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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Electric utility system master plan  

SciTech Connect

This publication contains the electric utility system plan and guidelines for providing adequate electric power to the various facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in support of the mission of the Laboratory. The topics of the publication include general information on the current systems and their operation, a planning analysis for current and future growth in energy demand, proposed improvements and expansions required to meet long range site development and the site`s five-year plan.

Erickson, O.M.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program plan: FY 1994--FY 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is addressing needed improvements so that the full benefits of these systems can be realized. A key element of the Program is the quantification of the benefits of batteries used in utility applications. The analyses of the applications and benefits are ongoing, but preliminary results indicate that the widespread introduction of battery storage by utilities could benefit the US economy by more than $26 billion by 2010 and create thousands of new jobs. Other critical elements of the DOE Program focus on improving the batteries, power electronics, and control subsystems and reducing their costs. These subsystems are then integrated and the systems undergo field evaluation. Finally, the most important element of the Program is the communication of the capabilities and benefits of battery systems to utility companies. Justifiably conservative, utilities must have proven, reliable equipment that is economical before they can adopt new technologies. While several utilities are leading the industry by demonstrating battery systems, a key task of the DOE program is to inform the entire industry of the value, characteristics, and availability of utility battery systems so that knowledgeable decisions can be made regarding future investments. This program plan for the DOE Utility Battery Storage Systems Program describes the technical and programmatic activities needed to bring about the widespread use of batteries by utilities. By following this plan, the DOE anticipates that many of the significant national benefits from battery storage will be achieved in the near future.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Cogeneration System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report COGENERATION SYSTEM INTRODUCTION utility plant. COGENERATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION In its current configuration, the central utility plant

Castillo, Steven P.

5

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Natural Gas System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan June 16, 2009 Stage Two Report NATURAL GAS SYSTEM INTRODUCTION New Mexico State University currently uses natural gas, provided by the City of Las Cruces

Castillo, Steven P.

6

Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

None

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Light duty utility arm startup plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan details the methods and procedures necessary to ensure a safe transition in the operation of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The steps identified here outline the work scope and identify responsibilities to complete startup, and turnover of the LDUA to Characterization Project Operations (CPO).

Barnes, G.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Utilities expand baseload power plant plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the plans being made by electric utilities to expand the number of baseload plants to accommodate increasing power demands. The results of a survey of utility's construction plans is presented. The topics include current construction, construction planning in the Southeast, current baseload technology, nuclear potential, and incorporation of environmental externalities impact in planning.

Smock, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Best Practices Guidebook for Integration of Distributed Energy Resources Into Utility System Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DTE Energy's real-world experience in applying Distributed Energy Resources (DER) has yielded a number of important lessons, explained in greater detail in this guidebook. The guidebook is designed to help distribution organizations 1) evaluate DER as a potential solution to distribution system capacity shortfalls and 2) implement cost-effective DER installations that enhance system reliability and improve customer service. Following are key points of the lessons learned: Real management support is essen...

2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Utility-Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans & Proposals | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans & Proposals Utility-Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans & Proposals The Edison Foundation's chart of plans and proposals for utility-scale smart meter deployments....

11

Applying DSM evaluation results to utility planning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a study to assess the application of DSM evaluation results to utility forecasting and planning. The paper has three objectives: (1) identify forecasting and planning applications of evaluation studies, (2) identify major obstacles and problems associated with applying evaluation results to forecasting and planning, and (3) suggest approaches to address the major problems. The paper summarizes results from interviews with utilities, regulators, and consultants to determine how the utility industry currently applies evaluation results in forecasting and planning. The paper also includes results from a detailed case study of Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and Southern California Edison Company (SCE), two utilities with large DSM programs and active evaluation efforts.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Planning support systems for spatial planning through social learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines new professional practices in urban planning that utilize new types of spatial planning support systems (PSS) based on geographic information systems (GIS) software. Through a mixed-methods ...

Goodspeed, Robert (Robert Charles)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Operations Speaker(s): Emma Stewart Date: March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar HostPoint of...

14

An Evaluation of Solar Valuation Methods Used in Utility Planning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Evaluation of Solar Valuation Methods Used in Utility Planning and Procurement Processes Title An Evaluation of Solar Valuation Methods Used in Utility Planning and Procurement...

15

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and...

16

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Title Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Ryan H. Wiser, Amol Phadke, and Charles A. Goldman Pagination 28 Date Published 03/2009 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords carbon emissions, electric utilities, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system planning Abstract Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demandside resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers

17

Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Title Solar Valuation in Utility Planning Studies Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mills, Andrew D., and Ryan H. Wiser Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable energy: policy Abstract This webinar was presented by the Clean Energy States Alliance and featured Andrew Mills of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) discussing new research on solar valuation that he and his colleague, Ryan Wiser, have recently published. As renewable technologies mature, recognizing and evaluating their economic value will become increasingly important for justifying their expanded use. In their report, Mills and Wiser used a unique investment and dispatch model to evaluate the changes in the long-run value of variable renewables with increasing penetration levels, based on a case study of California. They found that the value of solar is high at low penetration levels owing to the capacity and energy value of solar, even accounting for an increased need for ancillary services and imperfect forecastability. At higher penetration levels, the marginal value of additional PV and concentrating solar power (CSP) without thermal storage declines, largely due to a decrease in capacity value. The value of CSP with thermal storage remains higher for similar penetration levels owing to the ability to continue to produce energy for hours after the sun goes down. By way of comparison, in California the value of wind at low penetrations is less than the value of solar at low penetrations, but its value is less sensitive to penetration levels. In addition to discussing these findings, Mills reviewed a recent sample of utility planning studies and procurement processes to identify how current practices reflect these drivers of solar's economic value. The LBNL report found that many of the utilities have a framework to capture and evaluate solar's value, but approaches vary widely: only a few studies appear to complement the framework with detailed analysis of key factors such as capacity credits, integration costs, and tradeoffs between distributed and utility-scale photovoltaics. In particular Mills and Wiser found that studies account for the capacity value of solar, though capacity credit estimates with increasing penetration can be improved. Similarly, few planning studies currently reflect the full range of potential benefits from adding thermal storage and/or natural gas augmentation to concentrating solar power plants.

18

The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview  

SciTech Connect

Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Project scope: Comparative analysis of recent resource plans filed by 14 utilities in the Western U.S. and Canada. Analyze treatment of conventional & emerging resource options-including energy efficiency (EE)-Assess risk analysis & portfolio management -Develop more standardized methods and conventions for resource assessment-Summarize how issues are handled in resource plans; identify "best practices" and offer recommendations-Create information tools for CREPC that facilitate work on related projects (e.g. regional transmission planning) Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for

22

Utility resource planning using modular simulation and optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility resource planning traditionally focuses on conventional energy supplies. Nowadays, planning of renewable energy generation and its storage has become equally important due to the growth in demand, insufficiency of natural resources, ...

Juan Sáenz Corredor; Nurcin Celik; Shihab Asfour; Young-Jun Son

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESP: A System Utilization Benchmark Adrian T. Wong, LeonidEffective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designedEffective System Performance (ESP) benchmark, which measures

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Introduction Market barriers unrelated to...

25

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3) environmental management programs, (4) training, (5)Management Programs3-5 Structure and Responsibility.3-6 Training,Management System Plan Program Elements Additional information regarding EMS training

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Wind energy systems. Application to regional utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study developed a generic planning process that utilities can use to determine the feasibility of utilizing WECS (Wind Energy Conversion Systems) as part of their future mix of equipment. While this is primarily an economic process, other questions dealing with WECS availability, capacity credit, operating reserve, performance of WECS arrays, etc., had to be addressed. The approach was to establish the worth, or breakeven value, of WECS to the utility and to determine the impact that WECS additions would have on the utilities mix of conventional source.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assessing the performance of human-automation collaborative planning systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning and Resource Allocation (P/RA) Human Supervisory Control (HSC) systems utilize the capabilities of both human operators and automated planning algorithms to schedule tasks for complex systems. In these systems, ...

Ryan, Jason C. (Jason Christopher)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

title Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans journal Energy Policy year month abstract p We review long term electric utility plans representing nbsp textquoteright of generation within the Western U S and Canadian provinces nbsp We nbsp address what utility planners assume about future growth of electricity demand and supply what types of risk they consider in their long term resource planning and the consistency in which they report resource planning related data The region is anticipated to grow by annually by before Demand Side Management nbsp About nbsp two thirds of nbsp the utilities that provided an annual energy forecast also nbsp reported energy efficiency savings projections in aggregate they anticipate an average reduction in energy and nbsp reduction in

29

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state's citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a How-To'' manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual. [Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state`s citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a ``How-To`` manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

SciTech Connect

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Springfield Utility Board- Energy Savings Plan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Springfield Utility Board provides industrial customers with a comprehensive report to identify cost effective efficiency improvements. Eligible measures include high efficiency motors,...

33

CMS System Security Plan Template  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System Security Plan (SSP) Template Instructions. This template contains boiler plate language. Each template must be ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Optics Supply Planning System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system at a level of detail that can be used for construction and deployment. Test and quality assurance plans are also included to insure that the system delivers all requirements when it is built. The design is for an automated forecasting prototype that allocates inventory and processing resources in response to potentially daily changes in the forecasted optics exchanges required to operate NIF. It will automatically calculate future inventory levels and processing rates based on current inventory and projected exchanges, procurements, and capacities. It will include screens that allow users to readily assess the feasibility of the forecast, identify failures to meet the demand, revise input data, and re-run the automated forecast calculation. In addition, the system will automatically retrieve the current exchange demand from an external database. Approved forecasts from the system will automatically update work order plans and procurement plans in the existing inventory and production control database. The timing of optics exchanges affects the forecast of damage and future exchanges, so an approved exchange plan will be fed back to the demand database and be used to calculate the next demand projection. The system will read the demand data and update the forecast and output files daily. This specification has been divided into two parts. This document, Part 1 lays out the major design decisions and specifies the architectural, component, and data structure designs. Part 2 will add interface designs, quality assurance and testing plans, and deployment details.

Gaylord, J

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans Title Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2014 Authors Wilkerson, Jordan, Peter H. Larsen, and Galen L. Barbose Journal Energy Policy Date Published 2014 Abstract We review long-term electric utility plans representing "' 90% of generation within the Western U.S. and Canadian provinces. We address what utility planners assume about future growth of electricity demand and supply; what types of risk they consider in their long-term resource planning; and the consistency in which they report resource planning-related data. The region is anticipated to grow by 2% annually by 2020 before Demand Side Management. About two-thirds of the utilities that provided an annual energy forecast also reported energy efficiency savings projections; in aggregate, they anticipate an average 6.4% reduction in energy and 8.6% reduction in peak demand by 2020. New natural gas-fired and renewable generation will replace retiring coal plants. Although some utilities anticipate new coal-fired plants, most are planning for steady growth in renewable generation over the next two decades. Most planned solar capacity will come online before 2020, with most wind expansion after 2020. Fuel mix is expected to remain "' 55% of total generation. Planners consider a wide range of risks but focus on future demand, fuel prices, and the possibility of GHG regulations. Data collection and reporting inconsistencies within and across electric utility resource plans lead to recommendations on policies to address this issue.

36

Mobile systems capability plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A new method for electric utility resource planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an interval-based multi-attribute decision making (MADM) approach in support of the decision process with imprecise information. The proposed decision methodology is based on the model of linear additive utility function but extends ... Keywords: decision making, electric utilities, power generation, resource planning

M. Sedighizadeh

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Integrated resource planning Electric and gas utilities in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquisitions will be the important criteria. Resource planning at gas utilities IRP is just beginning to be applied to the natural gas industry. At gas utilities, called local distribution companies (LDCs and regulated differently. Natural gas is produced, transported, and distributed by three different sets

39

Application of DSM evaluation studies to utility forecasting and planning  

SciTech Connect

Utilities and their customers have made substantial investments in utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. These DSM programs also represent a substantial electricity resource. DSM program performance has been studied more systematically in recent years than over any previous period. DSM program evaluations are traditionally targeted to meet the program manager`s need for information on program costs and performance and, more recently, to verify savings to regulators for incentive awards and lost revenue recovery. Yet evaluations may also be used to produce results relevant to utility forecasting and planning. Applying evaluation results is especially important for utilities with substantial current and future commitments to acquiring demand-side resources. This report discusses the application of evaluation results to utility forecasting and planning. The report has three objectives. First, we identify what demand forecasters, DSM forecasters, and resource planners want to learn from evaluations. Second, we identify and describe the major obstacles and problems associated with applying evaluation results and illustrate many of these issues through a specific evaluation application exercise. Finally, we suggest approaches for addressing these major problems. The report summarizes results from interviews with utilities, regulators, and consultants to determine how the industry currently applies evaluation results in forecasting and planning. The report also includes results from case studies of Sacramento Municipal Utility District and Southern California Edison Company, utilities with large DSM programs and active evaluation efforts. Finally, we draw on a specific application exercise in which we used a set of impact evaluations to revise a utility DSM forecast.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Understanding Energy Storage Solutions and Capabilities on Utility Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Widespread use of storage will require better grid integration tools to plan for the optimal size, use, and location of energy storage systems. Also important will be a coordinated effort between technology developers and utilities to ensure that storage systems are designed to adequately address utility needs. Utilities must understand the technical attributes and grid operational benefits of energy storage systems. Such operational benefits can also improve the definition of storage system functional r...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Proactive Renewables Integration for Utility Distribution Planning and Operations Speaker(s): Emma Stewart Date: March 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote The interconnection process can be a laborious and expensive process for both utilities and developers. High PV penetration levels create a number of challenges for the management and operation of the utility grid. This study presents work being completed in Hawaii to improve and innovate the interconnect process, separating perceived issues from real technical concerns. Existing interconnection methods and standards such as IEEE 1547, Hawaii Rule 14H and California Rule 21 are evaluated in emerging high penetration scenarios. These rules define a 15% DG penetration level as a

43

Integrating Energy Efficiency and Demand Response into Utility Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the methods in which utilities integrate their supply-side and demand-side resources to meet their generating resource requirements. The major steps in developing a resource plan are reviewed, including the alternative methods currently employed. Finally, the report presents the results of a short survey that was administered to the advisors in Energy Utilization. The results show that methods are more sophisticated than 20 years ago, but more could be accomplished in ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Optimizing the Day to Day Operation of Utility Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the 2002 IETC, Linnhoff March presented an overview of spreadsheet-based software packages to rigorously model site utility systems. Such models allow the user to plan future scenarios that might impact upon the system operation (energy saving projects, production changes, new equipment, future energy tariffs, etc). Indeed, since last year, the DOE has made utility system template models freely available to industrial users as reported elsewhere at the 2003 IETC. Until last year, most industrial applications of this utility system software were set up for planning purposes, largely off-line. More recently, these applications have become more sophisticated and can operate on-line in real time. They include complex optimization routines to ensure that the utility system is always being operated in the best possible way under any prevailing conditions of production, energy tariffs and other variables. These optimizer models typically reduce day-to-day utility system operating costs by between 2 and 5%.

Eastwood, A.; Bealing, C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluating the role of uncertainty in electric utility capacity planning  

SciTech Connect

This final report on Evaluating the Role of Uncertainty in Electric Utility Capacity Planning is divided into separate sections addressing demand, supply and the simultaneous consideration of both and describes several mathematical characterizations of the effects of uncertainty on the capacity expansion decision. The basic objective is to develop more robust models which can appropriately include the fundamental uncertainties associated with capacity expansion planning in the electric utility industry. Much of what has been developed in this project has been incorporated into a long-term, computer model for capacity expansion planning. A review is provided of certain deterministic capacity expansion methodologies. The effect of load curve uncertainty on capacity planning is considered and the use of a certain expected load curve to account for uncertainty in demand is proposed. How uncertainty influences the allocation of capital costs among the various load curve realizations is also discussed. The supply side uncertainties of fuel prices and random availability of generating units are considered. In certain cases it is shown that the use of the expected fuel costs will furnish a solution which minimizes the total expected costs. The effect of derating units to account for their random availability is also characterized. A stochastic linear program formulated to examine the simultaneous consideration of fuel cost and demand uncertainties is analyzed. This volume includes the report text one appendix with information on linear programming-based analysis of marginal cost pricing in the electric utility industry.

Soyster, A.L.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Lighting and utilities - planning for the future: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains selected proceedings of a seminar entitled, Lighting and Utilities: Planning for the Future, held on May 21-22, 1984 in San Francisco, California, and June 5-6, 1984 in Hunt Valley, Maryland to help utility marketing, lighting and customer service executives to understand better the technological changes that affect their lighting loads. The seminar was sponsored by EPRI in cooperation with Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Potomac Electric Power Company, and Public Service Company of Colorado. The seminar addressed the following issues: lighting design, light sources, lighting equipment, lighting maintenance, and utility perspectives. With many changes being proposed to lighting regulations on the national and state level, this publication offers an opportunity for utility executives and others in the lighting community to obtain information on the future direction of lighting technology. Four papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; one had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Utility-Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans & Proposals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

edisonfoundation.net/IEE edisonfoundation.net/IEE Utility-Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans & Proposals April 2010 Utility State Target Number of Meters Notes Resources AEP 1 IN, KY, MI, OH, OK, TX, VA, WV 5,000,000 AEP plans on deploying smart meters to all customers within their service territory and have deployed 10,000 meters to customers in South Bend, IN, and are presently deploying another 700,000 to AEP-Texas customers. Timing for the remaining deployments will depend on specific conditions in each of the seven operating company subsidiaries. AEP Corporate Sustainability Report 2009 2 Allegheny Power MD, PA, WV 700,000 Allegheny launched pilots in Morgantown, WV and Urbana, MD to test smart meters and thermostats (1,140 meters installed). In PA, Act 129 (2008)

48

Planning Your First Wind Power Project: A Primer for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most U.S. utilities, wind power is a new technology they need to understand in order to evaluate its use in their systems. This primer addresses questions commonly asked by utilities and the issues to be considered in bringing a wind power plant on-line.

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey Survey of Western U.S. electric utility resource plans Jordan Wilkerson a,n , Peter Larsen a,b , Galen Barbose b a Management Science and Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States b Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-4000, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States H I G H L I G H T S  Anticipated power plant retirements are split between coal and natural gas.  By 2030, natural gas-fired generation represents 60% of new capacity followed by wind (15%), solar (7%) and hydropower (7%).  Utilities anticipate most new solar capacity to come online before 2020 with significant growth in wind capacity after 2020.  Utilities focus their uncertainty analyses on future demand, fuel prices,

50

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 1.03: Utilities guide  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool that was developed under the direction of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). This Utilities Guide explains how to operate utility programs that are supplied as a part of the IBS. These utility programs are chiefly for managing and manipulating various kinds of IBS data and system administration files. Many of the utilities are for creating, editing, converting, or displaying map data and other data that are related to geographic location.

Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Pottier, M.C.; Schrank, E.E.; Williams, J.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Sanitary Sewer System Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indicators PMT Plant Maintenance Technician POSM Pipeline Observation System Management POTW Publicly OwnedSanitary Sewer System Management Plan Prepared by: Environment, Health and Safety Division to enforce any violation iii-10 Section iv: Operation and Maintenance Program iv iv-a: System mapping iv-2 iv

54

TWRS Systems Engineering Working Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Systems Engineering (SE) Working Plan (SEWP) is to describe how the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) will implement the SE polity and guidance provided in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP). Sections 2.0 through 4.0 cover how the SE process and management will be performed to develop a technical baseline within TWRS. Section 5.0 covers the plans and schedules to implement the SE process and management within TWRS. Detailed information contained in the TWRS Program SEMP is not repeated in this document. This SEWP and the SE discipline defined within apply to the TWRS Program and new and ongoing TWRS projects or activities, including new facilities and safety. The SE process will be applied to the existing Tank Farm operations where the Richland TWRS Program Office management determines the process appropriate and where value will be added to existing Tank Farm system and operations.

Eiholzer, C.R.

1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

offices, the EMS Program Program Elements Environmental ManagementOffice of Institutional Assurance as stated in the OQMP. 3-7 • Environmental ManagementEnvironmental Management System Fiscal Year Improve (EMP classification) Integrated Safety Management System International Organization for Standardization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Office

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection Program, DOE Order 450.1A (June 4, 3. DOE Oand Health Reporting, DOE Order 231.1A (1995, as amended).Emergency Management System, DOE Order 151.1B (October 29,

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Integrated Baseline System (IBS) Version 2.0: Utilities Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Baseline System (IBS) is an emergency management planning and analysis tool being developed under the direction of the US Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency. This Utilities Guide explains how you can use the IBS utility programs to manage and manipulate various kinds of IBS data. These programs include utilities for creating, editing, and displaying maps and other data that are referenced to geographic location. The intended audience for this document are chiefly data managers but also system managers and some emergency management planners and analysts.

Burford, M.J.; Downing, T.R.; Williams, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bower, J.C. [Bower Software Services, Kennewick, WA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treatment of Solar Generation Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

59

11.304J / 4.255J Site and Urban Systems Planning, Spring 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The planning of sites and the infrastructure systems which serve them. Site analysis, spatial organization of uses on sites, design of roadways and subdivision patterns, grading plans, utility systems, analysis of runoff, ...

Ben-Joseph, Eran

60

Nome Joint Utility Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Joint Utility Systems Joint Utility Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Nome Joint Utility Systems Place Alaska Utility Id 13642 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electrical Charge Residential Power Cost Equalization Average Rates Residential: $0.3600/kWh Commercial: $0.3310/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Nome_Joint_Utility_Systems&oldid=411195

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Distribution Management Systems Planning Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

No portion of the electric power grid has been impacted more significantly by the Smart Grid concept than the electric distribution system. In the past, the distribution portion of the system received little attention compared to transmission and generation systems unless the lights went out. Since the dawn of the smart grid era, many electric distribution utilities have transitioned from (or are in the process of transitioning from) a mostly manual, paper-driven business process to electronic ...

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 Asheville, NC April 1996 Donald E. OsbornDavid E. Collier Sacramento Municipal Utility...

63

Municipal geothermal heat utilization plan for Glenwood Springs, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been made of the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing the geothermal resource underlying Glenwood Springs Colorado, to heat a group of public buildings. The results have shown that the use of geothermal heat is indeed feasible when compared to the cost of natural gas. The proposed system is composed of a wellhead plate heat exchanger which feeds a closed distribution loop of treated water circulated to the buildings which form the load. The base case system was designed to supply twice the demand created by the seven public buildings in order to take advantage of some economies of scale. To increase the utilization factor of the available geothermal energy, a peaking boiler which burns natural gas is recommended. Disposal of the cooled brine would be via underground injection. Considerable study was done to examine the impact of reduced operating temperature on the existing heating systems. Several options to minimize this problem were identified. Economic analyses were completed to determine the present values of heat from the geothermal system and from the present natural gas over a 30 year projected system life. For the base case savings of over $1 million were shown. Sensitivities of the economics to capital cost, operating cost, system size and other parameters were calculated. For all reasonable assumptions, the geothermal system was cheaper. Financing alternatives were also examined. An extensive survey of all existing data on the geology of the study has led to the prediction of resource parameters. The wellhead temperature of produced fluid is suspected to lie between 140 and 180/sup 0/F (60 and 82/sup 0/C). Flowrates may be as high as 1000 gpm (3800 liters per minute) from a reservoir formation that is 300 ft (90 m) thick beginning about 500 ft (150 m) below the suggested drill site in the proposed Two Rivers Park.

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Office of Planning,I. Introduction Markets for renewable electricity have grownRisk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western UtilityEmerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the WesternEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Office of Planning,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Improvements in patient treatment planning systems  

SciTech Connect

The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, Radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) software system is used to develop treatment planning information. In typical use BNCT-Rtpe consists of three main components: (1) Semi-automated geometric modeling of objects (brain, target, eyes, sinus) derived from MRI, CT, and other medical imaging modalities, (2) Dose computations for these geometric models with rtt-MC, the INEL Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code, and (3) Dose contouring overlaid on medical images as well as generation of other dose displays. We continue to develop a planning system based on three-dimensional image-based reconstructions using Bspline surfaces. Even though this software is in an experimental state, it has been applied for large animal research and for an isolated case of treatment for a human glioma. Radiation transport is based on Monte Carlo, however there will be implementations of faster methods (e.g. diffusion theory) in the future. The important thing for treatment planning is the output which must convey, to the radiologist, the deposition of dose to healthy and target tissue. Many edits are available such that one can obtain contours registered to medical image, dose/volume histograms and most information required for treatment planning and response assessment. Recent work has been to make the process more automatic and easier to use. The interface, now implemented for contouring and reconstruction, utilizes the Xwindowing system and the MOTIF graphical users interface for effective interaction with the planner. Much work still remains before the tool can be applied in a routine clinical setting.

Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Atkinson, C.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Babcock, R.; Evans, J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Easley Combined Utility System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Easley Combined Utility System Easley Combined Utility System Jump to: navigation, search Name Easley Combined Utility System Place South Carolina Utility Id 6709 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Church electric service rate (Inside city limits) Commercial Church electric service rate (Outside city limits) Commercial Residential service rate (Inside city limits) Residential Residential service rate (Outside city limits) Residential

68

Weatherford Mun Utility System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mun Utility System Mun Utility System Jump to: navigation, search Name Weatherford Mun Utility System Place Texas Utility Id 20230 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General Service - 1 (Demand 20.00 - 200.00) Industrial Large General Service - 2 (Demand 200.00 -1000.00) Industrial Large General Service - 2* Industrial Large General Service - 3 (Demand 1000.00 or More) Industrial Large General Service - 3* Industrial MV Lighting Lighting Residential service Residential

69

ESP: a system utilization benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a new benchmark, called the Effective System Performance (ESP) test, which is designed to measure system-level performance, including such factors as job scheduling efficiency, handling of large jobs and shutdown-reboot times. ...

Adrian T. Wong; Leonid Oliker; William T. C. Kramer; Teresa L. Kaltz; David H. Bailey

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DOCS System Configuration Management Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOCS System Configuration Management Plan DOCS System Configuration Management Plan The DOCS Systems Configuration Management Plan (SCMP), from an actual DOE systems engineering...

71

Pilot chargeback system program plan  

SciTech Connect

This planning document outlines the steps necessary to develop, test, evaluate, and potentially implement a pilot chargeback system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for the treatment, storage, and disposal of current waste. This pilot program will demonstrate one system that can be used to charge onsite generators for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive waste. In FY 1997, mock billings will begin by July 15, 1997. Assuming approvals are received to do so, FY 1998 activities will include modifying the associated automated systems, testing and evaluating system performance, and estimating the amount generators will spend for waste storage, treatment, and disposal in FY 1999. If the program is fully implemented in FY 1999, generators will pay actual, automated bills for waste management services from funds transferred to their budgets from Environmental Management.

Smith, P.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

ESP: A system utilization benchmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available T3E and SP systems at NERSC differ considerably insoftware. The Cray T3E at NERSC has recently demonstratedhours on 512 CPUs of the NERSC T3E. This time length was a

Wong, Adrian T.; Oliker, Leonid; Kramer, William T.C.; Kaltz, Teresa L.; Bailey, David H.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

West Point Utility System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System System Jump to: navigation, search Name West Point Utility System Place Iowa Utility Id 20396 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service and Municipal Institutional service Large General Service Commercial Rural Resident and Farm All-Electric Residential Rural Resident and Farm Rate Residential Security Light - 150 Watt HPS Customer Owned Pole Lighting Security Light - 150 Watt HPS Utility Owned Pole Lighting Urban All-Electric Residential Rate Residential

75

Strategic planning for power system restorations  

SciTech Connect

This paper considers the power system restoration planning problem (PSRPP) for disaster recovery, a fundamental problem faced by all populated areas. PSRPPs are complex stochastic optimization problems that combine resource allocation, warehouse location, and vehicle routing considerations. Furthermore, electrical power systems are complex systems whose behavior can only be determined by physics simulations. Moreover, these problems must be solved under tight runtime constraints to be practical in real-world disaster situations. This work is three fold: (1) it formalizes the specification of PSRPPs; (2) introduces a simple optimization-simulation hybridization necessary for solving PSRPPs; and (3) presents a complete restoration algorithm that utilizes the strengths of mixed integer programming, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search. This paper studied a novel problem in the field of humanitarian logistics, the Power System Restoration Problem (PSRPP). The PSRPP models the strategic planning process for post disaster power system recovery. The paper proposed a multi-stage stochastic hybrid optimization algorithm that yields high quality solutions to real-world benchmarks provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The algorithm uses a variety of technologies, including MIP, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search, to exploit the structure of each individual optimization subproblem. The experimental results on hurricane disaster benchmarks indicate that the algorithm is practical from a computational standpoint and produce significant improvements over existing relief delivery procedures.

Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Hententyck, Pascal [BROWN UNIV.; Coffrin, Carleton [BROWN UNIV.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Business System Planning Project, Preliminary System Design  

SciTech Connect

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is currently performing many core business functions including, but not limited to, work control, planning, scheduling, cost estimating, procurement, training, and human resources. Other core business functions are managed by or dependent on Project Hanford Management Contractors including, but not limited to, payroll, benefits and pension administration, inventory control, accounts payable, and records management. In addition, CHG has business relationships with its parent company CH2M HILL, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection and other River Protection Project contractors, government agencies, and vendors. The Business Systems Planning (BSP) Project, under the sponsorship of the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Chief Information Officer (CIO), have recommended information system solutions that will support CHG business areas. The Preliminary System Design was developed using the recommendations from the Alternatives Analysis, RPP-6499, Rev 0 and will become the design base for any follow-on implementation projects. The Preliminary System Design will present a high-level system design, providing a high-level overview of the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) modules and identify internal and external relationships. This document will not define data structures, user interface components (screens, reports, menus, etc.), business rules or processes. These in-depth activities will be accomplished at implementation planning time.

EVOSEVICH, S.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

TY JOUR T1 Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans Survey of Western U S Electric Utility Resource Plans JF Energy Policy A1 Jordan Wilkerson A1 Peter H Larsen A1 Galen L Barbose AB p We review long term electric utility plans representing nbsp of generation within the Western U S and Canadian provinces nbsp We nbsp address what utility planners assume about future growth of electricity demand and supply what types of risk they consider in their long term resource planning and the consistency in which they report resource planning related data The region is anticipated to grow by annually by before Demand Side Management nbsp About nbsp two thirds of nbsp the utilities that provided an annual energy forecast also nbsp reported energy ef ciency savings projections in aggregate they anticipate an average reduction in energy and nbsp reduction in peak demand by nbsp

78

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Products based on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) technology offer a unique solution to today's energy conversion storage needs. PEM products have undergone continual development since the late 1950's for many diverse applications. Rooted in rigorous aerospace applications, this technology is now ''breaking away'' to provide commercial solutions to common power, energy, and industrial gas feedstock problems. Important developments in PEM electrolyzers and various energy conversion devices (e.g. engines and fuel cells) can now be combined to form the basis for a revolutionary energy storage system that provides a much needed link to renewable resources, and offers a credible alternative for off-grid power applications. This technology operates by converting electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen as part of a water electrolysis process when excess power is available. When the primary source of power is unavailable, chemical energy is converted into electrical energy through an external combustion heat engine or other energy conversion device. The Phase II portion of this program began in May of 2000. The goal of Phase II of the project was to cost reduce the hydrogen generator as a critical link to having a fully sustainable hydrogen energy system. The overall goal is to enable the link to sustainability by converting excess renewable power into hydrogen and having that hydrogen available for conversion back to power, on demand. Furthermore, the cost of the capability must be less the $1,000 per kW (electrical power into the generator) and allow for a variety of renewable technology inputs. This cost target is based on a production volume of 10,000 units per year. To that end, Proton undertook an aggressive approach to cost reduction activities surrounding the 6kW, 40 standard cubic foot per hour (scfh) HOGEN hydrogen generator. The electrical side of the system targeted a number of areas that included approaches to reduce the cost of the power supply and associated electronics as well as improving efficiency, implementing a circuit board to replace the discreet electrical components in the unit, and evaluating the system issues when operating the unit with a variety of renewable inputs. On the mechanical side of the system the targets involved creative use of manifolds to reduce components and plumbing, overall fitting reduction through layout simplification and welded tube assemblies, and the development of an inexpensive gas drying methodology to remove moisture and improve gas purity. Lastly, activities surrounding the electrolysis cell stack focused on lower cost stack compression approaches and cost reduction of critical components. The last year of this project focused on validating the cost reductions mentioned above and advancing these cost reductions forward into a larger hydrogen generator. This larger hydrogen generator is a 60kW, 380 scfh, HOGEN hydrogen generator. Most of these efforts were in the control board and manifold development areas. The results achieved over the life of this program are in line with the goals of the Department of Energy. Proton projects that the current design of the 40 scfh generator projected to a volume of 10,000 units per year would be in the range of $1,500 per kilowatt. Furthermore, continuing efforts on materials substitution and design enhancements over the next few years should bring the cost of the system to the $1,000 per kilowatt goal for a system of this size. This report provides the technical details behind the cost reduction efforts undertaken during the Phase II portion of the program.

Proton Energy Systems

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System  

SciTech Connect

Products based on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) technology offer a unique solution to today's energy conversion storage needs. PEM products have undergone continual development since the late 1950's for many diverse applications. Rooted in rigorous aerospace applications, this technology is now ''breaking away'' to provide commercial solutions to common power, energy, and industrial gas feedstock problems. Important developments in PEM electrolyzers and various energy conversion devices (e.g. engines and fuel cells) can now be combined to form the basis for a revolutionary energy storage system that provides a much needed link to renewable resources, and offers a credible alternative for off-grid power applications. This technology operates by converting electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen as part of a water electrolysis process when excess power is available. When the primary source of power is unavailable, chemical energy is converted into electrical energy through an external combustion heat engine or other energy conversion device. The Phase II portion of this program began in May of 2000. The goal of Phase II of the project was to cost reduce the hydrogen generator as a critical link to having a fully sustainable hydrogen energy system. The overall goal is to enable the link to sustainability by converting excess renewable power into hydrogen and having that hydrogen available for conversion back to power, on demand. Furthermore, the cost of the capability must be less the $1,000 per kW (electrical power into the generator) and allow for a variety of renewable technology inputs. This cost target is based on a production volume of 10,000 units per year. To that end, Proton undertook an aggressive approach to cost reduction activities surrounding the 6kW, 40 standard cubic foot per hour (scfh) HOGEN hydrogen generator. The electrical side of the system targeted a number of areas that included approaches to reduce the cost of the power supply and associated electronics as well as improving efficiency, implementing a circuit board to replace the discreet electrical components in the unit, and evaluating the system issues when operating the unit with a variety of renewable inputs. On the mechanical side of the system the targets involved creative use of manifolds to reduce components and plumbing, overall fitting reduction through layout simplification and welded tube assemblies, and the development of an inexpensive gas drying methodology to remove moisture and improve gas purity. Lastly, activities surrounding the electrolysis cell stack focused on lower cost stack compression approaches and cost reduction of critical components. The last year of this project focused on validating the cost reductions mentioned above and advancing these cost reductions forward into a larger hydrogen generator. This larger hydrogen generator is a 60kW, 380 scfh, HOGEN hydrogen generator. Most of these efforts were in the control board and manifold development areas. The results achieved over the life of this program are in line with the goals of the Department of Energy. Proton projects that the current design of the 40 scfh generator projected to a volume of 10,000 units per year would be in the range of $1,500 per kilowatt. Furthermore, continuing efforts on materials substitution and design enhancements over the next few years should bring the cost of the system to the $1,000 per kilowatt goal for a system of this size. This report provides the technical details behind the cost reduction efforts undertaken during the Phase II portion of the program.

Proton Energy Systems

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A good integrated resource plan: Guidelines for electric utilities and regulators  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning helps utilities and state regulatory commissions consistently assess a broad range of demand and supply resources to meet customer energy-service needs cost-effectively. Key characteristics of this planning approach include: explicit consideration and fair treatment of a wide variety of demand and supply options, consideration of the environmental and other social costs of providing energy services, public participation in the development of the resource plan, and analysis of the uncertainties associated with different external factors and resource options. Integrated resource planning differs from traditional planning in the types and scope of resources considered, the owners of the resources, the organizations involved in resource planning, and the criteria for resource selection. This report presents suggestions to utilities on how to conduct such planning and what to include in their resource-planning reports. These suggestions are based on a review of about 50 resource plans as well as discussions with and presentations to regulators and utilities. The suggestions cover four broad topics; the technical competence with which the plan was developed; the adequacy, detail, and consistency (with the long-term plan) of the short-term action plan; the extent to which the interests of various stakeholders was considered, both in public participation in plan development and in the variety of resource plans developedand assessed; and the clarity and comprehensiveness of the utility`s report on its plan. Technical competence includes energy and demand forecasts, assessment of supply and demand resources, resource integration, and treatment of uncertainty. Issues associated with forecasts include forecasting approaches; links between the forecasts of energy use and peak demands; and links between the forecasts and the effects of past, present, and future demand-side management programs.

Hirst, E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bringing Better Planning and Energy Efficiency to Gas Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

being accelerated by recent policy changes at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. FERC Order 636 requires gas utilities to become active managers of their gas portfolios....

82

A good integrated resource plan: Guidelines for electric utilities and regulators  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning helps utilities and state regulatory commissions consistently assess a broad range of demand and supply resources to meet customer energy-service needs cost-effectively. Key characteristics of this planning approach include: explicit consideration and fair treatment of a wide variety of demand and supply options, consideration of the environmental and other social costs of providing energy services, public participation in the development of the resource plan, and analysis of the uncertainties associated with different external factors and resource options. Integrated resource planning differs from traditional planning in the types and scope of resources considered, the owners of the resources, the organizations involved in resource planning, and the criteria for resource selection. This report presents suggestions to utilities on how to conduct such planning and what to include in their resource-planning reports. These suggestions are based on a review of about 50 resource plans as well as discussions with and presentations to regulators and utilities. The suggestions cover four broad topics; the technical competence with which the plan was developed; the adequacy, detail, and consistency (with the long-term plan) of the short-term action plan; the extent to which the interests of various stakeholders was considered, both in public participation in plan development and in the variety of resource plans developedand assessed; and the clarity and comprehensiveness of the utility's report on its plan. Technical competence includes energy and demand forecasts, assessment of supply and demand resources, resource integration, and treatment of uncertainty. Issues associated with forecasts include forecasting approaches; links between the forecasts of energy use and peak demands; and links between the forecasts and the effects of past, present, and future demand-side management programs.

Hirst, E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Business System Planning Project System Requirements Specification  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Business Systems Planning Project System Requirements Specification (SRS) is to provide the outline and contents of the requirements for the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) integrated business and technical information systems. The SRS will translate proposed objectives into the statement of the functions that are to be performed and data and information flows that they require. The requirements gathering methodology will use (1) facilitated group requirement sessions; (2) individual interviews; (3) surveys; and (4) document reviews. The requirements will be verified and validated through coordination of the technical requirement team and CHG Managers. The SRS document used the content and format specified in Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. Organization Standard Software Practices in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 8340-1984 for Systems Requirements Documents.

NELSON, R.E.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of

CERTA PJ

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, the ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of the approximately 57 million gallons of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in September 2003. ORP has approved a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. The ORP has established contracts to implement this strategy to establish a basic capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategy for completion of the mission uses a number of interrelated activities. The ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) for treatment and disposal; (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) and about half of the low-activity waste (LAW) contained in the tank farms, and maximizing its capability and capacity; (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability or a second WTP LAW Facility that can safely treat about half of the LAW contained in the tank farms; (4) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for transuranic (TRU) tank waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); (5) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized HLW and shipping that waste to Yucca Mountain for disposal; (6) Operating the Integrated Disposal Facility for the disposal of immobilized LAW, along with the associated secondary waste, (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and al1 waste management and treatment facilities, (8) Developing and implementing technical solutions to mitigate the impact from substantial1y increased estimates of Na added during the pretreatment of the tank waste solids, This involves a combination of: (1) refining or modifying the flowsheet to reduce the required amount of additional sodium, (2) increasing the overall LAW vitrification capacity, (3) increasing the incorporation of sodium into the LAW glass, or (4) accepting an increase in mission duration, ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks, Key elements of the implementation of this strategy are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract, currently in procurement Since 2003, the ORP has conducted over 30 design oversight assessments of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The estimated cost at completion has increased and the schedule for construction and commissioning of the WTP has extended, The DOE, Office of Environmental Management (EM), sanctioned a comprehensive review of the WTP flowsheet, focusing on throughput. In 2005, the TFC completed interim stabilization of the SSTs and as of March 2007, has completed the retrieval of seven selected SSTs. Demonstration of supplemental treatment technologies continues. The ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, progress with supplemental treatment technologies, and changes in WTP schedule led to the FY 2007 TFC baseline submittal in November 2006. The TFC baseline submittal was developed before the WTP schedule was fully understood and approved by ORP, and therefore reflects an earlier start date for the WTP facilities. This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule with hot commissioning beginning in 2018 and full operations beginning in 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcom

CERTA PJ

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

FINREG : a financialregulatory model for utility capacity expansion plan evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A corporate financial/regulatory model, called FINREG, is presented to simulate a utility's accounting practices, financial policy and constraints, and ratemaking environment. For each year of simulation FINREG will yield ...

Klosowicz, Peter C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A universal planning system for hybrid domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many real world problems involve hybrid systems, subject to (continuous) physical effects and controlled by (discrete) digital equipments. Indeed, many efforts are being made to extend the current planning systems and modelling languages to support such ... Keywords: Hybrid systems, PDDL+, Universal planning

Giuseppe Della Penna; Daniele Magazzeni; Fabio Mercorio

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Least cost planning regulation; Restructuring the roles of utility management and regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This purpose of this paper is to examine the roles of regulators in long-range utility resource planning. Summary of major points include: Three regulatory options exist today with respect to integrated resource planning: Command and Control Regulation; Incentive Regulation; and Flexible Regulation. If deregulation is likely in the end, flexible regulation today offers the greatest promise of long-run success. Flexible regulation requires commissions and companies to agree on underlying principles and for utility management to exercise defensible judgment.

Donovan, D.J.; Goldfield, S.R. (Richard Metzler and Associates, Northbrook, IL (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Markets for renewable energy have historically been motivated primarily by policy efforts, but a less widely recognized driver is poised to also play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Resource planning has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions where retail competition has failed to take root. In the western United States, the most recent resource plans contemplate a significant amount of renewable energy additions. These planned additions--primarily coming from wind power--are motivated by the improved economics of wind power, a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities, and an increasing recognition of the inherent risks (e.g., natural gas price risk, environmental compliance risk) in fossil-based generation portfolios. This report examines how twelve western utilities treat renewable energy in their recent resource plans. In aggregate, these utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. Our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable energy, and (2) to identify methodological/modeling issues, and suggest possible improvements to methods used to evaluate renewable energy as a resource option. Here we summarize the key findings of the report, beginning with a discussion of the planned renewable energy additions called for by the twelve utilities, an overview of how these plans incorporated renewables into candidate portfolios, and a review of the specific technology cost and performance assumptions they made, primarily for wind power. We then turn to the utilities' analysis of natural gas price and environmental compliance risks, and examine how the utilities traded off portfolio cost and risk in selecting a preferred portfolio.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Electric utilities and residential solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-run incremental cost (LRIC) of providing electricity for solar heating and hot water systems is estimated for three utilities using a utility capacity expansion model and compared to the cost of providing electricity to electric-only systems. All investment, fuel and operating costs are accounted for. Hot water systems and combined heating and hot water systems are analyzed separately. It is found that the LRIC for solar backup is no more than the LRIC of electricity used for purely electric heating and hot water devices and also no more than the incremental cost of normal load growth. For the three utilities studied, there appears to be little basis for rate distinctions between solar devices using electric backup and electric-only heating and hot water devices. Off-peak storage heating and hot water devices have a much lower LRIC than the standard systems; again, there appears to be no basis for distinguishing between solar and electric off-peak devices. Compared to average cost pricing, incremental cost pricing offers considerable benefits to customers using solar and electric heat and hot water, especially if a separate lower rate is adopted for off-peak storage devices; these benefits can amount to several hundred dollars per year. Substantial savings in the use of oil and gas fuels can be achieved if residences using these fuels convert to solar systems, savings not necessarily achievable by a shift, instead, to electric systems.

Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

95

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

96

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

97

Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems, Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Photovoltaic system planning tool with internet access  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents advanced planning models integrated into a GIS-computational tool, based on a Geographic Information System, for evaluating solar energy resources, selecting the most suitable photovoltaic technology, and calculating the cost associated ... Keywords: distributed generation planning, internet GIS services, photovoltaic systems

I. J. Ramírez-Rosado; P. J. Zorzano-Santamaría; L. A. Fernández-Jiménez; E. García-Garrido

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Tank waste remediation system environmental program plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Program Plan has been developed in support of the Integrated Environmental, Safety and Health Management System and consistent with the goals of DOE/RL-96-50, Hanford Strategic Plan (RL 1996a), and the specifications and guidance for ANSI/ISO 14001-1996, Environmental Management Systems Specification with guidance for use (ANSI/ISO 1996).

Borneman, L.E.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

High slot utilization systems for electric machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new High Slot Utilization (HSU) Systems for electric machines enable the use of form wound coils that have the highest fill factor and the best use of magnetic materials. The epoxy/resin/curing treatment ensures the mechanical strength of the assembly of teeth, core, and coils. In addition, the first HSU system allows the coil layers to be moved inside the slots for the assembly purpose. The second system uses the slided-in teeth instead of the plugged-in teeth. The power density of the electric machine that uses either system can reach its highest limit.

Hsu, John S (Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

102

Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989. Volume 1, Categorical summaries of FGD systems  

SciTech Connect

This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

CMS System Security Plan Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TASK 5: SYSTEM DECOMMISSION. ... BPSSM Business Partners Systems Security Manual. ... of Information Technology, Policy, Procedures, & Audits. ...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Archimedes 2 mechanical assembly planning system  

SciTech Connect

We describe the implementation and performance of Archimedes 2, an integrated mechanical assembly planning system. Archimedes 2 includes two planners, two assembly sequence animation facilities, and an associated robotic workcell. Both planners use full 3 dimensional data. A rudimentary translator from high level assembly plans to control code for the robotic workcell has also been implemented. We can translate data from a commercial CAD system into input data for the system, which has allowed us to plan assembly sequences for many industrial assemblies. Archimedes 2 has been used to plan sequences for assemblies consisting of 5 to 109 parts. We have also successfully taken a CAD model of an assembly, produced an optimized assembly sequence for it, and translated the plan into robot code, which successfully assembles the device specified in the model.

Kaufman, S.G.; Wilson, R.H.; Jones, R.E.; Calton, T.L.; Ames, A.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electric utility resource planning using Continuous-Discrete Modular Simulation and Optimization (CoDiMoSO)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility resource planning traditionally focuses on conventional energy supplies such as coal, natural gas, and oil. Nowadays, planning of renewable energy generation as well as its side necessity of storage capacities have become equally important ... Keywords: Continuous-discrete simulation modeling, Distributed energy generation and storage, Electric utility capacity planning, Integrated decision making

Juan Pablo SáEnz; Nurcin Celik; Shihab Asfour; Young-Jun Son

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Utility-Interconnected Photovoltaic Systems: Evaluating the Rationale for the Utility-Accessible External Disconnect Switch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utility-accessible alternating current (AC) external disconnect switch (EDS) for distributed generators, including photovoltaic (PV) systems, is a hardware feature that allows a utility?s employees to manually disconnect a customer-owned generator from the electricity grid. This paper examines the utility-accessible EDS debate in the context of utility-interactive PV systems for residential and small commercial installations. It also evaluates the rationale for EDS requirements.

Coddington, M.; Margolis, R.M.; Aabakken, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Strategic Information Systems Planning: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information has emerged as an agent of integration and the enabler of new competitiveness for today's enterprise in the global marketplace. However, has the paradigm of strategic planning changed sufficiently to support the new role of information systems and technology? We reviewed the literature for commonly used or representative information planning methodologies and found that a new approach is needed. There are six methodologies reviewed in this paper. They all tend to regard planning as a separate stage which does not connect structurally and directly to the information systems development. An integration of planning with development and management through enterprise information resources - which capture and characterize the enterprise - will shorten the response cycle and even allow for economic evaluation of information system investment.

Somendra Pant; Cheng Hsu

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$24/ton, levelized over 2020-2030) was for a scenario inUtility Resource Plans (2010-2030) .. xii Figure ES - 2.Resource Plans (2010-2030).. 10 Maximum Energy

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Report to Congress: Comprehensive Program Plan for Advanced Turbine Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Consistent with the Department of Energy (DOE) mission, the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will develop more efficient gas turbine systems for both utility and industrial electric power generation (including cogeneration). The Program will develop base-load power systems for commercial offering in the year 2000. Although the target fuel is natural gas, the ATS will be adaptable to coal and biomass firing. All ATS will exhibit these characteristics: Ultra-high efficiency [utility systems: 60 percent (lower heating value basis); industrial systems: 15 percent improvement over today`s best gas turbine systems]; Environmental superiority [reduced nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC)]; and Cost competitiveness [10 percent lower cost of electricity]. This Program Plan was requested in the House, Senate, and Conference Reports on the FY 1993 Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, Public Law 102--381, and is consistent with the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which (in Section 2112) identifies work for improving gas turbines. This plan outlines the 8-year ATS Program and discusses rationale and planning. Total Program costs are estimated to be $700 million, consisting of an approximate $450 million government share and an approximate $250 million cost-share by industrial participants.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan  

SciTech Connect

The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents.

Vann, J.M.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-1023E Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/EMS_pubs.html Pre-print version of article to be published in Energy Efficiency Journal. "The journal article can be found in the Energy Efficiency Journal at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12053-008-9030-x" The work

115

Distribution load study aids system planning  

SciTech Connect

The Walnut Metering Project is an experimental substation and distribution system metering installation designed to provide quantitative data for distribution system planning. The design and operation of the metering equipment are discussed. After 3 years of operation it was concluded that the primary economic benefits anticipated from the determination of substation area diversity characteristics did not materialize because the peaking characteristics of the substations in the area were typically coincident with each other. However, the data obtained had a significant positive impact, both economically and operationally, in the field of equipment loadability, and is beneficial to activities related to load projections and distribution system planning. (LCL)

Scofield J.M.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

DOE Action Plan Addressing the Electricity Distribution System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ACTION PLAN ACTION PLAN ADDRESSING THE ELECTRICITY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ~DRAFT~ DOE Action Plan Addressing the Electricity Distribution System 1 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 2 The Grid Tech Team ................................................................................................ 2 Focus on Distribution .............................................................................................. 3 Roadmap Goals ....................................................................................................... 3 PROCESS OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................... 4

117

SMUD plans a [open quote]renewable[close quote] future. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) is currently developing a plan to meet 54 percent of its projected power needs with renewable energy sources - up from 49 percent today - and increase to 60 percent by 2004. Since the closing of the Rancho Seco nuclear plant, with the loss of 913 MW, SMUD has had to find and develop alternative sources of energy. Besides buying power from other utilities, SMUD has a far reaching integrated resource plan (IRP) that includes many types of renewable energy sources. Among the projects already producing are: the nation's largest photovoltaic power plant, the largest utility owned wind turbine, photovoltaic recharging stations for electric vehicles, and two geothermal projects generating 134 MW.

Garner, W.L.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Uniform System of Accounts for Gas Utilities (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes a uniform system of accounts and annual report filing requirements for natural gas utilities operating in Maine.

119

HEMP emergency planning and operating procedures for electric power systems  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of the impact of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electric power systems and electrical equipment have revealed that HEMP creates both misoperation and failures. These events result from both the early time E[sub 1] (steep-front pulse) component and the late time E[sub 3] (geomagnetic perturbations) component of HEMP. In this report a HEMP event is viewed in terms of its marginal impact over classical power system disturbances by considering the unique properties and consequences of HEMP. This report focuses on system-wide electrical component failures and their potential consequences from HEMP. In particular, the effectiveness of planning and operating procedures for electric systems is evaluated while under the influence of HEMP. This assessment relies on published data and characterizes utilities using the North American Electric Reliability Council's regions and guidelines to model electric power system planning and operations. Key issues addressed by the report include how electric power systems are affected by HEMP and what actions electric utilities can initiate to reduce the consequences of HEMP. The report also reviews the salient features of earlier HEMP studies and projects, examines technology trends in the electric power industry which are affected by HEMP, characterizes the vulnerability of power systems to HEMP, and explores the capability of electric systems to recover from a HEMP event.

Reddoch, T.W.; Markel, L.C. (Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Tank waste remediation system engineering plan  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ``as is`` condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ``to be`` configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively.

Rifaey, S.H.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geothermal energy systems plan for Boise City  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a plan for development of a downtown Boise geothermal district space heating system incorporating legal, engineering, organizational, geological, and economic requirements. Topics covered include: resource characteristics, system design and feasibility, economic feasibility, legal overview, organizational alternatives, and conservation. Included in appendices are: property ownership patterns on the Boise Front, existing hot well data, legal briefs, environmental data, decision point communications, typical building heating system retrofit schematics, and background assumptions and data for cost summary. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Analysis of potential benefits of integrated-gasifier combined cycles for a utility system  

SciTech Connect

Potential benefits of integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) units were evaluated for a reference utility system by comparing long range expansion plans using IGCC units and gas turbine peakers with a plan using only state of the art steam turbine units and gas turbine peakers. Also evaluated was the importance of the benefits of individual IGCC unit characteristics, particularly unit efficiency, unit equivalent forced outage rate, and unit size. A range of IGCC units was analyzed, including cases achievable with state of the art gas turbines and cases assuming advanced gas turbine technology. All utility system expansion plans that used IGCC units showed substantial savings compared with the base expansion plan using the steam turbine units.

Choo, Y.K.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Easy system call tracing for Plan 9.  

SciTech Connect

Tracing system calls makes debugging easy and fast. On Plan 9, traditionally, system call tracing has been implemented with acid. New systems do not always implement all the capabilities needed for Acid, particularly the ability to rewrite the process code space to insert breakpoints. Architecture support libraries are not always available for Acid, or may not work even on a supported architecture. The requirement that Acid's libraries be available can be a problem on systems with a very small memory footprint, such as High Performance Computing systems where every Kbyte counts. Finally, Acid tracing is inconvenient in the presence of forks, which means tracing shell pipelines is particularly troublesome. The strace program available on most Unix systems is far more convenient to use and more capable than Acid for system call tracing. A similar system on Plan 9 can simplify troubleshooting. We have built a system calling tracing capability into the Plan 9 kernel. It has proven to be more convenient than strace in programming effort. One can write a shell script to implement tracing, and the C code to implement an strace equivalent is several orders of magnitude smaller.

Minnich, Ronald G.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Environmental development plan: geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure that environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) considerations are addressed adequately in the technology decision making process, the Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies and evaluates EH and S concerns; defines EH and S research and related assessments to examine or resolve the concerns; provides a coordinated schedule with the technology program for required EH and S research and developement; and indicates the timing for Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Readiness Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports. This EDP for geothermal energy systems covers all current and planned activities of the DOE Geothermal Energy Systems. Hydrothermal convection systems, geopressured systems, and hot-dry-rock systems are covered. Environmental concerns and requirements for resolution of these concerns are discussed at length. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Office Safety System Oversight Staffing Plan - Filled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos Site Office Safety System Oversight Staffing Plan" Los Alamos Site Office Safety System Oversight Staffing Plan" "December 2008" "ACTIVITIES","Days for Activity in each Fiscal Year",,,,,,"Notes" ,"FY09","FY10","FY11","FY12","FY13","FY14" "Task Based",,,,,,,"Integrated Assessment Schedule items, SET lead, 15 days per assessment for team leader, based on 8 hour days, 7 days for team member (30 SC, 82 SS systems). Formal assessments can be reduced as CAS matures & Shadow assessments increased. (NA-1 SD 226.1A)" "7 SC Assessments",154,154,154,132,132,110 "10 SS System Assessments",220,220,220,198,198,176 "12 Shadow Assessments",48,48,48,68,68,92,"4 days per normal shadow assessment (NA-1 SD 226.1A)"

126

Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. Market barriers unrelated to technology often limit the expansion of utility-scale solar power, even in areas with exceptional resource potential. Many of these non-technical barriers have to do with policy, regulation, and planning, and hardly ever do they resolve themselves in a timely fashion. In most cases, pre-emptive intervention by interested stakeholders is the easiest way to remove/address such barriers, but it requires knowing how to navigate the institutional waters of the relevant agencies and boards. This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. It focuses on the Western Interconnection (WI), primarily because the quality of solar resources in the Southwest makes utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) economically feasible, and because the relevant institutions have evolved in a way that has opened up opportunities for removing non-technical market barriers. Developers will find in this report a high-level field manual to identify the venues for mitigating and possibly eliminating systemic market obstacles and ensuring that the economic playing field is reasonably level. Project-specific issues such as siting for transmission and generation resources are beyond the scope of this report. Instead, the aim is to examine issues that pervasively affect all utility-scale PV and CSP in the region regardless of where the project may be. While the focus is on the WI, many of the institutions described here also have their counterparts in the Eastern and the Texas interconnections. Specifically, this report suggests a number of critical engagement points relating to generation and transmission planning.

Hein, J.; Hurlbut, D.; Milligan, M.; Coles, L.; Green, B.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Planning for Home Renewable Energy Systems | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Home Renewable Energy Systems Planning for Home Renewable Energy Systems November 11, 2013 - 8:49pm Addthis Planning for a home renewable energy system is a process that...

128

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering Farmington Electric Utility System - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Net Metering Provider Farmington Electric Utility System Net metering rules developed by the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) apply to the state's investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities, which are not regulated by the commission, are exempt from the PRC rules but authorized to develop their own net metering programs. Farmington Electric, a municipal utility, offers net metering to residential customers with systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity.

129

Hybrid distributed generation for power distribution systems planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents planning models for hybrid distributed generation systems, as well as the results corresponding to a distribution systems planning problem obtained using a new computational tool based on a Geographic Information System, GIS. This ... Keywords: distributed generation (DG), geographical information systems (GIS), hybrid power systems, optimal planning

I. J. Ramírez-Rosado; P. J. Zorzano-Santamaría; L. A. Fernández-Jiménez; E. García-Garrido; P. Lara-Santillán; E. Zorzano-Alba; M. Mendoza-Villena

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Planning a Microhydropower System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microhydropower System Microhydropower System Planning a Microhydropower System July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis To see if a microhydropower system would work for you, determine the vertical distance (head) available and flow (quantity) of the water. To see if a microhydropower system would work for you, determine the vertical distance (head) available and flow (quantity) of the water. What are the key facts? A microhydropower system requires access to flowing water on your property; usually hilly or mountainous sites are best. Hiring professionals will determine the most accurate measurements of your site's head and flow, but you can get initial measurements yourself. To build a microhydropower system [11050], you need access to flowing water on your property. A sufficient quantity of falling water must be available,

131

Control System Development Plan for the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has as one of its primary goals the demonstration of the attractiveness of the spherical torus concept as a fusion power plant. Central to this goal is the achievement of high plasma {beta} ( = 2{micro}{sub 0}

/B{sup 2} a measure of the efficiency of a magnetic plasma confinement system). It has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the maximum achievable {beta} is a strong function of both local and global plasma parameters. It is therefore important to optimize control of the plasma. To this end a phased development plan for digital plasma control on NSTX is presented. The relative level of sophistication of the control system software and hardware will be increased according to the demands of the experimental program in a three phase plan. During Day 0 (first plasma), a simple coil current control algorithm will initiate plasma operations. During the second phase (Day 1) of plasma operations the control system will continue to use the preprogrammed algorithm to initiate plasma breakdown but will then change over to a rudimentary plasma control scheme based on linear combinations of measured plasma fields and fluxes. The third phase of NSTX plasma control system development will utilize the rtEFIT code, first used on DIII-D, to determine, in real-time, the full plasma equilibrium by inverting the Grad-Shafranov equation. The details of the development plan, including a description of the proposed hardware will be presented.

C. Neumeyer; D. Mueller; D.A. Gates; J.R. Ferron

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Utility battery storage systems program report for FY 94  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1994.

Butler, P.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Specific systems studies of battery energy storage for electric utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. As a part of this program, four utility-specific systems studies were conducted to identify potential battery energy storage applications within each utility network and estimate the related benefits. This report contains the results of these systems studies.

Akhil, A.A.; Lachenmeyer, L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jabbour, S.J. [Decision Focus, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States); Clark, H.K. [Power Technologies, Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Identification of issues pertaining to Maryland utilities' plans for complying with Title IV of the 1990 CAAA  

SciTech Connect

The utilities that operate plants in Maryland are formulating their plans for complying with this portion of the CAAA. The Power Plant Research Program of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has prepared the report to aid in the State's review of these plans. The purpose of the report is twofold: (1) to present summaries of the utilities' compliance plans; and (2) to identify issues or potential concerns that have arisen out of a preliminary review of those plans. A glossary of technical terms can be found at the end of the report.

Mountain, D.; Kahal, M.; Seinfeld, J.; Borkowicz, R.; Brower, R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for...

137

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility & Commercial Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to utility, commercial, and rail applications of advanced energy storage systems are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - Application of Large-Scale ESS in AEP - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Park - Kent Holst, ISEP.pdf

138

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program Gainesville Regional Utilities - Solar-Electric (PV) System Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5,000 Program Info Start Date 10/1/2010 State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Solar window of 80% or more: $1.00/watt Provider Gainesville Regional Utilities '''''NOTE: Application targets for fiscal year 2013 have been met for the GRU Solar PV Rebate Program. The next round of applications are scheduled to open on October 1, 2013 pending approval of the GRU budget by the Gainesville City Commission.''''' Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) offers its customers a rebate to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Systems with solar windows of 80% or

139

Systems Engineering Management Plan. Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Project Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to define and establish the MRS Project Systems Engineering process that implements the approved policy and requirements of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This plan is Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan (PMP). This plan provides the framework for implementation of systems engineering on the MRS Project consistent with DOE Order 4700.1, the OCRWM Program Management System Manual (PMSM), and the OCRWM Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP).

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

King, D.A.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Infrastructure Department PURADYN OIL BYPASS FILTRATION SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST PLAN October 2002 Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Supervisor (Thomas) Date Reviewed:...

142

Utility battery storage systems. Program report for FY95  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1995.

Butler, P.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Report for FY92  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the fiscal year 1992 activities of the, Utility Battery Storage Systems Program (UBS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Management (OEM). The UBS program is conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). UBS is responsible for the engineering development of integrated battery systems for use in utility-energy-storage (UES) and other stationary applications. Development is accomplished primarily through cost-shared contracts with industrial organizations. An important part of the development process is the identification, analysis, and characterization of attractive UES applications. UBS is organized into five projects: Utility Battery Systems Analyses; Battery Systems Engineering; Zinc/Bromine; Sodium/Sulfur; Supplemental Evaluations and Field Tests. The results of the Utility Systems Analyses are used to identify several utility-based applications for which battery storage can effectively solve existing problems. The results will also specify the engineering requirements for widespread applications and motivate and define needed field evaluations of full-size battery systems.

Butler, P.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Flight Plan Specification and Management for Unmanned Aircraft Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new concept for specifying Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) flight operations that aims at improving the waypoint based approach, found in most autopilot systems, by providing higher level fligh plan specification primitives. The ... Keywords: Flight plan management, Flight plan specification, Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)

Eduard Santamaria; Enric Pastor; Cristina Barrado; Xavier Prats; Pablo Royo; Marc Perez

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Intelligent Transformer Monitoring System Utilizing Neuro-Fuzzy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Transformer Monitoring System Utilizing Neuro-Fuzzy Technique Approach Intelligent Center Intelligent Transformer Monitoring System Utilizing Neuro-Fuzzy Technique Approach Final Project transformers and circuit breakers off-line, in order to assess whether the equipment is operating normally

146

Utility Battery Storage Systems Program report for FY93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contract development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility-energy-storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1993.

Butler, P.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action Speaker(s): Stephen Malloy V. Rory Jones Date: November 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne This presentation reviews a new software tool that recommends specific actions for homeowners and others to undertake to optimize their utility system configuration and operation. The tool, the "Utility System Optimizer" (USO), may be configured to optimize across all utilities (electricity, gas, water - and other fuels as propane, oil and wood) to meet objectives that are defined by the owner/operator (homeowner, retailer, etc.). Such objectives may be to maximize net wealth over time, to minimize carbon footprint for the best economics, to maximize health

150

Transmission System: Loss Reduction and Utilization Enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI R&D program 172Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained Worldcomprises base research activities and a series of demonstration projects under the collaborative efforts led by EPRI, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and the transmission industry. The program's goal is to understand, through real-life examples, designs that can help build a more efficient transmission system. Base research and development activities under program P172 have set the foundation for the demons...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

151

Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research Development (R D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)); Parks, W.P. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research & Development (R&D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R&D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Parks, W.P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Sacramento Municipal Utility District: Preparing its Distribution System for PEVs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2010, when a large-scale reintroduction of PEVs seemed imminent, SMUD embarked on a landmark distribution system analysis. The analysis pinpointed and monetized the utility's potential upgrade needs and alternatives. It also informed and enabled the utility to configure several rate pilots with current PEV customers. These analyses and pilots are the focus of this case study.

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Planning a Small Wind Electric System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Wind Electric System Small Wind Electric System Planning a Small Wind Electric System July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis Small wind electric systems require planning to determine if there is enough wind, the location is appropriate, if wind systems are allowed, and if the system will be economical. | Photo courtesy of Bergey WindPower. Small wind electric systems require planning to determine if there is enough wind, the location is appropriate, if wind systems are allowed, and if the system will be economical. | Photo courtesy of Bergey WindPower. What are the key facts? Careful planning helps to ensure that your small wind electric system project goes smoothly and is economical at your location. During planning, you will find out if there is enough wind to operate the system, if the location is appropriate, if wind systems are

156

ENERGY EFFICIENT SYSTEM DESIGN AND UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This model as- sumes that the decision to transition to low power state can be made in only one state model assumes that a decision to transition into a lower-power state can be made upon each event, the whole system, or some of its components can be transitioned into low-power states using dynamic power

Simunic, Tajana

157

HEMP emergency planning and operating procedures for electric power systems. Power Systems Technology Program  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of the impact of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electric power systems and electrical equipment have revealed that HEMP creates both misoperation and failures. These events result from both the early time E{sub 1} (steep-front pulse) component and the late time E{sub 3} (geomagnetic perturbations) component of HEMP. In this report a HEMP event is viewed in terms of its marginal impact over classical power system disturbances by considering the unique properties and consequences of HEMP. This report focuses on system-wide electrical component failures and their potential consequences from HEMP. In particular, the effectiveness of planning and operating procedures for electric systems is evaluated while under the influence of HEMP. This assessment relies on published data and characterizes utilities using the North American Electric Reliability Council`s regions and guidelines to model electric power system planning and operations. Key issues addressed by the report include how electric power systems are affected by HEMP and what actions electric utilities can initiate to reduce the consequences of HEMP. The report also reviews the salient features of earlier HEMP studies and projects, examines technology trends in the electric power industry which are affected by HEMP, characterizes the vulnerability of power systems to HEMP, and explores the capability of electric systems to recover from a HEMP event.

Reddoch, T.W.; Markel, L.C. [Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluating Utility System Operations Using APLUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steam system at a recycled paper fiberboard plant in Texas was evaluated using APLUS. These simulations identified inefficiencies in the current operation and so suggested more efficient alternatives. The information provided by the client was used to develop heat and mass balances for the base case. The marginal cost analysis in APLUS was used to identify the high cost areas in operating the steam system. This analysis highlighted that the cost of power from the 200 psig steam driven back pressure turbine was a prohibitive $270/MWh. The 600 psig boiler and extraction turbine were found to be large enough to meet all the steam and power requirements of the plant. This required that a new 600 HP motor be bought to drive the paper machine currently driven by the back pressure turbine. Shifting the load in this manner resulted in annual savings of $590,000.

Pethe, S.; Singh, R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial 7 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - Utility & Commercial Applications Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to utility, commercial, and rail applications of advanced energy storage systems are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies International Energy Storage Programs Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - Application of Large-Scale ESS in AEP - Ali Nourai, AEP.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Iowa Stored Energy Park - Kent Holst, ISEP.pdf

160

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Speaker(s): Katsuhiro Miura Date: January 27, 2012 - 10:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is a form of utility regulation that strengthens the financial incentives to lower rates, lower costs, or improve nonprice performance relative traditional regulation, which the authors call cost-of-service, rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. Although the electric utility industry has considerable experience with incentive mechanisms that target specific areas of performance, implementation of mechanisms that cover a comprehensive set of utility costs or services is relatively rare. In recent years, interest in PBR has increased as a result of growing dissatisfaction with COS/ROR and as a result of economic and technological trends that are leading to more competition in certain segments of the electricity industry. In addition, incentive regulation has been used with some success in other public utility industries, most notably telecommunications in the US and telecommunications, energy, and water in the United Kingdom. In this report, the authors analyze comprehensive PBR mechanisms for electric utilities in four ways: (1) they describe different types of PBR mechanisms, (2) they review a sample of actual PBR plans, (3) they consider the interaction of PBR and utility-funded energy efficiency programs, and (4) they examine how PBR interacts with electric utility resource planning and industry restructuring. The report should be of interest to technical staff of utilities and regulatory commissions that are actively considering or designing PBR mechanisms. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Hill, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Capacitor bank planning for possible system contingencies  

SciTech Connect

A new method for planning capacitor banks as sources of VARs for voltage maintenance during anticipated normal and contingency conditions is proposed in this work. The objective is to minimize the total investment cost in the new reactive sources. The scheduling technique is based on sequentially selecting the most severe operating state which requires the maximum reactive power, determining the optimal bus for this state using a cost-based index, and suitably modifying, if necessary, the reactive power installed to satisfy less severe operating conditions. The solution procedure employs the Compensation method (Largechange Sensitivity Technique) for network solution to update bus voltages. The discrete nature of the capacitor bank, the installation, site, and switching facility cost are all considered in the optimization process. The algorithm also minimizes the number of switchable installations. The proposed VAR scheduling method is compared with the Inverse Jacobian method for accuracy, and with other scheduling ideas for investment costs, via the IEEE 30-bus system.

Lee, T.H.; Hill, E.F.; Jong, T.L.; Obadina, O.O.; Pan, C.T.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Home energy rating system business plan feasibility study in Washington state  

SciTech Connect

In the Fall of 1993, the Washington State Energy Office funded the Washington Home Energy Rating System project to investigate the benefits of a Washington state HERS. WSEO established a HERS and EEM Advisory Group. Composed of mortgage lenders/brokers, realtors, builders, utility staff, remodelers, and other state agency representatives, the Advisory Group met for the first time on November 17, 1993. The Advisory Group established several subcommittees to identify issues and options. During its March 1994 meeting, the Advisory Group formed a consensus directing WSEO to develop a HERS business plan for consideration. The Advisory Group also established a business plan subcommittee to help draft the plan. Under the guidance of the business plan subcommittee, WSEO conducted research on how customers value energy efficiency in the housing market. This plan represents WSEO`s effort to comply with the Advisory Group`s request. Why is a HERS Business Plan necessary? Strictly speaking this plan is more of a feasibility plan than a business plan since it is designed to help determine the feasibility of a new business venture: a statewide home energy rating system. To make this determination decision makers or possible investors require strategic information about the proposed enterprise. Ideally, the plan should anticipate the significant questions parties may want to know. Among other things, this document should establish decision points for action.

Lineham, T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

Mountziaris, T. J.

167

Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) systems engineering policy provided in 97-IMSD-193. The SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Project to implement the policy. The SEMP will be used as the basis for tailoring the systems engineering applications to the development of the physical systems and processes necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program. It is a living document that will be revised as necessary to reflect changes in systems engineering guidance as the program evolves. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters has issued program management guidance, DOE Order 430. 1, Life Cycle Asset Management, and associated Good Practice Guides that include substantial systems engineering guidance.

Peck, L.G.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

System Utilization Benchmark on the Cray T3E  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization Benchmark on the Cray T3E Utilization Benchmark on the Cray T3E and IBM SP Adrian Wong, Leonid Oliker, William Kramer, Teresa Kaltz, and David Bailey National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA {atwong, loliker, wtkramer, tlkaltz, dhbailey}@lbl.gov Abstract. Obtaining maximum utilization of parallel systems continues to be an active area of research and development. This article outlines a new benchmark, called the Eflectiwe System Performance (ESP) test, designed to provide a utilization metric that is transferable between sys- tems and illuminate the effects of various scheduling parameters. Results with discussion are presented for the Cray T3E and IBM SP systems to- gether with insights obtained from simulation.

169

Distribution System Planning with Distributed Generation: Optimal versus Heuristic Approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Distribution system design and planning is facing a major change in paradigm because of deregulation of the power industry and with rapid penetration of distributed… (more)

Bin Humayd, Abdullah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Economic assessment of the utilization of lead-acid batteries in electric utility systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specific applications in which lead--acid batteries might be economically competitive on an electric utility system are identified. Particular attention is given to searching the Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE and G) system for installations of batteries which could defer or cancel costly transmission and/or distribution projects. Although the transmission and distribution data are based on specific applications on the PSE and G system, the generation data are based on a national reference system. The report analyzes and summarizes all costs and savings attributable to lead--acid batteries. 40 figures, 78 tables. (RWR)

Johnson, A.C.; Hynds, J.A.; Nevius, D.R.; Nunan, G.A.; Sweetman, N.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Capacity Utilization Study for Aviation Security Cargo Inspection Queuing System  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation study for an aviation security cargo inspection queuing system for material flow and accountability. The queuing model employed in our study is based on discrete-event simulation and processes various types of cargo simultaneously. Onsite measurements are collected in an airport facility to validate the queuing model. The overall performance of the aviation security cargo inspection system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, throughput, capacity utilization, subscribed capacity utilization, resources capacity utilization, subscribed resources capacity utilization, and number of cargo pieces (or pallets) in the different queues. These metrics are performance indicators of the system s ability to service current needs and response capacity to additional requests. We studied and analyzed different scenarios by changing various model parameters such as number of pieces per pallet, number of TSA inspectors and ATS personnel, number of forklifts, number of explosives trace detection (ETD) and explosives detection system (EDS) inspection machines, inspection modality distribution, alarm rate, and cargo closeout time. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures should reduce the overall cost and shipping delays associated with new inspection requirements.

Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL; Brumback, Daryl L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Graphic analysis and planning of electrical distribution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for computer modeling of electrical distribution systems have been available to utility engineers for years. The formation of a distribution data base can be a huge task because of the enormous number of components in a utility's distribution ...

Gwendolyn L. Fuehring

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Applications of HVAC System Utilizing Building Thermal Mass in Japan Speaker(s): Katsuhiro Miura Date: January 27, 2012 - 10:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Buildings have a large thermal capacity and it affects much on building thermal load for the HVAC system. The thermal mass can be utilized also to control the thermal load by storing thermal energy before HVAC operation. There are two ways to store thermal energy. One is by operating the HVAC system and the other is by natural ventilation, mainly at night. The latter could be combined with daily HVAC operation as a hybrid ventilation. Thermal mass storage is useful to decrease the hourly peak load and the daily thermal load and can be used for both cooling and heating purpose.

174

Modeling On-Site Utility Systems Using "APLUS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most energy saving schemes on industrial sites lead to reductions in the steam and/or power demands on an on-site utility system. Accurate knowledge of the marginal and incremental costs of the available levels of steam and shaft power from such systems is, therefore, essential for the correct economic evaluation of proposed retrofit schemes. Knowledge of marginal costs is also essential for continuous optimal operation of on-site utility systems. "APLUS" is an IBM-PC based software package developed for evaluation of marginal and incremental costs of on-site utilities. "APLUS" allows the user to configure steam/power systems using sets of predefined icons. Once a flowsheet has been configured, the program can be used to solve the heat and mass balance and to generate accurate marginal costs. An overview of the package and examples illustrating its applications are presented in this paper.

Ranade, S. M.; Jones, D. H.; Shrec, S. C.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Planning for Home Renewable Energy Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning for Home Renewable Energy Systems Planning for Home Renewable Energy Systems Planning for Home Renewable Energy Systems November 11, 2013 - 8:49pm Addthis Planning for a home renewable energy system is a process that includes analyzing your existing electricity use, looking at local codes and requirements, deciding if you want to operate your system on or off of the electric grid, and understanding technology options you have for your site. | Photo by Francis Fine Art Photography. Planning for a home renewable energy system is a process that includes analyzing your existing electricity use, looking at local codes and requirements, deciding if you want to operate your system on or off of the electric grid, and understanding technology options you have for your site. | Photo by Francis Fine Art Photography.

176

NRRI summary of Texas Utility Commission staff analysis of the incentive regulation plan established in Docket No. 8585: The first three years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Texas Public Utility Commission Staff review of Southwestern Bell Telephone Company of Texas` (SWBT of Texas) incentive regulation plan (the Plan) yielded mixed results. The evaluation of the Plan found that it provided benefits to Texas ratepayers, yet, as with any experiment, there have been both successes and failures in different aspects of the Plan.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

DOE Action Plan Addressing the Electricity Transmission System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACTION PLAN ADDRESSING THE ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION SYSTEM ~DRAFT~ DOE Action Plan Addressing the Electricity Transmission System 1 Table of Contents * INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 2 The Grid Tech Team ...................................................................................................... 2 Focus on Transmission .................................................................................................. 3 Roadmap Goals ............................................................................................................. 4 * PROCESS OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................... 5

178

Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/CMS-16.pdf Cost: Free References: WASP[1] "The WASP-IV code permits finding the optimal expansion plan for a power generating system over a period of up to thirty years, within constraints given by the planner." References ↑ "WASP" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wien_Automatic_System_Planning_(WASP)_Package&oldid=403685

179

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists some of these potential indirect energy market impacts, and identifies whether or not utilities

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists some of these potential indirect energy market impacts, and identifies whether or not utilities

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Utility market and requirements for a solar thermophotovoltaic system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing need for clean affordable electric power generation in both the U.S. and internationally and solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) can meet the needs of this market. This paper investigates the utility grid market applicable to a solar thermophotovoltaic power generating system. It finds that a large international electrical market and a smaller U.S. electrical market exist today but the U.S. market will grow by the year 2005 to a level that would easily support the high production level required for solar systems to be cost effective. Factors which could influence this market and the system characteristics considered by utilities in selecting future power systems such as levelized energy cost, dispatchability, environmental, etc., for both the grid and remote market are discussed. The main competition for this market and the operating performance of this competition are described. A conceptual design of a STPV power system is presented, the operation is described, and how the performance meets the utility requirements is discussed. The relationship between the cost of the TPV conversion unit and the system efficiency of the STPV system is given for both the grid and remote markets that it must meet in order to be competitive. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Stone, K. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, 5301 Bolsa Avenue, Huntington Beach, California 92647 (United States); McLellan, S. [Arizona Public Service, P.O. Box 53999 Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Utilities offer photovoltaic systems to remote residential customers  

SciTech Connect

From Idaho to Arizona and Nevada to Colorado, utilities across the U.S. are beginning to offer remote homeowners an option that may seem unusual today, but might be commonplace in the future. Would-be customers who do not live close to the electric grid may choose the option of photovoltaic (PV) systems to supply their electricity as an alternative to expensive line extension. These customers typically live and/or farm in rural sections of the country. Others own vacation homes far from towns or cities. Solar-powered energy systems have already proven successful for powering pumps to water livestock, and for lights and communications devices in locations far from established sources of electricity. Rather than receiving the customary electric bill for metered service, customers will pay a set rate to use the PV system, which the utility will own and maintain. The initial cost of purchasing the system can be much lower than extending the utility line (which can cost $20,000 a mile). From the utility's standpoint, it saves on investing in lines that stand to generate small profits because of the small load and resultant energy sales.

Van Arsdall, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Integrated Design of Chemical Processes and Utility Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pinch concept for integrated heat recovery networks has recently become established in chemical process design. This paper presents an overview of the concept and shows how it has now been extended to total process design (reactors, separators, etc.) and to the task of interfacing processes with their utility systems (furnaces, steam levels, turbines, etc.)

Linnhoff, B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS WITH SUPERCONDUCTING BEARINGS FOR UTILITY APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project’s mission was to achieve significant advances in the practical application of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials to energy-storage systems. The ultimate product was planned as an operational prototype of a flywheel system on an HTS suspension. While the final prototype flywheel did not complete the final offsite demonstration phase of the program, invaluable lessons learned were captured on the laboratory demonstration units that will lead to the successful deployment of a future HTS-stabilized, composite-flywheel energy-storage system (FESS).

Dr. Michael Strasik; Mr. Arthur Day; Mr. Philip Johnson; Dr. John Hull

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

SYSTEM PLANNING WITH THE HANFORD WASTE OPERATIONS SIMULATOR  

SciTech Connect

At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, 216 million liters (57 million gallons) of nuclear waste is currently stored in aging underground tanks, threatening the Columbia River. The River Protection Project (RPP), a fully integrated system of waste storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal facilities, is in varying stages of design, construction, operation, and future planning. These facilities face many overlapping technical, regulatory, and financial hurdles to achieve site cleanup and closure. Program execution is ongoing, but completion is currently expected to take approximately 40 more years. Strategic planning for the treatment of Hanford tank waste is by nature a multi-faceted, complex and iterative process. To help manage the planning, a report referred to as the RPP System Plan is prepared to provide a basis for aligning the program scope with the cost and schedule, from upper-tier contracts to individual facility operating plans. The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulation and mass balance computer model, is used to simulate the current planned RPP mission, evaluate the impacts of changes to the mission, and assist in planning near-term facility operations. Development of additional modeling tools, including an operations research model and a cost model, will further improve long-term planning confidence. The most recent RPP System Plan, Revision 4, was published in September 2009.

CRAWFORD TW; CERTA PJ; WELLS MN

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Systems Integration Office California Energy Resources£ Systems Integration Requi-rements for Decentralized Energy

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Manufactured residential utility wall system (ResCore), overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self-contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the residential kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty and students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the US Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a ``layered`` manufacturing technique that allows each major component group--structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc.--to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, C.; Lau, T.M. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Manufactured Residential Utility Wall System (ResCore),  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty, students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the U.S. Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a layered manufacturing technique that allows each major component group: structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc. to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, Clark; Lau, Tin Man [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Introduction to Electric Systems Expansion Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes (LPG) LG 12.805 per gallon 139.039 Motor Gasoline MG 19.564 per gallon 156.425 Petroleum Coke PC 32 field levels. 5. Cost of energy: The cost of electric energy, which is heavily determined by planning

McCalley, James D.

191

Integrated Requirements Management System Operations and Maintenance Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a plan for the operations and maintenance of the Integrated Requirements Management Systems (IRMS) database. This document describes the roles and responsibilities for the users of the IRMS. Planning is provided for the configuration management of the DOORS software, hardware and data set. Training consideration for the various categories of users is provided.

ACREE, C.D.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

Power System Operational Planning: Challenges and Research Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S.-Canada task force on the August 14, 2003 power system outage that affected 50 million people placed issues related to operational planning on the list of recommendations for improvement. This report documents the challenges that the electric power industry faces, as well as a preliminary set of research needs and a short-term action plan.

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

Online planning for multi-agent systems with bounded communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an online algorithm for planning under uncertainty in multi-agent settings modeled as DEC-POMDPs. The algorithm helps overcome the high computational complexity of solving such problems offline. The key challenges in decentralized operation ... Keywords: Communication in multi-agent systems, Cooperation and collaboration, Decentralized POMDPs, Planning under uncertainty

Feng Wu; Shlomo Zilberstein; Xiaoping Chen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

195

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System (Redirected from LEAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

196

NIF Projects Controls and Information Systems Software Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect

Quality achievement for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is the responsibility of the NIF Projects line organization as described in the NIF and Photon Science Directorate Quality Assurance Plan (NIF QA Plan). This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) is subordinate to the NIF QA Plan and establishes quality assurance (QA) activities for the software subsystems within Controls and Information Systems (CIS). This SQAP implements an activity level software quality assurance plan for NIF Projects as required by the LLNL Institutional Software Quality Assurance Program (ISQAP). Planned QA activities help achieve, assess, and maintain appropriate quality of software developed and/or acquired for control systems, shot data systems, laser performance modeling systems, business applications, industrial control and safety systems, and information technology systems. The objective of this SQAP is to ensure that appropriate controls are developed and implemented for management planning, work execution, and quality assessment of the CIS organization's software activities. The CIS line organization places special QA emphasis on rigorous configuration control, change management, testing, and issue tracking to help achieve its quality goals.

Fishler, B

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

197

Utility interface requirements for a solar power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study specifies that the southern tier of the US (south of the 36th parallel) should be examined to see what problems might develop with the installation of a Satellite Power System (SPS) in the year 2000. One or more 5-GW SPS units could be installed in the utility systems of the southern states in the year 2000. The 345- and 500-kV transmission systems that will probably exist at that time could be readily extended to accommodate the SPS units. The operation of the units will present the utilities with new and difficult problems in system stability and frequency control. The problems will arise because a somewhat variable 5-GW output will be produced by a generator having no mechanical inertia. The unavoidable time lag in controlling the position of the energy beam at the receiving station may have a very critical effect on the stability of the utility systems. The maintenance problems associated with the energy-receiving device, a continuous structure covering more than 40 mi/sup 2/, must be given careful consideration. Repair of lightning damage while maintaining SPS operation may be the most critical requirement. Acquisition and preparation of the 90 mi/sup 2/ land required for the receiving antenna (rectenna) will create many new and difficult environmental problems.

Donalek, P.J.; Whysong, J.L.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

Wills, R.H. [Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste plan  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-465 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Latray, D.A.

1998-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Utilization of Advanced Conductors to Improve Transmission System Utilization and Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Entergy has recently carried out a project on utilization of an advanced conductor to solve a reliability issue related to components overloading at N-1 conditions. The 230-kV Line 195 (Hartburg Inland Orange McLewis Helbig) in Entergy's system is one of the primary sources into the Beaumont/Port Arthur area. The single contingency loss of 500-kV Line 547 (Cypress Hartburg) causes thermal overloads of this line. To prevent conditions from overloading and potential cascading effects, the power transmitted...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60percent of the region's load. Utility and third-party administered energy efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a ten-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2percent of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appear to produce sizeable energy efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives, and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20percent of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

Hopper, Nichole; Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60percent of the region's load. Utility and third-party administered energy efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a ten-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2percent of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appear to produce sizeable energy efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives, and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20percent of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

Hopper, Nichole; Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Performance-Based Ratemaking for Electric Utilities: Review of Plans and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Office of Utility Technology, Office of Energy Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under

204

SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Project Planning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Project Tracking Checklist Energy.gov Careers & Internships Policy &...

205

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of NewRenewable Generation in the Western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, markets for renewable generation--especially wind power--have grown substantially in recent years. This growth is typically attributed to technology improvements and resulting cost reductions, the availability of federal tax incentives, and aggressive state policy efforts. But another less widely recognized driver of new renewable generation is poised to play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in the late-1980s to mid-1990s, but relegated to lesser importance as many states took steps to restructure their electricity markets in the late-1990s, IRP has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions such as the western United States, where retail competition has failed to take root. As practiced in the United States, IRP is a formal process by which utilities analyze the costs, benefits, and risks of all resources available to them--both supply- and demand-side--with the ultimate goal of identifying a portfolio of resources that meets their future needs at lowest cost and/or risk. Though the content of any specific utility IRP is unique, all are built on a common basic framework: (1) development of peak demand and load forecasts; (2) assessment of how these forecasts compare to existing and committed generation resources; (3) identification and characterization of various resource portfolios as candidates to fill a projected resource deficiency; (4) analysis of these different ''candidate'' resource portfolios under base-case and alternative future scenarios; and finally, (5) selection of a preferred portfolio, and creation of a near-term action plan to begin to move towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarely considered seriously in utility IRP. In the western United States, however, the most recent resource plans call for a significant amount of new wind power capacity. These planned additions appear to be motivated by the improved economics of wind power, an emerging understanding that wind integration costs are manageable, and a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities. Equally important, utility IRPs are increasingly recognizing the inherent risks in fossil-based generation portfolios--especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation--and the benefits of renewable energy in mitigating those risks. This article, which is based on a longer report from Berkeley Lab,i examines how twelve investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the western United States--Avista, Idaho Power, NorthWestern Energy (NWE), Portland General Electric (PGE), Puget Sound Energy (PSE), PacifiCorp, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Nevada Power, Sierra Pacific, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)--treat renewable energy in their most recent resource plans (as of July 2005). In aggregate, these twelve utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. In reviewing these plans, our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable generation in the United States, and (2) to suggest possible improvements to the methods used to evaluate renewable generation as a resource option. As such, we begin by summarizing the amount and types of new renewable generation planned as a result of these twelve IRPs. We then offer observations about the IRP process, and how it might be improved to more objectively evaluate renewable resources.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

Business Plan for Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBP) -- Biosolids Blends in Horticultural Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a marketing plan for coal combustion by-products (CCBP)-biosolids blends which summarizes the business opportunity (potential demand for CCBP-biosolids blends) and defines conditions necessary to seize and execute the opportunity identified. The plan places a hypothetical business in a specific location (Austell, GA) to make the cost-profit analysis as realistic as possible. It should be remembered, however, that the marketing plan for a business venture is not "the business." This h...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AEPS System Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEPS System Planning AEPS System Planning ASC logo The Alternative Energy Product Suite (AEPS) System Planning tool is a software application for the design, modeling, and simulation of electrical power systems with an emphasis on renewable energy sources (solar, wind, and hydro). The application calculates power generation, consumption, and storage for modeled systems. Power and cost data can be analyzed to optimize the modeled system based on user objectives and priorities. The Modeling capability supports graphically constructing an electrical power/alternative energy system consisting of site, generation, storage, and load components, including electrical conversion and control hardware. Models can support on-grid and off-grid systems. The Simulation capability generates, consumes, and uses grid and

208

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies, however, wind integration costs used in some of theestimated by recent wind integration studies is shown to theStudies Resource Plans Wind Integration Cost ($/MWh) Wind

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of Wind Power Also important to how renewable energyenergy considered in these plans. Not surprisingly, the total modeled cost of wind

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utilityutilities in evaluating renewable energy options. For anthe treatment of renewable energy in each of the plans is

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Reference guide to small cogeneration systems for utilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers systems performance and cost data for selected smaller cogeneration systems, which are defined generally as those cogeneration systems in the range below 5 megawatts. The data presented in this guide are expected to be used in two main ways. First, the data can be used to extend the existing DEUS Computer Evaluation Model data base to the smaller cogeneration systems. Second, the data will serve as a general guide to smaller cogeneration systems for use by the utilities companies and others. The data pertain to the following cogeneration system: gas turbine with heat recovery boiler, back pressure and extraction/condensing steam turbine, combined cycle, internal combustion (reciprocating) engine, steam bottoming cycle using industrial process exhaust, and gas turbine topping cycle with standard industrial process steam generators. A no-cogeneration base case is included for comparison purposes.

Rodden, R.M.; Boyen, J.L.; Waters, M.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System Speaker(s): Steve Black Date: December 5, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 BACKGROUND: Several recent issues of Today At Berkeley Lab, including for today, December 1, have called our attention to the planned changes to the Lab's shuttle bus system. If you have not yet viewed the description of the planned new system and the maps showing the new routes it is advisable for you to do so as the changes are significant, not just a "fine tuning". Several EETD staff members and shuttle bus riders have expressed serious concerns about the changes, which has prompted us to set up this special seminar. DESCRIPTION: Steve Black, who is fairly new to the Lab, has responsibility for a number of Laboratory support services

213

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This section provides a description of the Hanford Site, identifies the proposed method of 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS) closure, and briefly summarizes the contents of each chapter of this plan.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

AC transmission system planning choosing lines from a discrete set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission system planning (TSP) is a difficult nonlinear optimization problem involving non-convex quadratic terms, as well as discrete variables. We extend prior results for linear relaxations, drawing on a preliminary ...

Gilbertson, Eric W.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's...

216

Materials selection guidelines for geothermal energy utilization systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual includes geothermal fluid chemistry, corrosion test data, and materials operating experience. Systems using geothermal energy in El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States are described. The manual provides materials selection guidelines for surface equipment of future geothermal energy systems. The key chemical species that are significant in determining corrosiveness of geothermal fluids are identified. The utilization modes of geothermal energy are defined as well as the various physical fluid parameters that affect corrosiveness. Both detailed and summarized results of materials performance tests and applicable operating experiences from forty sites throughout the world are presented. The application of various non-metal materials in geothermal environments are discussed. Included in appendices are: corrosion behavior of specific alloy classes in geothermal fluids, corrosion in seawater desalination plants, worldwide geothermal power production, DOE-sponsored utilization projects, plant availability, relative costs of alloys, and composition of alloys. (MHR)

Ellis, P.F. II; Conover, M.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Residential end-use energy planning system (REEPS). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS) is described. REEPS is a forecasting model of residential energy patterns that is capable of evaluating the impacts of a broad range of energy conservation measures. REEPS forecasts appliance installations, operating efficiencies, and utilization patterns for space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and cooking. Each of these decisions is sensitive to energy prices, mandatory policies, and household/dwelling and geographical characteristics. The parameters of these choice models have been estimated statistically from national household survey data. The structure of the choice models and the results of the statistical analysis are reported in detail. REEPS forecasts energy choices for a large number of market segments representing households with different socioeconomic, dwelling, and geographical characteristics. These segments reflect the joint distribution of characteristics in the population. Aggregate forecasts are generated by summing up the decisions for all population segments. This technique provides a consistent method of obtaining aggregate forecasts from disaggregate, nonlinear choice models. Moreover, it permits evaluation of the distributional impacts of prospective conservation policies. The results of simulation of REEPS are described. REEPS forecasts a moderate rise in electricity consumption per household and significant drops in other fuels. These are caused in part by high market penetrations of electric appliances which themselves reflect major shifts in relative energy prices.

Goett, A.; McFadden, D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Guidelines for Planning Interoperable Distribution Automation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully integrated distribution automation is a relatively new challenge for the utility industry, and the full range of new capabilities it enables are not well understood. In addition, developing an overall strategy to long-term automation integration and deployment through the use of open standards adds to the challenge. These guidelines were developed to describe the overall vision of distribution automation and to assist in application of emerging open standards to the procurement and integration of a...

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the period April--June, 1996 for the utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration program. The topics of the report include NEPA information, ATS engine design, integrated program plan, closed loop cooling, thin wall casting development, rotor air sealing development, compressor aerodynamic development, turbine aerodynamic development, phase 3 advanced air sealing development, active tip clearance control, combustion system development, ceramic ring segment, advanced thermal barrier coating development, steam cooling effects, directionally solidified blade development, single crystal blade development program, advanced vane alloy development, blade and vane life prediction, nickel based alloy rotor, and plans for the next reporting period.

NONE

1996-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Archimedes: A system that plans and executes mechanical assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archimedes is a prototype mechanical assembly system which generates and executes robot assembly programs from a CAD model input. The system addresses the unrealized potential for flexibility in robotic mechanical assembly applications by automating the programming task. Input is a solid model of the finished assembly. Parts relationships and geometric constraints are deduced from the solid model. A rule-based planner generates a generic'' assembly plan that satisfies the geometric constraints, as well as other constraints embodied in the rules. A retargetable plan compiler converts the generic plan into code specific to an application environment. Execution of the compiled plan in a workcell containing an Adept Two robot, a vision system, and other parts handling equipment will be shown on videotape.

Strip, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk ofneeds. With natural gas prices expected to remain high forrisk (primarily natural gas price risk) in utility resourc e

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

portfolios – especially natural gas price risk and theutility needs. With natural gas prices expected to remainprice risk (primarily natural gas price risk) in utility

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluating Utility Executives' Perceptions of Smart Grid Costs, Benefits and Adoption Plans To Assess Impacts on Building Design and Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Grid technology is likely to be implemented in various magnitudes across utilities in the near future. To accommodate these technologies significant changes will have to be incorporated in building design construction and planning. This research paper attempts to evaluate public utility executives’ plans to adopt smart grid technologies and to assess timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Telephone survey was the data collection method used to collect information from executives at cooperative and municipal utilities. The study focuses on small and medium utilities with more than five thousand customers and fewer than one hundred thousand customers. A stratified random sampling approach was applied and sample results for fifty-nine survey responses were used to predict the timing of smart grid implementation and the timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Results of this research indicate that design and construction professionals should already be developing knowledge and experience to accommodate smart grid impacts on the built environment.

Rao, Ameya Vinayak

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices is therefore critical to properly valuing energy efficiency cost-effectiveness and marketenergy planning and investment decisions. Electricity market pricesenergy markets that may be important for energy planners to consider, including: Allowance prices

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices is therefore critical to properly valuing energy efficiency cost-effectiveness and marketenergy planning and investment decisions. Electricity market pricesenergy markets that may be important for energy planners to consider, including: Allowance prices

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sampling and Analytical Plan Guidance for Water Characterization of Coal-Fired Steam Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US EPA recently announced its intentions to conduct a two-year study to determine whether the Steam Electric Categorical Effluent Guidelines should be revised. This report provides sampling plan guidance designed to assist the EPA in developing a sampling program and site-specific sampling plans to characterize a coal-fired facility's wastewater, to include some sampling processes used by EPRI in past coal-fired wastewater characterization studies, and to assist EPA in ensuring data quality during it...

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applied to the case of hydroelectric facilities with large3. For comparison, the hydroelectric system in California asas droughts which reduce hydroelectric energy availability,

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Strategic planning in electric utilities: Using wind technologies as risk management tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights research investigating the ownership of renewable energy technologies to mitigate risks faced by the electric utility industry. Renewable energy technology attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead time, modularity, and investment reversibility are discussed. Incorporating some of these attributes into an economic evaluation is illustrated using a municipal utility`s decision to invest in either wind generation or natural gas based generation. The research concludes that wind and other modular renewable energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, have the potential to provide decision makers with physical risk-management investments.

Hoff, T E [Pacific Energy Group, Stanford, CA (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Operator Training Station (OTS) System Configuration Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Treated Effluent Disposal Facility Operator Training Station (TEDF OTS) is a computer based training tool designed to aid plant operations and engineering staff in familiarizing themselves with the TEDF Central Control System (CCS). It consists of PC compatible computers and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) designed to emulate the responses of various plant components connected to or under the control of the CCS. The system trains operators by simulating the normal operation but also has the ability to force failures of different equipment allowing the operator to react and observe the events. The paper describes organization, responsibilities, system configuration management activities, software, and action plans for fully utilizing the simulation program.

Carter, R.L. Jr.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Motion Planning for a Direct Metal Deposition Rapid Prototyping System  

SciTech Connect

A motion planning strategy was developed and implemented to generate motion control instructions from solid model data for controlling a robotically driven solid free-form fabrication process. The planning strategy was tested using a PUMA type robot arm integrated into a LENS{trademark} (Laser Engineered Net Shape) system. Previous systems relied on a series of x, y, and z stages, to provide a minimal coordinated motion control capability. This limited the complexity of geometries that could be constructed. With the coordinated motion provided by a robotic arm, the system can produce three dimensional parts by ''writing'' material onto any face of existing material. The motion planning strategy relied on solid model geometry evaluation and exploited robotic positioning flexibility to allow the construction of geometrically complex parts. The integration of the robotic manipulator into the LENS{trademark} system was tested by producing metal parts directly from CAD models.

AMES,ARLO L.; HENSINGER,DAVID M.; KUHLMANN,JOEL L.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mobile integrated temporary utility system. Innovative technology summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mobile Integrated Temporary Utility System (MITUS) integrates portable electrical power along with communications and emergency alarm and lighting capabilities to provide safe, centralized power to work areas that need to be de-energized for decommissioning work. MITUS consists of a portable unit substation; up to twenty portable kiosks that house the power receptacles, communications, and emergency alarm and lighting systems; and a central communications unit. This system makes sequential decommissioning efforts efficient and cost-effective by allowing the integrated system to remain intact while being moved to subsequent work sites. Use of the MITUS also eliminates the need to conduct zero-energy tests and implement associated lock-out/tag-out procedures at partially de-energized facilities. Since the MITUS is a designed system, it can be customized to accommodate unique facility conditions simply by varying kiosks and transformer configurations. The MITUS is an attractive alternate to the use of portable generators with stand-alone communications and emergency system. It is more cost-effective than upgrading or reconfiguring existing power distribution systems.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

High-Level Waste Systems Plan. Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revision of the High-Level Waste (HLW) System Plan aligns SRS HLW program planning with the DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) Ten Year Plan (QC-96-0005, Draft 8/6), which was issued in July 1996. The objective of the Ten Year Plan is to complete cleanup at most nuclear sites within the next ten years. The two key principles of the Ten Year Plan are to accelerate the reduction of the most urgent risks to human health and the environment and to reduce mortgage costs. Accordingly, this System Plan describes the HLW program that will remove HLW from all 24 old-style tanks, and close 20 of those tanks, by 2006 with vitrification of all HLW by 2018. To achieve these goals, the DWPF canister production rate is projected to climb to 300 canisters per year starting in FY06, and remain at that rate through the end of the program in FY18, (Compare that to past System Plans, in which DWPF production peaked at 200 canisters per year, and the program did not complete until 2026.) An additional $247M (FY98 dollars) must be made available as requested over the ten year planning period, including a one-time $10M to enhance Late Wash attainment. If appropriate resources are made available, facility attainment issues are resolved and regulatory support is sufficient, then completion of the HLW program in 2018 would achieve a $3.3 billion cost savings to DOE, versus the cost of completing the program in 2026. Facility status information is current as of October 31, 1996.

Brooke, J.N.; Gregory, M.V.; Paul, P.; Taylor, G.; Wise, F.E.; Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

300 Area waste acid treatment system closure plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOERL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion includes closure plan documentation submitted for individual, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, such as the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Whenever appropriate, 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. This 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System Closure Plan (Revision 2) includes a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Part A, Form 3. Information provided in this closure plan is current as of April 1999.

LUKE, S.N.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Description of the system planning process at Florida Power Corporation. Task I. Report No. FC-5237-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the means of evaluating a new technology is to have it considered by a utility company, run through the system planning, and thus scrutinized by a potential user of the new technology in a manner directly drawn from the user's methods of decision making on new capacity additions. By having Florida Power Corporation (FPC), a company with real potential for the future use of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), exercise its system planning methods to consider this possible source of future generating capacity, a number of highly useful results will be obtained. The overall study of the application of system planning to OTEC is being carried out in four tasks. This report covers task-1 which provides a description of the existing system and the planning process of Florida Power Corporation. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hydraulic modeling of large district cooling systems for master planning purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District Cooling Systems (DCS) have been widely applied in large institutions such as universities, government facilities, commercial districts, airports, etc. The hydraulic system of a large DCS can be complicated. They often stem from an original design that has had extensive additions and deletions over time. Expanding or retrofitting such a system involves large capital investment. Consideration of future expansion is often required. Therefore, a thorough study of the whole system at the planning phase is crucial. An effective hydraulic model for the existing DCS will become a powerful analysis tool for this purpose. Engineers can use the model to explore alternative system configurations to find an optimal way of accommodating the DCS hydraulic system to the planned future unit. This thesis presents the first complete procedure for the use of commercial simulation software to construct the hydraulic model for a large District Cooling System (DCS). A model for one of the largest DCS hydraulic systems in the United States has been developed based on this procedure and has been successfully utilized to assist its master planning study.

Xu, Chen

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Site Office Safety System Oversight Staffing Plan - Blank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Office Safety System Oversight Staffing Plan" Site Office Safety System Oversight Staffing Plan" "Date" "ACTIVITIES","Days for Activity in each Fiscal Year",,,,,,"Notes" ,"FY09","FY10","FY11","FY12","FY13","FY14" "Program Tasks" "Total Task Days",0,0,0,0,0,0,"Number of days required for activities that need to be completed regardless of number of staff" "Individual Tasks" "Qualification Training" "Continuing Training" "Collateral Duties" "Administrative" "Leave, Holidays" "Total Individual Days",0,0,0,0,0,0,"Number of days required for activities that need to be completed by each individual"

242

Spent Nuclear Fuel project systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the WHC Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to describe the systems engineering approach and methods that will be integrated with established WHC engineering practices to enhance the WHC engineering management of the SNF Project. The scope of the SEMP encompasses the efforts needed to manage the WHC implementation of systems engineering on the SNF Project. This implementation applies to, and is tailored to the needs of the SNF project and all its subprojects, including all current and future subprojects

Womack, J.C.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

Development of advanced methods for planning electric energy distribution systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An extensive search was made for the identification and collection of reports published in the open literature which describes distribution planning methods and techniques. In addition, a questionnaire has been prepared and sent to a large number of electric power utility companies. A large number of these companies were visited and/or their distribution planners interviewed for the identification and description of distribution system planning methods and techniques used by these electric power utility companies and other commercial entities. Distribution systems planning models were reviewed and a set of new mixed-integer programming models were developed for the optimal expansion of the distribution systems. The models help the planner to select: (1) optimum substation locations; (2) optimum substation expansions; (3) optimum substation transformer sizes; (4) optimum load transfers between substations; (5) optimum feeder routes and sizes subject to a set of specified constraints. The models permit following existing right-of-ways and avoid areas where feeders and substations cannot be constructed. The results of computer runs were analyzed for adequacy in serving projected loads within regulation limits for both normal and emergency operation.

Goenen, T.; Foote, B.L.; Thompson, J.C.; Fagan, J.E.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Utilization of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response as Resources for Transmission and Distribution Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI began its Energy Efficiency Initiative in early 2007. Initiative research, which covers numerous topics associated with energy efficiency and demand management, is categorized into three areas: analytics, infrastructure, and devices. The project described in this report details the Initiative’s analytics element, which deals with methods and tools for analyzing aspects of the use of energy efficiency as supply resource, including measurement and verification, inclusion in generation planning, emissi...

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Regional power systems planning: a state of the art assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report was to define regional power systems planning problems, the tools available and their shortcomings, and to document all of the above in a concise readable form. The approach consisted of a survey and literature search. The survey determined the tools being used by utilities, the tools they had rejected, and the tools they planned to try out. The literature search was conducted for the purpose of documenting the tools available, and performing a comparative analysis of these tools. The project included a mix of utility, university, and consulting organizations. Several organizations were consulted in the selection of the participants. A non-profit organization, The University of Oklahoma, was selected to manage the project. The results were reviewed in a series of four one day meetings by known authorities in each field. This report consists of the results of this project. Perhaps its major finding is that several aspects of the regional planning problem are not well defined, the roles of the various participants in regional planning is not clear, and certainly research is needed for the development of new methodology.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A proposed plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the advanced turbine systems development program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally-superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems for base-load application in the utility, independent power producer (IPP), and industrial markets. (VC)

Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. Jr.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A proposed plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the advanced turbine systems development program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally-superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems for base-load application in the utility, independent power producer (IPP), and industrial markets. (VC)

Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. Jr.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Feasible utility scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the latest design features and estimated costs of a 5000 MWh/1000 MW Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) plant. SMES is proposed as a commercially viable technology for electric utility load leveling. The primary advantage of SMES over other electrical energy storage technologies is its high net roundtrip efficiency. Other features include rapid availability and low maintenance and operating costs. Economic comparisons are made with other energy storage options and with gas turbines. In a diurnal load leveling application, a superconducting coil can be charged from the utility grid during off-peak hours. The ac grid is connected to the dc magnetic coil through a power conversion system that includes an inverter/rectifier. Once charged, the superconducting coil conducts current, which supports an electromagnetic field, with virtually no losses. During hours of peak load, the stored energy is discharged to the grid by reversing the charging process. The principle of operation of a SMES unit is shown in Fig. 1. For operation in the superconducting mode, the coil is maintained at extremely low temperature by immersion in a bath of liquid helium.

Loyd, R.J.; Schoenung, S.M.; Nakamura, T.; Lieurance, D.W.; Hilal, M.A.; Rogers, J.D.; Purcell, J.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Multi-Year R&D Program Plan NATIONAL METHANE HYDRATE MULTI-YEAR R&D PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center...

254

System Engineering Management and Implementation Plan for Project W-211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) describes the Project W-211 implementation of the Tank Farm Contractor Systems Engineering Management Plan (TFC SEMP). The SEMIP defines the systems engineering products and processes used by the project to comply with the TFC SEMP, and provides the basis for tailoring systems engineering processes by applying a graded approach to identify appropriate systems engineering requirements for W-211.

VAN BEEK, J.E.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Flow reference method testing and analysis: Field test plan, Texas Utilities Decordova Steam Electric Station  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the experimental design and test plan for the first of three field tests that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted in 1997 as part of a major study to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The experimental design involved four test teams taking concurrent in-stack measurements with velocity sensing probes. Seven types of probes were included in the study. Three test matrices were used to gather data for inter-probe and inter-team comparisons and to assess the impact of velocity decline near the stack wall on volumetric flow measurements.

Lieberman, E.; Werner, A.S.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Improved accounting of emissions from utility energy storage system operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing electric power systems to create the equivalent of new load-following plants that can rapidly respond to fluctuations in electricity demand and increase the flexibility of baseload generators. New energy storage systems using additional generation from existing plants can directly compete with new traditional sources of load-following and peaking electricity, yet this application of energy storage is not required to meet many of the Clean Air Act standards required of new electricity generators (e.g., coal- or gas-fired power plants). This study evaluates the total emissions that will likely result from the operation of a new energy storage facility when coupled with an average existing U.S. coal-fired power plant and estimates that the emission rates of SO{sub 2} and NOx will be considerably higher than the rate of a new plant meeting Clean Air Act standards, even accounting for the efficiency benefits of energy storage. This study suggests that improved emissions 'accounting' might be necessary to provide accurate environmental comparisons between energy storage and more traditional sources of electricity generation. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Paul Denholm; Tracey Holloway [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

HUCKFELDT, R.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

258

Tank waste remediation system multi-year work plan  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) documents the detailed total Program baseline and was constructed to guide Program execution. The TWRS MYWP is one of two elements that comprise the TWRS Program Management Plan. The TWRS MYWP fulfills the Hanford Site Management System requirement for a Multi-Year Program Plan and a Fiscal-Year Work Plan. The MYWP addresses program vision, mission, objectives, strategy, functions and requirements, risks, decisions, assumptions, constraints, structure, logic, schedule, resource requirements, and waste generation and disposition. Sections 1 through 6, Section 8, and the appendixes provide program-wide information. Section 7 includes a subsection for each of the nine program elements that comprise the TWRS Program. The foundation of any program baseline is base planning data (e.g., defendable product definition, logic, schedules, cost estimates, and bases of estimates). The TWRS Program continues to improve base data. As data improve, so will program element planning, integration between program elements, integration outside of the TWRS Program, and the overall quality of the TWRS MYWP. The MYWP establishes the TWRS baseline objectives to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The TWRS Program will complete the baseline mission in 2040 and will incur costs totalling approximately 40 billion dollars. The summary strategy is to meet the above objectives by using a robust systems engineering effort, placing the highest possible priority on safety and environmental protection; encouraging {open_quotes}out sourcing{close_quotes} of the work to the extent practical; and managing significant but limited resources to move toward final disposition of tank wastes, while openly communicating with all interested stakeholders.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Planning for environmental constraints on the PJM system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides a snapshot of the existing PJM system and identifies the environmental constraints that form the parameters for the regional approaches analyzed in this study. The chapter begins with a description of the PJM system and the costs and emissions levels of the pollutants under study associated with the reference case (the PJM system configured to meet only Clean Air Act Amendment Phase I SO{sub 2} requirements and the March 1994 NO{sub x} requirements affecting Phase I units){sup 3}. Next, the pollution-reduction scenario assumed for the purpose of the study, which covers the period 1995--2010, is described. Finally, the impacts of this pollution reduction scenario -- emissions that would need to be avoided on the reference case PJM system -- are identified. Modeling methods are described alongside the study`s results. Other chapters discuss: environmental constraints, alternate plans to achieve environmental goals, and comparison of alternate plans.

Not Available

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Configuration management program plan for Hanford site systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

This plan establishes the integrated configuration management program for the evolving technical baseline developed through the systems engineering process. This configuration management program aligns with the criteria identified in the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-1073-93. Included are specific requirements for control of the systems engineering RDD-100 database, and electronic data incorporated in the database that establishes the Hanford site technical baseline.

Hoffman, A.G.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Transmission Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Transmission Planning We accept requests from electric utilities, firm-power customers, private power developers, and independent power generators to interconnect...

262

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Management Plan is to define the function, organizational structure (including associated matrix organizations), interfaces, roles and responsibilities, authority, and relationship to the Department of Energy for the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO). GWPO is charged with the responsibility of coordinating all components of the groundwater program for Energy Systems. This mandate includes activities at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants.

Early, T.O.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Jicarilla Apache Utility Authority Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Strategic Planning  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Strategic Plan Report is to provide an introduction and in-depth analysis of the issues and opportunities, resources, and technologies of energy efficiency and renewable energy that have potential beneficial application for the people of the Jicarilla Apache Nation and surrounding communities. The Report seeks to draw on the best available information that existed at the time of writing, and where necessary, draws on new research to assess this potential. This study provides a strategic assessment of opportunities for maximizing the potential for electrical energy efficiency and renewable energy development by the Jicarilla Apache Nation. The report analyzes electricity use on the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in buildings. The report also assesses particular resources and technologies in detail, including energy efficiency, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and small hydropower. The closing sections set out the elements of a multi-year, multi-phase strategy for development of resources to the maximum benefit of the Nation.

Rabago, K.R.

2008-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Program Management Plan for the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management plan describes the scope, objectives, and method of accomplishment for the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The ORNL ER Program is one of five site program, receiving guidance from and reporting to the Energy Systems ER Division. Therefore, all ORNL ER policies and procedures are consistent with ER Division policies and procedures. This plan covers all ORNL ER activities, the participants involved in these activities (and their roles and responsibilities), and all phases of the remediation process. This plan will also serve as a template that may be supplemented as necessary to produce individual project management plans for specific projects. This document explains how the Energy Systems ORNL ER Program does business, so the ORNL ER Program`s management structure is illustrated in detail. Personnel are matrixed to the ER Program from other organizations to assist with specific projects. This plan identifies positions at the program level and discusses responsibilities and interactions with positions at the project level. This plan includes sections that describe requirements for project plans, work breakdown structures, schedules, project management and cost control systems, and information and reporting. Project management plans will utilize the work breakdown structure and dictionary pages in the appropriate life cycle baseline report This plan describes the information that should be contained in ORNL ER project management plans. The most important milestones are primary documents relating to the management and remediation of contaminated sites. Primary document milestones are subject to stipulated penalties and receive paramount attention.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Conceptual Process Plant Utility Schemes with Hybrid Energy System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of Alternative energy Production from sun and wind power with storage can become an integral part of a process plant utility. This will facilitate reduced ...

267

Optimizing Consumer Utility Systems to Drive Engagement and Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optimize across all utilities (electricity, gas, water - and other fuels as propane, oil and wood) to meet objectives that are defined by the owneroperator (homeowner,...

268

OCRWM Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP). Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Systems Engineering Management Plan (OCRWM SEMP) specifies the technical management approach for the development of the waste management system, and specifies the approach for the development of each of the system elements -- the waste acceptance system, the transportation system, the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility, and the mined geologic disposal system, which includes site characterization activity. The SEMP also delineates how systems engineering will be used by OCRWM to describe the system development process; it identifies responsibilities for its implementation, and specifies the minimum requirements for systems engineering. It also identifies the close interrelationship of system engineering and licensing processes. This SEMP, which is a combined OCRWM and M&O SEMP, is part of the top-level program documentation and is prepared in accordance with the direction provided in the Program Management System Manual (PMSM). The relationship of this document to other top level documents in the CRWMS document hierarchy is defined in the PMSM. A systems engineering management plan for each project, which specifies the actions to be taken in implementing systems engineering at the project level, shall be prepared by the respective project managers. [``Program`` refers to the CRWMS-wide activity and ``project`` refers to that level responsible for accomplishing the specific activities of that segment of the program.] The requirements for the project level SEMPs are addressed in Section 4.2.2.2. They represent the minimum set of requirements, and do not preclude the broadening of systems engineering activities to meet the specific needs of each project.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Markets. ” Wind Energy, 5(1): 19-36. Hirst, E.2002b. “Integrating Wind Energy with the BPA Power System:Large Amounts of Wind Energy with a Small Electric- Power

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Review of System Planning Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford November 2008 Dr. David S. Kosson, Vanderbilt University Dr. David R. Gallay, Logistics Management Institute Dr. Ian L. Pegg, The Catholic University of America Dr. Ray G. Wymer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ret.) Dr. Steven Krahn, U. S. Department of Energy ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The Review Team thanks Mr. Ben Harp, Office of River Protection (ORP), and Mr. James Honeyman, CH2M HILL, for their exceptional support during this review. Mr. Harp was the lead Department of Energy (DOE) representative responsible for organizing reviews held on-site by the Review Team. Mr. Honeyman, and his staff, provided responsive support through technical presentations, telephone conferences, and numerous reference documents.

271

Long-Range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Long-Range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Long-Range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environmental Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.energycommunity.org/default.asp?action=47 Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/long-range-energy-alternatives-planni

272

Coal Power Systems strategic multi-year program plans  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), through the Coal and Power Systems (C and PS) program, funds research to advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide new and improved energy technologies; to eliminate any detrimental environmental effects of energy production and use; and to maintain US leadership in promoting the effective use of US power technologies on an international scale. Further, the C and PS program facilitates the effective deployment of these technologies to maximize their benefits to the Nation. The following Strategic Plan describes how the C and PS program intends to meet the challenges of the National Energy Strategy to: (1) enhance American's energy security; (2) improve the environmental acceptability of energy production and use; (3) increase the competitiveness and reliability of US energy systems; and (4) ensure a robust US energy future. It is a plan based on the consensus of experts and managers from FE's program offices and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

None

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

System average rates of U.S. investor-owned electric utilities : a statistical benchmark study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using multiple regression methods, we have undertaken a statistical "benchmark" study comparing system average electricity rates charged by three California utilities with 96 other US utilities over the 1984-93 time period. ...

Berndt, Ernst R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Environmental Development Plan (EDP). Geothermal energy systems, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Energy Systems Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the environmental, health, safety, social, and economic issues which are associated with the development, demonstration, and commercialization of geothermal resources and conversion technology. The EDP also describes the actions and implementation strategy required to resolve the issues identified. These actions may include the initiation of R and D activities, operations monitoring, baseline characterization studies, or activities leading to the development of standards and criteria in concert with other responsible agencies.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fuel cell systems program plan, Fiscal year 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE Office of Fossil Energy (OoFE) is participating with private sector in developing molten carbon fuel cell (MCFC) and advanced concepts including solid oxide fuel cell for application in utility/commercial/industrial sectors. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) development was sponsored by OoFE and is now being commercialized. In 1993 DOD is undertaking use and demonstration of PAFC and other fuel cells. DOE Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy is sponsoring fuel cell development for propulsion. The Conservation program is focused on polymer electrolyte or proton exchange membrane fuel cells, although they also are implementing a demonstration program for PAFC buses. DOE fuel cell research, development and demonstration efforts are also supported by private sector funding. This Plan describes the fuel cell activities of the Office of Fossil Energy.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Program plan for molten carbonate fuel-cell systems development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe in both programmatic and technical terms the methodology that the US Department of Energy will use to commercialize a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. Responsibility for the planning and management of the program resides in the molten carbonate fuel cell program office at the Argonne National Laboratory which reports to the Assistant Director for Fuel Cells in the Division of Fossil Fuel utilization of DOE/FE. The actual development of technology is carried out by selected contractors. The technology development phase of the program will culminate with the construction and operation of two demonstration power plants. The first power plant will be an industrial cogeneration plant which will be completed in 1987. The other power plant will be a baseload electric power plant to be completed in 1989.

Not Available

1978-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

Overview of the US Department of Energy Utility Battery Storage Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories and its contractors. This program is specifically aimed at developing battery energy storage systems for electric utility applications commencing in the mid to late 1990s. One factory-integrated utility battery system and three battery technologies: sodium/sulfur, zinc/bromine, and lead-acid are being developed under this program. In the last few years the emphasis of this program has focused on battery system development. This emphasis has included greater interactions with utilities to define application requirements. Recent activities have identified specific applications of battery energy storage in certain utility systems and quantified the value of these applications to these utility companies. In part due to these activities, battery energy storage is no longer regarded by utilities as a load-leveling resource only, but as a multifunction, energy management resource.

Eaton, R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Akhil, A.; Butler, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurwitch, J. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

Rau, N.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a result, the utility’s revenues between rate cases are notspending, allowing utilities to earn a rate of return onto rate-of-return regulation, and public utilities and power

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Optimizing the Utility System of a Tissue Paper Mill Using Pinch Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tissue paper mill in southern California had existing utility demands of 7.1 MW for the tissue mill (13 MW for the whole site), and 55 MM Btu/hr of fuel gas for the steam boiler. Total utility costs were $12 MM per year. The mill was seriously considering an 11 MW cogeneration system as a means of reducing operating costs. The expected benefits of the cogeneration project were $5.5 MM/yr of savings for an investment of $9 MM. A "pinch" study of the mill was initiated by SCE, with the customer's consent, to explore viable alternative projects that would result in comparable savings at equal or better payback and lower risk. The study identified a group of ten inter-related projects, including process heat recovery, a waste heat boiler and a 2.5 MW gas turbine. Combined savings were $4.5 MM/yr (37% of existing bill) at an estimated capital cost of $6.6 MM. The recommended approach was considered more attractive by the paper mill than the original plan because: (a) the benefits were obtained in a number of different areas -reduced fuel use, reduced power cost, reduced water makeup, reduced wastewater discharge to sewer, and reduced solid wastes to landfill (b) the smaller projects involved lower technical and economic risk, and were easier to implement.

Kumana, J. D.; Sung, R. D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Enhancing spectrum utilization through cooperation and cognition in wireless systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have seen a proliferation of wireless technologies and devices in recent years. The resulting explosion of wireless demand has put immense pressure on available spectrum. Improving spectrum utilization is therefore ...

Rahul, Hariharan Shankar, 1975-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

IMRT Quality Assurance Using a Second Treatment Planning System  

SciTech Connect

We used a second treatment planning system (TPS) for independent verification of the dose calculated by our primary TPS in the context of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). QA plans for 24 patients treated with inverse planned dynamic IMRT were generated using the Nomos Corvus TPS. The plans were calculated on a computed tomography scan of our QA phantom that consists of three Solid Water slabs sandwiching radiochromic films, and an ion chamber that is inserted into the center slab of the phantom. For the independent verification, the dose was recalculated using the Varian Eclipse TPS using the multileaf collimator files and beam geometry from the original plan. The data was then compared in terms of absolute dose to the ion chamber volume as well as relative dose on isodoses calculated at the film plane. The calculation results were also compared with measurements performed for each case. When comparing ion chamber doses, the mean ratio was 0.999 (SD 0.010) for Eclipse vs. Corvus, 0.988 (SD 0.020) for the ionization chamber measurements vs. Corvus, and 0.989 (SD 0.017) for the ionization chamber measurements vs. Eclipse. For 2D doses with gamma histogram, the mean value of the percentage of pixels passing the criteria of 3%, 3 mm was 94.4 (SD 5.3) for Eclipse vs. Corvus, 85.1 (SD 10.6) for Corvus vs. film, and 93.7 (SD 4.1) for Eclipse vs. film; and for the criteria of 5%, 3 mm, 98.7 (SD 1.5) for Eclipse vs. Corvus, 93.0 (SD 7.8) for Corvus vs. film, and 98.0 (SD 1.9) for Eclipse vs. film. We feel that the use of the Eclipse TPS as an independent, accurate, robust, and time-efficient method for patient-specific IMRT QA is feasible in clinic.

Anjum, Muhammad Naeem [McGill University Health Center, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Parker, William, E-mail: william@medphys.mcgill.c [McGill University Health Center, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ruo, Russell; Aldahlawi, Ismail [McGill University Health Center, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Afzal, Muhammad [Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur (Pakistan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Optimization planning systems and their implementation and application in vertically integrated oil companies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approaches to planning of activities of a vertically integrated oil company by using optimization systems are considered. Development, implementation, and support of such systems are discussed. These problems fall under the APS (Advanced Planning ...

A. S. Khokhlov; A. I. Konnov; A. E. Zel'Din

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Impact of dispersed solar and wind systems on electric distribution planning and operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small-scale dispersed solar photovoltaic and wind generation (DSW) will affect the generation, transmission, and distribution systems of an electric utility. This study examines the technical and economic impacts of dispersing DSW devices within the distribution system. Dispersed intermittent generation is included. Effects of DSW devices on capital investments, reliability, operating and maintenance costs, protection requirements, and communication and control requirements are examined. A DSW operation model is developed to help determine the dependable capacity of fluctuating solar photovoltaic and wind generation as part of the distribution planning process. Specific case studies using distribution system data and renewable resource data for Southern California Edison Company and Consumers Power Company are analyzed to gain insights into the effects of interconnecting DSW devices. The DSW devices were found to offer some distribution investment savings, depending on their availability during peak loads. For a summer-peaking utility, for example, dispersing photovoltaic systems is more likely to defer distribution capital investments than dispersing wind systems. Dispersing storage devices to increase DSW's dependable capacity for distribution systems needs is not economically attractive. Substation placement of DSW and storage devices is found to be more cost effective than feeder or customer placement. Examination of the effects of DSW on distribution system operation showed that small customer-owned DSW devices are not likely to disrupt present time-current distribution protection coordination. Present maintenance work procedures, are adequate to ensure workmen's safety. Regulating voltages within appropriate limits will become more complex with intermittent generation along the distribution feeders.

Boardman, R.W.; Patton, R.; Curtice, D.H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A control system for improved battery utilization in a PV-powered peak-shaving system  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic (PV) power systems offer the prospect of allowing a utility company to meet part of the daily peak system load using a renewable resource. Unfortunately, some utilities have peak system- load periods that do not match the peak production hours of a PV system. Adding a battery energy storage system to a grid-connected PV power system will allow dispatching the stored solar energy to the grid at the desired times. Batteries, however, pose system limitations in terms of energy efficiency, maintenance, and cycle life. A new control system has been developed, based on available PV equipment and a data acquisition system, that seeks to minimize the limitations imposed by the battery system while maximizing the use of PV energy. Maintenance requirements for the flooded batteries are reduced, cycle life is maximized, and the battery is operated over an efficient range of states of charge. This paper presents design details and initial performance results on one of the first installed control systems of this type.

Palomino, E [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiles, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don (University of Chicago, Chicago, IL); Hanson, Jason (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Grimsrud, Kristine (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Thacher, Jennifer (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Broadbent, Craig (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brookshire, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chemak, Janie (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockeril Consulting, Boone, NC); Aragon, Carlos (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Project L-070, ``300 Area process sewer piping system upgrade`` Project Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the project management plan for Project L-070, 300 Area process sewer system upgrades.

Wellsfry, H.E.

1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Project Management Plan (PMP), W-364, 209E septic system upgrade, 200 East Area  

SciTech Connect

The document is the Project Management Plan (PMP) of the design and installation of the 209E Septic System Upgrade.

Lott, D.T.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

FACILITIES ENGINEER WEST CHICAGO Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvements, including all stages of project engineering: scope development, cost estimation, system designFACILITIES ENGINEER ­ WEST CHICAGO OVERVIEW: Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost estimation, system design, equipment sizing

Heller, Barbara

290

INEL test plan for evaluating waste assay systems  

SciTech Connect

A test bed is being established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These tests are currently focused on mobile or portable radioassay systems. Prior to disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), radioassay measurements must meet the quality assurance objectives of the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan. This test plan provides technology holders with the opportunity to assess radioassay system performance through a three-tiered test program that consists of: (a) evaluations using non-interfering matrices, (b) surrogate drums with contents that resemble the attributes of INEL-specific waste forms, and (c) real waste tests. Qualified sources containing a known mixture and range of radionuclides will be used for the non-interfering and surrogate waste tests. The results of these tests will provide technology holders with information concerning radioassay system performance and provide the INEL with data useful for making decisions concerning alternative or improved radioassay systems that could support disposal of waste at WIPP.

Mandler, J.W.; Becker, G.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Menkhaus, D.E.; Clements, T.L. Jr.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Functional Definition for Communication and Control Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. A functional definition of DR for defining communication and control requirements in electric utility distribution systems is provided. The report is a tool that readers can use in developing communication and control strategies for DR in specific distribution systems.

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

Host Utility Study of System Operating Impacts of FACTS Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible AC Transmission system (FACTS) devices can enhance power system control via added economic transfers and increased security and reliability. This report assesses FACTS system impacts and identifies ways of improving system performance through centralized FACTS coordination and control.

1995-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

293

Utility FGD survey, Janurary--December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)) [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)) [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network.

Koponen, B.L.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

Specifications for and Design of an Electric Service Plan Portfolio Management System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the structure and technology of the electric power industry will ultimately lead to profound changes in the electric service plans that are offered to customers. Given the value of electricity to state and local economies, the design and mix of the electric service plans offered by electricity utilities and competitive retailers may have large impacts on both direct stakeholders and the overall economy. For customers and utilities to benefit from these changes, it is essential that they ...

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fuel cell power systems for remote applications. Phase 1 final report and business plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Fuel Cell Power Systems for Remote Applications project is to commercialize a 0.1--5 kW integrated fuel cell power system (FCPS). The project targets high value niche markets, including natural gas and oil pipelines, off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Phase 1 includes the market research, technical and financial analysis of the fuel cell power system, technical and financial requirements to establish manufacturing capability, the business plan, and teaming arrangements. Phase 1 also includes project planning, scope of work, and budgets for Phases 2--4. The project is a cooperative effort of Teledyne Brown Engineering--Energy Systems, Schatz Energy Research Center, Hydrogen Burner Technology, and the City of Palm Desert. Phases 2 through 4 are designed to utilize the results of Phase 1, to further the commercial potential of the fuel cell power system. Phase 2 focuses on research and development of the reformer and fuel cell and is divided into three related, but potentially separate tasks. Budgets and timelines for Phase 2 can be found in section 4 of this report. Phase 2 includes: Task A--Develop a reformate tolerant fuel cell stack and 5 kW reformer; Task B--Assemble and deliver a fuel cell that operates on pure hydrogen to the University of Alaska or another site in Alaska; Task C--Provide support and training to the University of Alaska in the setting up and operating a fuel cell test lab. The Phase 1 research examined the market for power systems for off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Also included in this report are summaries of the previously conducted market reports that examined power needs for remote locations along natural gas and oil pipelines. A list of highlights from the research can be found in the executive summary of the business plan.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Georgia Institute of Technology chilled water system evaluation and master plan  

SciTech Connect

As the host of the Olympic Village for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, Georgia Tech has experienced a surge in construction activities over the last three years. Over 1.3 million square feet of new buildings have been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. This growth has placed a strain on the Georgia Tech community and challenged the facilities support staff charged with planning and organizing utility services. In concert with Olympic construction, utility planners have worked to ensure long term benefits for Georgia Tech facilities while meeting the short term requirements of the Olympic Games. The concentration of building construction in the northwest quadrant of the campus allowed planners to construct a satellite chilled water plant to serve the needs of this area and provide the opportunity to integrate this section of the campus with the main campus chilled water system. This assessment and master plan, funded in part by the US Department of Energy, has evaluated the chilled water infrastructure at Georgia Tech, identified ongoing problems and made recommendations for long term chilled water infrastructure development and efficiency improvements. The Georgia Tech office of Facilities and RDA Engineering, Inc. have worked together to assemble relevant information and prepare the recommendations contained in this document.

NONE

1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Reliability of Electric Utility Distribution Systems: EPRI White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses what is known about electric power distribution system reliability and investigates whether there are generally available methods for performing reliability analysis for distribution systems. The theory of the reliability of general systems is well understood. A fundamental issue is whether an appropriate implementation of the theory exists in a form readily usable by distribution system planners and designers.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Coal Power Systems strategic multi-year program plans  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), through the Coal and Power Systems (C and PS) program, funds research to advance the scientific knowledge needed to provide new and improved energy technologies; to eliminate any detrimental environmental effects of energy production and use; and to maintain US leadership in promoting the effective use of US power technologies on an international scale. Further, the C and PS program facilitates the effective deployment of these technologies to maximize their benefits to the Nation. The following Strategic Plan describes how the C and PS program intends to meet the challenges of the National Energy Strategy to: (1) enhance American's energy security; (2) improve the environmental acceptability of energy production and use; (3) increase the competitiveness and reliability of US energy systems; and (4) ensure a robust US energy future. It is a plan based on the consensus of experts and managers from FE's program offices and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Project development plan for East Mesa Geothermal Test Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans for a test facility for geothermal energy systems and components designed for moderate temperature/low salinity geothermal fluids available at the East Mesa site in the Imperial Valley of California are discussed. Details of the following phases of development are given: technical plan; management plan; procurement and contracting plan; technology transfer and utilization plan; and resource requirements. (JGB)

Not Available

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

User Instructions for the Systems Assessment Capability, Rev. 1, Computer Codes Volume 3: Utility Codes  

SciTech Connect

This document contains detailed user instructions for a suite of utility codes developed for Rev. 1 of the Systems Assessment Capability. The suite of computer codes for Rev. 1 of Systems Assessment Capability performs many functions.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Miley, Terri B.; Nichols, William E.; Strenge, Dennis L.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission waste feed delivery plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a plan presenting the objectives, organization, and management and technical approaches for the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Program. This WFD Plan focuses on the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project`s Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission.

Potter, R.D.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Coal and Power Systems Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL People Search Go to US DOE Publications - Brochures Coal and Power Systems Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program Plan Issued The Office of Fossil Energy Coal and Power...

305

Fuel cell systems program plan, Fiscal year 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Goal of the fuel cell program is to increase energy efficiency and economic effectiveness through development and commercialization of fuel cell systems which operate on fossil fuels in multiple end use sectors. DOE is participating with the private sector in sponsoring development of molten carbonate fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cells for application in the utility, commercial, and industrial sectors. Commercialization of phosphoric acid fuel cells is well underway. Besides the introduction, this document is divided into: goal/objectives, program strategy, technology description, technical status, program description/implementation, coordinated fuel cell activities, and international activities.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency in Resource Plans 27 References..33 Glossaryan Energy Efficient Economy: ACEEE-U054, October. Glossary

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Designing an intelligent decision support system for human-centered utility management automation part 1: structures, problem formulation, solution methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a Decision Support System (DSS) to aid the electric utility management automation system. A brief history of DSS application in power systems is presented. The importance and role of DSS and decision making in utility management automation ... Keywords: computational intelligence, decision making, decision support, human-centered systems, neural networks, power distribution system, state estimation, systems design, utility management automation

Alireza Fereidunian; Caro Lucas; Hamid Lesani; Mansooreh Zangiabadi

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Life Cycle Management Plans for Hope Creek and Salem: Feedwater Heater and Moisture Separator Controls, Circuit Breakers, and Station Air System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides utilities with optimized LCM plans for three SSC types at PSEG's Salem and Hope Creek generating stations for use as a resource for LCM planning for these SSC types at other plants.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Load-shape modeling in southeastern utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Load models are tools which have a wide range of application in the electric-utility industry. Some uses include monitoring load-management policies and helping with on-line commitment problems. The output from a load model can be placed in a suitable software environment where daily load curves are computed and displayed. Also, load models can be extended to perform forecasting functions. A weather sensitive load model that takes into account both weekdays and weekends on an hourly basis has been developed and applied to load shape modeling and short term forecasting on three southeastern electric utilities. A software package associated with the load modeling theory was developed and tested. This load-modeling program computes the daily load curve in terms of identifiable components. The program uses historical hourly load data to compute coefficients related to load components including base, growth, seasonal and weather. These coefficients can be used in a mathematical model to compute an estimate of the daily load curve with load values for each hour of the day. The load-modeling procedure described employs a linear least squares method for computing coefficients in the mathematical model.

Lebby, G.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Superconducting energy storage development for electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Model SMES experiments performed at LASL show that magnetic energy storage in a superconducting magnet is a viable alternate to energy storage methods which are being built today. It is a fast responding device, i.e., milliseconds, and efficient method which does not require electric energy be converted to mechanical form for storage. Component tests on a model SMES system include 12 pulse converter, automatic and manual converter power control system, and high current superconductors have been performed to evaluate and develop systems which could be used on the 100 MJ SMES system that has been designed. Test circuits have been designed and used for economical and nondestructive testing of magnets for superconductor performance and evaluation. A closed-loop model SMES system has been developed and built to study the electrical characteristics of the system. Initial test results were obtained for a symmetrically and asymmetrically triggered twelve-pulse converter. The asymmetrically triggered bridge shows the lower reactive power requirement, but a more distorted line current. Future converter tests and studies will be required to clearly identify the better circuit. A converter optimization study will include an evaluation of costs for harmonic filtering and power factor correction. Tests with the automatic control system show that a SMES system has switching times between the charging and discharging mode of about a cycle and a half. This makes the system very attractive for power system stabilization.

Turner, R.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m{sup 3} (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program.

Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy application study was performed by The Aerospace Corporation for the Wind Systems Branch of the Department of Energy. The objective was to identify integration problems for a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) placed into an existing conventional utility system. The integration problems included environmental, institutional and technical aspects as well as economic matters, but the emphasis was on the economics of wind energy. The Hawaiian Electric Company utility system on the island of Oahu was selected for the study because of the very real potential for wind energy on that island, and because of the simplicity afforded in analyzing that isolated utility.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Patient-Wandering System Disabled by Broken Utility Powerline Clamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Case Study describes EPRI's investigation into malfunctions of the patient-wandering system (PWS) at an assisted-living center in Tennessee.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Urban and R ural Feeders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and case studies on a rural and an urban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for those feeders.

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

Integration of Distributed Resources in the Electric Utility Distribution Systems: Distribution System Behavior Analysis for Suburba n Feeder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need to improve practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. Analytical models of DR were developed for use in existing utility system simulation tools, and initial case studies on a suburban distribution feeder were performed to assess the impacts of DR in various scenarios for that feeder.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Tank selection for Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) system hot testing in a single shell tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to recommend a single shell tank in which to hot test the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in Fiscal Year 1996. The LDUA is designed to utilize a 12 inch riser. During hot testing, the LDUA will deploy two end effectors (a High Resolution Stereoscopic Video Camera System and a Still/Stereo Photography System mounted on the end of the arm`s tool interface plate). In addition, three other systems (an Overview Video System, an Overview Stereo Video System, and a Topographic Mapping System) will be independently deployed and tested through 4 inch risers.

Bhatia, P.K.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Implementation Plans for a Systems Microbiology and Extremophile Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9073 9073 Implementation Plans for a Systems Microbiology and Extremophile Research Facility Summary of a workshop held March 26 th , 2008 Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Richland, WA April 2009 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research under Contract DE-AC05- 76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

319

Grid Operations and Planning Graphics System (GOP Graphics System): Functional Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a Functional Specification Document for the GOP Graphics System to be developed for EPRI's Grid Operations and Planning area. This application will create a set of tools using the Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC) and will enhance the functionality of Microsoft Visual Studio's C++ Framework. The tools created by this application will focus on the requirements of power system applications and the GOP applications in particular. The objective is to create a system for creating applications w...

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Connecting Your Solar Electric System to the Utility Grid: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the number of solar-powered homes connected to the local utility grid has increased dramatically. These''grid-connected'' buildings have solar electric panels or''modules'' that provide some or even most of their power, while still being connected to the local utility. This fact sheet provides information on connecting your solar electric system to the utility grid, including information on net metering.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The CEMS will be utilized to report emissions from each unit for each ozone season starting May 1, 2003. Each boiler has independent coal and natural gas metering systems. Coal is fed to each boiler by belt-type coal feeders. Each boiler has two dedicated coal feeders. Natural gas may be burned along with coal for flame stability. The boilers may also be fired on natural gas alone. Orifice meters measure the natural gas flow to each boiler.

None

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

322

Geothermal utilization plan, Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. Final report, March 1-September 1, 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary engineering feasibility study of geothermal utilization was completed for the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. The study incorporated previous studies of the geology, geophysics, and environment performed for the Center. In addition, information about fuel consumption and current heating methodology was provided by the Center's personnel. This information was integrated with design assumptions based on the best estimates available for geothermal resource temperature and flow rate. The result of the study is a recommended pipeline alignment and suggested geothermal service area. The estimated costs for construction of the system range from $4.5 to $5 million. The estimated savings in offset natural gas consumption after capital recovery is $3.8 million over a twenty year period. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Ghusn, G. Jr.; Flynn, T.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

In situ conversion process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in situ conversion system for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a plurality of u-shaped wellbores in the formation. Piping is positioned in at least two of the u-shaped wellbores. A fluid circulation system is coupled to the piping. The fluid circulation system is configured to circulate hot heat transfer fluid through at least a portion of the piping to form at least one heated portion of the formation. An electrical power supply is configured to provide electrical current to at least a portion of the piping located below an overburden in the formation to resistively heat at least a portion of the piping. Heat transfers from the piping to the formation.

Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Schoeber, Willen Jan Antoon Henri (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Impact of dispersed solar and wind systems on electric distribution planning and operation  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale dispersed solar photovoltaic and wind generation (DSW) will affect the generation, transmission, and distribution systems of an electric utility. This study examines the technical and economic impacts of dispersing DSW devices within the distribution system. Dispersed intermittent generation is included. Effects of DSW devices on capital investments, reliability, operating and maintenance costs, protection requirements, and communication and control requirements are examined. A DSW operation model is developed to help determine the dependable capacity of fluctuating solar photovoltaic and wind generation as part of the distribution planning process. Specific case studies using distribution system data and renewable resource data for Southern California Edison Company and Consumers Power Company are analyzed to gain insights into the effects of interconnecting DSW devices. The DSW devices were found to offer some distribution investment savings, depending on their availability during peak loads. For a summer-peaking utility, for example, dispersing photovoltaic systems is more likely to defer distribution capital investments than dispersing wind systems. Dispersing storage devices to increase DSW's dependable capacity for distribution systems needs is not economically attractive. Substation placement of DSW and storage devices is found to be more cost effective than feeder or customer placement. Examination of the effects of DSW on distribution system operation showed that small customer-owned DSW devices are not likely to disrupt present time-current distribution protection coordination. Present maintenance work procedures, are adequate to ensure workmen's safety. Regulating voltages within appropriate limits will become more complex with intermittent generation along the distribution feeders.

Boardman, R.W.; Patton, R.; Curtice, D.H.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Resource utilization in the ATLAS Data Acquisition System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data taking with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has started. The three-level trigger and data-acquisition system of the experiment is fully functional. In 2009 and 2010 large samples of cosmic ray and collisions data have been and are expected to be collected with it. The smooth operation of the system relies on a tuning made on the basis of test-system measurements and modelling performed prior to installation. It is now possible to compare these predictions with measurements made with the system in active use during data-taking and to extrapolate to performance at higher luminosities. In the system events to be analyzed offline are selected by means of a hardware first-level trigger, receiving input data via dedicated paths, and of two levels of software trigger, implemented on commercially available server computers embedded in the data-acquisition system. Data of events accepted by the first-level trigger are received and buffered in other computers forming together the ReadOut ...

Klous, S; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system and had to be imported into a GIS framework. Since the data is maintained in a different format in CAD, import into GIS involved several spatial processing steps to convert various geometric shapes present in the CAD data to self-closing polygons. The polygons represent facility footprints in plan or map view. Once these were successfully imported and converted, building identifier attributes from the CAD had to be associated with the appropriate polygons in GIS. Attributes are stored as graphical information in a CAD system and are not 'attached' to a building in a relational sense. In GIS, attributes such as building names, building area, hazards, or other descriptive information, must be associated or related to the spatial polygon representing a particular building. This spatial relationship between building polygons and the descriptive attribute information is very similar to relating tables of information in a relational database in which each table record has a unique identifier that can be used to join or relate that table to other tables of information present in the database. The CAD building identifiers were imported into the GIS and several spatial processing steps were used to associate building polygons with the correct identifiers. These spatial steps involved determining the intersection of and nearest identifiers with each building polygon in the GIS. Automating this process in GIS saved a significant amount of time. Once a current and geographically correct representation of the infrastructure data had been created in GIS, field-engineering teams collected information for each facility. This information included the building area, radiological hazards and the associated area, industrial hazards such as asbestos or mercury, structure type (e.g. hardened, industrial, nuclear), annual surveillance and monitoring cost, and other engineering data. The facility engineering data was used in a simple model to determine the rough-order-of-magnitude cost for decontaminating and demolishing each facility. Finally, the engineering and cost d

Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Bldg. 735-A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

CitrusSprayEx: An expert system for planning citrus spray applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert system (ES) has been developed to assist citrus spray applicators in planning and evaluating their sprayer operations. The ES is partitioned into two parts: (1) spray planning (procedures and calculations for sprayer calibration as well as ... Keywords: Airblast sprayer, Artificial intelligence, Expert knowledge, Spray calibration, Spray planning

Peter A. Larbi; Masoud Salyani

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Power System Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model (SUPER) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power System Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model (SUPER) Power System Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model (SUPER) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Power System Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model (SUPER) Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Hydro Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.olade.org/superEn.html References: SUPER website [1] "This model is useful for multi-year electricity system planning studies, making it possible to analyze, optimize, simulate and develop hydrothermal power system expansion plans." References ↑ "SUPER website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Power_System_Generation_and_Inter-Connection_Planning_Model_(SUPER)&oldid=329

330

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plan 2004”. Southern California Edison (SCE), 2004. “Southern California Edison Company’s 2004 Long-term9. Southern California Edison (SCE), 2006. CPUC Advice 1955-

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Small power systems study technical summary report. Volume II. Inventory of small generating units in U. S. utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Data identifying small (less than or equal to 10 MW) power units in the United States are tabulated. The data are listed alphabetically by state and are reported sequentially for investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electrical cooperatives and other utility systems. For a given utility system, the generating units are divided into steam turbines, diesel generators and gas turbines. The number and size of generating units are listed. A summary tabulation of the number of generating units of each type and total generating capacity by state is presented.

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

COMPREHENSIVE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR BURIED UTILITIES Sanat A. Talmaki 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specialists 2006). Unlike other types of infrastructure, buried utilities are difficult to locate and often smoothly. However with aging buried infrastructure, pipe bursts, costly repairs and exposure of citizensCOMPREHENSIVE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR BURIED UTILITIES Sanat A. Talmaki 1 , Suyang Dong 2

Kamat, Vineet R.

333

Optimization of Utility-Scale Wind-Hydrogen-Battery Systems: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional utility-scale wind energy systems are not dispatchable; that is, the utility cannot instantaneously control their power output. Energy storage, which can come in many forms, is needed to add dispatchability to a wind farm. This study investigates two options: batteries and hydrogen.

Fingersh, L. J.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radio frequency communication system utilizing radiating transmission lines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radio communication system for use in tunnels, mines, buildings or other shielded locations in which a pair of radiating transmission lines (30), (31) extend through such location in spaced coextensive relation to each other. Each transmission line (30), (31) has at least one unidirectional amplifier (32), (33) interposed therein with the sense of the unidirectional amplifier (32) of one transmission line (30) being opposite to the sense of the unidirectional amplifier (33) of the other transmission line (31). Each of the amplifiers (32), (33) has a gain which is less than the coupling loss between the transmission lines (30), (31). Two or more mobile transceivers (35) in the location served by the system are coupled to the transmission lines (30), (31) by electromagnetic wave propagation in space in order to communicate directly with each other at a given radio frequency within the frequency range of the system.

Struven, Warren C. (San Carlos, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Building system integration research: recommendations for a US Department of Energy multiyear program plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the scope, technical content, and resources required to conduct the Building System Integration (BSI) research program during FY 1987 through 1991. System integration research is defined, the need for the research is discussed, its benefits are outlined, and the history of building system integration research is summarized. The program scope, the general approach taken in developing this program plan, and the plan's contents are also described.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes. Because of these advantages, as well as the ability to build cost-effective small-to-medium sized reactors, this design is currently being considered for construction in many countries, from Japan, where test reactors are being analyzed, to China. The use of TRISO-coated micro-particles as a fuel in these reactors leads to multi-heterogeneity physics features that must be properly treated and accounted for. Inherent interrelationships of neutron interactions, temperature effects, and structural effects, further challenge computational evaluations of High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The developed models and computational techniques have to be validated in code-to-code and, most importantly, code-to-experiment benchmark studies. This report quantifies the relative accuracy of various multi-heterogeneity treatments in whole-core 3D models for parametric studies of Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactors as well as provide preliminary results of the PBMR performance analysis. Data is gathered from two different models, one based upon a benchmark for the African PBMR-400 design, and another based on the PROTEUS criticality experiment, since the African design is a more realistic power reactor, but the PROTEUS experiment model can be used for calculations that cannot be performed on the more complex model. Early data was used to refine final models, and the resulting final models were used to conduct parametric studies on composition and geometry optimization based on pebble bed reactor physics in order to improve fuel utilization.

Kelly, Ryan 1989-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Post-design analysis for building and refining AI planning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of industrial applications of artificial intelligence has raised the need for design tools to aid in the conception and implementation of such complex systems. The design of automated planning systems faces several engineering challenges including ... Keywords: Artificial intelligence planning, Knowledge engineering, Modeling, Post-design, System design

Tiago Stegun Vaquero, José Reinaldo Silva, J. Christopher Beck

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Critical success factors for successful implementation of enterprise resource planning systems in manufacturing organisations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the impact of the Critical Success Factors (CSFs) on the successful implementation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems in Malaysian manufacturing organisations. The ERP system is an integrated package of ... Keywords: ERP implementation, Malaysia, business information systems, critical success factors, enterprise resource planning, implementation success, manufacturing organisations, moderating effect, organisational resistance, pre-determined goals, resistance to change, user satisfaction

T. Ramayah; Matthew H. Roy; Sawaridass Arokiasamy; Imad Zbib; Zafar U. Ahmed

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Some Aspects of Distribution System Planning in the Context of Investment in Distributed Generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A paradigm shift in distribution system design and planning is being led by the deregulation of the power industry and the increasing adoption of distributed… (more)

Wong, Steven M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

Unknown

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

NONE

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

349

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

Unknown

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

352

International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization & Fuel Systems Clearwater (FL), USA, March 4-7, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

27th International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization & Fuel Systems Clearwater (FL), USA is a legitimate demand for more base-load energy which can be covered only by additional nuclear power the USA, i.e. Los Alamos

Zevenhoven, Ron

353

A feedback based load shaping strategy for fuel utilization control in SOFC systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells are attractive energy conversion devices due to their fuel flexibility and high efficiency. Fuel utilization is a critical variable in SOFC systems that directly impacts efficiency and longevity. In this paper we propose a control ...

Tuhin Das; Ryan Weisman

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

Turgut Gur

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Implementation of a Dual Containment/Surveillance System utilizing scene-change detection and radio frequency technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the implementation of scene-change detection and radio frequency technology within a Dual Containment/Surveillance (C/S) System. Additionally, this paper will examine the human performance factors in the operation of these systems. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company utilizes the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System (CIMS) in the performance of Dual C/S to monitor special nuclear materials within International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards and Domestic Safeguards. CIMS is comprised of the Material Monitoring System (MMS) (R), a multi-media electronic surveillance system developed by Sandia National Laboratory which incorporates the use of active seals commonly called Radio Frequency Tamper Indicating Devices (RFTIDs), NT Vision (R) as developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Microsoft Windows NT (R) based operating system providing for domestic scene-change detection and the Digital Multi-Camera Optical Surveillance System (DMOS) (R) which provides scene-change detection for IAEA. Although this paper will focus on the implementation of Dual C/S utilizing the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System, the necessity for a thorough review of Safeguards and Security requirements with organizations and personnel having minimal to no prior MPC&A training will also be covered. Successful Dual C/S implementation plans must consider not only system design and failure modes, but must also be accompanied with the appropriate ''mind shift'' within operations and technical personnel. This is required to ensure completion of both physical and electronic activities, and system design changes are performed conscientiously and with full awareness of MPC&A requirements.

FITZGERALD, ERIC; KOENIG, RICHARD

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), which includes Arizona, California, Colorado,Colorado Puget Sound Energy Public Utilities Commission San Diego Gas & Electric Southern California Edison Western Electricity

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WGA CDEAC) (2006). Energy Efficiency Task Force Report.on Phase 1 Issues: Energy Efficiency Shareholder Mechanism,Schlegel, J. (2006). Energy Efficiency in Western Utility

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power prices, natural gas prices, coal plant retirements, and load growth.Growth Regional Transmission Expansion Coal Plant Retirement Utility Avista Idaho Power

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

In situ heat treatment process utilizing a closed loop heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems and methods for an in situ heat treatment process that utilizes a circulation system to heat one or more treatment areas are described herein. The circulation system may use a heated liquid heat transfer fluid that passes through piping in the formation to transfer heat to the formation. In some embodiments, the piping may be positioned in at least two of the wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Recommended Practice: Creating Cyber Forensics Plans for Control Systems  

SciTech Connect

Cyber forensics has been in the popular mainstream for some time, and has matured into an information-technology capability that is very common among modern information security programs. The goal of cyber forensics is to support the elements of troubleshooting, monitoring, recovery, and the protection of sensitive data. Moreover, in the event of a crime being committed, cyber forensics is also the approach to collecting, analyzing, and archiving data as evidence in a court of law. Although scalable to many information technology domains, especially modern corporate architectures, cyber forensics can be challenging when being applied to non-traditional environments, which are not comprised of current information technologies or are designed with technologies that do not provide adequate data storage or audit capabilities. In addition, further complexity is introduced if the environments are designed using proprietary solutions and protocols, thus limiting the ease of which modern forensic methods can be utilized. The legacy nature and somewhat diverse or disparate component aspects of control systems environments can often prohibit the smooth translation of modern forensics analysis into the control systems domain. Compounded by a wide variety of proprietary technologies and protocols, as well as critical system technologies with no capability to store significant amounts of event information, the task of creating a ubiquitous and unified strategy for technical cyber forensics on a control systems device or computing resource is far from trivial. To date, no direction regarding cyber forensics as it relates to control systems has been produced other than what might be privately available from commercial vendors. Current materials have been designed to support event recreation (event-based), and although important, these requirements do not always satisfy the needs associated with incident response or forensics that are driven by cyber incidents. To address these issues and to accommodate for the diversity in both system and architecture types, a framework based in recommended practices to address forensics in the control systems domain is required. This framework must be fully flexible to allow for deployment into any control systems environment regardless of technologies used. Moreover, the framework and practices must provide for direction on the integration of modern network security technologies with traditionally closed systems, the result being a true defense-in-depth strategy for control systems architectures. This document takes the traditional concepts of cyber forensics and forensics engineering and provides direction regarding augmentation for control systems operational environments. The goal is to provide guidance to the reader with specifics relating to the complexity of cyber forensics for control systems, guidance to allow organizations to create a self-sustaining cyber forensics program, and guidance to support the maintenance and evolution of such programs. As the current control systems cyber security community of interest is without any specific direction on how to proceed with forensics in control systems environments, this information product is intended to be a first step.

Eric Cornelius; Mark Fabro

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goal.6 Figure 2-2. Accounting for Energy Efficiency2-3. Accounting for Energy Efficiency Resources in LoadFigure 3-1. Plan Energy Efficiency Program Effects: Annual

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goal.6 Figure 2-2. Accounting for Energy Efficiency8 Figure 2-3. Accounting for Energy Efficiency Resources in10 Figure 3-1. Plan Energy Efficiency Program Effects:

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5% of total energy requirements for BC Hydro and PacifiCorp1 Avista BC Hydro PacifiCorp PGE Total energy requirementsNorthwestern Energy, and BC Hydro) plan to offset ~30–50% of

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Engineering Task Plan for the 241-AN-105 Multi-Function Corrosion Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of the corrosion probe assembly into riser WST-RISER-016 (formerly 15B) of tank 241-AN-105. The corrosion monitoring system utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring system is designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the system also facilitates the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates.

EDGEMON, G.L.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

366

Summary of Utility License Termination Documents and Lessons Learned: Summary of License Termination Plan Submittals by Three Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) 1996 revised decommissioning regulations specify that the operator of a nuclear plant must submit a "License Termination Plan" (LTP) two years prior to termination of the plant license. The LTP explicitly defines the elements that the plant operator must address in the decommissioning plan. This report focuses on the approaches and experience gained by three of the leading plants in the preparation and submittal of their LTP submittals under the 1996 regul...

2002-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Commercialization of PV-powered pumping systems for use in utility PV service programs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report was a commercialization effort focused on cost-effective remote water pumping systems for use in utility-based photovoltaic (PV) service programs. The project combined a commercialization strategy tailored specifically for electric utilities with the development of a PV-powered pumping system that operates conventional ac pumps rather than relying on the more expensive and less reliable PV pumps on the market. By combining these two attributes, a project goal was established of creating sustained utility purchases of 250 PV-powered water pumping systems per year. The results of each of these tasks are presented in two parts contained in this Final Summary Report. The first part summarizes the results of the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN) as a new business venture, while the second part summarizes the results of the Golden Photon system installations. Specifically, results and photographs from each of the system installations are presented in this latter part.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Lift-and-project relaxations of AC microgrid distribution system planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply relaxation procedures to polynomial optimization problems that originate in transmission system planning, and obtain new convex formulations for the AC case. The approach is novel because the optimization is efficient but also addresses the ... Keywords: AC power flow, lift-and-project relaxation, linear programming, transmission system planning

Joshua A. Taylor; Franz S. Hover

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Multi-Criteria Spatial Decision Support System DECERNS: Application to Land Use Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use planning and environmental management often requires an implementation of both geoyspatial information analysis and value-driven criteria within the decision-making process. DECERNS Decision Evaluation in Complex Risk Network Systems is a web-based ... Keywords: DECERNS, GIS, Housing Development, Land-Use Planning, MCDA, Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Spatial Decision Support System, WebSDSS

B. Yatsalo; V. Didenko; A. Tkachuk; G. Gritsyuk; O. Mirzeabasov; V. Slipenkaya; A. Babutski; I. Pichugina; T. Sullivan; I. Linkov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Robust Method for the Concurrent Motion Planning of Multi-Manipulators Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article a robust and simple procedure for the on-line concurrent motion planning of multi-manipulators is presented. The approach is based on solving for each manipulator a linear system of equations taking into account a vector for motion ... Keywords: concurrent motion planning, multi-manipulator systems, redundancy resolution

R. V. Mayorga; A. K. C. Wong

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Configuration Management (TWRS) Configuration Management Implementation Plan descibes the execution of the configuration management (CM) that the contractor uses to manage and integrate its programmatic and functional operations to perform work.

WEIR, W.R.

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Introducing the use of integrated Decision Support System in Natural Resources Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The target subject of Natural Resources Planning (NRP) includes various systems and their elements, all of which are centered around the natural resource system. Given this characteristic complexity and a high degree of ...

Park, Hye Yeon, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility The Impact of Forced Air System Blowers on Furnace Performance and Utility Loads Speaker(s): Bert Phillips Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: James Lutz Bert Phillips will talk about the impact of forced air system blower performance on furnace or heating performance and on utility loads, and what can be done to reduce blower power requirements. He will also briefly discuss a ground source heat pump monitoring study that he just finished. Mr. Phillips is a registered Professional Engineer in three Canadian provinces and part owner of UNIES Ltd., an engineering firm in Winnipeg, Manitoba (60 miles straight north of the North Dakota/Minnesota border). He does research and HVAC system design and investigates

375

Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems and Analysis Utilities (TAU) on BG/P Systems References TAU Project Site TAU Instrumentation Methods TAU Compilation Options TAU Fortran Instrumentation FAQ TAU Leap to Petascale 2009 Presentation TAU Workshop 2009 Introduction The TAU (Tuning and Analysis Utilities) Performance System is a portable profiling and tracing toolkit for performance analysis of parallel programs written in Fortran, C, C++, Java, Python. TAU gathers performance information while a program executes through instrumentation of functions, methods, basic blocks, and statements. The instrumentation consists of calls to TAU library routines which can be incorporated into a program in several ways: automatic instrumentation of the code at the source level using the Program Database Toolkit (PDT)

376

Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This section gives metropolitan counties the authority to prepare and adopt groundwater plans, or to grant this responsibility to soil and water

377

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

378

Impacts of environmental and utility siting laws on community energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Community Energy Systems provide an interesting energy conservative alternative to the traditional trend of large, central, grid-connected power plant design. The small community energy system (generally smaller than 100 MW), provides for waste heat utilization and utility cogeneration significantly reducing a community's total energy demand. Developers of Community Energy Systems, unfortunately, are faced with a complex of environmental and siting regulations, most of which are aimed at regulating the development and design of large power-generating facilities. Aside from discouraging development of a potentially more economic and environmentally sound approach to power generation, air-pollution regulations discriminate against these smaller systems. Compliance with the many Federal, state and local regulations often make small energy systems uneconomical. This project studies the emissions associated with Community Energy Systems and reviews the Federal, state, and local laws that regulate their design.

Senew, M J; Shimamoto, G T; Seymour, D A; Santini, D J

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Birthday Party Frame System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is an experimental investigation of the utility of the MIT-AI frames system. Using this system, a birthday party planning system was written, representing the basic decisions that comprise such a plan as frames. ...

Clemenson, Gregory D.

380

The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems  

SciTech Connect

One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Transmission System Efficiency and Utilization Improvement: Summary of R&D Activity and Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

  This report compiles and summarizes the activities, findings, and main conclusions derived from the development of EPRI R&D Program 172 - Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained World.BackgroundEPRI R&D Program 172, Efficient Transmission Systems for a Carbon-Constrained World, was initiated in 2008 and finalized in 2012. The main objective of the program was to assist utilities to prepare for operating a power-delivery system ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

A new approach in utilizing a computer data acquisition system for criticality safety control  

SciTech Connect

A new approach in utilizing a computer data acquisition system is proposed to address many issues associated with criticality safety control. This Criticality Safety Support System (CSSS) utilizes many features of computer and information process technology such as digital pictures, barcodes, voice data entry, etc. to enhance criticality safety in an R and D environment. Due to on-line data retrieving, data recording, and data management offered by new technology, the CSSS would provide a framework to design new solutions to old problems. This pilot program is the first step in developing this application for the years to come.

Hopkins, H; Song, H; Warren, F

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

Forecast-driven tactical planning models for manufacturing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our work is motivated by real-world planning challenges faced by a manufacturer of industrial products. In the first part of the thesis, we study a multi-product serial-flow production line that operates in a low-volume, ...

Chhaochhria, Pallav

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Cogeneration Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration, the sequential use of a fuel to generate electricity and thermal energy, has become a widely discussed concept in energy engineering. American-Standard, a world-wide diversified manufacturing corporation, has actively been pursuing cogeneration projects for its plants. Of concern to us are rapidly escalating electrical costs plus concern about the future of some utilities to maintain reserve capacity. Our review to date revolves around (1) obtaining low-cost reliable fuel supplies for the cogeneration system, (2) identifying high cost/low reserve utilities, and (3) developing systems which are base loaded, and thus cost-effective. This paper will be an up-to-date review of our cogeneration planning process.

Mozzo, M. A. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Section III: Sustainability/ 1 University of Colorado Boulder Master Plan utilization of existing buildings, before building new ones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­25acresoflandforthedevelopmentofa local food production facility such as solar powered greenhouses in CU-Boulder South. Smaller buildings, before building new ones. The Boulder campus recently created a Space Manage- ment Advisory Committee to oversee space allocation, maximization of space utilization, as well as develop space standards

Stowell, Michael

386

Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Parking and routing information system phase 1 evaluation -- Individual evaluation test plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parking and routing information system (PARIS) is being designed and deployed at a test site on the Mountain Home Veterans Administration campus in Johnson City, Tennessee using three sensor technologies. The purpose of the PARIS project is to demonstrate innovative integration of vehicle sensing technologies with parking management strategies to improve mobility and relieve congestion associated with a growing medical/technology complex. This technical memorandum presents the four individual evaluation test plans, System Performance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, User Acceptance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, Institutional and Business Issues Individual Evaluation Test Plan, and Transportation Systems Individual Evaluation Test Plan, which were developed to support ORNL`s responsibilities and functions during the four studies. The plans define the level of effort required to satisfy the data collection, processing, and analysis requirements for the assessment of the system performance, user acceptance, institutional and business issues, and transportation systems components of the PARIS phase 1 evaluation. Each plan is divided into three subsections: executive summary, detailed study design, and study management.

Carter, R.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Performance improvement of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak electric auxiliary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and construction of a heat pump system suitable for incorporating in a space solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility are described. The performance of the system is evaluated. The refrigerating capacity, heating capacity and compressor horsepower for a heat pump system using a piston type compressor are first determined. The heat pump design is also matched with the existing University of Toledo solar house heating system. The refrigerant is Freon-12 working between a condensing temperature of up to 172/sup 0/F and evaporator temperature between 0/sup 0/F and 75/sup 0/F. The heat pump is then installed. Performance indices for the heat pump and the heating system in general are defined and generated by the on-line computer monitoring system for the 1979/80 heating season operation. Monthly and seasonal indices such as heat pump coefficient of performance, collector efficiency, percent of heating load supplied by solar energy and individual components efficiencies in general are recorded. The data collected is then analyzed and compared with previously collected data. The improvement in the performance resulting from the addition of a piston type compressor with an external motor belt drive is then evaluated. Data collected points to the potentially improved operating performance of a solar heating system utilizing off-peak storage from the electric utility. Data shows that the seasonal percent of space heating load supplied by solar is 60% and the seasonal percent cost of space heating load supplied by solar is 82% with a solar collection coefficient of performance of 4.6. Data also indicates that such a system would pay for itself in 14 years when used in Northwest Ohio.

Eltimsahy, A.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume III of III: software description. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is the software description for the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG). This is the third of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual describes the software which has been developed for NUREG. This includes a listing of the source modules. All computer code has been written in FORTRAN.

None

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

Integrating Distributed Resources into Electric Utility Distribution Systems: EPRI White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI white paper is about understanding electric power engineering issues related to integrating distributed resources (DR) into utility distribution systems. It is an overview designed for all stakeholders rather than a rigorous technical engineering guide. A major goal of the paper is to move discussion of integration issues toward solutions.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Current Interconnection Practice and Unified Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for interconnecting them with electric utility distribution systems. An assessment of current practice is provided, and a unified approach is recommended to achieve greater consistency. This report is a tool that readers can use to simplify their efforts in resolving DR interconnection problems.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

392

Image replica detection system utilizing R-trees and linear discriminant analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript introduces a novel system for content-based identification of image replicas. The proposed approach utilizes image resemblance for deciding whether a test image has been replicated from a certain original or not. We formulate replica ... Keywords: Content-based monitoring, Copy image detection, Copyright protection, Fingerprinting, Linear discriminant analysis (LDA), Perceptual hashing, R-tree indexing, Replica detection, Robust hashing

Spiros Nikolopoulos; Stafanos Zafeiriou; Nikos Nikolaidis; Ioannis Pitas

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

An analysis of GPU utilization trends on the Keeneland initial delivery system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 2010, The Georgia Institute of Technology along with its partners - the Oak Ridge National Lab, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and the National Institute for Computational Sciences, deployed the Keeneland Initial Delivery System (KIDS) ... Keywords: GPU, nvidia-smi, utilization

Tabitha K. Samuel; Stephen McNally; John Wynkoop

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Low complexity subcarrier and power allocation for utility maximization in uplink OFDMA systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the joint subcarrier and power allocation problem with the objective of maximizing the total utility of users in the uplink of an OFDMA system. Our formulation includes the problems of sum rate maximization, proportional fairness and max-min ...

Cho Yiu Ng; Chi Wan Sung

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

752 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 24, NO. 2, MAY 2009 Large-Scale Distribution Planning--Part  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

752 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 24, NO. 2, MAY 2009 Large-Scale Distribution Planning methodology for low-voltage distribution network planning. Combined optimization of transformers and approximately 1 300 000 customers. Index Terms--Low voltage, network planning, power distribu- tion planning

Rudnick, Hugh

396

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Microprocessor Based Combustion Monitoring and Control Systems Utilizing in Situ Opacity, Oxygen and CO Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new hybrid combustion control system has been developed which combines the functions which have traditionally been performed by separate stand-alone measurement and control instruments into one low-cost integrated system. Complete O2 Trim Control Systems will soon be available starting at less than 6,000 dollars. By utilizing a high performance low-cost microprocessor, both measurement and control functions can now be performed simultaneously. The new systems will feature automatic calibration, self-diagnostics, field programmable memory, and improved operator interface. By measuring the products of combustion utilizing the latest In Situ Opacity, Oxygen, and CO Monitoring technology, the fuel air mixture ratio of industrial fuel burning equipment can be optimized to insure reduced fuel consumption end improved combustion efficiency. Typical fuel savings of 3 to 5 percent have been experienced on a wide variety of different types of fuel burning sources, including packaged boilers, incinerators, and process heaters.

Molloy, R. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Formerly Utilized MED/AEC Sites Remedial Action Program. Project management plan for the decontamination of Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory, and Eckhart Hall, the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has in place a plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of contaminated sites that had been formerly utilized by the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) and/or the Atomic Energy Commission. This plan is referred to as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Among these sites are Jones Laboratory, Ryerson Physical Laboratory and Eckhart Hall of The University of Chicago at Chicago, Illinois. This document represents the Project Management Plan for the decontamination of these facilities. 13 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Flynn, K.F.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Framework for designing regional planning architecture for APTS-enabled regional multimodal public transportation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsustainable transportation systems have been the cause of many problems facing urban areas around the world. Lack of regard for sustainable development considerations by those responsible for planning and implementing ...

Zakaria, Zulina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Incorporating operational flexibility into electric generation planning : impacts and methods for system design and policy analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation demonstrates how flexibility in hourly electricity operations can impact long-term planning and analysis for future power systems, particularly those with substantial variable renewables (e.g., wind) or ...

Palmintier, Bryan S. (Bryan Stephen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Appreciating Wind Energy's Probabilistic Nature within the Uncertainty Context of Electric Power System Network Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric power system network planning is influenced by the uncertainty in many parameters, such as future customer-demand/fossil-fuel-price parameter projections and new generation plant locations, which can generally be modeled in an approximate or ...

Daniel J. Burke, M. J. O'Malley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Lift-and-Project Relaxations of AC Microgrid Distribution System Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply relaxation procedures to polynomial optimization problems that originate in transmission system planning, and obtain new convex formulations for the AC case. The approach is novel because the optimization is ...

Taylor, Joshua A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Strategic information systems planning: A case study from the financial services industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategic Information Systems Planning (SISP) is an important topic for managers and researchers alike. However, there is evidence of a gap between SISP research and practice. Taking this situation as a motivation, we conducted an in depth case study ...

R. A. Teubner

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Power System Planning: Emerging Practices Suitable for Evaluating the Impact of High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report explores the impact of high-penetration renewable generation on electric power system planning methodologies and outlines how these methodologies are evolving to enable effective integration of variable-output renewable generation sources.

Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Dynamic plan migration for snapshot-equivalent continuous queries in data stream systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data stream management system executes a large number of continuous queries in parallel. As stream characteristics and query workload change over time, the plan initially installed for a continuous query may become inefficient. As a consequence, the ...

Jürgen Krämer; Yin Yang; Michael Cammert; Bernhard Seeger; Dimitris Papadias

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

An optimization-model-based interactive decision support system for regional energy management systems planning under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, an interactive decision support system (UREM-IDSS) has been developed based on an inexact optimization model (UREM, University of Regina Energy Model) to aid decision makers in planning energy management systems. Optimization modeling, ... Keywords: Decision making, Energy management systems, Green house gas, Interactive decision support system, Optimization, Sustainable development, Uncertainty

Y. P. Cai; G. H. Huang; Q. G. Lin; X. H. Nie; Q. Tan

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Harmonization of Utility Common Information Model (CIM) with other IEC Power System Management Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has sponsored the development of a number of international standards which provide the basis for information exchange to support power system management. One of the most important is the Common Information Model (CIM), which is rapidly gaining acceptance throughout the world as a common semantic model to unify and integrate the data from a myriad of systems involved in support of real-time electric utility operations. As its acceptance as the basis for information integration grows and areas of appl...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

411

Metrics and Methods for Consideration of Flexibility in Power System Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work done in 2012 as part of the Grid Planning “Strategic and Flexible Planning” project. This project is concerned with methods and metrics to assess power system flexibility to manage variability and uncertainty. In 2011, a two-tiered approach to this issue was proposed, and aspects of system flexibility were demonstrated. This year’s work continued the development of both high-level screening and detailed, simulation-based metrics and methods for assessing ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

An approach to assess the performance of utility-interactive photovoltaic systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a probabilistic approach based on the convolution technique to assess the performance of utility-interactive photovoltaic systems supplying loads. Analytical expressions are developed to obtain the duration curve for the power injected into the utility grid. The energy injected into the grid and drawn from it to supply the load during the study period can be calculated from this duration curve. The load model employed enables the study period to range from one year to one particular hour-of-day, thus allowing the inclusion of the time-value of energy as appropriate in economic assessments.

Abouzahr, I. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Ramakumar, R. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Engineering Energy Lab.)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

An approach to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a probabilistic approach based on the convolution technique to assess the performance of utility-interactive wind electric conversion systems supplying loads. Expressions are developed to obtain the duration curve for the power injected into the utility grid. The energy injected into the grid and drawn from it to supply the load during the study period can be calculated from this duration curve. The load model employed enables the study period to range from one year to one particular hour-of-day, thus allowing the inclusion of the time-value of energy as appropriate in economic assessments.

Abouzahr, I.; Ramakumar, R. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess the potential for the application of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (a field of interconnected WTGs denoted in this report by the acronym WECS) in a specific utility contest to gain advance information concerning their economic feasibility; their optional problems; the criteria and procedures for site selection; environmental impacts; legal, social, and other problems; and the balance of cost and benefits from the point of view of the consumer and the utility. This study addresses the circumstances of the Hawaiian Electric Company operations onthe Island of Oahu.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

416

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a similar climate and hydroelectric-based electric systema similar climate and a hydroelectric-based electric system.

Hopper, Nichole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Consolidated Air Mobility Planning System (CAMPS): An Air Mobility Planning and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the initial development of CAMPS was concluded and primary maintenance responsibility was turned over for Transportation Analysis (CTA) Research Areas Aviation Safety Air Traffic Management Analysis Data, Statistical Analysis Highway Safety Intelligent Transportation Systems Logistics Management Supply Chain Management

418

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 1. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear byproducts are a major national resource that has yet to be incorporated into the economy. The current Defense Byproducts Program is designed to match specific military and commercial needs with the availability of valuable products which are currently treated as waste at considerable expense in waste management costs. This program plan focuses on a few specific areas with the greatest potential for near-term development and application. It also recognizes the need for a continuing effort to develop new applications for byproducts and to continue to assess the impacts on waste management. The entire program has been, and will continue to be structured so as to ensure the safety of the public and maintain the purity of the environment. Social and institutional concerns have been recognized and will be handled appropriately. A significant effort will be undertaken to inform the public of the benefits of byproduct use and of the care being taken to ensure safe, efficient operation.

None

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Multi-area power system state estimation utilizing boundary measurements and phasor measurement units ( PMUs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to prove the validity of a multi-area state estimator and investigate the advantages it provides over a serial state estimator. This is done utilizing the IEEE 118 Bus Test System as a sample system. This thesis investigates the benefits that stem from utilizing a multi-area state estimator instead of a serial state estimator. These benefits are largely in the form of increased accuracy and decreased processing time. First, the theory behind power system state estimation is explained for a simple serial estimator. Then the thesis shows how conventional measurements and newer, more accurate PMU measurements work within the framework of weighted least squares estimation. Next, the multi-area state estimator is examined closely and the additional measurements provided by PMUs are used to increase accuracy and computational efficiency. Finally, the multi-area state estimator is tested for accuracy, its ability to detect bad data, and computation time.

Freeman, Matthew A

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Coal Utilization Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility system plans" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Micro-Computer-Based Fuel Optimization System Utilizing In-Situ Measurement of Carbon Monoxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A microcomputer-based control system utilizing a distributed intelligence architecture has been developed to control combustion in hydrocarbon fuel-fired boilers and heaters to significantly reduce fuel usage. The system incorporates a unique flue gas analyzer that mounts directly in the flue or stack to continuously measure carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, opacity and temperature. The control console interfaces directly with the boiler's existing analog control system to provide precise air fuel ratio control based on carbon monoxide measurements. Significant decreases in excess air result in reduced fuel usage while meeting steam demand. Actual performance on industrial boilers shows increases in efficiency of from 1% to 3% with substantial fuel savings.

DeVivo, D. G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp  

SciTech Connect

High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.

Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C.; Page, E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-464, immobilized high-level waste storage  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-46 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Wecks, M.D.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Fifty. West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of West Virginia governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-nine. Washington  

SciTech Connect

A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Washington governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fuzzy-Pareto-dominance driven possibilistic model based planning of electrical distribution systems using multi-objective particle swarm optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a fuzzy-Pareto dominance driven possibilistic model based planning of electrical distribution systems using multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO). This multi-objective planning model captures the possibilistic variations ... Keywords: Electrical distribution system planning, Fuzzy-Pareto-dominance, Multi-objective optimization, Pareto-optimality, Particle swarm optimization, Possibilistic load model

N. C. Sahoo; S. Ganguly; D. Das

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Utility solar water heating workshops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to explore the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM measure. Expected benefits from the workshops included an increased awareness and interest by utilities in solar water heating as well as greater understanding by federal research and policy officials of utility perspectives for purposes of planning and programming. Ultimately, the project could result in better information transfer, increased implementation of solar water heating programs, greater penetration of solar systems, and more effective research projects. The objective of the workshops was satisfied. Each workshop succeeded in exploring the problems and opportunities for utility participation with so