studies on a rural and an urban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for those feeders.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

137

Integration of Distributed Resources in the Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Suburba n Feeder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need to improve practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and initial case studies on a suburban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for that feeder.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tank selection for Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) system hot testing in a single shell tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to recommend a single shell tank in which to hot test the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in Fiscal Year 1996. The LDUA is designed to utilize a 12 inch riser. During hot testing, the LDUA will deploy two end effectors (a High Resolution Stereoscopic Video Camera System and a Still/Stereo Photography System mounted on the end of the arm`s tool interface plate). In addition, three other systems (an Overview Video System, an Overview Stereo Video System, and a Topographic Mapping System) will be independently deployed and tested through 4 inch risers.

Bhatia, P.K.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Connecting Your Solar Electric System to the Utility Grid: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the number of solar-powered homes connected to the local utility grid has increased dramatically. These''grid-connected'' buildings have solar electric panels or''modules'' that provide some or even most of their power, while still being connected to the local utility. This fact sheet provides information on connecting your solar electric system to the utility grid, including information on net metering.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS WITH SUPERCONDUCTING BEARINGS FOR UTILITY APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This projects mission was to achieve significant advances in the practical application of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials to energy-storage systems. The ultimate product was planned as an operational prototype of a flywheel system on an HTS suspension. While the final prototype flywheel did not complete the final offsite demonstration phase of the program, invaluable lessons learned were captured on the laboratory demonstration units that will lead to the successful deployment of a future HTS-stabilized, composite-flywheel energy-storage system (FESS).

Dr. Michael Strasik; Mr. Arthur Day; Mr. Philip Johnson; Dr. John Hull

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Resource utilization in the ATLAS Data Acquisition System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data taking with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has started. The three-level trigger and data-acquisition system of the experiment is fully functional. In 2009 and 2010 large samples of cosmic ray and collisions data have been and are expected to be collected with it. The smooth operation of the system relies on a tuning made on the basis of test-system measurements and modelling performed prior to installation. It is now possible to compare these predictions with measurements made with the system in active use during data-taking and to extrapolate to performance at higher luminosities. In the system events to be analyzed offline are selected by means of a hardware first-level trigger, receiving input data via dedicated paths, and of two levels of software trigger, implemented on commercially available server computers embedded in the data-acquisition system. Data of events accepted by the first-level trigger are received and buffered in other computers forming together the ReadOut ...

Klous, S; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Ugashik, AK (2001 - 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278290 Varnish cache server Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Ugashik, AK (2001 - 2002) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Ugashik Traditional Village in Alaska from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2001 through 2002, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp.

146

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Tanana, AK (2001 - 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Varnish cache server Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for Tanana, AK (2001 - 2002) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from Tanana Village in Alaska from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2001 through 2002, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago)

147

Small power systems study technical summary report. Volume II. Inventory of small generating units in U. S. utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Data identifying small (less than or equal to 10 MW) power units in the United States are tabulated. The data are listed alphabetically by state and are reported sequentially for investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electrical cooperatives and other utility systems. For a given utility system, the generating units are divided into steam turbines, diesel generators and gas turbines. The number and size of generating units are listed. A summary tabulation of the number of generating units of each type and total generating capacity by state is presented.

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

COMPREHENSIVE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR BURIED UTILITIES Sanat A. Talmaki 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specialists 2006). Unlike other types of infrastructure, buried utilities are difficult to locate and often smoothly. However with aging buried infrastructure, pipe bursts, costly repairs and exposure of citizensCOMPREHENSIVE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR BURIED UTILITIES Sanat A. Talmaki 1 , Suyang Dong 2

Kamat, Vineet R.

149

Optimization of Utility-Scale Wind-Hydrogen-Battery Systems: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional utility-scale wind energy systems are not dispatchable; that is, the utility cannot instantaneously control their power output. Energy storage, which can come in many forms, is needed to add dispatchability to a wind farm. This study investigates two options: batteries and hydrogen.

Fingersh, L. J.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Radio frequency communication system utilizing radiating transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radio communication system for use in tunnels, mines, buildings or other shielded locations in which a pair of radiating transmission lines (30), (31) extend through such location in spaced coextensive relation to each other. Each transmission line (30), (31) has at least one unidirectional amplifier (32), (33) interposed therein with the sense of the unidirectional amplifier (32) of one transmission line (30) being opposite to the sense of the unidirectional amplifier (33) of the other transmission line (31). Each of the amplifiers (32), (33) has a gain which is less than the coupling loss between the transmission lines (30), (31). Two or more mobile transceivers (35) in the location served by the system are coupled to the transmission lines (30), (31) by electromagnetic wave propagation in space in order to communicate directly with each other at a given radio frequency within the frequency range of the system.

Struven, Warren C. (San Carlos, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes. Because of these advantages, as well as the ability to build cost-effective small-to-medium sized reactors, this design is currently being considered for construction in many countries, from Japan, where test reactors are being analyzed, to China. The use of TRISO-coated micro-particles as a fuel in these reactors leads to multi-heterogeneity physics features that must be properly treated and accounted for. Inherent interrelationships of neutron interactions, temperature effects, and structural effects, further challenge computational evaluations of High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The developed models and computational techniques have to be validated in code-to-code and, most importantly, code-to-experiment benchmark studies. This report quantifies the relative accuracy of various multi-heterogeneity treatments in whole-core 3D models for parametric studies of Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactors as well as provide preliminary results of the PBMR performance analysis. Data is gathered from two different models, one based upon a benchmark for the African PBMR-400 design, and another based on the PROTEUS criticality experiment, since the African design is a more realistic power reactor, but the PROTEUS experiment model can be used for calculations that cannot be performed on the more complex model. Early data was used to refine final models, and the resulting final models were used to conduct parametric studies on composition and geometry optimization based on pebble bed reactor physics in order to improve fuel utilization.

Kelly, Ryan 1989-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

Unknown

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

NONE

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

Unknown

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization & Fuel Systems Clearwater (FL), USA, March 4-7, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

27th International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization & Fuel Systems Clearwater (FL), USA is a legitimate demand for more base-load energy which can be covered only by additional nuclear power the USA, i.e. Los Alamos

Zevenhoven, Ron

165

A feedback based load shaping strategy for fuel utilization control in SOFC systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells are attractive energy conversion devices due to their fuel flexibility and high efficiency. Fuel utilization is a critical variable in SOFC systems that directly impacts efficiency and longevity. In this paper we propose a control ...

Tuhin Das; Ryan Weisman

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

Turgut Gur

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

One-sided Tauberian conditions for (A,k) summability method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, some one-sided Tauberian conditions for (A,k) summability method have been obtained. Keywords: (A ,k) summability, General control modulo, Moderate oscillation, Regularly generated sequence, Slow oscillation

?Brahim Anak; Mit Totur; Mehmet Dik

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

GRR/Section 7-AK-a - Power Plant Siting and Construction | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon GRRSection 7-AK-a - Power Plant Siting and Construction < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png...

170

Pelican Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pelican Utility Pelican Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pelican Utility Place Alaska Utility Id 29297 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.4450/kWh Commercial: $0.4450/kWh Industrial: $0.3890/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Pelican_Utility&oldid=411348

171

Commercialization of PV-powered pumping systems for use in utility PV service programs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report was a commercialization effort focused on cost-effective remote water pumping systems for use in utility-based photovoltaic (PV) service programs. The project combined a commercialization strategy tailored specifically for electric utilities with the development of a PV-powered pumping system that operates conventional ac pumps rather than relying on the more expensive and less reliable PV pumps on the market. By combining these two attributes, a project goal was established of creating sustained utility purchases of 250 PV-powered water pumping systems per year. The results of each of these tasks are presented in two parts contained in this Final Summary Report. The first part summarizes the results of the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN) as a new business venture, while the second part summarizes the results of the Golden Photon system installations. Specifically, results and photographs from each of the system installations are presented in this latter part.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report COGENERATION SYSTEM INTRODUCTION utility plant. COGENERATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION In its current configuration, the central utility plant

Castillo, Steven P.

173

Results from ORNL Characterization of Zr02-500-AK2 - Surrogate TRISO Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particle batch designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the createion of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significanly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

Hunn, John D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Results from ORNL characterization of ZrO2-500-AK2 - surrogate TRISO material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the characterization data for the TRISO-coated surrogate particles designated ZrO2-500-AK2 that was produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program. The ZrO2-500-AK2 material contains nominally 500 {micro}m kernels of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coated with all TRISO layers (buffer, inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and outer pyrocarbon). The ZrO2-500-AK2 material was created for: (1) irradiation testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and (2) limited dissemination to laboratories as deemed appropriate to the AGR program. This material was created midway into a TRISO fuel development program to accommodate a sudden opportunity to perform irradiation testing on surrogate material. While the layer deposition processes were chosen based on the best technical understanding at the time, technical progress at ORNL has led to an evolution in the perceived optimal deposition conditions since the creation of ZrO2-500-AK2. Thus, ZrO2-500-AK2 contains a reasonable TRISO microstructure, but does differ significantly from currently produced TRISO surrogates and fuel at ORNL. In this document, characterization data of the ZrO2-500-AK2 surrogate includes: size, shape, coating thickness, and density.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility Loads Speaker(s): Bert Phillips Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: James Lutz Bert Phillips will talk about the impact of forced air system blower performance on furnace or heating performance and on utility loads, and what can be done to reduce blower power requirements. He will also briefly discuss a ground source heat pump monitoring study that he just finished. Mr. Phillips is a registered Professional Engineer in three Canadian provinces and part owner of UNIES Ltd., an engineering firm in Winnipeg, Manitoba (60 miles straight north of the North Dakota/Minnesota border). He does research and HVAC system design and investigates

176

Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems, Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems References TAU Project Site TAU Instrumentation Methods TAU Compilation Options TAU Fortran Instrumentation FAQ TAU Leap to Petascale 2009 Presentation TAU Workshop 2009 Introduction The TAU (Tuning and Analysis Utilities) Performance System is a portable profiling and tracing toolkit for performance analysis of parallel programs written in Fortran, C, C++, Java, Python. TAU gathers performance information while a program executes through instrumentation of functions, methods, basic blocks, and statements. The instrumentation consists of calls to TAU library routines which can be incorporated into a program in several ways: automatic instrumentation of the code at the source level using the Program Database Toolkit (PDT)

178

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

179

Impacts of environmental and utility siting laws on community energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Community Energy Systems provide an interesting energy conservative alternative to the traditional trend of large, central, grid-connected power plant design. The small community energy system (generally smaller than 100 MW), provides for waste heat utilization and utility cogeneration significantly reducing a community's total energy demand. Developers of Community Energy Systems, unfortunately, are faced with a complex of environmental and siting regulations, most of which are aimed at regulating the development and design of large power-generating facilities. Aside from discouraging development of a potentially more economic and environmentally sound approach to power generation, air-pollution regulations discriminate against these smaller systems. Compliance with the many Federal, state and local regulations often make small energy systems uneconomical. This project studies the emissions associated with Community Energy Systems and reviews the Federal, state, and local laws that regulate their design.

Senew, M J; Shimamoto, G T; Seymour, D A; Santini, D J

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems  

SciTech Connect

One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transmission System Efficiency and Utilization Improvement: Summary of R&D Activity and Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and summarizes the activities, findings, and main conclusions derived from the development of EPRI R&D Program 172 - Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained World.BackgroundEPRI R&D Program 172, Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained World, was initiated in 2008 and finalized in 2012. The main objective of the program was to assist utilities to prepare for operating a power-delivery system ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

A new approach in utilizing a computer data acquisition system for criticality safety control  

SciTech Connect

A new approach in utilizing a computer data acquisition system is proposed to address many issues associated with criticality safety control. This Criticality Safety Support System (CSSS) utilizes many features of computer and information process technology such as digital pictures, barcodes, voice data entry, etc. to enhance criticality safety in an R and D environment. Due to on-line data retrieving, data recording, and data management offered by new technology, the CSSS would provide a framework to design new solutions to old problems. This pilot program is the first step in developing this application for the years to come.

Hopkins, H; Song, H; Warren, F

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of a heat pump system suitable for incorporating in a space solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility are described. The performance of the system is evaluated. The refrigerating capacity, heating capacity and compressor horsepower for a heat pump system using a piston type compressor are first determined. The heat pump design is also matched with the existing University of Toledo solar house heating system. The refrigerant is Freon-12 working between a condensing temperature of up to 172/sup 0/F and evaporator temperature between 0/sup 0/F and 75/sup 0/F. The heat pump is then installed. Performance indices for the heat pump and the heating system in general are defined and generated by the on-line computer monitoring system for the 1979/80 heating season operation. Monthly and seasonal indices such as heat pump coefficient of performance, collector efficiency, percent of heating load supplied by solar energy and individual components efficiencies in general are recorded. The data collected is then analyzed and compared with previously collected data. The improvement in the performance resulting from the addition of a piston type compressor with an external motor belt drive is then evaluated. Data collected points to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. Data shows that the seasonal percent of space heating load supplied by solar is 60% and the seasonal percent cost of space heating load supplied by solar is 82% with a solar collection coefficient of performance of 4.6. Data also indicates that such a system would pay for itself in 14 years when used in Northwest Ohio.

Eltimsahy, A.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Integrating Distributed Resources into Electric Utility Distribution Systems: EPRI White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI white paper is about understanding electric power engineering issues related to integrating distributed resources (DR) into utility distribution systems. It is an overview designed for all stakeholders rather than a rigorous technical engineering guide. A major goal of the paper is to move discussion of integration issues toward solutions.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Current Interconnection Practice and Unified Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for interconnecting them with electric utility distribution systems. An assessment of current practice is provided, and a unified approach is recommended to achieve greater consistency. This report is a tool that readers can use to simplify their efforts in resolving DR interconnection problems.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Image replica detection system utilizing R-trees and linear discriminant analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript introduces a novel system for content-based identification of image replicas. The proposed approach utilizes image resemblance for deciding whether a test image has been replicated from a certain original or not. We formulate replica ... Keywords: Content-based monitoring, Copy image detection, Copyright protection, Fingerprinting, Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), Perceptual hashing, R-tree indexing, Replica detection, Robust hashing

Spiros Nikolopoulos; Stafanos Zafeiriou; Nikos Nikolaidis; Ioannis Pitas

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

An analysis of GPU utilization trends on the Keeneland initial delivery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 2010, The Georgia Institute of Technology along with its partners - the Oak Ridge National Lab, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and the National Institute for Computational Sciences, deployed the Keeneland Initial Delivery System (KIDS) ... Keywords: GPU, nvidia-smi, utilization

Tabitha K. Samuel; Stephen McNally; John Wynkoop

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Low complexity subcarrier and power allocation for utility maximization in uplink OFDMA systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the joint subcarrier and power allocation problem with the objective of maximizing the total utility of users in the uplink of an OFDMA system. Our formulation includes the problems of sum rate maximization, proportional fairness and max-min ...

Cho Yiu Ng; Chi Wan Sung

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Microprocessor Based Combustion Monitoring and Control Systems Utilizing in Situ Opacity, Oxygen and CO Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hybrid combustion control system has been developed which combines the functions which have traditionally been performed by separate stand-alone measurement and control instruments into one low-cost integrated system. Complete O2 Trim Control Systems will soon be available starting at less than 6,000 dollars. By utilizing a high performance low-cost microprocessor, both measurement and control functions can now be performed simultaneously. The new systems will feature automatic calibration, self-diagnostics, field programmable memory, and improved operator interface. By measuring the products of combustion utilizing the latest In Situ Opacity, Oxygen, and CO Monitoring technology, the fuel air mixture ratio of industrial fuel burning equipment can be optimized to insure reduced fuel consumption end improved combustion efficiency. Typical fuel savings of 3 to 5 percent have been experienced on a wide variety of different types of fuel burning sources, including packaged boilers, incinerators, and process heaters.

Molloy, R. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Harmonization of Utility Common Information Model (CIM) with other IEC Power System Management Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has sponsored the development of a number of international standards which provide the basis for information exchange to support power system management. One of the most important is the Common Information Model (CIM), which is rapidly gaining acceptance throughout the world as a common semantic model to unify and integrate the data from a myriad of systems involved in support of real-time electric utility operations. As its acceptance as the basis for information integration grows and areas of appl...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

195

An approach to assess the performance of utility-interactive photovoltaic systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a probabilistic approach based on the convolution technique to assess the performance of utility-interactive photovoltaic systems supplying loads. Analytical expressions are developed to obtain the duration curve for the power injected into the utility grid. The energy injected into the grid and drawn from it to supply the load during the study period can be calculated from this duration curve. The load model employed enables the study period to range from one year to one particular hour-of-day, thus allowing the inclusion of the time-value of energy as appropriate in economic assessments.

Abouzahr, I. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Ramakumar, R. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Engineering Energy Lab.)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

An approach to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a probabilistic approach based on the convolution technique to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems supplying loads. Expressions are developed to obtain the duration curve for the power injected into the utility grid. The energy injected into the grid and drawn from it to supply the load during the study period can be calculated from this duration curve. The load model employed enables the study period to range from one year to one particular hour-of-day, thus allowing the inclusion of the time-value of energy as appropriate in economic assessments.

Abouzahr, I.; Ramakumar, R. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess the potential for the application of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (a field of interconnected WTGs denoted in this report by the acronym WECS) in a specific utility contest to gain advance information concerning their economic feasibility; their optional problems; the criteria and procedures for site selection; environmental impacts; legal, social, and other problems; and the balance of cost and benefits from the point of view of the consumer and the utility. This study addresses the circumstances of the Hawaiian Electric Company operations onthe Island of Oahu.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

GRR/Section 7-AK-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-AK-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity GRR/Section 7-AK-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-AK-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity 07AKCCertificateOfPublicConvenienceAndNecessity.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Regulatory Commission of Alaska Regulations & Policies AS 42.05.175: Timeline for Final Orders AS 42.05.221: Certificates Required AS 42.05.711: Exemptions 3 AAC 48.645: Application 3 AAC 48.648: Complete Applications 3 AAC 48.650: Incomplete Applications AAC Title 3 2012 Supplement Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07AKCCertificateOfPublicConvenienceAndNecessity.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

199

GRR/Section 20-AK-a - Well Abandonment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20-AK-a - Well Abandonment Process 20-AK-a - Well Abandonment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 20-AK-a - Well Abandonment Process 20AKAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Regulations & Policies 20 AAC 25.105 20 AAC 25.112 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 20AKAWellAbandonmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the process for abandoning wells in the state of Alaska. The Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission ("commission")

200

GRR/Section 6-AK-b - Construction Storm Water Permitting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-AK-b - Construction Storm Water Permitting GRR/Section 6-AK-b - Construction Storm Water Permitting < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-AK-b - Construction Storm Water Permitting 06AKBConstructionStormWaterPermitting (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies 18 AAC 72: Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06AKBConstructionStormWaterPermitting (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative From DEC Website: The goal of the Storm Water Program is to reduce or eliminate pollutants in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GRR/Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process GRR/Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process 03AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Land Act: AS 38.05 Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

202

GRR/Section 18-AK-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-AK-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 8-AK-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-AK-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18AKB - HazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies AS 46.03.302 18 AAC 60.020 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18AKB - HazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation defers to the federal

203

GRR/Section 15-AK-c - Title V Operating Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-AK-c - Title V Operating Permit GRR/Section 15-AK-c - Title V Operating Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-AK-c - Title V Operating Permit 15AKCTitleVOperatingPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code 18 AAC 50 Air Quality Control Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15AKCTitleVOperatingPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative One of the major initiatives Congress added to the Clean Air Act in 1990 is

204

GRR/Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-AK-c - Drinking Water Permit 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies 18 AAC 80 Drinking Water 40 CFR 141 40 CFR 142 40 CFR 143 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06AKCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Alaska's drinking water program is monitored under the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. The type of permit required depends on the

205

GRR/Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit GRR/Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-AK-b - Air Quality Minor Permit 15AKBAirQualityMinorPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code 18 AAC 50 Air Quality Control Regulations 40 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter C - Air Programs Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15AKBAirQualityMinorPermit.pdf 15AKBAirQualityMinorPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The mission of the Air Permit Program is to protect the Alaskan environment

206

GRR/Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration GRR/Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-AK-a - Storage Tank Registration 18AKA - StorageTankRegistration (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies AS 46.03.380 As 46.03.385 18 AAC 78 Underground Storage Tanks Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18AKA - StorageTankRegistration (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Any project that requires installation or operation of a storage tank must

207

GRR/Section 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-AK-b - Geophysical Exploration Permit 04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04AKBGeophysicalExplorationPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A Geophysical Exploration Permit is necessary for conducting seismic

208

GRR/Section 19-AK-b - Temporary Use of Water Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-AK-b - Temporary Use of Water Permit 9-AK-b - Temporary Use of Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-AK-b - Temporary Use of Water Permit 19AKBTemporaryUseOfWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Water Use Act Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19AKBTemporaryUseOfWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Alaska, water is declared a public resource belonging to the people of

209

GRR/Section 9-AK-a - Alaska Environmental Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 9-AK-a - Alaska Environmental Process GRR/Section 9-AK-a - Alaska Environmental Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-AK-a - Alaska Environmental Process 09AKAStateEnvironmentalProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies AS 38.05.035: Powers & Duties of ADNR Director AS 38.05.082: Leases for Shore Fisheries AS 38.05.115: Conditions of Sale AS 38.05.850: Permits AS 38.05.945: Notice AS 38.05.946: Hearings Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 09AKAStateEnvironmentalProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

210

GRR/Section 14-AK-c - Alaska UIC Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-AK-c - Alaska UIC Permit GRR/Section 14-AK-c - Alaska UIC Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-AK-c - Alaska UIC Permit 14AKCAlaskaUICPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14AKCAlaskaUICPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Underground Injection Control Permit is regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA regulates Class V injection wells on Federal lands, many tribal lands, and in some states like Alaska. Injection wells are overseen by either a state or Tribal Agency or one of

211

GRR/Section 4-AK-c - Geothermal Exploration Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-AK-c - Geothermal Exploration Permit 4-AK-c - Geothermal Exploration Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-AK-c - Geothermal Exploration Permit 04AKCGeothermalExplorationPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04AKCGeothermalExplorationPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Department of Natural Resources requires filing an application

212

GRR/Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution GRR/Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-AK-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14AKANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14AKANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Alaska's Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Control Strategy is a statewide plan for protecting Alaska's natural resources from polluted runoff also

213

GRR/Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues GRR/Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-AK-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19AKAWaterAccessWaterRights.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Water Use Act Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19AKAWaterAccessWaterRights.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Alaska, water is declared a public resource belonging to the people of

214

GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) GRR/Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-b - Right of Ways (ROWs) 03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water (ML&W) oversees land use within the state and issues right of ways, easements or permit to use state

215

GRR/Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A land use permit in Alaska covers a number of uses of state land that are less invasive and do not require a full property interest such as a lease

216

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amchitka Island Test Center - AK 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amchitka Island Test Center - AK 01 Amchitka Island Test Center - AK 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Amchitka Island Test Center (AK.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Amchitka Island Test Center Documents Related to Amchitka Island Test Center Draft Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Amchitka Island, Alaska, Project Site (September 2013) An Assessment of the Reported Leakage of Anthropogenic Radionuclides From the Underground Nuclear Test Sites at Amchitka Island, Alaska, USA to the Surface Environment. Conceptual Site Models as a Tool in Evaluation Ecological health; The Case of the Department of Energys Amchitka Island Nuclear Test Site.

217

GRR/Section 11-AK-a - State Cultural Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1-AK-a - State Cultural Considerations 1-AK-a - State Cultural Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-AK-a - State Cultural Considerations 11AKAStateCulturalConsiderations (2).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies AS 41.35.060: Power to Acquire AS 41.35.070: Preservation of Historic Resources AS 41.35.090: Notice AS 41.35.100: Excavation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11AKAStateCulturalConsiderations (2).pdf 11AKAStateCulturalConsiderations (2).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative It is the policy of the State of Alaska to preserve and protect the

218

GRR/Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process GRR/Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process 03AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Land Act: AS 38.05 Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

219

GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-AK-a - Drilling and Well Development 05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05AKADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative All wells drilled in search or in support of the recovery of geothermal

220

GRR/Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-AK-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14AKDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation United States Environmental Protection Agency U S Army Corps of Engineers Regulations & Policies Alaska Water Quality Standards Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14AKDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf 14AKDSection401WaterQualityCertification.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

GRR/Section 18-AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-AK-c - Waste Disposal Permit Process 18AKC - WasteDisposalPermitProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies AS 46.03.110 Waste Disposal Permit Regulations 18 AAC 60.200 et seq Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18AKC - WasteDisposalPermitProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is responsible

222

GRR/Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process GRR/Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-AK-a - Air Quality Assessment Process 15AKAAirQualityAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Statute Title 46 Alaska Administrative Code 18 AAC 50 Air Quality Regulations 40 CFR 71 Operating Permits Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15AKAAirQualityAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

223

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and are also stringent in order to avoid poisoning catalysts utilized in making liquids from fuel gas, electrodes in fuel cells, and selective catalytic reduction...

224

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

project phases focused on cell and stack research and development with emphasis on SOFC performance enhancement (power density, fuel utilization, and degradation), cost...

225

Multi-area power system state estimation utilizing boundary measurements and phasor measurement units ( PMUs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to prove the validity of a multi-area state estimator and investigate the advantages it provides over a serial state estimator. This is done utilizing the IEEE 118 Bus Test System as a sample system. This thesis investigates the benefits that stem from utilizing a multi-area state estimator instead of a serial state estimator. These benefits are largely in the form of increased accuracy and decreased processing time. First, the theory behind power system state estimation is explained for a simple serial estimator. Then the thesis shows how conventional measurements and newer, more accurate PMU measurements work within the framework of weighted least squares estimation. Next, the multi-area state estimator is examined closely and the additional measurements provided by PMUs are used to increase accuracy and computational efficiency. Finally, the multi-area state estimator is tested for accuracy, its ability to detect bad data, and computation time.

Freeman, Matthew A

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Micro-Computer-Based Fuel Optimization System Utilizing In-Situ Measurement of Carbon Monoxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A microcomputer-based control system utilizing a distributed intelligence architecture has been developed to control combustion in hydrocarbon fuel-fired boilers and heaters to significantly reduce fuel usage. The system incorporates a unique flue gas analyzer that mounts directly in the flue or stack to continuously measure carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, opacity and temperature. The control console interfaces directly with the boiler's existing analog control system to provide precise air fuel ratio control based on carbon monoxide measurements. Significant decreases in excess air result in reduced fuel usage while meeting steam demand. Actual performance on industrial boilers shows increases in efficiency of from 1% to 3% with substantial fuel savings.

DeVivo, D. G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp  

SciTech Connect

High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.

Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C.; Page, E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Fifty. West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of West Virginia governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-nine. Washington  

SciTech Connect

A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Washington governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Analysis of potential benefits of integrated-gasifier combined cycles for a utility system  

SciTech Connect

Potential benefits of integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) units were evaluated for a reference utility system by comparing long range expansion plans using IGCC units and gas turbine peakers with a plan using only state of the art steam turbine units and gas turbine peakers. Also evaluated was the importance of the benefits of individual IGCC unit characteristics, particularly unit efficiency, unit equivalent forced outage rate, and unit size. A range of IGCC units was analyzed, including cases achievable with state of the art gas turbines and cases assuming advanced gas turbine technology. All utility system expansion plans that used IGCC units showed substantial savings compared with the base expansion plan using the steam turbine units.

Choo, Y.K.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Solar heating and cooling system for an office building at Reedy Creek Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes in detail the solar energy system installed in a new two-story office building at the Reedy Creek Utilities Company, which provides utility service to Walt Disney World at Lake Buena Vista, Florida. The solar components were partly funded by the Department of Energy under Contract EX-76-C-01-2401, and the technical management was by NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. The solar energy system application is 100 percent heating, 80 percent cooling, and 100 percent hot water. The collector is a modular cylindrical concentrator type with an area of 3.840 square feet. The storage medium is water with a capacity of 10,000 gallons hot and 10,000 gallons chilled. Design, construction, operation, cost, maintenance, and performance are described in depth. Detailed drawings are included.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

This analysis uses simulated building data, simulated solar photovoltaic (PV) data, and actual electric utility tariff data from 25 cities to understand better the impacts of different commercial rate structures on the value of solar PV systems. By analyzing and comparing 55 unique rate structures across the United States, this study seeks to identify the rate components that have the greatest effect on the value of PV systems. Understanding the beneficial components of utility tariffs can both assist decision makers in choosing appropriate rate structures and influence the development of rates that favor the deployment of PV systems. Results from this analysis show that a PV system's value decreases with increasing demand charges. Findings also indicate that time-of-use rate structures with peaks coincident with PV production and wide ranges between on- and off-peak prices most benefit the types of buildings and PV systems simulated. By analyzing a broad set of rate structures from across the United States, this analysis provides an insight into the range of impacts that current U.S. rate structures have on PV systems.

Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Doris, E.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of filter elements to remove ash from the syngas prior to it being utilized in a gas turbine or fuel cell. The elements are arranged in columns called "candles" and contained...

234

Utility-impacts assessment of residential passive-solar systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a project undertaken to provide the electric-utility industry with a tool to use in analyzing the advantages and disadvantages for themselves and their customers of passive-solar residential construction within their service areas. A methodology to accomplish this was created and then tested in cooperation with seven participating utilities. Results indicate that passive solar homes and well-insulated homes are more economic to both utilities and homeowners than conventional homes insulated to ASHRAE 90-75 standards, still the norm for building construction in many parts of the country. Further indications are that passive-solar homes may have lower life-cycle costs for heating and cooling than well-insulated homes in areas of the country where the annual heating load predominates over the annual cooling load, and where there is an adequate amount of sunshine during the heating season. The methodology developed also has the capability of simulating and comparing the performance of a wide variety of non-solar electrical heating and cooling systems. As a result, it can be adapted by utilities for a broad range of residential energy analyses.

Wood, R.A.; Siegel, M.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Influence of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems on Air Conditioning Demand in an Utility Pilot Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A utility monitoring project has evaluated radiant barrier systems (RBS) as a new potential demand site management (DSM) program. The study examined how the retrofit of attic radiant barriers can be expected to alter utility residential space conditioning loads. An RBS consists of a layer of aluminum foil fastened to roof decking or roof trusses to block radiant heat transfer between the hot roof surface and the attic below. The radiant barrier can significantly lower summer heat transfer to the attic insulation and to the cooling duct system. Both of these mechanisms have strong potential impacts on cooling energy use as illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. The pilot project involved installation of RBS in nine homes that had been extensively monitored over the preceding year. The houses varied in conditioned floor area from 939 to 2,440 square feet; attic insulation varied from R-9 to R-30. The homes had shingle roofs with varying degrees of attic ventilation. The radiant barriers were installed during the summer of 2000. Data analysis on the pre and post cooling and heating consumption was used to determine impacts on energy use and peak demand for the utility. The average cooling energy savings from the RBS retrofit was 3.6 kWh/day, or about 9%. The average reduction in summer afternoon peak demand was 420 watts (or about 16%).

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The use of linear systems analysis to identify the residential/utility relationship  

SciTech Connect

There is little doubt that there will be significant changes to future residential electric loads and these changes will have a significant impact on the efficiency with which a utility meets its overall load demand. Changes to the residential load will come about, in part, due to residential growth and increased market penetration of alternate energy sources such as solar space heating. In view of these inevitable changes, it is imperative to develop analytical tools to assess their impact. To date, effective analytical tools include computer simulations and load duration analysis. Computer simulation methods are generally very powerful but require substantial computer, personnel, and financial resources which may put this method of analysis out of the reach of many utilities and systems analysts. In addition, detailed computer simulations have a tendency to obscure insight into the problem. Load duration analysis does provide good insight into the problem, but oftentimes must resort to simulation results if correlations exist between utility load curves and the modified residential curve. One analytical method which has not been exploited to its fullest potential is the use of linear systems analysis to solve this type of problem.

Baer, C.A.; Winn, C.B.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

LNG Vehicle High-Pressure Fuel System and ''Cold Energy'' Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure fuel system for LNG vehicles with direct-injection natural gas engines has been developed and demonstrated on a heavy-duty truck. A new concept for utilizing the ''cold energy'' associated with LNG vehicles to generate mechanical power to drive auxiliary equipment (such as high-pressure fuel pumps) has also been developed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The high-pressure LNG fuel system development included the design and testing of a new type of cryogenic pump utilizes multiple chambers and other features to condense moderate quantities of sucked vapor and discharge supercritical LNG at 3,000 to 4,000 psi. The pump was demonstrated on a Class 8 truck with a Westport high-pressure direct-injection Cummins ISX engine. A concept that utilizes LNG's ''cold energy'' to drive a high-pressure fuel pump without engine attachments or power consumption was developed. Ethylene is boiled and superheated by the engine coolant, and it is cooled and condensed by rejecting h eat to the LNG. Power is extracted in a full-admission blowdown process, and part of this power is applied to pump the ethylene liquid to the boiler pressure. Tests demonstrated a net power output of 1.1. hp at 1.9 Lbm/min of LNG flow, which is adequate to isentropically pump the LNG to approximately 3,400 psi..

powers,Charles A.; Derbidge, T. Craig

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

238

Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

239

Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

Kearney, D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Dependence of delivered energy on power conditioner electrical characteristics for utility-interactive PV systems  

SciTech Connect

In a utility-interactive photovoltaic system, the electrical characteristics of the dc-to-ac power-conditioning unit (inverter) influence the quantity of electrical energy delivered by the system, and therefore, affect the user worth of the system. An analysis of the effect of relevant inverter electrical characteristics on the quantity of system-delivered energy is undertaken using computer simulations of system behavior. Significant conclusions are that: (1) the annual system performance advantage of maximum-power-point voltage tracking is small compared with fixed-dc-input voltage operation; (2) low levels of inverter ac-power consumption during times of zero insolation can significantly degrade system performance; (3) the effect of small changes in the array-to-inverter size ratio on the user worth of the system is small; and (4) most of the system energy is delivered at power levels greater than one-half of the nominal array rating, and consequently, the inverter low-power efficiency is less important than is its full-power efficiency. A formula that approximates the inverter annual throughput efficiency with only four laboratory measurements on the inverter is presented.

Rasmussen, N.E.; Branz, H.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gwitchyaa Zhee Utility Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gwitchyaa Zhee Utility Co Gwitchyaa Zhee Utility Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Gwitchyaa Zhee Utility Co Place Alaska Utility Id 7833 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.2730/kWh Commercial: $0.5010/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gwitchyaa_Zhee_Utility_Co&oldid=410787

243

Tatitlek Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tatitlek Electric Utility Tatitlek Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tatitlek Electric Utility Place Alaska Utility Id 18480 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.5470/kWh Commercial: $0.4590/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tatitlek_Electric_Utility&oldid=411647

244

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMR METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMR METERS","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMI METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMI METERS","RESIDENTIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","COMMERCIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TOTAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",10789,1063,76,0,11928,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 3,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",10789,1063,76,0,11928,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 2013,1,"AK",3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc",69377,8707,,,78084,,,,,0,,,,,0 2013,1,"AK",7353,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",38017,6318,503,,44838,,,,,0,,,,,0 2013,1,"AK",10210,"Ketchikan Public Utilities",0,0,0,0,0,3437,350,0,0,3787,5208.03,789.27,0,0,5997.31 2013,1,"AK",10433,"Kodiak Electric Assn Inc",4585,1038,105,0,5728,,,,,0,,,,,0 2013,1,"AK",10451,"Kotzebue Electric Assn Inc",915,6,0,0,921,,,,,0,,,,,0 2013,1,"AK",11824,"Matanuska Electric Assn Inc",47829,3616,0,0,51445,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 2013,1,"AK",19558,"Homer Electric Assn Inc",25421,2737,,,28158,46,6,,,52,2.37,0.87,,,3.24

245

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMR METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMR METERS","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMI METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMI METERS","RESIDENTIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","COMMERCIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TOTAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",10105,925,62,0,11092,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 2,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",10105,925,62,0,11092,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 2012,1,"AK",3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc",77639,,,,77639,,,,,0,,,,,0 2012,1,"AK",7353,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",37816,6372,488,,44676,,,,,0,,,,,0 2012,1,"AK",10210,"Ketchikan Public Utilities",0,0,0,0,0,3262,312,0,0,3574,5074.17,742.17,0,0,5816.34 2012,1,"AK",10433,"Kodiak Electric Assn Inc",4574,1018,100,,5692,,,,,0,,,,,0 2012,1,"AK",10451,"Kotzebue Electric Assn Inc",915,6,,,921,,,,,0,,,,,0 2012,1,"AK",11824,"Matanuska Electric Assn Inc",47769,3513,0,0,51282,,,,,0,,,,,0 2012,1,"AK",19558,"Homer Electric Assn Inc",24988,2579,,,27567,41,5,,,46,2.05,0.06,,,2.1

246

Superconducting magnetic energy storage applications and benefits for electric utility power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large SMES units are being studied for electric utility applications as diurnal, load-curve leveling and as transient stabilizer units. Such SMES units show promise of providing greater operating flexibility than pumped-hydro or other types of energy storage. This operating flexibility, together with its fast response capability to provide transient and dynamic stabilization benefits to a power system, are discussed. Small SMES units are being designed for dynamic stability applications on electric power systems for use when negatively damped system operating conditions are encountered. The 30-MJ, 10-MW SMES dynamic-stabilizer design is presented; and the status of the component development and fabrication contracts which have been placed with commercial manufacturers is discussed.

Turner, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NOTICE Neither Optimum Utility Systems nor the Cornell Cooperative Extension Association of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wyoming County makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by Optimum Utility Systems or the Cornell Cooperative Extension Association of Wyoming County. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of Optimum Utility Systems or the Cornell Cooperative Extension Association of Wyoming County. Gas-fired heating equipment is to be installed only in accordance with local laws, codes, and regulations, and only by contractors qualified in the installation and service of gasfired heating equipment. Cornell Cooperative Extension Association of Wyoming County, 2001. 2Biogas Applications for Large Dairy Operations: Alternatives to Conventional Engine-Generators Dairy anaerobic digester systems process cow manure to generate a biogas that is

Darrell T. Mears

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of clean energy systems. Accomplishments The AVESTAR team successfully deployed 3-D virtual IGCC immersive training systems at NETL and West Virginia University that allow...

250

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diverse number of systems and chemical processes ranging from catalysts developments for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis applications, nanoscience, development of dense membrane systems...

251

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier; hot gas filtration; continuous ash depressurization systems; and various instrumentation, sampling, and controls systems. After only eight years from the time of...

252

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gasifier; hot gas filtration; continuous ash depressurization systems; and various instrumentation, sampling, and controls systems. Only eight years after construction and...

253

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00-1.99 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use

257

Ketchikan Public Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ketchikan Public Utilities Ketchikan Public Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Ketchikan Public Utilities Place Alaska Utility Id 10210 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential and Community Facilities Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1020/kWh Commercial: $0.0974/kWh Industrial: $0.0877/kWh

258

Federal policies to promote the widespread utilization of photovoltaic systems. Supplement: review and critique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is intended as a supplement to the two-volume report entitled Federal Policies to Promote the Widespread Utilization of Photovoltaic Systems that was submitted to Congress by the Department of Energy in February and April of 1980. This supplement contains review comments prepared by knowledgeable experts who reviewed early drafts of the Congressional report. Responses to the review comments by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, preparer of the Congressional report, are also included in this supplement. The Congressional report, mandated in the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590), discusses various issues related to promoting the deployment of photovoltaic systems through the Federal Photovoltaic Program. Various program strategies and funding levels are examined.

Smith, J.L.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

GRR/Section 12-AK-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 12-AK-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-AK-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations 12AKAFloraFaunaConsiderations (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Fish and Game Regulations & Policies AS 16.05.841: Fishways AS 16.05.871: Protection of Fish and Game AS 16.20: Conservation and Protection 5 AAC 95.011: Waters Important to Anadromous Fish Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12AKAFloraFaunaConsiderations (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

260

Anemometer Data (Wind Speed, Direction) for YKHC-Bethel, AK (2003 - 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

YKHC-Bethel, AK (2003 - 2004) YKHC-Bethel, AK (2003 - 2004) Dataset Summary Description Wind data collected from YKHC - Bethel in Alaska from an anemometer as part of the Native American anemometer loan program. Monthly mean wind speed is available for 2003 through 2004, as is wind direction and turbulence data. Data is reported from a height of 20 m. The data was originally made available by Wind Powering America, a DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) program. A dynamic map displaying all available data from DOE anemometer loan programs is available http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/anemometerloans/projects.asp. Source EERE Date Released November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated November 09th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords wind wind direction wind speed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

GRR/Section 19-AK-c - Permit to Appropriate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 19-AK-c - Permit to Appropriate < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-AK-c - Permit to Appropriate 19AKCPermitToAppropriate.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Water Use Act Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19AKCPermitToAppropriate.pdf 19AKCPermitToAppropriate.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Alaska, water is declared a public resource belonging to the people of

262

File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AK-CookInlet-Liquids.pdf AK-CookInlet-Liquids.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 10.19 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

263

GRR/Section 17-AK-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 17-AK-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 17-AK-a - Aesthetic Resource Assessment 17AKAAestheticResourceAssessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 17AKAAestheticResourceAssessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

264

GRR/Section 4-AK-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 4-AK-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-AK-a - State Exploration Process 04AKAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04AKAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

265

The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

Rau, N.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation on Pyroelectric Ceramic Temperature Sensors for Energy System Applications Background There is an increasing need to monitor processing parameters such as...

267

AK-TRIBE-ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

include installation of an (EPA certified) wood-fired central boiler, a conventional (household size) energy efficient oil-fired boiler, a heat distribution system, energy...

268

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Conduct bench-scale testing of the complete ICES incorporating the selected particle growth method with the optimized capture duct and diffuser systems to enable the...

269

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Background Oxygen is among the top five chemicals produced worldwide...

270

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for advanced power generation technologies, such as coal gasification, heat engines, such as turbines,...

271

Utility-scale combined-cycle power systems with Kalina bottoming cycles  

SciTech Connect

A new power-generation technology, often referred to as the Kalina cycle, is being developed as a direct replacement for the Rankine steam cycle. It can be applied to any thermal heat source, low or high temperature. Among several Kalina cycle variations, there is one that is particularly well suited as a bottoming cycle for utility combined-cycle applications. It is the subject of this paper. Using an ammonia/water mixture as the working fluid and a condensing system based on absorption-refrigeration principles, the Kalina bottoming cycle outperforms a triple-pressure steam cycle by 16%. Additionally, this version of the Kalina cycle is characterized by an intercooling feature between turbine stages, diametrically opposite to normal reheating practice in steam plants. Energy and mass balances are presented for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina bottoming cycle. Kalina cycle performance is compared to a triple-pressure steam plant. Energy and mass balances are presented as well for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina direct-fired cycle designed for utility purposes.

Kalina, A.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Optimizing the Utility System of a Tissue Paper Mill Using Pinch Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tissue paper mill in southern California had existing utility demands of 7.1 MW for the tissue mill (13 MW for the whole site), and 55 MM Btu/hr of fuel gas for the steam boiler. Total utility costs were $12 MM per year. The mill was seriously considering an 11 MW cogeneration system as a means of reducing operating costs. The expected benefits of the cogeneration project were $5.5 MM/yr of savings for an investment of $9 MM. A "pinch" study of the mill was initiated by SCE, with the customer's consent, to explore viable alternative projects that would result in comparable savings at equal or better payback and lower risk. The study identified a group of ten inter-related projects, including process heat recovery, a waste heat boiler and a 2.5 MW gas turbine. Combined savings were $4.5 MM/yr (37% of existing bill) at an estimated capital cost of $6.6 MM. The recommended approach was considered more attractive by the paper mill than the original plan because: (a) the benefits were obtained in a number of different areas -reduced fuel use, reduced power cost, reduced water makeup, reduced wastewater discharge to sewer, and reduced solid wastes to landfill (b) the smaller projects involved lower technical and economic risk, and were easier to implement.

Kumana, J. D.; Sung, R. D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Performance evaluation of high-temperature superconducting current leads for electric utility SMES systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Technology Program, Argonne National Laboratory and Babcock & Wilcox are developing high-temperature super-conductor (HTS) current leads for application to electric utility superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. A 16,000-A HTS lead has been designed and is being constructed. An evaluation program for component performance was conducted to confirm performance predictions and/or to qualify the design features for construction. Performance of the current lead assemblies will be evaluated in a test program that includes assembly procedures, tooling, and quality assurance; thermal and electrical performance; and flow and mechanical characteristics. Results of the evaluations to date are presented.

Niemann, R.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Hull, J.R. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Robust Output Feedback Stabilization of Nonlinear Interconnected Systems with Application to an Industrial Utility Boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to an Industrial Utility Boiler Adarsha Swarnakar, Horacio Jose Marquez and Tongwen Chen Abstract-- This paper boiler (Utility boiler), where the nonlinear model describes the complicated dynamics of the drum

Marquez, Horacio J.

276

1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","All Sources",4,85.9,80.09  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

STATE_CODE","PRODUCER_TYPE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY STATE_CODE","PRODUCER_TYPE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY (Megawatts)","SUMMER_CAPACITY (Megawatts)" 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","All Sources",4,85.9,80.09 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","Coal",3,65.5,61.1 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Commercial Power","Petroleum",1,20.4,18.99 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","All Sources",23,229.4,204.21 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","Natural Gas",28,159.32,136.67 1990,"AK","Combined Heat and Power, Industrial Power","Petroleum",8,68.28,65.86

277

Ammonia Production and Utilization in a Hybrid LNT+SCR System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hybrid LNT+SCR system is used to control NOx from a light-duty diesel engine with in-cylinder regeneration controls. A diesel oxidation catalyst and diesel particulate filter are upstream of the LNT and SCR catalysts. Ultraviolet (UV) adsorption spectroscopy performed directly in the exhaust path downstream of the LNT and SCR catalysts is used to characterize NH3 production and utilization in the system. Extractive exhaust samples are analyzed with FTIR and magnetic sector mass spectrometry (H2) as well. Furthermore, standard gas analyzers are used to complete the characterization of exhaust chemistry. NH3 formation increases strongly with extended regeneration (or over regeneration ) of the LNT, but the amount of NOx reduction occurring over the SCR catalyst is limited by the amount of NH3 produced as well as the amount of NOx available downstream of the LNT. Control of lean-rich cycling parameters enables control of the ratio of NOx reduction between the LNT and SCR catalysts. During lean-rich cycling, fuel penalties are similar for either LNT dominant or LNT with supplemental SCR NOx reduction. However, stored NH3 after multiple lean-rich cycles can enable continued NOx reduction by the SCR after lean-rich cycling stops; thus, requirements for active regeneration of the LNT+SCR system can be modified during transient operation.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

FINAL TOPICAL REPORT FOR NOVEL SYSTEMS SEQUESTERING AND UTILIZATION OF CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are increasing by about 0.5% each year, and there is serious concern that this will cause adverse climate change via the ''greenhouse effect.'' The principal sources of the increase are the utilization of fossil fuels and the deforestation of land. The capture of CO{sub 2} from flue gas or process streams has been demonstrated using chemical absorption with an ethanolamine solvent. However, the cost of releasing the CO{sub 2} by thermal stripping and recovering the solvent is very high, resulting in an energy penalty of 27% to 37 %, depending on the type of power plant (1). Alternatives that would result in energy penalties of 15% have been investigated. Sequestering schemes for CO{sub 2} produced from fossil fuels conversion to energy in utility plants could instead yield useful polymer products. Relatively concentrated CO{sub 2} by-product streams from fermentation of cellulose to fuel ethanol will also be available for conversion to useful polymers. As shown in Figure 1, this project offers two opportunities for mitigating the emission of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, depending on the source configuration and economic feasibility of the proposed processes: CO{sub 2} in a conventional utility-produced flue gas could be sequestered to form a reactive monomer using an amine (such as ethanolamine) that reacts with an aldehyde to form an amine intermediate, which subsequently copolymerizes with the CO{sub 2} to give a copolyurethane. Using a tertiary amine to trap the CO{sub 2} is also proposed. In this case the tertiary ammonium carbonate is reacted with the aldehyde to form the copolycarbonate, regenerating the tertiary amine. In an alternate scheme, a concentrated CO{sub 2} stream from an advanced energy system could be directly polymerized with aldehyde and catalyst to Polymer 2. Sources of concentrated CO{sub 2} include the water-gas shift reaction in an IGCC (integrated gasification combined-cycle) device, fermentation, a fuel cell anode gas, or oxygen-fired combustion. Significant sequestration of CO{sub 2} would be accomplished if large amounts could be efficiently and economically converted to stable and useful products that would pay for the processing. If the CO{sub 2} is stored rather than converted to a useful product, the cost of sequestering must be extremely low. If CO{sub 2} is to be utilized as a chemical feedstock, the allowable process cost can be higher, but only high-volume commodity chemical products could sequester a significant amount of CO{sub 2}. Large volumes of inexpensive CO{sub 2}-derived polymers could be utilized for enhanced oil recovery, structural thermoplastic resins, and ion-exchange applications. Economic success is better achieved with the availability of a very inexpensive aldehyde or derivative mine. To provide this component inexpensively, a novel photosystem is proposed such that CO{sub 2} is also converted to the desired copolymer feedstock.

Edwin S. Olson

1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report NATURAL GAS SYSTEM INTRODUCTION New Mexico State University currently uses natural gas, provided by the City of Las Cruces

Castillo, Steven P.

280

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Advanced systems demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Volume III. Equipment specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains all of the equipment specifications to be utilized for the proposed biomass co-generation plant in Maine. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Power Electronics for Distributed Energy Systems and Transmission and Distribution Applications: Assessing the Technical Needs for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power electronics can provide utilities the ability to more effectively deliver power to their customers while providing increased reliability to the bulk power system. In general, power electronics is the process of using semiconductor switching devices to control and convert electrical power flow from one form to another to meet a specific need. These conversion techniques have revolutionized modern life by streamlining manufacturing processes, increasing product efficiencies, and increasing the quality of life by enhancing many modern conveniences such as computers, and they can help to improve the delivery of reliable power from utilities. This report summarizes the technical challenges associated with utilizing power electronics devices across the entire spectrum from applications to manufacturing and materials development, and it provides recommendations for research and development (R&D) needs for power electronics systems in which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) could make a substantial impact toward improving the reliability of the bulk power system.

Tolbert, L.M.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Compact fuel cell system utilizing a combination of hydrogen storage materials for optimized performance.  

SciTech Connect

An entirely new class of light-weight reversible hydrides was recently discovered (the Ti-doped alanates)[1]. These NaAIH{sub 4}-based materials have demonstrated reversible hydrogen storage capacities of up to 5 wt%, nearly 4 times the gravimetrically density of commercial metal hydrides. For this reason, they have been considered a breakthrough for hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles. This project is the first to publish the use of alanates for the generation of electrical power and the first demonstration of a hydride-fueled elevated-temperature PEM Fuel Cell. Because the kinetics of hydrogen uptake and release by the alanate improves with elevated temperatures, novel concepts were tested for the purpose of developing a highly efficient stand-alone power system. A major focus of this work was on the modeling, design, construction and testing of an integrated fuel cell stack and hydrogen storage system that eliminates the need of complicated heat transfer systems and media. After extensive modeling efforts, a proof-of-concept system was built that employs an integrated fuel cell stack and hydride beds that balancing the generation of fuel cell waste heat with the endothermic release of hydrogen from the alanates. Our demonstration unit was capable of greater than one hour of operation on a single charge of hydrogen from the integrated 173 gram alanate bed. In addition, composite hydride materials with synergistic reaction heats were evaluated and tested to enhance the operational performance of the alanates. The composites provide a unique opportunity to utilize the heat produced from hydriding classic metal hydrides to improve both absorption and desorption rates of the alanates. A particular focus of the mixed storage materials work was to balance the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydrides for start-up conditions. Modeling of the sorption properties proved invaluable in evaluating the optimum composition of hydrides. The modeling efforts were followed by full validation by experimental measurements. This project successfully completed the proof-of-concept goals and generated a powerful set of tools for optimizing the complete power-generation system. It has also created a new direction for hydrogen power generation as well the potential for new R&D based on this work.

Chan, Jennifer P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Gross, Karl J.; Ng, Greg L.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Novel Power Cycle for Combined-Cycle Systems and Utility Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The description of a new power cycle, based on the use of a multicomponent working fluid, was published earlier. A thermodynamic analysis of this cycle has demonstrated its superiority over the currently used Rankine Cycle, and a distribution of losses in the subsystems of this cycle has been established. A new, improved variant of the cycle, which provides 10% efficiency improvement over the initial variant, has been developed. The new variant employs a cooling of the working fluid between turbine stages and a recuperation of the released heat for supplementation of the boiler heat supply. Analysis shows that with this new, improved cycle efficiencies of up to 52% for a combined-cycle system employing standard turbines, and of up to 55% when modern high-temperature gas turbines are employed, can be achieved. The same cycle can be utilized to retrofit existing direct-fired power plants, providing an efficiency of up to 42%. The possible implications off such a cycle implementation are briefly discussed. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is now conducting a study of this cycle.

Kalina, A. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Superconductive Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) System Studies for Electrical Utility at Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-layer low aspect ratio rippled and non-rippled solenoids mounted in surface trenches are described for superconductive magnetic energy storage utility applications. Open pool cooling in superfluid helium provides extended time cryogenic stability. Axial structure also functions as a protective heat absorbing secondary during emergency discharge. The cost of the conductor, trench, dewar, struts, radial structure, plus others are proportional to E^ 2/3 where E= stored energy; the cost of the axial structure is approximately E; and the cost of refrigeration is a constant plus an E^2/3 term. Costs scale approximately from E^0.58 (low E) to E^0.71 (100 - 3000 MWh) to E ^0.78 (3000 to 10,000 MWh). The cost of the ac-dc conversion system is about $60/kW. The electrical usage is best for load-leveling units that charge 8 h at night and discharge 15 h during the daytime. 98% storage efficiency and rapid power reversal are the two primary benefits of SMES. The potential impact of high Tc oxide superconductors is a 10%-20% cost reduction for large SMES units (above 3000 MWh). The operational storage efficiency of smaller units would improve to better than 95% for E > 10 MWh.

Boom, R. W.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Abdelsalem, M. K.; Huang, X.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.  

SciTech Connect

We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

"2012 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial" Industrial" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",94,127106,11993,9.4354318 "Chugach Electric Assn Inc","AK","Cooperative",7,54804,5902,10.769287 "City & Borough of Sitka - (AK)","AK","Municipal",15,4968,476,9.5813205 "City of Petersburg - (AK)","AK","Municipal",39,19905,2208.6,11.095705 "City of Seward - (AK)","AK","Municipal",126,33599,5828,17.345754

288

File:NREL-ak-50m.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ak-50m.pdf ak-50m.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska Mainland Regions Annual Average Wind Speed at 50 Meters (PDF) Size of this preview: 776 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 777 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,647 × 1,272 pixels, file size: 6.1 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Title Alaska Mainland Regions Annual Average Wind Speed at 50 Meters (PDF) Description Alaska Mainland Regions Annual Average Wind Speed at 50 Meters (PDF) Sources National Renewable Energy Laboratory Related Technologies Wind Creation Date 2010/01/15 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 15:08, 21 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 15:08, 21 December 2010 1,647 × 1,272 (6.1 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

289

File:NREL-ak2-50m.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ak2-50m.pdf ak2-50m.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska Panhandle Annual Average Wind Speed at 50 Meters (PDF) Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.8 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Title Alaska Panhandle Annual Average Wind Speed at 50 Meters (PDF) Description Alaska Panhandle Annual Average Wind Speed at 50 Meters (PDF) Sources National Renewable Energy Laboratory Related Technologies Wind Creation Date 2010/01/15 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:46, 21 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:46, 21 December 2010 1,275 × 1,650 (1.8 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

290

Evaluation and Design of Utility Co-Owned Cogeneration Systems for Industrial Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, is currently evaluating the potential of utility co-owned cogeneration facilities in industrial parks. This paper describes part of the work performed by one of EPRI's contractors, Impell Corporation, chosen by EPRI to support the industrial parks study. Cogeneration benefits for park owners, tenants and the local utilities are presented. A method developed for selecting industrial park sites for cogeneration facilities and design and financing options are also discussed.

Hu, D. S.; Tamaro, R. F.; Schiller, S. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMR METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMR METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMR METERS","NUMBER OF RESIDENTIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF INDUSTRIAL AMI METERS","NUMBER OF TRANSPORTATION AMI METERS","TOTAL NUMBER OF AMI METERS","RESIDENTIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","COMMERCIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)","TOTAL ENERGY SERVED THRU AMI METERS (MWh)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",9111,782,58,0,9951,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 1,1,"AK",213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",9111,782,58,0,9951,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 2011,1,"AK",1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 2011,1,"AK",10210,"Ketchikan Public Utilities",0,0,0,0,0,2974,264,2,0,3240,4461,786,114,0,5361 2011,1,"AK",10433,"Kodiak Electric Assn Inc",4574,976,101,0,5651,,,,,0,,,,,0 2011,1,"AK",11824,"Matanuska Electric Assn Inc",47365,3590,,,50955,,,,,0,,,,,0 2011,1,"AK",19558,"Homer Electric Assn Inc",24337,2482,0,0,26819,31,4,0,0,35,1.29,0.01,0,0,1.31 2011,1,"AL",195,"Alabama Power Co",,,,,,1227639,172463,5845,0,1405947,1548871.17,1047712.67,1805530.5,0,4402114.33

292

Overview of PV balance-of-systems technology: Experience and guidelines for utility ties in the United States of America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. National Photovoltaic Program began in 1975 by supporting the development of terrestrial PV modules and hardware associated with grid-connected PV systems. Early PV-system demonstration programs were also supported and cost shared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A wide variety of PV systems were deployed, usually with utility participation. The early demonstration projects provided, and continue to provide, valuable PV system experience to utilities, designers and suppliers. As a result of experience gained, several important milestones in codes and standards pertaining to the design, installation and operation of photovoltaic (PV) systems have been completed. These code and standard activities were conducted through collaboration of participants from all sectors of the PV industry, utilities and the US DOE National Photovoltaic Program. Codes and standards that have been proposed, written, or modified include changes and additions for the 1999 National Electric Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}), standards for fire and personnel safety, system testing, field acceptance, component qualification, and utility interconnection. Project authorization requests with the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) have resulted in standards for component qualification and were further adapted for standards used to list PV modules and balance-of-system components. Industry collaboration with Underwriter Laboratories, Inc., with the American Society for Testing and Materials, and through critical input and review for international standards with the International Electrotechnical Commission have resulted in new and revised domestic and international standards for PV applications. Activities related to work on codes and standards through the International Energy Agency are also being supported by the PV industry and the US DOE. The paper shows relationships between activities in standards writing.

Bower, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitaker, C. [Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Birch Creek Village Elec Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Birch Creek Village Elec Util Birch Creek Village Elec Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Birch Creek Village Elec Util Place Alaska Utility Id 1747 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.6070/kWh Commercial: $0.6150/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Birch_Creek_Village_Elec_Util&oldid=409048" Categories:

294

Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to develop low-emissions, efficient fuel-flexible combustion technology which enables operation of a given gas turbine on a wider range of opportunity fuels that lie outside of current natural gas-centered fuel specifications. The program encompasses a selection of important, representative fuels of opportunity for gas turbines with widely varying fundamental properties of combustion. The research program covers conceptual and detailed combustor design, fabrication, and testing of retrofitable and/or novel fuel-flexible gas turbine combustor hardware, specifically advanced fuel nozzle technology, at full-scale gas turbine combustor conditions. This project was performed over the period of October 2008 through September 2011 under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868 for the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines". The overall objective of this program was met with great success. GE was able to successfully demonstrate the operability of two fuel-flexible combustion nozzles over a wide range of opportunity fuels at heavy-duty gas turbine conditions while meeting emissions goals. The GE MS6000B ("6B") gas turbine engine was chosen as the target platform for new fuel-flexible premixer development. Comprehensive conceptual design and analysis of new fuel-flexible premixing nozzles were undertaken. Gas turbine cycle models and detailed flow network models of the combustor provide the premixer conditions (temperature, pressure, pressure drops, velocities, and air flow splits) and illustrate the impact of widely varying fuel flow rates on the combustor. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were employed to compare some fundamental combustion characteristics of the target fuels, including flame speeds and lean blow-out behavior. Perfectly premixed combustion experiments were conducted to provide experimental combustion data of our target fuels at gas turbine conditions. Based on an initial assessment of premixer design requirements and challenges, the most promising sub-scale premixer concepts were evaluated both experimentally and computationally. After comprehensive screening tests, two best performing concepts were scaled up for further development. High pressure single nozzle tests were performed with the scaled premixer concepts at target gas turbine conditions with opportunity fuels. Single-digit NOx emissions were demonstrated for syngas fuels. Plasma-assisted pilot technology was demonstrated to enhance ignition capability and provide additional flame stability margin to a standard premixing fuel nozzle. However, the impact of plasma on NOx emissions was observed to be unacceptable given the goals of this program and difficult to avoid.

Venkatesan, Krishna

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY...

296

Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a 20 month study to explore the technical and economic feasibility of fuelwood utilization to operate a 50 megawatt energy conversion facility are described. The availability of biomass as a fuel source, the methods of harvesting and collecting the fuelstock, the costs of providing adequate fuel to the plant, and other requirements for fueling the proposed conversion facility are investigated. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Collaborative Research: Metabolic Engineering of E. coli Sugar-Utilization Regulatory Systems for the Consumption of Plant Biomass Sugars.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to metabolically engineer the E. coli sugar-utilization regulatory systems (SURS) to utilize sugar mixtures obtained from plant biomass. Of particular relevance is the implementation of a metabolic engineering cycle aided by functional genomics and systems biology tools. Our findings will help in the establishment of a platform for the efficient production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. Our research has improved the understanding of the role of SURS in regulating sugar utilization and several other cellular functions. For example, we discovered that Mlc, a global regulatory protein, regulates the utilization of xylose and demonstrated the existence of an important link between catabolite repression and respiratory/fermentative metabolism. The study of SURS mutants also revealed a connection between flagellar biosynthesis and catabolite repression. Several tools were also developed as part of this project. A novel tool (Elementary Network Decomposition, END) to help elucidate the network topology of regulatory systems was developed and its utility as a discovery tool was demonstrated by applying it to the SURS in E. coli. A novel method (and software) to estimate metabolic fluxes that uses labeling experiments and eliminates reliance on extracellular fluxes was also developed. Although not initially considered in the scope of this project, we have developed a novel and superior method for optimization of HPLC separation and applied it to the simultaneous quantification of different functionalities (sugars, organic acids, ethanol, etc.) present in our fermentation samples. Currently under development is a genetic network driven metabolic flux analysis framework to integrate transcriptional and flux data.

Ramon Gonzalez (PI); J. V. Shanks (Co-PI); K-Y. San (Co-PI).

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells-West Virginia University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/ NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. West Virginia University's (WVU) project will establish the tolerance limits of contaminant

300

Why Sequence Sinorhizobium meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sinorhizobium meliloti Sinorhizobium meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C? Nitrogen is a crucial element for plant growth and makes up nearly 80 percent of the Earth's atmosphere. Unfortunately plants can't use atmospheric nitrogen unless it is converted into another form. Fertilizers can supply the needed nitrogen, but they are made using processes that contribute to the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. On the other hand, symbiotic nitrogen fixation done by bacteria such as Rhizobia residing in the soil or in the roots of plants bypasses the need for nitrogen fertilizers and allows farmers to plant crops in marginal lands that might not normally be used as such. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation contributes some 90 million tons of fixed nitrogen annually for legume crops such as soybeans, red clover and peas. S meliloti is a symbiotic

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301

File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 10.19 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaska's Cook Inlet By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

302

File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

File File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Alaskan North Slope By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 2.16 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Alaskan North Slope By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Alaska File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

303

Coordination of reactive power scheduling in a multi-area power system operated by independent utilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the problem of reactive power scheduling in a power system with several areas controlled by independent transmission system operators (TSOs). To design (more)

Phulpin, Yannick

304

City of Elfin Cove, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elfin Cove, Alaska (Utility Company) Elfin Cove, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Elfin Cove Place Alaska Utility Id 5721 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.3290/kWh Commercial: $0.5250/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Elfin_Cove,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409550

305

City of Manokotak, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manokotak, Alaska (Utility Company) Manokotak, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Manokotak Place Alaska Utility Id 26317 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Community Facility Commercial Residential Residential State and Federal Rate Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.5500/kWh Commercial: $0.5670/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Manokotak,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409906"

306

City of Ouzinkie, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ouzinkie, Alaska (Utility Company) Ouzinkie, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Ouzinkie Place Alaska Utility Id 14234 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.3410/kWh Commercial: $0.3980/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Ouzinkie,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410075

307

City of Chefornak, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chefornak, Alaska (Utility Company) Chefornak, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Chefornak Place Alaska Utility Id 3422 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Average Rates Residential: $0.4860/kWh Commercial: $0.4600/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Chefornak,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409440"

308

City of Unalaska, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unalaska, Alaska (Utility Company) Unalaska, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Unalaska Place Alaska Utility Id 19454 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Industrial Industrial Large General Commercial Residential Residential Small General Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.3860/kWh Commercial: $0.3250/kWh Industrial: $0.2800/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Unalaska,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410359"

309

Kokhanok Village Council (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kokhanok Village Council (Utility Company) Kokhanok Village Council (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kokhanok Village Council Place Alaska Utility Id 10455 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location AK NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.8990/kWh Commercial: $0.9040/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kokhanok_Village_Council_(Utility_Company)&oldid=41095

310

Native Village of Perryville, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Perryville, Alaska (Utility Company) Perryville, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Native Village of Perryville Place Alaska Utility Id 14832 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Community Facilities Rate Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.7620/kWh Commercial: $0.7660/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Native_Village_of_Perryville,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=412328"

311

City of Tenakee Springs, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs, Alaska (Utility Company) Springs, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Tenakee Springs Place Alaska Utility Id 18541 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Service Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.6380/kWh Commercial: $0.6460/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Tenakee_Springs,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410328

312

Pedro Bay Village Council (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pedro Bay Village Council (Utility Company) Pedro Bay Village Council (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Pedro Bay Village Council Place Alaska Utility Id 14633 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Residential School Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.9080/kWh Commercial: $0.8510/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Pedro_Bay_Village_Council_(Utility_Company)&oldid=411345

313

City of Larsen Bay, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Larsen Bay, Alaska (Utility Company) Larsen Bay, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Larsen Bay Place Alaska Utility Id 10716 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Industrial Rate Industrial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.3910/kWh Commercial: $0.3340/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Larsen_Bay,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=40983

314

Enabling AMI System Prognostics and Health Management: A Procedural Guide for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electromechanical meter production has halted in the United States and utilities are now deploying solid state electronic meters exclusively. The service life expectancy and failure modes of these solid state meters are not well known. The prior generation of electromechanical meters had well established life characteristics, but many questions exist regarding the newer solid state products. With any new technology there are risks. When the new technology is integrated with core business processes, ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluation of Islanding Detection Methods for Utility-Interactive Inverters in Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the various methods and circuits that have been developed to detect an islanding condition for photovoltaic applications and presents three methods that have been developed to test those methods and circuits. Passive methods for detecting an islanding condition basically monitor parameters such as voltage and frequency and/or their characteristics and cause the inverter to cease converting power when there is sufficient transition from normal specified conditions. Active methods for detecting the island introduce deliberate changes or disturbances to the connected circuit and then monitor the response to determine if the utility grid with its stable frequency, voltage and impedance is still connected. If the small perturbation is able to affect the parameters of the load connection within prescribed requirements, the active circuit causes the inverter to cease power conversion and delivery of power to the loads. The methods not resident in the inverter are generally controlled by the utility or have communications between the inverter and the utility to affect an inverter shut down when necessary. This report also describes several test methods that may be used for determining whether the anti-islanding method is effective. The test circuits and methodologies used in the U.S. have been chosen to limit the number of tests by measuring the reaction of a single or small number of inverters under a set of consensus-based worst-case conditions.

BOWER, WARD I.; ROPP, MICHAEL

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressurized Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near

317

Integrated Control of Active and Reactive Power Flow Controllers to Optimize Transmission System Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized power system control requires oversight of numerous control elements to efficiently and reliably transfer power across the system. The objective of this project was to minimize losses in the Consolidated Edison Electric power system via modification of control variables available to the system operator. These variables include generator voltages, transformer voltage/phase angle tap set points, and switched shunt status. System constraints include bus voltages, branch/interface flow limits, ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

318

Implementation of a Dual Containment/Surveillance System utilizing scene-change detection and radio frequency technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the implementation of scene-change detection and radio frequency technology within a Dual Containment/Surveillance (C/S) System. Additionally, this paper will examine the human performance factors in the operation of these systems. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company utilizes the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System (CIMS) in the performance of Dual C/S to monitor special nuclear materials within International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards and Domestic Safeguards. CIMS is comprised of the Material Monitoring System (MMS) (R), a multi-media electronic surveillance system developed by Sandia National Laboratory which incorporates the use of active seals commonly called Radio Frequency Tamper Indicating Devices (RFTIDs), NT Vision (R) as developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Microsoft Windows NT (R) based operating system providing for domestic scene-change detection and the Digital Multi-Camera Optical Surveillance System (DMOS) (R) which provides scene-change detection for IAEA. Although this paper will focus on the implementation of Dual C/S utilizing the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System, the necessity for a thorough review of Safeguards and Security requirements with organizations and personnel having minimal to no prior MPC&A training will also be covered. Successful Dual C/S implementation plans must consider not only system design and failure modes, but must also be accompanied with the appropriate ''mind shift'' within operations and technical personnel. This is required to ensure completion of both physical and electronic activities, and system design changes are performed conscientiously and with full awareness of MPC&A requirements.

FITZGERALD, ERIC; KOENIG, RICHARD

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joining of Advanced Joining of Advanced High-Temperature Materials Background To remain economically competitive, the coal-fired power generation industry needs to increase system efficiency, improve component and system reliability, and meet ever tightening environmental standards. In particular, cost-effective improvements in thermal efficiency are particularly attractive because they offer two potential benefits: (1) lower variable operating cost via increased fuel utilization (fuel costs represent over 70 percent of the variable operating cost of a fossil fuel-fired power plant) and (2) an economical means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other emissions. To achieve meaningful gains, steam pressure and temperature must be increased to

320

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the period April--June, 1996 for the utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration program. The topics of the report include NEPA information, ATS engine design, integrated program plan, closed loop cooling, thin wall casting development, rotor air sealing development, compressor aerodynamic development, turbine aerodynamic development, phase 3 advanced air sealing development, active tip clearance control, combustion system development, ceramic ring segment, advanced thermal barrier coating development, steam cooling effects, directionally solidified blade development, single crystal blade development program, advanced vane alloy development, blade and vane life prediction, nickel based alloy rotor, and plans for the next reporting period.

NONE

1996-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

How Do Forecasters Utilize Output From A Convection-Permitting Ensemble Forecast System? Case Study Of A High-Impact Precipitation Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proliferation of ensemble forecast system output in recent years motivates this investigation into how operational forecasters utilize convection-permitting ensemble forecast system guidance in the forecast preparation process. A sixteen-...

Clark Evans; Donald F. Van Dyke; Todd Lericos

322

The influence of utility - interactive PV system characteristics to AC power network  

SciTech Connect

Two experimental PV systems are constructed and operated. One is a system with a line-commutated inverter and another uses a self-commutated inverter and is operated alone as an independent power source when the power network is in trouble. Operating and generating characteristics have been measured for the line-commutated inverter system and for the self-commutated inverter system connected to the Ac simulated network which simulates the actual power distribution system. For the system voltage fluctuation, amplitude of variation in AC voltage was measured at the joining point of the simulated distribution network connected to the PV system by changing the system short circuit current ration. For the harmonics characteristics, the line-commutated inverter system is a harmonic current power source and the self-commutated inverter system is a harmonic voltage power source. The protective sequence for failures in the power system or PV system is also studied. An optimum protection control method with an emphasis on safety is proposed for the self-commutated inverter system. This paper also describes examples of failures in solar cell arrays during the operation of these PV systems and proposes data for improving the reliability of solar cell arrays.

Takeda, Y.; Kaminosono, H.; Takigawa, K.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems program (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. First quarterly report, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally-superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability- Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase 1 of the ATS program, Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is re-configured with closed- loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to bum coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. Future Phase IV activities consist of manufacturing, constructing,

Brushwood, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Program on Technology Innovation: Utility-Connected Algae Systems--Analysis and Decision Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility power plants have supplies of CO2, impaired water, and low-grade heat that are useful inputs for growth of microalgae (algae), which itself can be biomass feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. Because modern algae cultivation requires a source of CO2, growing algal biomass is thus a potential scenario for lowering net power plant CO2 emissions. At present, microalgal growth is still an unproven technology on a large scale for any purpose other than creating specialty neutr...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Preferences and concerns of potential users in the selection of solar thermal systems for industrial and small utility applications  

SciTech Connect

To achieve widespready application in the industrial and utility sectors, solar systems must be economically competitive. Economic viability is, in turn, determined by a number of supporting criteria, ranging from system reliability to dispatch characteristics to how the system supports the main product line. In addition, solar systems possess some inherent attributes that may render some of the traditional supporting criteria inappropriate or require their redefinition. Those criteria and their relation to the solar investments are discussed in three steps. First, the main concerns and preferences of the potential users, as identified in recent SERI studies, are identified. Second, the equitability of the resulting decision criteria for solar investments are examined. Finally, the implications of these criteria for solar energy's penetration into these markets are discussed.

Gresham, J.B.; Kriz, T.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Computational Design and Scale Computational Design and Synthesis of Protective Smart Coatings for Refractory Metal Alloys Background The goal of the University Coal Research (UCR) Program within the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to further the understanding of coal utilization. Since the program's inception in 1979, its primary objectives have been to (1) improve understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal so it can be used in an environmentally acceptable manner, (2) maintain and upgrade the coal research capabilities of and facilities at U.S. colleges and universities, and (3) support the education of students in the area of coal science. The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Coal and Power Systems supports

327

An assessment of the use of direct contact condensers with wet cooling systems for utility steam power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential use of a direct contact condenser for steam recovery at the turbine exhaust of a utility power plant using a wet cooling system is investigated. To maintain condensate separate from the cooling water, a bank of plate heat exchangers is used. In a case study for a nominal 130-MW steam power plant, two heat rejection systems, one using a conventional surface condenser and another using a direct contact condenser together with a set of plate heat exchangers are compared on the basis of their performance, operation and maintenance, and system economics. Despite a higher initial cost for the direct contact system, the advantages it offers suggests that this system is viable both technically and economically. Key to the improvements the direct contact system offers is a higher equivalent availability for the power system. Reduction of dissolved oxygen and other metallic ions in the condensate, reduced use of chemical scavengers and polishers, and potential elimination of a plant floor are also major benefits of this system. Drawbacks include added plant components and higher initial cost. The potential for long-term cost reduction for the direct contact system is also identified.

Bharathan, D.; Hoo, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); D`Errico, P. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Analysis of an improved solar-powered cooling system utilizing open-cycle absorbent regeneration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar-powered cooling system which promises high system C.O.P.'s and low collector costs is analyzed. It consists of a desiccant and an absorption cooling system operating in series to both dry and cool the air. A common solution of lithium chloride is used as the absorbant. The lithium chloride solution is regenerated by evaporating the excess water to the atmosphere in an ''open'' collector. This collector consists merely of a blackened flat surface. The weak solution of lithium chloride is introduced at the top of the collector and then flows by gravity over the entire collector surface where it is subsequently heated and dried. The daily performance of this combined system is compared by computer simulation to that of either an absorption or desiccant system alone using actual weather data for five typical U.S. cities. The performance improvement of the combined system ranged from 25% to 95%, the greatest improvement being for humid, windy conditions.

Collier, R.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Camera cleaning study for Automatic Milking System utilizing steam at DeLaval International AB.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The VMS is a robot milking system of DeLaval International AB. It has been observed that a layer of residue remains on the camera (more)

Jongschaap, Tiemen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Demonstration of a utility industry horizontal drilling system: Horizontal well AMH-5 installation report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of VOCs in soils and groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989. The overall goal of the program is demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program. Directional drilling has been shown to be a successful technique for enhancing access to the subsurface, thus improving remediation systems, especially remediation systems which perform in situ. Demonstration of an innovative directional drilling system at the Integrated Demonstration Site at the SRS, was initiated in June of 1992. The directional drilling system was designed to install an in situ remediation system. The drilling system is an experimental compaction/dry drilling technique developed by Charles Machine Works (Ditch Witch{reg_sign}) of Perry, Oklahoma. A horizontal well was installed in the M Area of the SRS below and parallel to an abandoned tile process sewer line. The installation of the horizontal well was a two-part process. Part one consisted of drilling the borehole, and part two was the horizontal well completion.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Natural Gas",6,244.7,210.5  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TYPE_OF_PRODUCER","STATE_CODE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY TYPE_OF_PRODUCER","STATE_CODE","FUEL_SOURCE","GENERATORS","NAMEPLATE_CAPACITY (Megawatts)","SUMMER_CAPACITY (Megawatts)" 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Natural Gas",6,244.7,210.5 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Petroleum",4,4.8,4.8 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","Wind",1,24.6,24 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AK","All Sources",11,274.1,239.3 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AR","Coal",1,755,600 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AR","Natural Gas",1,22,20 2012,"Total Electric Power Industry","AR","All Sources",2,777,620

332

City of Seward, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seward, Alaska (Utility Company) Seward, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Seward City of Place Alaska Utility Id 16955 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General Service Industrial Residential Residential Small General Service Commercial Street Lights Lighting Yard Lights 175 watts Lighting Yard Lights 250 watts Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1720/kWh Commercial: $0.1840/kWh

333

City of Wrangell, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wrangell, Alaska (Utility Company) Wrangell, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Wrangell Place Alaska Utility Id 21015 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electrical Rate Incentive Commercial Industrial Industrial Large commercial Commercial Metered Heat and Hot Water Industrial Industrial Metered Heat and Hot Water Large Commercial Commercial Metered Heat and Hot Water Residential Residential Metered Heat and Hot Water Small Commercial Commercial

334

City & Borough of Sitka (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City & Borough of Sitka (Utility Company) City & Borough of Sitka (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Sitka City & Borough of Place Alaska Utility Id 17271 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Boat Service Commercial General Service Industrial Interruptible Service - Large Customer Commercial Residential Residential Street and Security Light Service 100 Watt Lighting Street and Security Light Service 1000 Watt Lighting Street and Security Light Service 150 Watt Lighting

335

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public paper: Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System, dated September 13, 2007. The Grant done a very thorough job of assessing the current and future carbon dioxide footprints of the Northwest

336

Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary. Semi-annual progress report, June 18, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

During the period 18 June 1979 through December 1979, a solar assisted heat pump system was designed, installed and operated in the University of Toledo Experimental Solar House. The heat pump system is capable of operating in a wide range of temperatures which is needed in a solar house utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. The complete system consists of 584.1 square feet of Libbey-Owens-Ford's flat plate solar collectors, a 5 horsepower compressor (Victaulic Corp.), an evaporator (Dunham-Bush), a condensor (Dunham-Bush), thermal storage units, and associated equipment. During the installation and initial operation of the system, numerous aspects of the feasibility of this system design have been evaluated. Many of these aspects point to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility.

Eltimsahy, A.H.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Bethel Utilities Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Corp Utilities Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Bethel Utilities Corp Place Alaska Utility Id 1651 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png SINGLE PHASE Commercial THREE PHASE Commercial WHOLESALE Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.4550/kWh Commercial: $0.4350/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Bethel Utilities Corp (Alaska). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

338

Reedy Creek Utilities, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, solar energy system performance evaluation, December 1979-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Reedy Creek solar system operated moderately well during the December 1979 through March 1980 heating season. The overall performance of the system was below estimated design performance but the solar system still supplied 47% of the building conditioning loads. The thermal performance is summarized. The system failed to reach design performance levels in the cooling subsystem. Since the cooling load of 40.24 million Btu was nearly three times larger than the space heating and domestic hot water loads of 14.44 million Btu, the overall system performance was significantly reduced. Although collected solar energy exceeds the system load in most months, the solar fraction is necessarily less than 100% due to the normal operating inefficiencies of pumps, heat exchanger, and particularly the absorption chiller. At Reedy Creek, excessive storage losses, presumably due to high storage temperatures, further degrade system performance. Collector array efficiency based on the total incident solar radiation was 11%. This was significantly lower than the 14% collector array efficiency for the 1979 heating season.

Logee, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Utilizing Load Response for Wind and Solar Integration and Power System Reliability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Responsive load is still the most underutilized reliability resource in North America. This paper examines the characteristics of concern to the power system, the renewables, and to the loads.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Utilization of emergent aquatic plants for biomass-energy-systems development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review was conducted of the available literature pertaining to the following aspects of emergent aquatic biomass: identification of prospective emergent plant species for management; evaluation of prospects for genetic manipulation; evaluation of biological and environmental tolerances; examination of current production technologies; determination of availability of seeds and/or other propagules, and projections for probable end-uses and products. Species identified as potential candidates for production in biomass systems include Arundo donax, Cyperus papyrus, Phragmites communis, Saccharum spontaneum, Spartina alterniflora, and Typha latifolia. If these species are to be viable candidates in biomass systems, a number of research areas must be further investigated. Points such as development of baseline yield data for managed systems, harvesting conceptualization, genetic (crop) improvement, and identification of secondary plant products require refinement. However, the potential pay-off for developing emergent aquatic systems will be significant if development is successful.

Kresovich, S.; Wagner, C.K.; Scantland, D.A.; Groet, S.S.; Lawhon, W.T.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Technology selection and architecture optimization of in-situ resource utilization systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses an approach to exploring the conceptual design space of large-scale, complex electromechanical systems that are technologically immature. A modeling framework that addresses the fluctuating architectural ...

Chepko, Ariane (Ariane Brooke)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Predicting and Optimizing System Utilization and Performance via Statistical Machine Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dhruba Borthakur of Facebook and Matei Zaharia of RADLabefforts to enable access to Facebooks production Hadoop jobSystems, Cloudera, eBay, Facebook, Fujitsu, Hewlett-Packard,

Ganapathi, Archana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OTH_REV (Thousand $)","OTH_SALES (MWh)","OTH_CONS","TOT_REV (Thousand $)","TOT_SALES (MWh)","TOT_CONS" OTH_REV (Thousand $)","OTH_SALES (MWh)","OTH_CONS","TOT_REV (Thousand $)","TOT_SALES (MWh)","TOT_CONS" 0,"State Level Adjustment","AK","2007R",1,5766,24179,0,7398,30009,0,1385.504,7829.663,0,,,0,14549.504,62017.663,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","2007R",1,1479,14609,13602,981,11953,2118,390.496,5260.337,99,0,0,0,2850.496,31822.337,15819 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK","2007R",1,605,2282,4456,803,3397,2000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1408,5679,6456 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK","2007R",1,1488,16596,23880,5545,87869,6182,0,0,0,0,0,0,7033,104465,30062 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK","2007R",1,489,1180,1563,1171,2979,1121,0,0,0,0,0,0,1660,4159,2684

345

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10,1,6539.248,26227.516,0,8095.266,30902.977,0,1420.819,7702.417,0,0,0,0,16055.333,64832.91,0 10,1,6539.248,26227.516,0,8095.266,30902.977,0,1420.819,7702.417,0,0,0,0,16055.333,64832.91,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",2010,1,1535.941,15011.6,13783,980.665,11721.382,2156,987.54,11255.996,91,0,0,0,3504.146,37988.978,16030 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK",2010,1,668.02,2319.376,4592,921.903,3261.675,2099,0,0,0,0,0,0,1589.923,5581.051,6691 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK",2010,1,1759.777,15111.366,24014,7807.31,87008.534,6284,0,0,0,0,0,0,9567.087,102119.9,30298 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK",2010,1,468,1127,1643,1135,2893,1060,0,0,0,0,0,0,1603,4020,2703 3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","AK",2010,1,7333,57329,69482,5576,52475,8979,311,3086,5,0,0,0,13220,112890,78466

346

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,1,6253.499,25151.849,0,8208.937,31991.364,0,1543.228,7550.664,0,,,0,16005.664,64693.877,0 8,1,6253.499,25151.849,0,8208.937,31991.364,0,1543.228,7550.664,0,,,0,16005.664,64693.877,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",2008,1,2015.937,14801.591,13678,1251.812,10568.181,2133,586.169,5267.906,104,0,0,0,3853.918,30637.678,15915 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK",2008,1,671,2365,4469,920,3569,2025,0,0,0,0,0,0,1591,5934,6494 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK",2008,1,1651.456,16935.599,23989,6541.271,93233.067,6236,0,0,0,0,0,0,8192.727,110168.666,30225 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK",2008,1,487,1211,1569,1098,2861,1141,0,0,0,0,0,0,1585,4072,2710 3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","AK",2008,1,7922,60443,69877,5884,54753,8839,290,3241,6,0,0,0,14096,118437,78722

347

UTILITY_ID","UTILNAME","STATE_CODE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_S  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9,1,6604.695,26567.861,0,8336.99,32882.18,0,1345.301,7416.849,0,0,0,0,16286.986,66865.89,0 9,1,6604.695,26567.861,0,8336.99,32882.18,0,1345.301,7416.849,0,0,0,0,16286.986,66865.89,0 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",2009,1,3587,16219,13713,2198,10943,2143,1053,5362,91,0,0,0,6838,32524,15947 219,"Alaska Power Co","AK",2009,1,676.033,2544.992,4478,879.743,3565.976,2065,0,0,0,0,0,0,1555.776,6110.968,6543 599,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","AK",2009,1,1829.997,17165.04,23948,7297.496,90566.855,6262,0,0,0,0,0,0,9127.493,107731.895,30210 1651,"Bethel Utilities Corp","AK",2009,1,597,1111,1622,1377,2655,1074,0,0,0,0,0,0,1974,3766,2696 3522,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","AK",2009,1,9619,63056,69308,7256,55227,8987,340,2916,6,0,0,0,17215,121199,78301

348

Best Practices Guidebook for Integration of Distributed Energy Resources Into Utility System Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DTE Energy's real-world experience in applying Distributed Energy Resources (DER) has yielded a number of important lessons, explained in greater detail in this guidebook. The guidebook is designed to help distribution organizations 1) evaluate DER as a potential solution to distribution system capacity shortfalls and 2) implement cost-effective DER installations that enhance system reliability and improve customer service. Following are key points of the lessons learned: Real management support is essen...

2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage performance on the Bonneville Power Administration utility transmission system*  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western U.S. Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. The unit can follow a sinusoidal power demand signal with an amplitude of up to 8.6 MW with the converter working in a 12 pulse mode. When the converter operates in the constant VAR mode, a time varying real power demand signal of up to 5 MW can be met. Experiments showed that the Pacific AC Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. In this mode, the energy of the power spectrum is not concentrated at one frequency to avoid exciting a resonance frequency of the ac transmission system. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined. Accurate power system data are necessary for tuning the control algorithm so that the SMES unit can operate in the closed loop stabilizer mode.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the early 90's GE recognized the need to introduce new technology to follow on to the ''F'' technology the Company introduced in 1988. By working with industry and DOE, GE helped shape the ATS program goal of demonstrating a gas turbine, combined-cycle system using natural gas as the primary fuel that achieves the following targets: system efficiency exceeding 60% lower heating value basis; environmental superiority under full-load operating conditions without the use of post-combustion emissions controls, environmental superiority includes limiting NO{sub 2} to less than 10 parts per mission by volume (dry basis) at 15% oxygen; busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems meeting the same environmental requirements; fuel-flexible designs operating on natural gas but also capable of being adapted to operate on coal-based, distillate, or biomass fuels; reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to modern advanced power generation systems; and commercial systems that could enter the market in the year 2000.

Unknown

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R)  

SciTech Connect

In the early 90's GE recognized the need to introduce new technology to follow on to the ''F'' technology the Company introduced in 1988. By working with industry and DOE, GE helped shape the ATS program goal of demonstrating a gas turbine, combined-cycle system using natural gas as the primary fuel that achieves the following targets: system efficiency exceeding 60% lower heating value basis; environmental superiority under full-load operating conditions without the use of post-combustion emissions controls, environmental superiority includes limiting NO{sub 2} to less than 10 parts per mission by volume (dry basis) at 15% oxygen; busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems meeting the same environmental requirements; fuel-flexible designs operating on natural gas but also capable of being adapted to operate on coal-based, distillate, or biomass fuels; reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to modern advanced power generation systems; and commercial systems that could enter the market in the year 2000.

Unknown

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

30-MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system for electric utility transmission stabilization  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system has been built to damp power oscillations on the Western U.S. Power System, particularly on the Pacific AC Intertie that is used to transmit power from the Northwest to southern California. The 30-MJ superconducting inductor that stores energy for this purpose is contained in a nonconducting dewar and is supported by a helium refrigerator and a gas-handling system mounted on trailers. Energy flows in and out of the inductor at frequencies from 0.1 to 1.0 Hz with power amplitudes up to 11 MW. The principal oscillation to be damped has a characteristic frequency of 0.35 Hz. The superconducting coil maximum current is 5 kA with terminal voltages up to 2.2 kV. The coil interfaces with the Bonneville Power Administration 13.8-kV bus at the Tacoma Substation through a converter and transformers. The system can be operated with the converter either in parallel-bridge mode or for constant VAR control with the bridges in buck-boost mode. The program for the design, fabrication, installation, and the preliminary experimental operation of the system is reviewed.

Rogers, J.D.; Hauer, J.F.; Miller, B.L.; Schermer, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Solar power system utilizing optical fibers each fiber fed by a respective lens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mosaic of lenses is oriented to face the sun. Each lens focuses a solar image upon the open end of a respective optical fiber. The several fibers converge to form a bundle. The bundle passes to a receiver generally inside a building. The radiation delivered by the bundle may be used for cooking, lighting, operation of a thermodynamic engine, or other similar application. In the preferred system the lens mosaic is a plastic sheet into which lenses have been molded. In a first auxiliary system the lens mosaic is formed on the front surface of a transparent plate. Solar images are formed on the rear surface. Optical fibers are attached where these solar images are formed. This eliminates two reflecting surfaces, thereby increasing efficiency by 19%. In a second auxiliary system mass of the plate is reduced by using truncated cones to transmit the radiation to the solar image positions.

Whitaker, R.O.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Effects of voltage control in utility interactive dispersed storage and generation systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When a small generator is connected to the distribution system, the voltage at the point of interconnection is determined largely by the system and not the generator. This report examines the effect on the generator, on the load voltage and on the distribution system of a number of different voltage control strategies in the generator. Synchronous generators with three kinds of exciter control are considered, as well as induction generators and dc/ac inverters, with and without capacitor compensation. The effect of varying input power during operation (which may be experienced by generators based on renewable resources) is explored, as well as the effect of connecting and disconnecting the generator at ten percent of its rated power.

Kirkham, H.; Das, R.

1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Utility water system with a pressureless storage container, particularly for solar installations  

SciTech Connect

A warm water storage system for supplying warm water to a network with water under pressure characterized in that the storage is pressureless and takes place in a ventilated container, and that between the take-off region of the container and the warm water supply network is incorporated a booster pump.

Laing, K.; Laing, N.; Laing, O.; Ludin, L.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Flexible DER Utility Interface System: Final Report, September 2004--May 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to accelerate deployment of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) such as wind, solar, and conventional backup generators to our nation's electrical grid, Northern Power Systems (NPS), the California Energy Commission (CEC), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collaborated to create a prototype universal interconnect device called the DER Switch.

Lynch, J.; John, V.; Danial, S. M.; Benedict, E.; Vihinen, I.; Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray.RTM. (RGX.RTM.) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Kross, Brian J. (Yorktown, VA); Zorn, Carl J. (Yorktown, VA); Majewski, Lukasz A. (Grafton, VA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray{trademark} (RGX{trademark}) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging. 5 figs.

Majewski, S.; Kross, B.J.; Zorn, C.J.; Majewski, L.A.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

Service and Utility Oriented Distributed Computing Systems: Challenges and Opportunities for Modeling and Simulation Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Modeling and Simulation Communities Rajkumar Buyya and Anthony Sulistio Grid Computing and Distributed- oriented computing systems such as Data Centers and Grids. We present various case studies on the use by the electrical power grid's pervasiveness and reliability, began exploring the design and development of a new

Buyya, Rajkumar

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

None

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Shoreline monitoring program on the Upper Texas Coast utilizing a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to shoreline erosion, approximately seventeen miles of Texas State Highway 87, located in Jefferson County Texas, have been repeatedly destroyed by storms and rebuilt. This thesis describes a shoreline monitoring program developed to obtain a comprehensive data set that will be used to define the coastal erosion problem and assist in the reconstruction of the roadway. An improved survey system similar to a concept developed by Beach et al. (1996) was designed and constructed for this project. This thesis discusses the improved survey system design and testing. The nearshore system utilizes a Real-Time Kinematic Differential Global Positioning System (RTK-DGPS) mounted on a personal watercraft and integrated with a survey quality echo sounder. The nearshore system was tested by repeating transects in the nearshore. The repeatability of the profiles demonstrated a standard deviation of 6.2 cm from the mean absolute difference of 8.0 cm. The beach survey utilizes RTK-DGPS equipment carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The maximum expected error for the beach survey is approximately []4 cm. The system is an accurate, mobile and efficient method to obtain beach profiles. Additional accuracy may be obtained by integrating a motion sensor and CTD profiler. The survey data are processed using commercially available software packages and programs developed for this project. The processed data is integrated and stored in a geographic information system (GIS). The data collected exemplify morphological features indicative of erosion due to overwash. This is consistent with visual observations and numerical model results provided by Howard (1999). The shoreline movement since 1996 is consistent with historical data and is related to storm events. The current research has provided a survey system capable of performing fast, accurate surveys in the nearshore and a baseline data set. The survey system is fully operational and will be instrumental in the ongoing research related to the Highway 87 reconstruction project. The baseline data set, together with sediment analyses data and water level predictions, provides the foundation from which further investigations will be conducted and will provide information that can be used for the design of the new highway.

Wamsley, Ty V

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reference design of 100 MW-h lithium/iron sulfide battery system for utility load leveling  

SciTech Connect

The first year in a two-year cooperative effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Rockwell International to develop a conceptual design of a lithium alloy/iron sulfide battery for utility load leveling is presented. A conceptual design was developed for a 100 MW-h battery system based upon a parallel-series arrangement of 2.5 kW-h capacity cells. The sales price of such a battery system was estimated to be very high, $80.25/kW-h, exclusive of the cost of the individual cells, the dc-to-ac converters, site preparation, or land acquisition costs. Consequently, the second year's efforts were directed towards developing modified designs with significantly lower potential costs.

Zivi, S.M.; Kacinskas, H.; Pollack, I.; Chilenskas, A.A.; Barney, D.L.; Grieve, W.; McFarland, B.L.; Sudar, S.; Goldstein, E.; Adler, E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Operational, cost, and technical study of large windpower systems integrated with an existing electric utility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed wind energy assessment from the available wind records, and evaluation of the application of wind energy systems to an existing electric utility were performed in an area known as the Texas Panhandle, on the Great Plains. The study area includes parts of Texas, eastern New Mexico, the Oklahoma Panhandle and southern Kansas. The region is shown to have uniformly distributed winds of relatively high velocity, with average wind power density of 0.53 kW/m/sup 2/ at 30 m height at Amarillo, Texas, a representative location. The annual period of calm is extremely low. Three separate compressed air storage systems with good potential were analyzed in detail, and two potential pumped-hydro facilities were identified and given preliminary consideration. Aquifer storage of compressed air is a promising possibility in the region.

Ligon, C.; Kirby, G.; Jordan, D.; Lawrence, J.H.; Wiesner, W.; Kosovec, A.; Swanson, R.K.; Smith, R.T.; Johnson, C.C.; Hodson, H.O.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young Unit 2 and TXU Monticello Unit 3. The work involves establishing Hg oxidation levels upstream of air pollution control devices (APCDs) and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with those removal rates, investigating the possibility of the APCD acting as a multipollutant control device, quantifying the balance of plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization.

Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

In situ conversion process systems utilizing wellbores in at least two regions of a formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of elongated heaters located in a plurality of openings in the formation. At least two of the heaters are substantially parallel to each other for at least a portion of the lengths of the heaters. At least two of the heaters have first end portions in a first region of the formation and second end portions in a second region of the formation. A source of time-varying current is configured to apply time-varying current to at least two of the heaters. The first end portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them. The second portions of at least two heaters are configured to have substantially the same voltage applied to them.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

367

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Direct contact low emission steam generating system and method utilizing a compact, multi-fuel burner  

SciTech Connect

A high output, high pressure direct contact steam generator for producing high quality steam particularly suited for use with low grade, low cost fuel. When used in a system incorporating heat recovery and conversion of carryover water enthalpy into shaft horsepower, the unit disclosed provides high quality, high pressure steam for ''steam drive'' or thermal stimulation of petroleum wells through injection of high pressure steam and combustion gas mixtures. A particular feature of the burner/system disclosed provides compression of a burner oxidant such as atmospheric air, and shaft horesepower for pumping high pressure feedwater, from a lowest cost energy source such as leased crude, or other locally available fuel.

Eisenhawer, S.; Donaldson, A. B.; Fox, R. L.; Mulac, A. J.

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fuel cell and system for supplying electrolyte thereto utilizing cascade feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte distribution supply system for use with a fuel cell having a wicking medium for drawing electrolyte therein is formed by a set of containers of electrolyte joined to respective fuel cells or groups thereof in a stack of such cells. The electrolyte is separately stored so as to provide for electrical isolation between electrolytes of the individual cells or groups of cells of the stack. Individual storage compartments are coupled by individual tubes, the ends of the respective tubes terminating on the wicking medium in each of the respective fuel cells. The individual compartments are filled with electrolyte by allowing the compartments to overflow such as in a cascading fashion thereby maintaining the requisite depth of electrolyte in each of the storage compartments. The individual compartments can also contain packed carbon fibers to provide a three stage electrolyte distribution system.

Feigenbaum, Haim (Highland Park, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Utility-Side Voltage and PQ Control with Inverter-based Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Distributed energy resources (DER) are small generators located close to the load centers. The DERs that are integrated to the grid with the power electronic converter interfaces are capable of providing nonactive power in addition to active power. Hence, they are capable of regulating the voltages of the weak buses in the distribution systems. This paper discusses the voltage control capability of photovoltaic (PV) systems as compared to the traditional capacitor banks. The simulation results prove the effectiveness of dynamic voltage control capability of inverter-based PV. With the proper control algorithm, the active and nonactive power from the DERs like battery banks or solar photovoltaic can be controlled independently. This paper also presents the scenario of controlling the active and nonactive power from the PV array to track and supply the local load.

Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL; Barker, Thomas J. [Southern California Edison RTTC; Hite, Ronald [Southern California Edison RTTC

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technology Assessment and Application Guide for the Utility Systems Technologies Voltage Sag Fighter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage sag, a disturbance in a power system defined as a decrease in root mean square (RMS) voltage magnitude lasting from 0.5 to 30 cycles, has been identified as the most prevalent power disturbance experienced by industrial customers. The higher frequency of voltage sages makes them inherently more costly than interruptions since fault-induced, short-duration voltage variations can result in costly loss of production, damaged materials, repair and cleaning of equipment, and lost business opportunitie...

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

372

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This scope document defines the work scope for accomplishing the design of the GE MS7001H and MS9001H (7H and 9H) combined-cycle power systems under the original ATS Phase 3 DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-95MC31176, and incorporates changes in scope required to convert Phase 3 to the ''restructured'' Phase 3R as defined in Amendment A012 to the Cooperative Agreement.

Unknown

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

373

Monetizing the Geospatial Information System (GIS): The Value of GIS Data Quality for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The smart grid is dramatically changing the way we deliver electrical energy. What has historically been a uni-directional flow of energy from generation to customer is now increasingly paralleled with a bi-directional communication network to optimize the use and flow of electricity. However, the intelligence of the smart grid relies critically on geospatial data to represent and track the locations of numerous devices within the connectivity model of the distribution system. A GIS (Geospatial ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Autonomous aerial refueling of UAVS utilizing a vision based navigation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major technological obstacle to be overcome for practical and reliable autonomous probe-and-drogue aerial refueling is obtaining accurate relative position and attitude measurements during the docking phase. An integrated controller-sensor-navigation system for this task must be robust and possess good disturbance rejection properties. Previous attempts to solve this problem have used video servoing with pattern recognition algorithms and the differential Global Positioning System. This thesis seeks to determine the feasibility of autonomous aerial refueling by developing a robust docking controller and integrating it with the relative position and attitude measurements from a novel Vision-based Navigation (VisNav) sensor. VisNav accurately determines the line of sight vector between a positioning sensing diode and a target configured with multiple light emitting diode beacons. A study is conducted to determine the best number and placement of the beacons on the drogue and the best location to mount the sensor on an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV). Optimal Nonzero Set Point and optimal Command Generator Tracker controllers are developed and used to simulate six degree-of-freedom docking maneuvers using dynamical system models of a UAV and a refueling drogue. Test cases for stationary and moving drogues in atmospheric turbulence are evaluated in terms of docking position errors, control effort, control rate, and quadratic cost. Simulation results demonstrate that a Proportional Integral Filter Command Generator Tracker controller, coupled with the VisNav sensor and navigation system, provides a viable candidate solution to the autonomous aerial refueling problem. The beacon lights can be placed in the location of lights currently on the drogue, and the sensor can be placed at the base of the refueling probe on the UAV.

Kimmett, Jennifer Jones

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

None

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q98.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

EVALUATION OF FLAT-PLATE PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL HYBRID SYSTEMS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic attractiveness of combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar energy collectors was evaluated. The study was limited to flat-plate collectors since concentrating photovoltaic collectors require active cooling and thus are inherently PV/T collectors, the only decision being whether to use the thermal energy or to dump it. it was also specified at the outset that reduction in required roof area was not to be used as an argument for combining the collection of thermal and electrical energy into one module. Three tests of economic viability were identified, all of which PV/T must pass if it is to be considered a promising alternative: PV/T must prove to be competitive with photovoltaic-only, thermal-only, and side-by-side photovoltaic-plus-thermal collectors and systems. These three tests were applied to systems using low-temperature (unglazed) collectors and to systems using medium-temperature (glazed) collectors in Los Angeles, New York, and Tampa. For photovoltaics, the 1986 DOE cost goals were assumed to have been realized, and for thermal energy collection two technologies were considered: a current technology based on metal and glass, and a future technology based on thin-film plastics. The study showed that for medium-temperature applications PV/T is not an attractive option in any of the locations studied. For low-temperature applications, PV/T appears to be marginally attractive.

ANDREWS,J.W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Methods of chemically converting first materials to second materials utilizing hybrid-plasma systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of chemically converting a first material to a second material. A first plasma and a second plasma are formed, and the first plasma is in fluid communication with the second plasma. The second plasma comprises activated hydrogen and oxygen, and is formed from a water vapor. A first material is flowed into the first plasma to at least partially ionize at least a portion of the first material. The at least partially ionized first material is flowed into the second plasma to react at least some components of the first material with at least one of the activated hydrogen and activated oxygen. Such converts at least some of the first material to a second material. In another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a synthetic gas by flowing a hydrocarbon-containing material into a hybrid-plasma system. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of degrading a hydrocarbon-containing material by flowing such material into a hybrid-plasma system. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of releasing an inorganic component of a complex comprising the inorganic component and an other component, wherein the complex is flowed through a hybrid-plasma system.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

RH-TRU Waste Inventory Characterization by AK and Proposed WIPP RH-TRU Waste Characterization Objectives  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) has developed draft documentation to present the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) remote-handled (RH-) transuranic (TRU) waste characterization program to its regulators, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department. Compliance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 191 and 194; the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (PL 102-579); and the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, as well as the Certificates of Compliance for the 72-B and 10-160B Casks, requires that specific waste parameter limits be imposed on DOE sites disposing of TRU waste at WIPP. The DOE-CBFO must control the sites' compliance with the limits by specifying allowable characterization methods. As with the established WIPP contact handled TRU waste characterization program, the DOE-CBFO has proposed a Remote-Handled TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria (RH-WAC) document consolidating the requirements from various regulatory drivers and proposed allowable characterization methods. These criteria are consistent with the recommendation of a recent National Academy Sciences/National Research Council to develop an RH-TRU waste characterization approach that removes current self imposed requirements that lack a legal or safety basis. As proposed in the draft RH-WAC and other preliminary documents, the DOE-CBFO RH-TRU waste characterization program proposes the use of acceptable knowledge (AK) as the primary method for obtaining required characterization information. The use of AK involves applying knowledge of the waste in light of the materials or processes used to generate the waste. Documentation, records, or processes providing information about various attributes of a waste stream, such as chemical, physical, and radiological properties, may be used as AK and may be applied to individual waste containers either independently or in conjunction with radiography, visual examination, assay, and other sampling and analytical data. RH-TRU waste cannot be shipped to WIPP on the basis of AK alone if documentation demonstrating that all of the prescribed limits in the RH-WAC are met is not available, discrepancies exist among AK source documents describing the same waste stream and the most conservative assumptions regarding those documents indicates that a limit will not be met, or all required data are not available for a given waste stream.

Most, W. A.; Kehrman, R.; Gist, C.; Biedscheid, J.; Devarakonda, J.; Whitworth, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

382

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels be used annually by 2022, which allows continued

384

A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metering and communication gateway technology enables utilities and service companies to use residential and commercial customer data to enhance servicedata communications, master computer, and metering systems for each ancillary service

Weller, G.H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Elec Coop, Inc & Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc Place Alaska Utility Id 1276 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Primary Metering ASNA/PHS Commercial Primary Metering USAF/DEW Site Commercial Primary Metering NSB Gas Fields Commercial Primary Metering NSBSD, C/O Annex Commercial Primary Metering UIC/NARL Commercial

386

City of Petersburg, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petersburg Petersburg Place Alaska Utility Id 14856 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Harbor Residential Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1000/kWh Commercial: $0.1160/kWh Industrial: $0.1060/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Petersburg,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410106" Categories:

387

IMPROVEMENTS IN HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) PROGRAM UTILIZING SYSTEMS MODELING AND ANALYSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Real-Time Radiography, Non-Destructive Assay, and Head Space Gas Sampling), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates.

UYTIOCO EM

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Integrated Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine System for Increased Utilization of Gaseous Opportunity Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The project is addressing barriers to or opportunities for increasing distributed generation (DG)/combined heat and power (CHP) use in industrial applications using renewable/opportunity fuels. This project brings together novel gas quality sensor (GQS) technology with engine management for opportunity fuels such as landfill gas, digester gas and coal bed methane. By providing the capability for near real-time monitoring of the composition of these opportunity fuels, the GQS output can be used to improve the performance, increase efficiency, raise system reliability, and provide improved project economics and reduced emissions for engines used in distributed generation and combined heat and power.

Pratapas, John; Zelepouga, Serguei; Gnatenko, Vitaliy; Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas; Li, Hailin; Getz, Timothy; Mather, Daniel

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 4. Driller's logs, stratigraphic cross section and utility routines  

SciTech Connect

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for use by the hydrologic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the fourth of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Diagnostic Systems and Resources utilization of the ATLAS High Level Trigger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the LHC started colliding protons in December 2009, the ATLAS trigger has operated very successfully with a collision rate which has increased by several orders of magnitude. The trigger monitoring and data quality infrastructure was essential to this success. We describe the software tools used to monitor the trigger system performance and assess the overall quality of the trigger selection during collisions running. ATLAS has broad physics goals which require a large number of different active triggers due to complex event topology, requiring quite sophisticated software structures and concepts. The trigger of the ATLAS experiment is built as a three level system. The first level is realized in hardware while the high level triggers (HLT) are software based and run on large PC farms. The trigger reduces the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz, at design, to an average event rate of about 200 Hz for storage. Since the ATLAS detector is a general purpose detector, the trigger must be sensitive to a large numb...

zur Nedden, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Ospanov, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Multispectral polarimetric sensor for glucose monitoring utilizing a digital closed-loop control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of many medical disorders, such as diabetes hics. and other hormonal or metabolic imbalances, requires accurate blood analysis. Conventionally, blood is analyzed by withdrawing a sample from the body of the subject. One of the major disadvantages of conventional methods is the invasive nature of the tests that raise the risk of patient infection and discomfort. The polarimetric approach is currently being researched to determine glucose levels in the body non-invasively. Polarized light experiences a change in its plane of rotation that is proportional to the concentration of the sample when passed through an optically choral sample such as glucose. A multi-wavelength, multi-beam polarimetric device has been designed and implemented. The potential site for in-vivo measurements is the aqueous humor of the eye, which shows glucose concentrations proportional to the concentrations in the blood. The purpose of this dual wavelength device is to provide the means for overcoming two important problems with in-vivo glucose monitoring, namely, motion artifacts and the presence of other optically active substances at the test site. The device was tested in-vitro for accuracy and sensitivity. It predicted glucose to within an average standard deviation of 9.88mg/d1 for 670nm wavelength and 7.61mg/dl for the 820nm wavelength for the hyperglycemic ranges of 0-600mg/dl of glucose doped water. Improved results were obtained for glucose predictions in the hypoglycemic range of 0-100mg/dl of glucose. Glucose was predicted to within a standard deviation of 9.57mg/d1 for the 67013m wavelength and 5.35mg/dl for the 820nm wavelength. The system was also able to extract glucose information to within an average standard deviation of 24.41mg/dl from a solution of albumin and glucose, albumin being the other choral substance used in this study. Motion artifact studies indicated a clear trend of the two wavelengths in tracking each other, which potentially could be used to allow for glucose measurements in the presence of motion artifacts. The novelty of the system was its simultaneous dual wavelength approach and a fast feedback control system implemented in Labview. Overall, the results are satisfactory and show considerable being developed as an important approach to glucose potential in this technique sensing.

Gorde, Harshal Wasudeo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Wham, Robert M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Control System Design for Effective Energy Utilization...A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the activities and results of a typical plant powerhouse energy management survey. The powerhouse provides electrical energy, steam supply at two different pressure levels, and compressed air for the process plant. The owners had already performed energy loss surveys and implemented maintenance and energy management programs. The activities described include a follow-up survey and a concentration on the improvement of the boiler operations and efficiencies. The Input-Output and Heat Loss methods of determining boiler efficiency, in accordance with ANSI & ASME PTC4.1, are explained. A comparison of the methods, including a sensitivity analysis, shows the effects of measurement inaccuracies on each. Each boiler is studied and the required measurements identified and described. The importance of flue gas oxygen measurements is described along with the variations in readings obtained using dry or wet basis measurements. The existing operating efficiency of each boiler is determined and the effects of improved controls identified. The considerations for Security, Reliability, Maintainability, and Efficiency Improvement required by any control system are described. A control strategy is selected and hardware chosen to implement the improved boiler and overall steam generation performance. Focus is shifted from the single boiler problem to the requirements for optimal loading of each boiler to meet total system load requirements. The economics of multiple boiler loading is discussed with the introduction of the Cost Function. This permits direct comparison of boilers even when using different fuels of varying costs. Provisions are included for operator limits of each boiler. These limits are required to permit identification of maximum boiler steaming rates or to provide hot standby (spinning) reserves. Minimum limitations on boiler loading such as burner turn-down are also recognized. In addition, the amount of boiler bias or offset can be limited on a per boiler basis. Lastly. a comparison is made between the powerhouse operation initially, following installation of improved controls. and finally when optimal boiler loading is implemented.

Dziubakowski, D. J.; Keyes, M. A., IV

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of the computerized utilities energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Military Community at Goeppingen, Germany  

SciTech Connect

Under the provisions of an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is evaluating the Utilities and Energy Monitoring and Control System (UEMCS) installed at the US Military Community Activity at Goeppingen, Germany. This evaluation relies on examination of existing data and information to determine the effectiveness of the UEMCS. The Goeppingen UEMCS is an integral part of a combined UEMCS/district heating system which includes the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend, Germany. The system was installed during 1985 and 1986. The UEMCS at Goeppingen and Schwaebisch Gmuend are both well designed, implemented, and maintained. The UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend does not have a central computer, but requires only a dedicated phone line to couple with the one at Goeppingen. Though the conversion to district heat has produced the majority of energy savings, the UEMCS day/night setback program also contributes substantially, with additional savings from start/stop programs, such as seasonal switchover, and various temperature control programs. Further opportunities for savings exist in increasing monitoring and control of water usage and connecting the community`s electrical network to the UEMCS, permitting demand limiting and increased power factor control.

Purucker, S.L.; Gettings, M.B.

1991-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

AN ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON MEASUREMENTS IN KANSAS UTILIZING GRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIs) TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning January 1, 1987, the state of Kansas began collecting and recording data from residential radon tests. This data was collected based entirely upon voluntary home testing, performed by 1) the home owner (using a store-purchased radon test kit), 2) a professional radon testing laboratory or 3) by technicians from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) state laboratory. The majority of test results arc from tests conducted by homeowners. The radon database was analyzed using Arc Info 8.2. Three primary graphical information system (GIs) analyses were performed: 1) a comparison of the Kansas database to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)l Unites States Geographical Service (USGS) radon threat map for Kansas, 2) a data density analysis of statewide testing patterns and 3) an analysis of average radon values across clustered zip code districts in Sedgwick County, Shawnee County and the Kansas City metropolitan area (including Johnson, Wyandottc, Leavenworth and Douglas Counties). Comparison of the Kansas radon database to the EPAIUSGS threat asscssmcnt map showed similar but not identical trends. The data density analysis identified the zip code districts for which no test results had been collected and identified the areas of

Hanscn Brian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Utilization of melting techniques for borehole wall stabilization. [Applied to geothermal well production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program on the Subterrene concept based on excavation by melting has been completed. Theoretical and experimental studies were made for a broad range of applications. Most recently, a study of Subterrene deep geothermal well production systems predicted that, compared to rotary-drilled wells, significant cost savings are possible, e.g., 2 and 4 million dollars for 10-km-deep wells and geothermal gradients of 25 and 40 K/km, respectively. It was also concluded that for most wells the rate of penetration of the melting bits should be increased several times over that attained in the Subterrene tests. Subterrene melting penetration tests showed that borehole glass liners can be formed in a wide variety of materials and structural characterization tests showed that tuff glass cylinders can be many times stronger in compression than the parent material. Also, the tests showed that the rock-glass liner permeability decreases rapidly with confining pressure. New melting devices are conceivable that could line rotary-drilled boreholes with rock glass or other materials with resultant improvements in well costs. With emphasis on borehole liners, an overview of Subterrene program results, data on rock-glass liners, and suggestions on how molten materials might be applied to the borehole wall as part of a rotary drilling operation are presented.

Altseimer, J.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Durability of Turbine Components through Trenched Film Cooling and Contoured Endwalls-University of Texas at Austin Background Gas turbine operation utilizing coal-derived high hydrogen fuels (synthesis gas, or syngas) requires new cooling configurations for turbine components. The use of syngas is likely to lead to degraded cooling performance resulting from rougher surfaces and partial blockage of film cooling holes. In this project the University of Texas at Austin (UT) in cooperation with The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) will investigate the development of new film cooling and endwall cooling designs for maximum performance when subjected to high levels of contaminant depositions. This project was competitively selected under the University Turbine Systems Research

398

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

City of Saint Paul, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Paul Saint Paul Place Alaska Utility Id 17898 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png City Internal Rate Commercial Coast Guard rate Commercial Commercial Commercial Community Facilities Rate Commercial Institutional Rate Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.4710/kWh Commercial: $0.5330/kWh Industrial: $0.4900/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from

400

Alternative Minimum Levels for Utility Aqueous Discharges: Chemical Analytical Measurement Guide for National Pollutant Discharge El imination System (NPDES) Permits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act requires the electric utility industry to monitor their wastewater discharges to ensure compliance with discharge permit limits. EPRI developed a new definition of quantitation level appropriate to water quality compliance monitoring and used data from its previous studies on trace element analysis of utility wastewaters to calculate Alternative Minimum Levels (AMLs). The approach developed in this report will help utilities define reasonable pollutant discharge limits to meet effluen...

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

$18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations...

402

Guidebook for the Use of Synfuels in Electric Utility Combustion Systems, Volume 3: Liquid Fuels Derived From Shale and Tar Sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of liquid fuels derived from oil shales or tar sands differ substantially and in varying degrees from those of conventional petroleum fuels. Utilities will find data and procedures in this guidebook to help them evaluate the modifications those fuels would require in their systems.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A New Scheme on Robust Observer Based Control Design for Nonlinear Interconnected Systems with Application to an Industrial Utility Boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Application to an Industrial Utility Boiler Adarsha Swarnakar, Horacio Jose Marquez and Tongwen Chen Abstract. The controller design is evaluated on a natural circulation drum boiler, where the nonlinear model describes

Marquez, Horacio J.

404

Development of an Enterprise-wide Energy Information and Utility Monitoring System in a Major Hotel Chain: The Hyatt Hotels Corporation Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hyatt Hotels Corporation is currently implementing an enterprise-wide Energy Information and Utility Monitoring System (UMS). New Horizon Technologies and eComponents Technology have teamed to provide an integrated solution that will ultimately include all Hyatt Hotels in North America. In addition, these 120 Hyatt Hotels participate in a monthly web-based energy benchmarking and hotel engineering reporting system. For hotels with Utility Monitoring Systems (UMS) installed, energy and water consumption data is automatically summarized for the web reports. Hotels without the UMS enter monthly utility data manually on the website. The base UMS at the hotels consists of electric, gas and domestic water consumption and local temperature and relative humidity measurements. The Hyatt UMS is one of the first enterprise-wide systems to include domestic water metering. Many hotels elect to install additional sub-metering for major loads or end uses such as chillers, kitchens and laundries. The local hotel UMS consists of a data acquisition system capable of displaying real-time data that also logs 15-minute interval data. The system transfers interval data daily, to a data center and also transfers interval data hourly, via a Local Area Network, to an on-site workstation with a local database. The local workstation permits users to have real-time alarming capability, access to easy-touse data visualization and analysis tools, and the ability to generate both customized and standard daily and monthly reports. Report writing and utility costing software are used to generate daily and month-to-date cost reports. Bill estimation software uses actual utility rate tariff models to create estimates of utility costs for any custom defined period. Data resident in the Hyatt data center is accessible to the individual hotels using a web-based system. Senior engineers with authorization can access data for all Hyatt Hotels in their regions. The corporate energy director and senior management have access to all data in the Hyatt data center. Browser-based hotel benchmarking data is also available through a similar system with an authorization hierarchy. This paper will describe the design and implementation of the Hyatt UMS in detail, review how the system is currently being used by Hyatt personnel, discuss potential future applications and provide an initial look at UMS system-wide data, including a preliminary return on investment (ROI) analysis.

Burke, B.; McBride, J.; Kimble, K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

New indices of geomagnetic activity at test: Comparing the correlation of the analogue ak index with the digital Ah and IHV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New indices of geomagnetic activity at test: Comparing the correlation of the analogue ak index Abstract We test here two recently proposed indices of geomagnetic activity, the Ah index and the IHV index, which are based on digitally available hourly geomagnetic measurements. We study their correlation

Mursula, Kalevi

406

ORISE "AK RlDGE lNSTlT"TE FOR SCIENCE AND EDUCATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

t\i,;;; il.,. (' t\i,;;; il.,. (' . d ORISE "AK RlDGE lNSTlT"TE FOR SCIENCE AND EDUCATION August 1,200l Robert Atkin U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 SUBJECT: CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05000R22750 FINAL REPORT-VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE NEW BRUNSWICK LABORATORY SITE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY Dear Mr. Atkin: The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted verification surveys at the New Brunswick Laboratory Site, located in the town of New Brunswick, New Jersey, during the period of August through November 1996. A draft report detailing the procedures and results of the survey was submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy

407

A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

Weller, G.H.

2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of Utility System Impacts and Benefits of Optimally Dispatched Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid electric vehicles with the capability of being recharged from the grid may provide a significant decrease in oil consumption. These ''plug-in'' hybrids (PHEVs) will affect utility operations, adding additional electricity demand. Because many individual vehicles may be charged in the extended overnight period, and because the cost of wireless communication has decreased, there is a unique opportunity for utilities to directly control the charging of these vehicles at the precise times when normal electricity demand is at a minimum. This report evaluates the effects of optimal PHEV charging, under the assumption that utilities will indirectly or directly control when charging takes place, providing consumers with the absolute lowest cost of driving energy. By using low-cost off-peak electricity, PHEVs owners could purchase the drive energy equivalent to a gallon of gasoline for under 75 cents, assuming current national average residential electricity prices.

Denholm, P.; Short, W.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Evaluation of Utility System Impacts and Benefits of Optimally Dispatched Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles with the capability of being recharged from the grid may provide a significant decrease in oil consumption. These ''plug-in'' hybrids (PHEVs) will affect utility operations, adding additional electricity demand. Because many individual vehicles may be charged in the extended overnight period, and because the cost of wireless communication has decreased, there is a unique opportunity for utilities to directly control the charging of these vehicles at the precise times when normal electricity demand is at a minimum. This report evaluates the effects of optimal PHEV charging, under the assumption that utilities will indirectly or directly control when charging takes place, providing consumers with the absolute lowest cost of driving energy. By using low-cost off-peak electricity, PHEVs owners could purchase the drive energy equivalent to a gallon of gasoline for under 75 cents, assuming current national average residential electricity prices.

Denholm, P.; Short, W.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Technique to Utilize Smart Meter Load Information for Adapting Overcurrent Protection for Radial Distribution Systems with Distributed Generations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart radial distribution grids will include advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and significant distributed generators (DGs) connected close to loads. DGs in these radial distribution systems (RDS) introduce bidirectional power flows (BPFs) and contribute to fault current. These BPFs may cause unwanted tripping of existing overcurrent (OC) protection devices and result in permanent outages for a large number of customers. This thesis presents a protection approach that modified an existing overcurrent protection scheme to reduce the number of customers affected by faults in RDS with DGs. Further, a technique is presented that utilizes customers loading information from smart meters in AMI to improve the sensitivity of substation OC relays by adaptively changing the pickup settings. The modified protection approach involves predefining zones in RDS with DGs and installing directional OC relays and circuit breakers at the zonal boundaries. Zonal boundary relays determine faulted zones by sharing information on the direction of detected faults current using binary state signals over a communication medium. The technique to adapt the substation relay pickup settings uses the demand measurements from smart meters for two 12-hour intervals from the previous day to determine the maximum diversified demand at the relay?s location. The pickup settings of the substation relay for the two 12-hour intervals during the following day for the zone supplied by the substation are adaptively set based on the current that corresponds to the maximum diversified demand from the previous day. The techniques were validated through simulations in EMTP/PSCAD using an expanded IEEE 34 node radial test feeder that included DGs and a secondary distribution level. By decentralizing the control of the zonal boundary breakers, the single point of failure was eliminated in the modified protection approach. The cases studied showed that the modified protection approach allows for selective identification and isolation of the faulted zones. Also, the sensitivity of the substation OC relay was improved by at least 24% by using the pickup settings for the two 12-hour intervals from the smart meter demand measurements compared to the pickup settings computed using the conventional methodology based on the maximum loading of the zone.

Ituzaro, Fred Agyekum

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Risk Assessment Partnership National Risk Assessment Partnership The Need for Quantitative Risk Assessment for Carbon Utilization and Storage Carbon utilization and storage-the injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into permanent underground and terrestrial storage sites-is an important part of our nation's strategy for managing CO2 emissions. Several pilot- to intermediate-scale carbon storage projects have been performed in the U.S. and across the world. However, some hurdles still exist before carbon storage becomes a reality in the U.S. at a large scale. From a technical point of view, carbon storage risk analysis is complicated by the fact that all geologic storage sites are not created equally. Every potential site comes with an individual set of characteristics, including type of storage formation, mineral make-

412

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into the Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates primarily focused to improve the existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation site validate all software updates prior to release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

413

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates focused to improve existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation validate any software update prior to its release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

414

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern United States Carbon Southwestern United States Carbon Sequestration Training Center Background Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions emitted into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications will require a drastically expanded workforce trained in CCUS related disciplines, including geologists, engineers, scientists, and technicians. Training to enhance the existing CCUS workforce and to develop new professionals can be accomplished through focused educational initiatives in the CCUS technology area. Key educational topics include simulation and risk assessment; monitoring, verification,

415

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the South Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO 2 Storage Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Conventional

416

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Capture and Storage Training Carbon Capture and Storage Training Background Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions emitted into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications will require a drastically expanded workforce trained in CCUS related disciplines, including geologists, engineers, scientists, and technicians. Training to enhance the existing CCUS workforce and to develop new professionals can be accomplished through focused educational initiatives in the CCUS technology area. Key educational topics include simulation and risk assessment; monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA); geology-related

417

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility in an Underground Mine in the Keweenaw Basalts Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies is necessary in preparation for future commercial deployment. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCUS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training

418

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Development Phase Illinois Basin - Decatur Project Site Background The U.S. Department of Energy Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative consists of seven partnerships. The purpose of these partnerships is to determine the best regional approaches for permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Each RCSP includes stakeholders comprised of state and local agencies, private companies, electric utilities, universities, and nonprofit organizations. These partnerships are the core of a nationwide network helping to establish the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure needs for carbon storage. The partnerships include more than 400 distinct organizations, spanning 43 states

419

Solar-energy-system performance evaluation. Reedy Creek Utility District office building, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, September 1978-February, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Reedy Creek site is a two-story office building in Florida whose solar heating system provides space heating and domestic hot water and space cooling. The system consists of an array of parabolic trough collectors, an absorption chiller, a 10,000-gallon hot water tank and a 10,000-gallon cold water tank. The system and its operation are briefly described, and its performance is analyzed using a system energy balance technique. (LEW)

Smith, H.T.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Coal Utilization Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility systems ak" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Deregulating the electric utility industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many functions must be performed in any large electric power system. A specific proposal for a deregulated power system, based on a real-time spot energy marketplace, is presented and analyzed. A central T&D utility acts ...

Bohn, Roger E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Simulations of the Large Scale Simulations of the Mechanical Properties of Layered Transition Metal Ternary Compounds for FE Power Systems Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes the advancement of computational capabilities to develop materials for advanced fossil energy power systems. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Advanced Research (AR) Program is working to enable the next generation of Fossil Energy (FE) power systems. The goal of

423

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Transport Models with Reactive Transport Models with Geomechanics to Mitigate Risks of CO2 Utilization and Storage Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

425

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

29,759 29,759 PROJECT NUMBER FWP-2012.03.03 Task 3 Conversion and Fouling Background Coal and biomass gasification is an approach to cleaner power generation and other uses of these resources. Currently, the service life of gasifiers does not meet the performance needs of users. Gasifiers fail to achieve on-line availability of 85-95 percent in utility applications and 95 percent in applications such as chemical production. The inability to meet these goals has created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of advanced gasification technologies. Gasifier output is a hot gas mixture consisting primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), known as synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas cooler is one of the key components identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities

426

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Demonstration of CO2 Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Background Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial processes, among other sources, are linked to global climate change. Advancing development of technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for extended periods is of great importance. Advanced carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer significant potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating global climate change, while minimizing the economic impacts of the solution. Under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) program, the U.S. Department

427

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Siemens Energy Siemens Energy Background Siemens Energy, along with numerous partners, has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop hydrogen turbines for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Siemens Energy is expanding this program for industrial applications such as cement, chemical, steel, and aluminum plants, refineries, manufacturing facilities, etc., under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines for industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

428

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andrea Dunn Andrea Dunn Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7594 andrea.dunn@netl.doe.gov Marte Gutierrez Principal Investigator Colorado School of Mines 1600 Illinois Street Golden, CO 80401 303-273-3468 Fax: 303-273-3602 mgutierr@mines.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date 12/01/2009 End Date 5/31/2013 COST Total Project Value $297,505 DOE/Non-DOE Share $297,505 / $0 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS)

429

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing and Evaluation of Next Processing and Evaluation of Next Generation Oxygen Carrier Materials for Chemical Looping Combustion Background The Department of Energy (DOE) supports research towards the development of efficient and inexpensive CO 2 capture technologies for fossil fuel based power generation. The Department of Energy Crosscutting Research Program (CCR) serves as a bridge between basic and applied research. Projects supported by the Crosscutting Research Program conduct a range of pre-competitive research focused on opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality by research in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, and computational energy science. Within the CCR, the University Coal Research (UCR) Program sponsors

430

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rodosta Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Darin Damiani Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4398 darin.damiani@netl.doe.gov Vivak Malhotra Principal Investigator Southern Illinois University Neckers 483A Mailcode: 4401 Carbondale, IL 62901 618-453-2643 Fax: 618-453-1056 vmalhotra@physics.siu.edu PARTNERS None Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rock under Non-Equilibrium Conditions Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS)

431

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Electric General Electric Background GE Power & Water, along with GE Global Research Center, has an ongoing U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) program to develop gas turbine technology for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). GE is broadening this development effort, along with expanding applicability to industrial applications such as refineries and steel mills under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines with industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

432

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diode Laser Cladding of High Diode Laser Cladding of High Temperature Alloys Used in USC Coal- Fired Boilers Background The Advanced Research (AR) Materials Program addresses materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for advanced power generation and coal fuels technologies. Examples of these technologies include coal gasification, heat engines such as turbines, combustion systems, fuel cells, hydrogen production, and carbon capture

433

Making Biopower Work for Utilities: A Rationale for Near-Term Investment in Integrated Biomass Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the feasibility studies of six very different integrated biomass power systems suggests potentially large future payoffs from near-term R&D. At this time, when biomass crops are more expensive than fossil fuels, it is the corollary benefits or coproducts associated with biomass power production that make the economics of a system work.

1996-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of TBC Systems in Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems- University of Pittsburgh Background The conditions inside integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, such as high steam levels from hydrogen firing, high carbon dioxide steam mixtures in oxy- fired systems, and different types of contaminants, introduce complexities associated with thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability that are currently unresolved. In this work the University of Pittsburgh will team with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST) to deter- mine the degradation mechanisms of current state-of-the-art TBCs in environments consisting of deposits and gas mixtures that are representative of gas turbines using coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas).

435

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-up Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available CO2 capture and storage significantly reduces efficiency of the power cycle. The aim of the ACS program is to develop advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near zero emissions of other flue gas pollutants.

436

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Efficiency Molten Bed Oxy- Coal Combustion with Low Flue Gas Recirculation Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO 2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near

437

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO2 Capture Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while

438

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Oxy-fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor Development and Scale-up for New and Retrofit Coal-fired Power Plants Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy-combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to

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Electric utility transmission and distribution upgrade deferral benefits from modular electricity storage : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work documented in this report was undertaken as part of an ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Electricity Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study characterizes one especially attractive value proposition for modular electricity storage (MES): electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) upgrade deferral. The T&D deferral benefit is characterized in detail. Also presented is a generalized framework for estimating the benefit. Other important and complementary (to T&D deferral) elements of possible value propositions involving MES are also characterized.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Evaluation of unthrottled combustion system options for light duty applications with future syncrude derived fuels. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program examining the interaction between several fuel and light duty automotive engine combinations is detailed. Combustion systems addressed covered indirect and direct injection diesel and spark ignited stratified charge. Fuels primarily covered D2, naphtha and intermediate broadcut blends. Low ignition quality diesel fue