National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for utility sector end-use

  1. End-Use Sector Flowchart

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors—transportation, industry, commercial and residential—identified in Figure 1. By clicking on any of the boxes with the word "Sector" in the title will reveal the more detailed structure within that sector.

  2. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  3. United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Morrow, William R.; Masanet, Eric

    2012-05-11

    The United States Department of Energys (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to provide detailed data on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector. The survey is a sample of approximately 15,000 manufacturing establishments selected from the Economic Census - Manufacturing Sector. MECS provides statistics on the consumption of energy by end uses (e.g., boilers, process, electric drives, etc.) disaggregated by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) categories. The manufacturing sector (NAICS Sector 31-33) consists of all manufacturing establishments in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. According to the NAICS, the manufacturing sector comprises establishments engaged in the mechanical, physical, or chemical transformation of materials, substances, or components into new products. The establishments are physical facilities such as plants, factories, or mills. For many of the sectors in the MECS datasets, information is missing because the reported energy use is less than 0.5 units or BTUs, or is withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual establishments, or is withheld because the standard error is greater than 50%. We infer what the missing information likely are using several approximations techniques. First, much of the missing data can be easily calculated by adding or subtracting other values reported by MECS. If this is not possible (e.g. two data are missing), we look at historic MECS reports to help identify the breakdown of energy use in the past and assume it remained the same for the current MECS. Lastly, if historic data is also missing, we assume that 3 digit NAICS classifications predict energy use in their 4, 5, or 6 digit NAICS sub-classifications, or vice versa. Along with addressing data gaps, end use energy is disaggregated beyond the specified MECS allocations using additional industry specific energy consumption data. The result is a completed

  4. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014" "Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1219363,276627,129773,812963,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1134527,513748,563581,57198,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal

  5. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Kentucky Utilities Co","Investor-owned",18888411,6334638,5483135,7070638,0 2,"Louisville Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",11817164,4157326,4885866,2773972,0 3,"Kenergy Corp","Cooperative",9670080,757715,325857,8586508,0

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"MidAmerican Energy Co","Investor-owned",20585461,570529...

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NorthWestern Energy LLC - (MT)","Investor-owned",597...

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Westar Energy Inc","Investor-owned",9973395,3434301,4...

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC","Investor-owned",567506...

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-owned",41994756...

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-owned",...

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Indiana Inc","Investor-owned",28224148,9...

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",38670...

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Puget Sound Energy Inc","Investor-owned",20568948...

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-ow...

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-owned...

  18. Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11<//td> 1989 1,439 6,057 [R] 3,993 785 551 [12] 1,251 [12] 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 8,062 [R] 2,817 826 432 [12] 469 [12] 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 5,715 [R] 3,947

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee E M C","Cooperative",5743330,3134733,1993358,615239,0 5,"Knoxville Utilities Board","Public",5536187,2506771,2279472,749944,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Arkansas Inc","Investor-owned",21049257,8069917,6170936,6808318,86 2,"Southwestern Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",4018839,1121436,1354356,1543047,0 3,"Mississippi County Electric

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Arizona Public Service Co","Investor-owned",27584533,12837752,12477518,2269263,0 2,"Salt River Project","Public",27548529,12293633,11099759,4155137,0 3,"Tucson Electric Power

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Southern California Edison Co","Investor-owned",75828585,29972416,37903351,7874457,78361 2,"Pacific Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",75114523,29289082,28107971,17717470,0 3,"Los Angeles Department of Water &

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-owned",28671219,9008526,12886370,6712282,64041 2,"City of Colorado Springs - (CO)","Public",4477715,1425423,1097160,1955132,0 3,"Intermountain Rural Elec

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Connecticut Light & Power Co","Investor-owned",8945482,6146224,2365991,367962,65305 2,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",2018823,0,1320397,692814,5612 3,"United Illuminating

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",3556542,40286,3515507,749,0 2,"Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",3015764,1733437,1282327,0,0 3,"WGL Energy Services,

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",104431096,55224658,46172611,2942385,91442 2,"Duke Energy Florida, Inc","Investor-owned",37240099,19002681,14970106,3267312,0 3,"Tampa Electric

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-Owned",83740365,27132065,32894391,23548775,165134 2,"Jackson Electric Member Corp - (GA)","Cooperative",5201199,3003210,1476773,721216,0 3,"Cobb Electric Membership

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Hawaiian Electric Co Inc","Investor-owned",6781665,1611149,2270495,2900021,0 2,"Maui Electric Co Ltd","Investor-owned",1132056,381979,373947,376130,0 3,"Hawaii Electric Light Co

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-owned",18061768,9114941,7890441,1056386,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",10686139,5208659,5477480,0,0 3,"Homefield

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Louisiana LLC","Investor-owned",32904509,9047299,6757407,17099803,0 2,"Entergy Gulf States - LA LLC","Investor-owned",20822523,5368421,5529206,9924896,0 3,"Cleco Power

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NextEra Energy Power Marketing","Investor-owned",1984446,859679,1082377,42390,0 2,"New Brunswick Power Generation Corp.","Investor-owned",2101006,1963787,58020,79199,0 3,"Electricity Maine,

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Baltimore Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",12270475,8927905,3147168,195402,0 2,"WGL Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",7202209,1077458,6124751,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Massachusetts Electric Co","Investor-owned",10602381,7180002,3013034,409068,277 2,"NSTAR Electric Company","Investor-owned",8805023,5064032,3531796,209195,0 3,"Direct Energy

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"DTE Electric Company","Investor-owned",41923906,14932840,16790364,10199382,1320 2,"Consumers Energy Co","Investor-owned",33253922,12593983,11045552,9614387,0 3,"Constellation Energy Services,

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Union Electric Co - (MO)","Investor-owned",37022540,13649267,14751404,8600114,21755 2,"Kansas City Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",8554331,2571510,4454312,1528509,0 3,"KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of NH","Investor-owned",3799020,2390026,1240068,168926,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",1008956,3870,1005086,0,0 3,"Constellation NewEnergy,

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Elec & Gas Co","Investor-owned",19571938,11374261,7430854,766823,0 2,"Jersey Central Power & Lt Co","Investor-owned",9957517,7264641,2445207,247669,0 3,"Direct Energy

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc","Investor-owned",19756921,9869409,9783465,102499,1548 2,"New York Power Authority","Public",18956177,0,8062381,8156837,2736959 3,"Long Island Power

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",24307160,8652606,9472917,6181637,0 2,"Public Service Co of Oklahoma","Investor-owned",17947669,6320906,6389387,5237376,0 3,"Grand River Dam

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",4281682,1551471,1572378,1157833,0 2,"Vermont Electric Cooperative, Inc","Cooperative",446870,222366,122807,101697,0 3,"City of Burlington Electric -

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Virginia Electric & Power Co","Investor-owned",75562974,29406355,39038242,6916360,202017 2,"Appalachian Power Co","Investor-owned",15954286,6461192,4013267,5479827,0 3,"Rappahannock Electric

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Wisconsin Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",23909329,7778541,8832104,7298684,0 2,"Wisconsin Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",10646058,3533105,2424249,4688704,0 3,"Wisconsin Public Service

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",104431096,55224658,46172611,2942385,91442 2,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-owned",83740365,27132065,32894391,23548775,165134 3,"Southern California Edison

  4. Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

  5. Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utilities Co","Investor-owned",2068166,811250,1081889,175027,0 3,"Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop","Cooperative",2025153,263270,182264,1579619,0 4,"Otter Tail Power ...

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Delmarva Power","Investor-owned",3604764,2673209,902845,28710,0 2,"Delaware Electric Cooperative","Cooperative",1301698,1060347,241351,0,0 3,"Direct Energy Business","Investor-owned",709072,0,709072,0,0 4,"City of Dover -

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Idaho Power Co","Investor-owned",13462077,4784073,3792971,4885033,0 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",3495174,665344,457510,2372320,0 3,"Avista Corp","Investor-owned",3083614,1188464,1029305,865845,0 4,"City of Idaho Falls -

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Mississippi Inc","Investor-owned",13204945,5672166,5235681,2297098,0 2,"Mississippi Power Co","Investor-owned",9960184,2136509,2905744,4917931,0 3,"Tennessee Valley Authority","Federal",4527039,0,0,4527039,0

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Omaha Public Power District","Public",10659655,3561537,3640059,3458059,0 2,"Nebraska Public Power District","Public",3353118,895508,1211817,1245793,0 3,"Lincoln Electric System","Public",3219685,1193586,1526628,499471,0

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Portland General Electric Co","Investor-owned",17603187,7461863,6849512,3283792,8020 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",12958735,5309295,5109334,2524679,15427 3,"City of Eugene - (OR)","Public",2336296,919175,872330,544791,0

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"The Narragansett Electric Co","Investor-owned",5006934,2852069,1901360,253505,0 2,"Direct Energy Business","Investor-owned",589515,0,589515,0,0 3,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",469721,0,296950,149198,23573

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",24105301,6605139,8564346,8875134,60682 2,"Provo City Corp","Public",784886,236348,410174,138364,0 3,"City of St George","Public",616490,276947,68066,271477,0 4,"Moon Lake Electric Assn

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",9568272,1041412,1503050,7023810,0 2,"Powder River Energy Corp","Cooperative",2640812,221881,891312,1527619,0 3,"Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co","Investor-owned",1175006,259090,533610,382306,0

  15. Table 3.6 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars 1) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 5,272 4,186 10,352 20,112 1,844 1,440 7,319 10,678 2,082 2,625 6,069 366 5,624 16,691 35,327 35,379 1971 5,702 4,367 11,589 21,934 2,060 1,574

  16. Table 10.7 Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet) Year and Type By Market Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 1 Industrial 2 Electric Power 3 Other 4 Pool Heating Water Heating Space Heating Space Cooling Combined Heating 5 Process Heating Electricity Generation Total Shipments 6<//td> 2001 Total 10,125 1,012 17 1 35 10,797 274 70 0 12 34 2 11,189 Low 7 9,885 987 12 0 34 10,782 42 61 0 0 34 0 10,919 Medium 8 240 24 5 0 1 16

  17. 1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

  18. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communication...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commission's Communications, Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communications Commission's...

  19. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to Commerce Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commerce Department's Spectrum Advisory Committee DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to Commerce Department's Spectrum Advisory Committee December 14, 2010 - 5:40pm Addthis...

  20. Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 1.06 1.54 6.51 2.10 0.75 0.90 [R] 6.09 1.97 0.45 0.38 0.98 1.59 2.99 0.84 2.31 2.31 1971 1.12 1.59 6.80 2.24 .80 1.02 6.44 2.15 .50 .41 1.05

  1. Utility Sector Leaders Make Firm Commitment to Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 80 energy, environmental and other organizations announced commitments and public statements in support of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE), released today, which provides energy consumers and providers information on policies and techniques to save money as well as protect the environment. By adopting the plan's recommendations on low-cost, under-used energy efficiency, Americans could save hundreds of billions of dollars on their gas and electric utility bills, cut greenhouse gas emissions, and lower the costs for energy and pollution controls.

  2. End Use and Fuel Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–B: End Use and Fuel Certification John Eichberger, Vice President of Government Relations, National Association for Convenience Stores

  3. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1990 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1990 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. The report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1990 time period, and gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1990. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell annually to four sectors. Data is provided on each retail customer sector and also on the customers Bonneville serves directly: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. 21 figs., 40 tabs.

  4. Market study for direct utilization of geothermal resources by selected sectors of economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    A comprehensive analysis is presented of industrial markets potential for direct use of geothermal energy by a total of six industry sectors: food and kindred products; tobacco manufactures; textile mill products; lumber and wood products (except furniture); chemicals and allied products; and leather and leather products. A brief statement is presented regarding sectors of the economy and major manufacturing processes which can readily utilize direct geothermal energy. Previous studies on plant location determinants are summarized and appropriate empirical data provided on plant locations. Location determinants and potential for direct use of geothermal resources are presented. The data was gathered through interviews with 30 senior executives in the six sectors of economy selected for study. Probable locations of plants in geothermal resource areas and recommendations for geothermal resource marketing are presented. Appendix A presents factors which impact on industry location decisions. Appendix B presents industry executives interviewed during the course of this study. (MHR)

  5. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  6. Reduction in tribological energy losses in the transportation and electric utilities sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkus, O.; Wilcock, D.F.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01

    This report is part of a study of ways and means of advancing the national energy conservation effort, particularly with regard to oil, via progress in the technology of tribology. The report is confined to two economic sectors: transportation, where the scope embraces primarily the highway fleets, and electric utilities. Together these two sectors account for half of the US energy consumption. Goal of the study is to ascertain the energy sinks attributable to tribological components and processes and to recommend long-range research and development (R and D) programs aimed at reducing these losses. In addition to the obvious tribological machine components such as bearings, piston rings, transmissions and so on, the study also extends to processes which are linked to tribology indirectly such as wear of machine parts, coatings of blades, high temperature materials leading to higher cycle efficiencies, attenuation of vibration, and other cycle improvements.

  7. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  8. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  9. End-Use Sector Flowcharts, Energy Intensity Indicators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. vssp_12_wagner.pdf (1.32 MB) More Documents & Publications Ignition Control for HCCI High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines Expanding Robust HCCI Operation (Delphi CRADA) Cooling | Department of Energy

    A new approach, called Adaptive-Jet-Cooling, leverages two distinct spray patters of hollow conical sprays

  10. ,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  11. End-use taxes: Current EIA practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-17

    There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

  12. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:20 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  13. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:14 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  14. ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 6:36:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  15. Industrial Utility Webinar: Opportunities for Cost-Effective Energy Efficiency in the Industrial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-13

    The Industrial Utility Webinars focus on providing utilities with information on how to develop sucessful energy efficeincy programs for industrial energy consumers.

  16. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  17. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  18. Preliminary CBECS End-Use Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    For the past three CBECS (1989, 1992, and 1995), we used a statistically-adjusted engineering (SAE) methodology to estimate end-use consumption. The core of the SAE methodology...

  19. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas ...

  20. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net

  1. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source:...

  2. Profiles in renewable energy: Case studies of successful utility-sector projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anson, S.; Sinclair, K.; Swezey, B.

    1993-10-01

    As considerations of fuel diversity, environmental concerns, and market uncertainties are increasingly factored into electric utility resource planning, renewable energy technologies are beginning to find their place in the utility resource portfolio. This document profiles 10 renewable energy projects, utilizing six different renewable resources, that were built in the US throughout the 1980s. The resources include: biomass, geothermal, hydropower, photovoltaics, solar thermal, and wind. For each project, the factors that were key to its success and the development issues that it faced are discussed, as are the project`s cost, performance, and environmental impacts and benefits.

  3. Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 8, 2010, the Department of Energy General Counsel’s office hosted a seminar on the topic of spectrum policy, attended by approximately fifty representatives of the utility industry.  At...

  4. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural

  5. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural

  6. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for

  7. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for

  8. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report describes the NREL partnership with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, which can be used to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  9. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  10. Examination of the factors and issues for an environmental technology utilization partnership between the private sector and the Department of Energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouse, P.

    1997-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) held a meeting on November 12, 1992 to evaluate the DOE relations with industry and university partners concerning environmental technology utilization. The goal of this meeting was to receive feedback from DOE industry and university partners for the identification of opportunities to improve the DOE cooperative work processes with the private sector. The meeting was designed to collect information and to turn that information into action to improve private sector partnerships with DOE.

  11. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ...

  12. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate ...

  13. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil ...

  14. Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ...

  15. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel ...

  16. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil ...

  17. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate ...

  18. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate ...

  19. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  20. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or ...

  1. Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel ...

  2. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  3. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  4. Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

  5. Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses This tip sheet outlines alternative strategies for low-pressure end uses as a pathway to reduced compressed air energy costs. COMPRESSED AIR TIP SHEET #11 Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses (August 2004) (246.6 KB) More Documents & Publications Eliminate Inappropriate Uses of Compressed Air Compressed Air System Control Strategies Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency

  6. The effect of efficiency standards on water use and water heating energy use in the US: A detailed end-use treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, J.G.; Dunham, C.; Lutz, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    Water heating is an important end-use, accounting for roughly 16% of total primary energy consumption in the US residential sector. Recently enacted efficiency standards on water heaters and hot water-using equipment (e.g., dishwashers, clothes washers, showerheads, and faucets) will substantially affect the energy use of water heaters in the future. Assessment of current and future utility programs and government policies requires that regulators, resource planners, and forecasters understand the effects of these regulations. In order to quantify these impacts, this paper presents a detailed end-use breakdown of household hot and cold water use developed for the US Department of Energy. This breakdown is based on both previous studies and new data and analysis. It is implemented in a spreadsheet forecasting framework, which allows significant flexibility in specifying end-use demands and linkages between water heaters and hot water-using appliances. We disaggregate total hot and cold water use (gallons per day) into their component parts: showers, baths, faucets (flow dominated and volume dominated), toilets, landscaping/other, dishwashers, and clotheswashers. We then use the end-use breakdown and data on equipment characteristics to assess the impacts of current efficiency standards on hot water use and water heater energy consumption.

  7. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: ...

  8. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: ...

  9. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  10. Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The relative magnitude of the energy consumption of different end uses can be a starting point for prioritizing energy investments and action, whether the scope under consideration involves new metering, targeted energy audits, or end-use equipment upgrades.

  11. Power sector liberalization in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seabright, J.

    1998-07-01

    Based on extensive experience of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) with power sector liberalization in developing countries over the past decade, it has become clear that liberalization is a powerful tool for helping achieve sustainable and environmentally sound social and economic development. The basic driving forces for liberalization are: The need for additional energy to support sustainable economic and social development; the lack of public sector financial resources for system improvement; the inefficiency of existing power generation, transmission, distribution and end use; and the poor environmental performance of public sector power utilities. Power sector liberalization has brought the benefits of greater efficiency in the power sector, increased investment, more economic pricing, greater independence from political interference, increased competition and dampening of tariff increase, and better environmental protection. Care needs to be taken, however, to insure that progress in the areas of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and rural electrification are not compromised in the drive to liberalize. USAID firmly believes that power sector liberalization offers a fundamental opportunity to all countries to improve the sustainable supply and use of energy for productive purposes for this and future generations. All nations should seriously consider energy sector liberalization and one or more of the various approaches.

  12. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Publications » Market Studies » Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3)

  13. Utilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 July 2016 ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 Utilities [References: FAR 41, DEAR 941 and 970.4102] 1.0 Summary of Latest Changes This update includes administrative changes. 2.0 Discussion This chapter supplements other more primary acquisition regulations and policies contained in the references above and should be considered in the context of those references. 2.1 Overview. This section discusses the acquisition and sales of utility services by

  14. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Estimates The end-use estimates had two main sources: the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system....

  15. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review compressed air end uses and determine the required level of air pressure. * Review the compressed air end ...

  16. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in the way that variables such as building age and employment density could interact with the engineering estimates of end-use consumption. The SAE equations were...

  17. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses

  18. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district...

  19. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End-Use Analyst Contact: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager URL: http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecscbec-eu1.html separater bar If...

  20. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  1. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire ...

  2. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island ...

  3. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  4. Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Building Metering Guidance specifies buildings with water using processes and whole building water consumption that exceeds 1,000 gallons per day must have a water meter installed. Below are methods for estimating daily water use for typical end-uses that drive building-level, end-use water consumption.

  5. Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

  6. Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

  7. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    as buildings of the 1980's. In this section, intensities are based upon the entire building stock, not just those buildings using a particular fuel for a given end use. This...

  8. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 10:31:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  9. Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government and commercial sectors - Update 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Sondreal, E.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A.

    1999-07-01

    The following conclusions are drawn from the information presented in this report: (1) Joint efforts by industry and government focused on meeting RTC recommendations for reduction/removal of barriers have met with some success. The most notable of these are the changes in regulations related to CCB utilization by individual states. Regionally or nationally consistent state regulation of CCB utilization would further reduce regulatory barriers. (2) Technology changes will continue to be driven by the CAAA, and emission control technologies are expected to continue to impact the type and properties of CCBs generated. As a result, continued RD and D will be needed to learn how to utilize new and changing CCBs in environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically advantageous ways. Clean coal technology CCBs offer a new challenge because of the high volumes expected to be generated and the different characteristics of these CCBs compared to those of conventional CCBs. (3) Industry and government have developed the RD and D infrastructure to address the technical aspects of developing and testing new CCB utilization applications, but this work as well as constant quality control/quality assurance testing needs to be continued to address both industry wide issues and issues related to specific materials, regions, or users. (4) Concerns raised by environmental groups and the public will continue to provide environmental and technical challenges to the CCB industry. It is anticipated that the use of CCBs in mining applications, agriculture, structural fills, and other land applications will continue to be controversial and will require case-by-case technical and environmental information to be developed. The best use of this information will be in the development of generic regulations specifically addressing the use of CCBs in these different types of CCB applications. (5) The development of federal procurement guidelines under Executive Order 12873 titled

  10. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End

  11. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net

  12. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End

  13. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net

  14. Distribution Infrastructure and End Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution Infrastructure and End Use Distribution Infrastructure and End Use The expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) created under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 requires 36 billion gallons of biofuels to be blended into transportation fuel by 2022. Meeting the RFS2 target introduces new challenges for U.S. infrastructure, as modifications will be needed to transport and deliver renewable fuels that are not compatible with existing petroleum infrastructure. The

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Alternative Fuels » Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research Biofuels offer Americans viable domestic, environmentally sustainable alternatives to gasoline and diesel. Learn about the basics, benefits, and issues to consider related to biodiesel and ethanol on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. The Vehicle Technologies Office supports research to increase our knowledge of the effects of biofuels on engines and

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Duke Energy Progress - (NC)","Investor-owned",6559067,2292609,1804594,2461864,0 5,"Berkeley Electric Coop Inc","Cooperative",2095651,1269704,244465,581482,0 " ","Total ...

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ..."Investor-owned",8097075,2268295,2959866,2868914,0 3,"Shell Energy North America (US), L.P.","Investor-owned",1278471,0,0,1278471,0 4,"Colorado River Comm of Nevada","Public",10359...

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,"Wheeling Power Co","Investor-owned",3269892,425005,447849,2397038,0 5,"Black Diamond Power Co","Investor-owned",56232,39152,17080,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wheeler Elec Member Corp","Cooperative",1662817,621444,300425,740948,0 5,"Baldwin County El Member Corp","Cooperative",1361550,911009,450541,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,"Southwestern Public Service Co","Investor-owned",5014741,1127323,1655334,2232084,0 3,"El Paso Electric Co","Investor-owned",1640996,651515,910681,78800,0 4,"City of Farmington - ...

  1. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  2. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  3. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  4. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Net

  5. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","

  6. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  7. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for

  8. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for

  9. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"

  10. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  11. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"

  12. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  13. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

  14. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6:35:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...2","N3035US2","N3025US2","N3045US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption ...

  15. Energy Intensity Changes by Sector, 1985-2011 - Alternative Measures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source energy attributes all the energy used for electricity generation and transmission to the specific end-use sector, addition to the direct consumption of electricity and ...

  16. Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

  17. The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2007-11-27

    This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the

  18. REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

  19. The utilization of excess wind-electric power from stock water pumping systems to heat a sector of the stock tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nydahl, J.E.; Carlson, B.O.

    1996-12-31

    On the high plains, a wind-electric stock water pumping system produces a significant amount of excess power over the winter months due to intense winds and the decreased water consumption by cattle. The University of Wyoming is developing a multi-tasking system to utilize this excess energy to resistively heat a small sector of the stock tank at its demonstration/experimental site. This paper outlines the detailed heat transfer analysis that predicted drinking water temperature and icing conditions. It also outlines the optimization criteria and the power produced by the Bergey 1500 wind electric system. Results show that heating a smaller insulated tank inserted into the larger tank would raise the drinking water temperature by a maximum of 6.7 {degrees}C and eliminate icing conditions. The returns associated with the additional cattle weight gain, as a result of the consumption of warmer water, showed that system modification costs would be recovered the first year. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Update of Market Assessment for Capturing Water Conservation Opportunities in the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcmordie, Katherine; Solana, Amy E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Parker, Graham B.

    2005-09-08

    This updated market assessment for capturing water conservation opportunities in the Federal sector is based on a new analytical approach that utilizes newly available data and technologies. The new approach fine-tunes the original assessment by using actual Federal water use, which is now tracked by DOE (as compared to using estimated water use). Federal building inventory data is also used to disseminate water use by end-use technology in the Federal sector. In addition, this analysis also examines the current issues and obstacles that face performance contracting of water efficiency projects at Federal sites.

  1. Detailed End Use Load Modeling for Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.

    2010-04-09

    The field of distribution system analysis has made significant advances in the past ten years. It is now standard practice when performing a power flow simulation to use an algorithm that is capable of unbalanced per-phase analysis. Recent work has also focused on examining the need for time-series simulations instead of examining a single time period, i.e., peak loading. One area that still requires a significant amount of work is the proper modeling of end use loads. Currently it is common practice to use a simple load model consisting of a combination of constant power, constant impedance, and constant current elements. While this simple form of end use load modeling is sufficient for a single point in time, the exact model values are difficult to determine and it is inadequate for some time-series simulations. This paper will examine how to improve simple time invariant load models as well as develop multi-state time variant models.

  2. Energy Intensity Indicators: Indicators for Major Sectors | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy for Major Sectors Energy Intensity Indicators: Indicators for Major Sectors This system of energy intensity indicators for total energy covers the economy as a whole and each of the major end-use sectors - transportation, industry, commercial, and residential, as well as the electric power sector. These sectors are shown in Figure 1. Please go to the menu below the figure to see a more detailed discussion of historical trends in the energy intensity indicator for a particular sector.

  3. Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-08-05

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent

  4. International Energy Outlook 2016-Industrial sector energy consumption -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration 7. Industrial sector energy consumption print version Overview The industrial sector uses more delivered energy [294] than any other end-use sector, consuming about 54% of the world's total delivered energy. The industrial sector can be categorized by three distinct industry types: energy-intensive manufacturing, nonenergy-intensive manufacturing, and nonmanufacturing (Table 7-1). The mix and intensity of fuels consumed in the industrial sector vary across

  5. Hot Water Electric Energy Use in Single-Family Residences in the Pacific Northwest : Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Megan E., Ritland, Keith G., Pratt, R.G.

    1991-09-01

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMP is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Developing an industrial end-use forecast: A case study at the Los Angeles department of water and power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mureau, T.H.; Francis, D.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) uses INFORM 1.0 to forecast industrial sector energy. INFORM 1.0 provides an end-use framework that can be used to forecast electricity, natural gas or other fuels consumption. Included with INFORM 1.0 is a default date set including the input data and equations necessary to solve each model. LADWP has substituted service area specific data for the default data wherever possible. This paper briefly describes the steps LADWP follows in developing those inputs and application in INFORM 1.0.

  7. Industrial end-use forecasting that incorporates DSM and air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tutt, T.; Flory, J.

    1995-05-01

    The California Energy Commission (CEC) and major enregy utilities in California have generally depended on simple aggregate intensity or economic models to forecast energy use in the process industry sector (which covers large industries employing basic processes to transform raw materials, such as paper mills, glass plants, and cement plants). Two recent trends suggests that the time has come to develop a more disaggregate process industry forecasting model. First, recent efforts to improve air quality, especially by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), could significantly affect energy use by the process industry by altering the technologies and processes employed in order to reduce emissions. Second, there is a renewed interest in Demand-Side Management (DSM), not only for utility least-cost planning, but also for improving the economic competitiveness and environmental compliance of the pro{minus}cess industries. A disaggregate forecasting model is critical to help the CEC and utilities evaluate both the air quality and DSM impacts on energy use. A crucial obstacle to the development and use of these detailed process industry forecasting models is the lack of good data about disaggregate energy use in the sector. The CEC is nearing completion of a project to begin to overcome this lack of data. The project is testing methds of developing detailed energy use data, collecting an initial database for a large portion of southern California, and providing recommendations and direction for further data collection efforts.

  8. Refining and end use study of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, G.

    1998-05-01

    A conceptual design and ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation model was developed for a Battelle biomass-based gasification, Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquefaction and combined-cycle power plant. This model was developed in a similar manner to those coal liquefaction models that were developed under DOE contract DE-AC22-91PC90027. As such, this process flowsheet simulation model was designed to be a research guidance tool and not a detailed process design tool. However, it does contain some process design features, such as sizing the F-T synthesis reactors. This model was designed only to predict the effects of various process and operating changes on the overall plant heat and material balances, utilities, capital and operating costs.

  9. Biogas end-use in the European community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constant, M.; Naveau, H.; Nyns, E.J. ); Ferrero, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    In Europe over the past few years the generation of biogas for energy and environmental purposes has been gaining in importance. Industrial wastewaters, cattle manure, sewage sludges, urban wastes, crop residues, algae and aquatic biomass are all typical of the materials being utilized. In contrast to the extensive inventory of biomethanation processes which has been carried out within the EEC, until recently a detailed, up-to-date investigation of the end-sues of biogas had not been undertaken. To supply the necessary information, the Commission of the European Communities and the Belgian Science Policy Office jointly entrusted a study to the Unit of Bioengineering at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. This book is record of the study and has the following key features: it gives a broad overview of the ongoing use of biogas in Europe; it summarizes available data on storage, purification and engines using biogas; it draws several conclusions concerning the technical and economic viability of the processes; it discusses the problems of using biogas; and it outlines recommendations and future R and D and demonstration projects in the field.

  10. Sector 9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 9 About Science and Research Beamlines Operations and Schedule Safety Search APS ... Search Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts Advisory Committee Beamlines...

  11. Wells Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Wells Public Utilities Website http:www.SaveEnergyInWells.com State Minnesota Program Type...

  12. EPOD Renewable Utilities Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EPOD Renewable Utilities Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: EPOD Renewable Utilities Inc Place: Frankfurt, Germany Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Focused on operating...

  13. Mora Municipal Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Mora Municipal Utilities Website http:www.SaveEnergyInMora.com State Minnesota Program...

  14. Osage Municipal Utilities Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Facility Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Osage...

  15. Central Lincoln People's Utility District - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electric Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Central Lincoln People(tm)s Utility District Website http:clpud.orgrebate-information State Oregon Program Type...

  16. Truckee Donner Public Utility District - Energy Conservation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebates 10,000 Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Truckee Donner Public Utility District Website http:www.tdpud.org State California Program Type Rebate...

  17. The Utility Management Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Utility Management Conference™ 2016 in San Diego is the place to be for leading utility and consulting staff. The technical program has been expanded to 36 sessions running in four concurrent rooms in order to provide utility leaders with the latest tools, techniques, best practices, and emerging solutions you need for effective utility management. This event will empower attendees, leading the water sector “On the Road to the Utilities of the Future.”

  18. ,"U.S. Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  19. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  20. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  1. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","

  2. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  3. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  4. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  5. WINDExchange: Wind Energy Market Sectors

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Market Sectors Printable Version Bookmark and Share Utility-Scale Wind Distributed Wind Motivations for Buying Wind Power Buying Wind Power Selling Wind Power Wind Energy Market Sectors U.S. power plants generate electricity for homes, factories, and businesses from a variety of resources, including coal, hydro, natural gas, nuclear, petroleum, and (non-hydro) renewable resources such as wind and solar energy. This power generation mix varies significantly across the country depending on

  6. Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Facility Gas Utilization Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  7. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  8. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  9. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  10. Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    distribution-level, and end-use metering. * Explain the ... by major utility type: electricity, natural gas, steam, ... Increase in Energy Consumption ...... 5.8 ...

  11. Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L.; Geller, H.; Nadel, S.

    1992-03-01

    In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

  12. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiencies April 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiencies i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  13. End-Use Opportunity Analysis from Progress Indicator Results for ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Xie, YuLong

    2015-02-05

    This report and an accompanying spreadsheet (PNNL 2014a) compile the end use building simulation results for prototype buildings throughout the United States. The results represent he energy use of each edition of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ASHRAE 2004, 2007, 2010, 2013). PNNL examined the simulation results to determine how the remaining energy was used.

  14. Working to Achieve Cybersecurity in the Energy Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers cybersecurity in the energy sector and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume details the end-use electricity demand and efficiency assumptions. The projection of electricity demand is an important consideration in determining the extent to which a predominantly renewable electricity future is feasible. Any scenario regarding future electricity use must consider many factors, including technological, sociological, demographic, political, and economic changes (e.g., the introduction of new energy-using devices; gains in energy efficiency and process improvements; changes in energy prices, income, and user behavior; population growth; and the potential for carbon mitigation).

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai,

  17. New Braunfels Utilities - Energy Efficiency and Water Conservation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clothes Washers Heat Pumps Air conditioners Other EE LED Lighting Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator New Braunfels Utilities Website http:nbutexas.com...

  18. Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commercial location per year, 5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Austin Utilities Website http:www.austinutilities.compages...

  19. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Center for Biomass Utilization Jump to: navigation, search Name: EERC Center for Biomass Utilization Place: Grand Forks, North Dakota Sector: Biofuels, Biomass Product: The mission...

  20. Sacramento Municipal Utility District Solar Array | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipal Utility District Solar Array Sector Solar Facility Type Ground-mounted fixed tilt Owner EnXco Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Sacramento Municipal Utility District...

  1. United Utilities Green Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: United Utilities Green Energy Ltd Place: England, United Kingdom Sector: Hydro, Renewable Energy Product: United Utilities Green...

  2. Port Angeles Public Works & Utilities - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    70% of incremental energy project costs Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities Website https:www.cityofpa.us...

  3. Shakopee Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conditioners CustomOthers pending approval Other EE Maximum Rebate 50% of total project cost PV: 5000 per business account Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator...

  4. Helio Micro Utility Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helio Micro Utility Inc Address: 1827A Fifth Street Place: Berkeley, California Zip: 94710 Region: Bay Area Sector: Solar Product: Contracts with solar installers to build and...

  5. Lassen Municipal Utility District - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lighting Heat Pumps Air conditioners Other EE LED Lighting Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Public Benefits Specialist Website http:www.lmud.org...

  6. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

  7. Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.

    2004-09-04

    This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

  8. Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

  9. Prospects for the power sector in nine developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S.; Goldman, N.; Martin, N.; Friedmann, R.

    1993-04-01

    Based on information drawn primarily from official planning documents issued by national governments and/or utilities, the authors examined the outlook for the power sector in the year 2000 in nine countries: China, India, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, Argentina and Mexico. They found that the implicit rates of average annual growth of installed electric power capacity between 1991 and 2001 range from a low of 3.3% per year in Argentina to a high of 13.2% per year in Indonesia. In absolute terms, China and India account for the vast majority of the growth. The plans call for a shift in the generating mix towards coal in six of the countries, and continued strong reliance on coal in China and India. The use of natural gas is expected to increase substantially in a number of the countries. The historic movement away from oil continues, although some countries are maintaining dual-fuel capabilities. Plans call for considerable growth of nuclear power in South Korea and China and modest increases in India and Taiwan. The feasibility of the official plans varies among the countries. Lack of public capital is leading towards greater reliance on private sector participation in power projects in many of the countries. Environmental issues are becoming a more significant constraint than in the past, particularly in the case of large-scale hydropower projects. The financial and environmental constraints are leading to a rising interest in methods of improving the efficiency of electricity supply and end use. The scale of such activities is growing in most of the study countries.

  10. ,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Oil Company Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Electric Utility Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to...

  11. ,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utility Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Adj SalesDeliveries Transportation Total (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Adj SalesDeliveries to Military ...

  12. U.S. Utility Rate Database - U.S. Utility Rate Database

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    As Of Today ApprovedUnapproved All Approved Only Unapproved Only Order By Latest Update Utility Name Rate Name Sector Approval Staus Effective Date End Date Display Results...

  13. 2014 Energy Sector Specific Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sector-Specific Plan Energy Sector-Specific Plan 2015 ii Page intentionally left blank Energy Sector-Specific Plan 2015 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE ......

  14. July 11 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial And Residential Building End-Use Equipment And Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These documents contain the three slide decks presented at the public meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances, held on July 11, 2014 in Washington, DC.

  15. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

    2006-06-01

    This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

  16. Solar Utility SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility SpA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Utility SpA Place: Italy Sector: Solar Product: Italy-based solar PV project developer. References: Solar Utility SpA1 This...

  17. Utility Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility Partnerships 7/10/12. Provides an overview of LEAP's (Charlottesville, VA) partnership with local utilities.

  18. Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, R.J.; McConnell, B.W.

    1993-06-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

  19. Power Sector Modeling 101

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Erin Boyd Department of Energy - Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis erin.boyd@hq.doe.gov DOE's Technical Assistance Website www.energy.gov/ta Power Sector Modeling 101 2 Presentation Description - DOE Power Sector Modeling 101 With increased energy planning needs and new regulations, environmental agencies, state energy offices and others have expressed more of an interest in electric power sector models, both for (a) interpreting the results and potential applications of modeling from

  20. Commercial Sector Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  1. End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, J.E.; Winiarski, D.W.; Donnelly, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.

  2. Development and utilization strategies for recovery and utilization of coal mine methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrer, C.W.; Layne, A.W.; Guthrie, H.D.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), at its Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been involved in natural gas research since the 1970`s. DOE has assessed the potential of gas in coals throughout the U.S. and promoted research and development for recovery and use of methane found in minable and unminable coalbeds. DOE efforts have focused on the use of coal mine methane for regional economic gas self-sufficiency, energy parks, self-help initiatives, and small-power generation. This paper focuses on DOE`s past and present efforts to more effectively and efficiently recover and use this valuable domestic energy source. The Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) (1) lists a series of 50 voluntary initiatives designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, such as methane from mining operations, to their 1990 levels. Action No. 36 of the CCAP expands the DOE research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts to broaden the range of cost-effective technologies and practices for recovering methane associated with coal mining operations. The major thrust of Action No. 36 is to reduce methane emissions associated with coal mining operations from target year 2000 levels by 1.5 MMT of carbon equivalent. Crosscutting activities in the DOE Natural Gas Program supply the utilization sectors will address RD&D to reduce methane emissions released from various mining operations, focusing on recovery and end use technology systems to effectively drain, capture, and utilize the emitted gas. Pilot projects with industry partners will develop and test the most effective methods and technology systems for economic recovery and utilization of coal mine gas emissions in regions where industry considers efforts to be presently non-economic. These existing RD&D programs focus on near-term gas recovery and gathering systems, gas upgrading, and power generation.

  3. The Italian energy sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The energy sector in Italy, as in Europe and in many other areas of the world, is undergoing rapid and profound changes. The 1986 ratification of the European Single Act was intended to create a European internal market, where circulation of people, capital, goods, and services would reach the highest possible liberalization. In 1988, in the document The Energy Internal Market, the European Union (EU) commission stressed the need for creation of an internal energy market--free of obstacles--to increase security of supply, to reduce costs, and to strengthen the competitiveness of the European economic system. In 1990, the Community Council adopted directives to implement the EU energy sector. This article describes Italy`s role as part of the EU energy sector. It covers the following topics: the Italian energy sector; electricity vs gas transportation; project finance; recent developments advance Italian power industry; specifying powerplant components -- Italian stype; buyers` guide to Italian equipment, services.

  4. Chemical Sector Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACChemical Sector Analysis content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of capabilities for analyzing the consequences of disruptions to the chemical manufacturing industry. Each capability provides a different but complementary perspective on the questions of interest-questions like Given an event, will the entire chemical sector be impacted or just parts? Which chemicals, plants,

  5. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:energyright.comresidentialescore.html State Alabama Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation - 250Home (One...

  6. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:energyright.comresidentialescore.html State Mississippi Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation - 250...

  7. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Digestion Program Info Sector Name State State Virginia Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Summary Virginia passed legislation (S.B. 1416) in April 2007 that...

  8. Moorhead Public Service Utility - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Personal Computing Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Moorhead Public ServiceBright Energy Solutions Website http:...

  9. Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ISER’s partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to respond to the needs of the sector and the nation.

  10. Central Lincoln People's Utility District - Renewable Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Small) Maximum Rebate PV (Residential): 2,000 PV (Commercial): 5,000 Solar Water Heating: 800 Wind: 5,000 Hydro Electric: 5,000 Program Info Sector Name Utility...

  11. Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

    1980-10-10

    This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

  12. WINDExchange: Utility-Scale Wind

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Utility-Scale Wind Photo of two people standing on top of the nacelle of a utility-scale wind turbine. Wind is an important source of affordable, renewable energy, currently supplying nearly 5% of our nation's electricity demand. By generating electricity from wind turbines, the United States can reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and help revitalize key sectors of its economy, including manufacturing.

  13. Labview utilities

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  14. Private sector initiatives in energy conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebholz, A.F.

    1983-06-01

    As an example of private sector initiatives in energy conservation, Prudential's energy management program is highlighted. In Phase I specific hours of operation were permitted, temperatures were maintained at a prescribed level, and lighting standards were reduced. In Phase II, inefficient HVAC systems were upgraded, timing switches and energy management computers were installed, solar film was applied to windows, and metering utilities were separated. An energy consumption tracking system called PACE was also instrumented to maintain the achieved objectives by monthly measuring.

  15. Table 2.6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009 Appliance Year Change 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 1980 to 2009 Total Households (millions) 77 78 82 83 84 86 91 94 97 101 107 111 114 32 Percent of Households<//td> Space Heating - Main Fuel 1 Natural Gas 55 55 55 56 57 55 55 55 53 52 55 52 50 -5 Electricity 2 16 17 18 17 16 17 20 23 26 29 29 30 35 17 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 Distillate

  16. Fact #689: August 22, 2011 Energy Use by Sector and Source | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 9: August 22, 2011 Energy Use by Sector and Source Fact #689: August 22, 2011 Energy Use by Sector and Source The transportation sector consumed 28% of U.S. energy in 2010, nearly all of it (93.5%) in petroleum use. The industrial sector used about 40% petroleum and 40% natural gas. The electric utility sector used little petroleum, but was dependent on coal for nearly half of the energy it consumed. Renewables, such as biofuels for transportation, were being used in every sector in

  17. The examination of pretreatment and end use technologies for dirty fuels produced from coal gasification, coal pyrolysis, oil shale processing, and heavy oil recovery: Final technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raden, D.P.; Page, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify pretreatment (upgrading) and end use technologies which: (1) reduce environmental, health and safety impacts, (2) reduce pollution control costs, or (3) reduce upgrading costs of ''dirty fuels'' while producing higher value energy products. A comprehensive list of technologies was developed for upgrading the various dirty fuels to higher value and products. Fifty-two process flow concepts were examined and from these four process flow concepts were chosen for further development. These are: heavy oil recovery and in situ hydrotreating; wet air oxidation in a downhole reactor; total raw gas shift; and high density fuels via vacuum devolatilization. Each of these four process flow concepts described exhibit the potential for reducing environmental, health and safety impacts and/or pollution control costs. In addition these concepts utilize dirty fuels to produce an upgraded or higher value energy product. These concepts should be developed and evaluated in greater detail to assess their technical and economical viability. Therefore, it is recommended that a program plan be formulated and a proof-of-concept research program be performed for each process concept. 3 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Utilization Graphs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that use data from the PDSF batch scheduler (SGE) to show the utilization of the cluster over the past 24 hours. The graphs were generated with RRDTool and are updated...

  19. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  20. Searching for Dark Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Searching for Dark Sector Physics with MiniBooNE Georgia Karagiorgi, Columbia University On behalf of the MiniBooNE Collaboration 3 rd International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics August 6, 2014 MiniBooNE: Past & current highlights MiniBooNE, an accelerator-based neutrino experiment at Fermilab, has run for 10 years with neutrino and antineutrino beams, collecting data for ~2x10 21 POT, amounting to 100k's of neutrino interactions. It has been able to address the two-neutrino

  1. DOE Launches the "Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with 17 Electric Utilities | Department of Energy DOE Launches the "Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience" with 17 Electric Utilities DOE Launches the "Partnership for Energy Sector Climate Resilience" with 17 Electric Utilities June 2, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Melanie A. Kenderdine Melanie A. Kenderdine Director of the Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis On April 30, Energy Secretary Moniz and Deputy Secretary Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall welcomed senior

  2. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies ...

  4. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of Contents...

  5. Fact #582: August 3, 2009 Energy Shares by Sector and Source | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2: August 3, 2009 Energy Shares by Sector and Source Fact #582: August 3, 2009 Energy Shares by Sector and Source The transportation sector consumed about 28% of U.S. energy in 2008, nearly all of it (95%) in petroleum use. The industrial sector used about 40% petroleum and 40% natural gas. The electric utility sector used little petroleum, but was dependent on coal for more than half of the energy it consumed. Renewables, such as biofuels for transportation, were being used in

  6. Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311 and 3312) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    99 2.6 IRON AND STEEL SECTOR (NAICS 3311, 3312) 2.6.1. Overview of the Iron and Steel Manufacturing Sector The iron and steel sector is an essential part of the U.S. manufacturing sector, providing the necessary raw material for the extensive industrial supply chain. U.S. infrastructure is heavily reliant on the U.S. iron and steel sector, as it provides the foundation for construction (bridges, buildings), transportation systems (railroads, cars, trucks), utility systems (municipal water

  7. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Presentation Slides: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

  8. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

  9. Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and  Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

  10. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  11. Sector Collaborative on Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-06-01

    Helps stakeholders identify and act on cost-effective opportunities for expanding energy efficiency resources in the hospitality, retail, commercial real estate, grocery, and municipal sectors.

  12. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  13. Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................... 1 4 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................................. 5 5 2.1 Chemical Industry Focus

  14. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    .7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

  15. Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-09-12

    This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

  16. The use of negotiated agreements to improve efficiency of end-use appliances: First results from the European experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoldi, P.; Bowie, R.; Hagen, L.

    1998-07-01

    The European Union is pursuing measures to improve end-use equipment efficiency through a variety of policy instruments, in particular for domestic appliances. One of the most effective methods to achieve market transformation is through minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS). However, after the difficulties and controversy following the adoption of legislation for MEPS for domestic refrigerators/freezers, a new policy instrument, i.e. negotiated agreements by manufacturers, has been investigated and tested for two type of appliances: domestic washing machines and TVs and VCRs. Based on the positive experience of the above two agreements, other products (e.g. dryers, dishwasher, electric water heaters, etc.) will be the subject of future negotiated agreements. Based on the results of the two negotiated agreements, this paper describes the energy efficiency potential, the procedures, and the advantages and disadvantages of negotiated agreements compared to legislated mandatory for MEPS, as developed in the European context. The paper concludes that negotiated agreements are a viable policy option, which allow flexibility in the implementation of the efficiency targets and therefore the adoption of cost-effective solutions for manufacturers. In addition, negotiated agreements can be implemented more quickly compared to mandatory MEPS and they allow a closer monitoring of the results. The main question asked in the paper is whether the negotiated agreements can deliver the results in the long term compared to what could be achieved through legislation. The European experience indicates that this instrument can deliver the results and that it offer a number of advantages compared to MEPS.

  17. TriUtils Trilinos Utilities Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-09-26

    TriUtils is a package of utilities for other Trilinos packages. TriUtils contains utilities to perform common operations such as command line parsing, and input file reading.

  18. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billingsley, Megan A.; Hoffman, Ian M.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; LaCommare, Kristina

    2014-03-19

    End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas utility system needs within the United States. There is a direct connection between the maturation of energy efficiency as a resource and the need for consistent, high-quality data and reporting of efficiency program costs and impacts. To support this effort, LBNL initiated the Cost of Saved Energy Project (CSE Project) and created a Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts Database to provide a resource for policy makers, regulators, and the efficiency industry as a whole. This study is the first technical report of the LBNL CSE Project and provides an overview of the project scope, approach, and initial findings, including: • Providing a proof of concept that the program-level cost and savings data can be collected, organized, and analyzed in a systematic fashion; • Presenting initial program, sector, and portfolio level results for the program administrator CSE for a recent time period (2009-2011); and • Encouraging state and regional entities to establish common reporting definitions and formats that would make the collection and comparison of CSE data more reliable. The LBNL DSM Program Impacts Database includes the program results reported to state regulators by more than 100 program administrators in 31 states, primarily for the years 2009–2011. In total, we have compiled cost and energy savings data on more than 1,700 programs over one or more program-years for a total of more than 4,000 program-years’ worth of data, providing a rich dataset for analyses. We use the information to report costs-per-unit of electricity and natural gas savings for utility customer-funded, end-use energy efficiency programs. The program administrator CSE values are presented at national, state, and regional levels by market sector (e.g., commercial, industrial, residential) and by program type (e.g., residential whole home programs, commercial new

  19. Property:DeploymentSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Property Name DeploymentSector Property Type String Description Depolyment Sector as used in cleanenergysolutions.org Allows the following values: Commercial...

  20. Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by Robert ...

  1. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector ...

  2. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

  3. Fact #561: March 9, 2009 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: March 9, 2009 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Fact #561: March 9, 2009 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Before 1989 the U.S. produced enough petroleum to meet the needs of the transportation sector, but was still short of meeting the petroleum needs of all the sectors, including industrial, residential and commercial, and electric utilities. In 1973 the gap between what the U.S. produced and what was consumed was 5.6 million barrels per day. By 2030, the gap is expected to be at least 9.2 million

  4. Fact #610: February 15, 2010 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 10: February 15, 2010 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Fact #610: February 15, 2010 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Before 1989 the U.S. produced enough petroleum to meet the needs of the transportation sector, but was still short of meeting the petroleum needs of all the sectors, including industrial, residential and commercial, and electric utilities. In 1973 the gap between what the U.S. produced and what was consumed was 5.6 million barrels per day. By 2035, the gap is expected to be at

  5. Fact #688: August 15, 2011 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 8: August 15, 2011 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Fact #688: August 15, 2011 All Sectors' Petroleum Gap Before 1989 the U.S. produced enough petroleum to meet the needs of the transportation sector, but was still short of meeting the petroleum needs of all the sectors, including industrial, residential and commercial, and electric utilities. In 1973 the gap between what the U.S. produced and what was consumed was 5.6 million barrels per day. By 2035, the gap is expected to be at least 9.6

  6. Coal sector profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-05

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  7. Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    consumption across manufacturing subsectors. The U.S. Manufacturing diagram below shows the fuel, steam and electricity ... Applied energy (applied toward direct production or end use ...

  8. Energy Analysis by Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    flows to major energy end uses in manufacturing and line colors indicate fuel, steam, electricity, and applied or lost ... compare energy consumption across manufacturing subsectors. ...

  9. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2006-07-24

    In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth

  10. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  11. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group - Utility Interconnection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting-discusses solarphotovoltaic (PV) projects to connect with utility in California and their issues. fupwgfall12jewell.pd...

  12. Natural gas to buoy Trinidad and Tobago petroleum sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Trinidad and Tobago's petroleum sector remains at a crossroads. While heavily reliant on oil and gas for domestic energy consumption and hard currency export earnings, the small Caribbean island nation faces some tough choices in reviving its hydrocarbon sector in the 1990s. Exploration and production of crude oil have stagnated in recent years, and domestic refinery utilization remains low at 36%. However, substantial natural gas reserves in Trinidad and Tobago offer the promise of a burgeoning natural gas based economy with an eye to liquefied natural gas and gas based petrochemical exports. Any solutions will involve considerable outlays by the government as well as a sizable infusion of capital by foreign companies. Therein lie some of the hard choices. The article describes the roles of oil and gas, foreign investment prospects, refining status, refining problems, gas sector foreign investment, and outlook for the rest of the 1990's.

  13. The National Fuel End-Use Efficiency Field Test: Energy Savings and Performance of an Improved Energy Conservation Measure Selection Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of an advanced residential energy conservation measure (ECM) selection technique was tested in Buffalo, New York, to verify the energy savings and program improvements achieved from use of the technique in conservation programs and provide input into determining whether utility investments in residential gas end-use conservation are cost effective. The technique analyzes a house to identify all ECMs that are cost effective in the building envelope, space-heating system, and water-heating system. The benefit-to-cost ratio (BCR) for each ECM is determined and cost-effective ECMs (BCR > 1.0) are selected once interactions between ECMs are taken into account. Eighty-nine houses with the following characteristics were monitored for the duration of the field test: occupants were low-income, houses were single-family detached houses but not mobile homes, and primary space- and water-heating systems were gas-fired. Forty-five houses received a mix of ECMs as selected by the measure selection technique (audit houses) and 44 served as a control group. Pre-weatherization data were collected from January to April 1988 and post-weatherization data were collected from December 1988 to April 1989. Space- and waterheating gas consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the two winters. A house energy consumption model and regression analysis were employed to normalize the space-heating energy savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and a 68 F indoor temperature. Space and water-heating energy savings for the audit houses were adjusted by the savings for the control houses. The average savings of 257 therms/year for the audit houses was 17% of the average pre-weatherization house gas consumption and 78% of that predicted. Average space-heating energy savings was 252 therms/year (25% of pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption and 85% of the predicted value) and average water-heating savings was 5 therms/year (2% of pre

  14. Utilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine ...

  15. April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

  16. Sector Profiles of Significant Large CHP Markets, March 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of market assessments of large CHP sector profiles of the chemicals, food, and pharmaceuticals sectors

  17. NET PRED UTILITY

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php

  18. A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels with Conventional Fuels in the Transportation Sector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels with Conventional Fuels in the Transportation Sector Robert E. Abbott, Ph.D. ConocoPhillips Paul Worhach, Ph.D. Nexant Corporation Diesel Engines Emission Reduction Conference Loews Coronado Bay Resort Coronado, CA August 29 - September 2, 2004 Study Purpose * Evaluate GTL energy use and emissions in comparison to alternative fuel production processes and end-uses * Education and communication with peers and stakeholders * Assess and

  19. Energy data sourcebook for the US residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, T.P.; Koomey, J.G.; Sanchez, M.

    1997-09-01

    Analysts assessing policies and programs to improve energy efficiency in the residential sector require disparate input data from a variety of sources. This sourcebook, which updates a previous report, compiles these input data into a single location. The data provided include information on end-use unit energy consumption (UEC) values of appliances and equipment efficiency; historical and current appliance and equipment market shares; appliances and equipment efficiency and sales trends; appliance and equipment efficiency standards; cost vs. efficiency data for appliances and equipment; product lifetime estimates; thermal shell characteristics of buildings; heating and cooling loads; shell measure cost data for new and retrofit buildings; baseline housing stocks; forecasts of housing starts; and forecasts of energy prices and other economic drivers. This report is the essential sourcebook for policy analysts interested in residential sector energy use. The report can be downloaded from the Web at http://enduse.lbl. gov/Projects/RED.html. Future updates to the report, errata, and related links, will also be posted at this address.

  20. Water Impacts of the Electricity Sector (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation discusses the water impacts of the electricity sector. Nationally, the electricity sector is a major end-user of water. Water issues affect power plants throughout the nation.

  1. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-08-01

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  2. Working with the Real Estate Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Working with the Real Estate Sector, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 1, 2012. This call discussed effective strategies for working with the real estate sector.

  3. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity Advanced Vehicle...

  4. SEP Special Projects Report: Buildings Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    The buildings section of this Sharing Success document describes SEP special projects in the buildings sector including funding.

  5. Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MSGP Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) The Multi-Sector General Permit authorizes the discharge of stormwater associated with industrial activity. What's New Documents submitted to EPRR in last 30 Days TBD What is the Multi-Sector General Permit? Storm water discharges from EPA specified industrial activities are regulated under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP). LANL regulated industrial activities include: Metal fabrication Power

  6. Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia (Presentation) Author Paul Brophy Conference World Geothermal Energy Summit; Jakarta, Indonesia; 20120706...

  7. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) | Department of Energy Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) This paper examines the behavioral assumptions that underlie California's residential sector energy efficiency programs and recommends improvements that will help to advance the state's ambitious greenhouse gas

  8. Coupling hydrogen fuel and carbonless utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    A number of previous analyses have focused on comparisons of single hydrogen vehicles to petroleum and alternative fuel vehicles or of stationary hydrogen storage for utility or local power applications. LLNL`s approach is to compare combined transportation/utility storage systems using hydrogen and fossil fuels. Computer models have been constructed to test the hypothesis that combining carbonless electricity sources and vehicles fueled by electrolytic hydrogen can reduce carbon emissions more cost effectively than either approach alone. Three scenarios have been developed and compared using computer simulations, hourly utility demand data, representative data for solar and wind energy sites, and the latest available EIA projections for transportation and energy demand in the US in 2020. Cost projections were based on estimates from GRI, EIA, and a recent DOE/EPRI report on renewable energy technologies. The key question guiding this analysis was: what can be gained by combining hydrogen fuel production and renewable electricity? Bounding scenarios were chosen to analyze three carbon conscious options for the US transportation fuel and electricity supply system beyond 2020: Reference Case -- petroleum transportation and natural gas electric sector; Benchmark Case -- petroleum transportation and carbonless electric sector; and Target Case -- hydrogen transportation and carbonless electric sector.

  9. Energy balances in the production and end use of alcohols derived from biomass. A fuels-specific comparative analysis of alternate ethanol production cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Considerable public interest and debate have been focused on the so-called energy balance issue involved in the conversion of biomass materials into ethanol for fuel use. This report addresses questions of net gains in premium fuels that can be derived from the production and use of ethanol from biomass, and shows that for the US alcohol fuel program, energy balance need not be a concern. Three categories of fuel gain are discussed in the report: (1) Net petroleum gain; (2) Net premium fuel gain (petroleum and natural gas); and (3) Net energy gain (for all fuels). In this study the investment of energy (in the form of premium fuels) in alcohol production includes all investment from cultivating, harvesting, or gathering the feedstock and raw materials, through conversion of the feedstock to alcohol, to the delivery to the end-user. To determine the fuel gains in ethanol production, six cases, encompassing three feedstocks, five process fuels, and three process variations, have been examined. For each case, two end-uses (automotive fuel use and replacement of petrochemical feedstocks) were scrutinized. The end-uses were further divided into three variations in fuel economy and two different routes for production of ethanol from petrochemicals. Energy requirements calculated for the six process cycles accounted for fuels used directly and indirectly in all stages of alcohol production, from agriculture through distribution of product to the end-user. Energy credits were computed for byproducts according to the most appropriate current use.

  10. Utility Potential Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Potential Studies in the Northwest V1.0 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2007 Utility Potential Calculator V1.0 for Excel 2003 Note: BPA developed the Utility...

  11. Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships Private Sector Outreach and Partnerships ISER's partnerships with the private sector are a strength which has enabled the division to ...

  12. Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and the Finance Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy...

  13. Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment (Redirected from Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate...

  14. Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector Energy Outlook for the Transport Sector PDF icon deer10karsner.pdf More Documents & Publications The ...

  15. Utility Partnerships Program Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Management Program (FEMP) Utility Partnerships Program fosters effective partnerships between federal agencies and their local serving utility. FEMP works to reduce the cost ...

  16. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-09-30

    This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

  17. Utility Partnership Program Utility Partners | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Heuser Kentucky Northeast Utilities Marge Howell 860-280-2510 Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire NSTAR Robert Laurence 800-592-2000 Massachusetts Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co. ...

  18. Electric energy sector in Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastos, C.M.

    1994-06-01

    This article describes how the organization of the electric energy sector in Argentina has changed dramatically from a sector in which state-owned companies worked under a central planning to one in which private companies make their own decisions. The way that the electrical system used to work can be shown by these statements: demand growth estimated by central planning team; projects to be developed and the timetable determined by the same team; unit operations ruled by central dispatch, and under state-owned companies responsibility; integration with neighbor countries focused on physical projects, such as Salto Grande with Uruguay and Yacyreta with Paraguay. Today the electrical system works under these rules: the system has been vertically separated and the companies cannot be integrated; electric energy is considered as an ordinary wealth and the value that consumers give it is taken into account, (the distribution companies pay consumers a penalty for the energy that they cannot supply, the penalty is worth the economic damage consumers suffer due to its lack); producers have to compete for demand. They can sell in two ways: sell under private agreements or sell to the system. Both ways of selling compete with each other because the system buys giving priority to lower costs and, as a consequence, some of the producers do not sell at all.

  19. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction ...

  20. A Case Study of Danville Utilities: Utilizing Industrial Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study of Danville Utilities: Utilizing Industrial Assessment Centers to Provide Energy Efficiency Resources for Key Accounts A Case Study of Danville Utilities: Utilizing ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles | Department of Energy Transitioning the Transportation Sector - Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector - Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles This report, titled "Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles" is based

  2. DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues National Energy Sector Cyber Organization Notice of Intent February 11, 2010 The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced on Jan. 7 that it intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for a National Energy Sector Cyber Organization, envisioned as a partnership between the federal government and energy sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security

  3. Chapter 2: Energy Sectors and Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Energy Sectors and Systems September 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review 2 Energy Sectors and Systems Issues and RDD&D Opportunities Energy systems are becoming increasingly interconnected and complex. Integrated energy systems present both opportunities for performance improvement as well as risks to operability and security. The size and scope of these opportunities and risks are just beginning to be understood. This chapter addresses both the key issues of energy sectors and their

  4. Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This analysis is an update to the Energy Efficiency Potential report completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kaua‘i (KEMA 2005).

  5. Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas ...

  6. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In February 2014, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the ...

  7. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    paper examines the behavioral assumptions that underlie California's residential sector energy efficiency programs and recommends improvements that will help to advance the state's ...

  8. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date March 2009 Topic Financing, Incentives & Market Analysis Subprogram Soft Costs Author National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector ...

  9. US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photo credits: iStockphoto U.S. ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND ... and International Affairs (DOE-PI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). ...

  10. Property:Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: G Green Economy Toolbox Pages using the property "Sector" Showing 25 pages using this...

  11. Category:Public Sectors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    no pages or media. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:PublicSectors&oldid272249" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  12. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department released guidance to help the energy sector establish or align existing cybersecurity risk management programs to meet the objectives of the Cybersecurity Framework...

  13. Draft Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the Federal Register, inviting the public to comment on DOE's Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance. Comments must be received on or before October...

  14. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    invites public comment on a draft of the Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance. Comments must be received on or before October 14, 2014. The draft document...

  15. Model Documentation Report: Commercial Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the State Energy Data System (SEDS) historical commercial sector consumption, applying an additive correction term to ensure that simulated model results correspond to published...

  16. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2009-11-22

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling residential appliance uptake as a function of root macroeconomic drivers. The analysis concentrates on four major energy end uses in the residential sector: refrigerators, washing machines, televisions and air conditioners. The model employs linear regression analysis to parameterize appliance ownership in terms of household income, urbanization and electrification rates according to a standard binary choice (logistic) function. The underlying household appliance ownership data are gathered from a variety of sources including energy consumption and more general standard of living surveys. These data span a wide range of countries, including many developing countries for which appliance ownership is currently low, but likely to grow significantly over the next decades as a result of economic development. The result is a 'global' parameterization of appliance ownership rates as a function of widely available macroeconomic variables for the four appliances studied, which provides a reliable basis for interpolation where data are not available, and forecasting of ownership rates on a global scale. The main value of this method is to form the foundation of bottom-up energy demand forecasts, project energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and allow for the construction of detailed emissions mitigation scenarios.

  17. Avista Utilities- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Avista Utilities customers, any net excess generation (NEG) during a monthly billing period is credited to the customer's next bill at the utility's retail rate. At the beginning of each ca...

  18. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  19. Utility Partnerships Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-03

    Document describes the Utility Partnerships Program within the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program.

  20. National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-06-30

    The goal of the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) project was to address cyber security issues for the electric sector, particularly in the near and mid-term. The following table identifies the strategies from the DOE Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity published in September 2011 that are applicable to the NESCOR project.

  1. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt071_vss_cesiel_2011_o.pdf (760.6 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity

  2. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance │ Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Preparing for Framework Implementation

  3. Taiwan: An energy sector study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, T.; Fridley, D.; Kang, Wu

    1988-03-01

    A study on the economy of Taiwan, with special reference to the energy sector, revealed the following: Taiwan's rapid export-driven economic growth in the 1970s and 1980s has earned them the rank of ''Newly Industrialized Countries.'' Coal reserves measure less than 1 billion tons, and annual output has declined to below 2 million tons per year. Marginal amounts of crude are produced. Natural gas resources have been exploited both on- and offshore, through production amounts to little more than 1 billion cubic meters per year. Domestic hydrocarbon production is forecast to decline. Taiwan prssesses an estimated 5300 mW of exploitable hydropower capacity, of which 2564 mW had been installed by 1986. Taiwan has undertaken a massive program of nuclear power construction in response to the rapid rise in oil prices during the 1970s. Energy demand has risen an average of 9.0 percent per year since 1954, while real GNP has grown 8.6 percent per year. Sine 1980, oil has provided a lower share of total energy demand. Oil demand for transport has continued to grow rapidly. Declining production of domestic natural gas has led Taiwan to initiate LNG imports from Indonesia beginning in 1990. Coal has regained some of its earlier importance in Taiwan's energy structure. With declining domestic production, imports now provide nearly 90 percent of total coal demand. Taiwan is basically self-sufficient in refining capacity. Energy demand is expected to grow 5.4 percent per year through the yeat 2000. With declining output of domestic resources, energy dependency on imports will rise from its current 90 percent level. Government policy recognizes this external dependency and has directed it efforts at diversification of suppliers. 18 refs., 11 figs., 40 tabs.

  4. Employment-generating projects for the energy and minerals sectors of Honduras. Proyectos generadores de empleos para los sectores energetico y minero de Honduras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, J.A.

    1988-12-01

    A mission to Honduras invited by the Government of Honduras and sponsored by the Organization of American States addressed the generation of employment in various areas of interest to the country. The mission was made up of experts from numerous countries and international agencies. In the energy sector, the mission recommended consolidating the sector under a coordinating body; carrying out projects to promote reforestation, tree farms, and rational forest utilization; encouraging industrial energy conservation; developing alternative energy sources; and promoting rural electrification and expansion of the electrical grid. In the mining sector, the mission supported promotion and technical assistance for small gold-leaching and placer operations, the national mineral inventory, detailed exploration of promising sites, and the development of a mining school. 13 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies ... Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy ...

  6. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

  7. Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities:...

  8. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies ...

  9. Carbon Dioxide Utilization Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 6th Carbon Dioxide Utilization Summit will be held in Newark, New Jersey, from Feb. 24–26, 2016. The conference will look at the benefits and challenges of carbon dioxide utilization. Advanced Algal Systems Program Manager Alison Goss Eng and Technology Manager Devinn Lambert will be in attendance. Dr. Goss Eng will be chairing a round table on Fuels and Chemicals during the Carbon Dioxide Utilization: From R&D to Commercialization discussion session.

  10. Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

    2006-09-01

    Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

  11. Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    historic, in human and machine readable formats. See also the NREL System Advisor Model (SAM) and NREL's BEOpt. Utility Outage Information dataset - Information and resources...

  12. Utility Service Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any upgrade to utility service provides an opportunity to revisit a Federal building's electrical loads and costs, but it also may provide an economic way to bundle the upgrade with an onsite renewable electricity project during renovation. Upgrading utility service to the site may involve improving or adding a transformer, upgrading utility meters, or otherwise modifying the interconnection equipment or services with the utility. In some cases, the upgrade may change the tariff structure for the facility and may qualify the property for a different structure with lower overall costs. In all cases, the implementation of renewable energy technologies should be identified during the design phase.

  13. USET Tribal Utility Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) is hosting its annual Tribal Utility Summit at the Harrah's Cherokee Casino and hosted by Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

  14. Electrical Utility Materials Handler

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Electrical Utility Material Handler (EUMH)...

  15. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  16. Tribal Utility Policy Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Coal Combustion Residuals Regulation Act of 2015 (H.R. 1734) FCC's Connect America Funding to provide broadband to rural communities Gas Utility Issues Pipeline Safety & ...

  17. When Utility Bills Attack!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As proactive as I am with my monthly budgeting, I tend to be reactive when it comes to my monthly utility bills.

  18. Utility Sounding Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tool Conduit Utility Sounding Board Residential Segmentation Six Going On Seven The USB was created to inform BPA on the implementation of energy efficiency programs...

  19. EM Utility Contracts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    22012 EM UTILITY CONTRACT Site State Supplier Executed Contract Type DOE Contract East Tennessee Technology Park TN Tennessee Valley Authority 4272007 Energy supply contract ...

  20. Resources for Utility Regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action

    2012-06-01

    Provides a summary of State and Local Energy Efficiency Action Network (SEE Action) information resources available to utility regulators, organized by topic.

  1. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure

  2. Proceedings of the alcohol fuel production and utilization conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A conference was held to provide farmers, businesses, industries, and specialty groups with the best available information on current and projected activities related to the production and utilization of biomass for alcohol fuels. All aspects of the alcohol fuel production and utilization process were discussed. From biomass sources, through conversion processes to end-use products and applications were topics discussed by numerous experts. Other experts took this basic information and put it together into total systems. Speakers presented overviews on alcohol fuel related activities on state, regional, and national levels. Finally, commercialization incentives, funding sources, environmental considerations, research developments, safety considerations, and regulatory requirements were discussed as factors which must be addressed when considering the production and utilization of alcohol fuels. Separate abstracts have been prepared for items within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

  3. Dalton Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dalton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dalton Utilities Place: Georgia Phone Number: 706-278-1313 Website: www.dutil.comresidentialinde Twitter: @DaltonUtilities...

  4. DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the federal government and energy sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security of the grid. ...

  5. Market Report for the Industrial Sector, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastri, Bhima; Brueske, Sabine; de los Reyes, Pamela; Jamison, Keith; Justiniano, Mauricio; Margolis, Nancy; Monfort, Joe; Raghunathan, Anand; Sabouni, Ridah

    2009-07-01

    This report provides an overview of trends in industrial-sector energy use. It focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors and several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry.

  6. Utility+Utility Access Map | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: Category:Utility CompaniesEiaUtilityId::15248 substituting...

  7. Teuchos Utility Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-03-01

    Teuchos is designed to provide portable, object-oriented tools for Trillnos developers and users. This includes templated wrappers to BLAS/LAPACK, a serial dense matrix class, a parameter list, XML parsing utilities, reference counted pointer (smart pointer) utilities, and more. These tools are designed to run on both serial and parallel computers.

  8. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance On January 8, 2015, the Energy Department released guidance to help the energy sector establish or align existing cybersecurity risk management programs to meet the objectives of the Cybersecurity Framework released by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) in February 2014. The voluntary Cybersecurity Framework consists of standards, guidelines, and

  9. NREL: Energy Analysis: Electric Sector Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Sector Integration Integrating higher levels of renewable resources into the U.S. electricity system could pose challenges to the operability of the nation's grid. NREL's electric sector integration analysis work investigates the potential impacts of expanding renewable technology deployment on grid operations and infrastructure expansion including: Feasibility of higher levels of renewable electricity generation. Options for increasing electric system flexibility to accommodate higher

  10. 2015 Energy Sector-Specific Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sector-Specific Plan 2015 Energy Sector-Specific Plan The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as the Sector-Specific Agency for the Energy Sector, has worked closely with government and industry partners to develop the 2015 Energy Sector-Specific Plan (SSP). DOE conducted much of this work in collaboration with the Energy Sector Coordinating Councils (SCCs) and the Energy Government Coordinating Council (GCC). The Energy SCCs represent the interests of the Electricity and Oil and Natural Gas

  11. Utilities Offering Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Utilities Offering Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts Utilities Offering Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (codified as 42 USC Section 8256 (c) Utility Incentive Programs) authorizes and encourages agencies to participate in generally available utility programs to increase energy efficiency; conserve water; or manage electricity demand conducted by gas, water, or electric utilities. The following maps show utility service territories

  12. Utility Partnership Program Utility Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Partners Utility Partnership Program Utility Partners Utility Partnership Program utility partners are eager to work closely with federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals. If a serving utility is not listed below, utilities and agencies can contact the Federal Energy Management Program to discuss launching a utility energy service contract program. Organization Contact States Served AGL Resources Kathy Robb 404-584-4372 Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia

  13. Utility Partnership Program Utility Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Partners Utility Partnership Program Utility Partners Utility Partnership Program utility partners are eager to work closely with federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals. If a serving utility is not listed below, utilities and agencies can contact the Federal Energy Management Program to discuss launching a utility energy service contract program. Organization Contact States Served AGL Resources Kathy Robb 404-584-4372 Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia

  14. Clean Energy Investment Center and Private Sector Talk Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Clean Energy Investment Center and Private Sector Talk Innovation and Investment in Smart ... Clean Energy Investment Center and Private Sector Talk Innovation and Investment in Smart ...

  15. Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    projects, and the Department will invite private sector participation to accelerate the ... underwriting process and leverage private sector expertise and capital for the ...

  16. Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate Renewable Energy Projects Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate Renewable Energy Projects October 7, ...

  17. DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector Outreach DOE Technology Commercialization Fund Kicks Off New Private Sector Outreach May 24, 2016 - 4:08pm ...

  18. Template:Energy Generation Facilities by Sector | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Generation Facilities by Sector Jump to: navigation, search This is the Energy Generation Facilities by Sector template. It will display energy generation facilities for the...

  19. Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 ...

  20. Morocco-Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Morocco-Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Name Morocco-Low Carbon...

  1. Nigeria-Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nigeria-Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Name Nigeria-Low Carbon...

  2. South Africa-Danish Government Sector Programmes | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Programmes Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-Danish Government Sector Programmes AgencyCompany Organization Danish Government Partner Danish Ministry for...

  3. Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas Presents techniques on overcoming the barriers of multifamily energy...

  4. National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A Comparison Across Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential: A...

  5. LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: ...

  6. Number of Large Energy User Manufacturing Facilities by Sector...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number of Large Energy User Manufacturing Facilities by Sector and State (with Industrial Energy Consumption by State and Manufacturing Energy Consumption by Sector) State...

  7. Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of...

  8. New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean ...

  9. Workforce Training for the Electric Power Sector | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce Training for the Electric Power Sector Workforce Training for the Electric Power Sector PDF icon 04-08-2010SGWorkforceSelections.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  10. List of Companies in Hydrogen Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Companies in Hydrogen Sector Jump to: navigation, search Companies in the Hydrogen sector: Add a Company Download CSV (rows 1-196) Map of Hydrogen companies Loading map......

  11. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS ...

  12. Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment AgencyCompany Organization Climate and...

  13. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) May 2007 Department of Energy Energy Sector ...

  14. Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector - January...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector - January 2006 Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector - January 2006 This document, the Roadmap to Secure...

  15. Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options 2003 DEER Conference ...

  16. List of Companies in Geothermal Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Sector Jump to: navigation, search Companies in the Geothermal energy sector: Add a Company Download CSV (rows 1-212) Map of Geothermal energy companies Loading map......

  17. EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Sector Energy Intensities RESIDENTIAL SECTOR ENERGY INTENSITIES: 1978-2005 Released Date: August 2004 Page Last Modified:June 2009 These tables provide estimates of...

  18. Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector - January...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - January 2006 Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector - January 2006 This document, the Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector, outlines a coherent ...

  19. Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Sector Online Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector Online Course Agency...

  20. OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

  1. Improving the Usability of Integrated Assessment for Adaptation Practice: Insights from the U.S. Southeast Energy Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Preston, Benjamin; Rice, Jennie S.

    2014-10-01

    Energy systems comprise a key sector of the U.S. economy, and one that has been identified as potentially vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change. However, understanding of adaptation processes in energy companies and private entities more broadly is limited. It is unclear, for example, the extent to which energy companies are well-served by existing knowledge and tools emerging from the impacts, adaptation and vulnerability (IAV) and integrated assessment modeling (IAM) communities and/or what experiments, analyses, and model results have practical utility for informing adaptation in the energy sector. As part of a regional IAM development project, we investigated available evidence of adaptation processes in the energy sector, with a particular emphasis on the U.S. Southeast and Gulf Coast region. A mixed methods approach of literature review and semi-structured interviews with key informants from energy utilities was used to compare existing knowledge from the IAV community with that of regional stakeholders. That comparison revealed that much of the IAV literature on the energy sector is climate-centric and therefore disconnected from the more integrated decision-making processes and institutional perspectives of energy utilities. Increasing the relevance of research and assessment for the energy sector will necessitate a greater investment in integrated assessment and modeling efforts that respond to practical decision-making needs as well as greater collaboration between energy utilities and researchers in the design, execution, and communication of those efforts.

  2. UESC Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides utility representatives with additional training to meet their responsibilities with respect to Utility Energy Savings Contracts (UESC).

  3. Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... fuel use comprises the remaining 14% of primary energy consumption. ... fuel is consumed onsite in order to generate additional electricity and steam for the manufacturing end uses. ...

  4. Food and Beverage Sector (NAICS 311 and 312) Combustion Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Offsite electricity losses, which consume 607 TBtu, are the single greatest portion of electricity consumption. Offsite generated electricity provides 275 TBtu to direct end uses ...

  5. Public Utility Commission in the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.N.

    1995-12-31

    This article is about What is and What ought to be as we look to the institution of public utility commission regulation at the turn of the century. To signal my own view at the outset, I find the prospects somewhat worrisome in light of the nature and direction of much of the response to real and imaginary changes in the regulated sectors. I surely do not call for standing in place, but I strongly believe we should leave the place standing. The following items are discernable trends that will shape the PUC at the turn-of-the century: (1) dichotomy of customers into core and noncore groups, (2) unbundling and new service offerings with a menu of prices, (3) relaxed regulation and increased reliance on market solutions instead of command and control, (4) increased use of market-based pricing and incentive ratemaking, (5) large users seeking lowest-cost generation and supply services, (6) shift from old regulatory bargains regarding exclusive territorial franchises and assured recovery of costs and investments, (7) utility diversification, (8) increasing business risk for utilities, amd (9) uncertainty as to continued utility attention to social goals and a changing obligation to serve. For each of these, the author focuses on: (1) changing missions and roles of the PUC, (2) the strategies for achieving them, and (3) the implementation requirements that operationalize the strategies.

  6. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Fuller, Merrian C.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Peters, Jane S.; McRae, Marjorie; Albers, Nathaniel; Lutzenhiser, Susan; Spahic, Mersiha

    2010-03-22

    The energy efficiency services sector (EESS) is poised to become an increasingly important part of the U.S. economy. Climate change and energy supply concerns, volatile and increasing energy prices, and a desire for greater energy independence have led many state and national leaders to support an increasingly prominent role for energy efficiency in U.S. energy policy. The national economic recession has also helped to boost the visibility of energy efficiency, as part of a strategy to support economic recovery. We expect investment in energy efficiency to increase dramatically both in the near-term and through 2020 and beyond. This increase will come both from public support, such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and significant increases in utility ratepayer funds directed toward efficiency, and also from increased private spending due to codes and standards, increasing energy prices, and voluntary standards for industry. Given the growing attention on energy efficiency, there is a concern among policy makers, program administrators, and others that there is an insufficiently trained workforce in place to meet the energy efficiency goals being put in place by local, state, and federal policy. To understand the likelihood of a potential workforce gap and appropriate response strategies, one needs to understand the size, composition, and potential for growth of the EESS. We use a bottom-up approach based upon almost 300 interviews with program administrators, education and training providers, and a variety of EESS employers and trade associations; communications with over 50 sector experts; as well as an extensive literature review. We attempt to provide insight into key aspects of the EESS by describing the current job composition, the current workforce size, our projections for sector growth through 2020, and key issues that may limit this growth.

  7. AWWA Utility Management Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Water Works Association (AWWA), the Utility Management Conference is one of the leading management conferences to share experiences and learn from others in similar situations to the most pressing management issues of the day.

  8. PAM stack test utility

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-22

    The pamtest utility calls the normal PAM hooks using a service and username supplied on the command line. This allows an administratory to test any one of many configured PAM stacks as any existing user on the machine.

  9. Utility Metering- AGL Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses AGL Resources metering, including interruptible rate customers, large users, and meeting federal metering goals.

  10. Hualapai Tribal Utility Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hualapai Tribal Utility Project Tribal Utility Project DOE First Steps Program DOE First Steps Program Jack Ehrhardt Jack Ehrhardt - - Hualapai Planning Director Hualapai Planning Director WHO WE ARE WHO WE ARE ~1 MILLION ACRES IN ~1 MILLION ACRES IN NW ARIZONA NW ARIZONA 108 MILES OF THE 108 MILES OF THE GRAND CANYON GRAND CANYON 2500 Members 2500 Members Peach Springs Peach Springs Community Community ~240 electric customers ~240 electric customers ECONOMIC SITUATION ECONOMIC SITUATION Very

  11. Corix Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    53202 Sector: Services Product: U.S-based company that develops customized water, wastewater and energy infrastructure systems and provides field metering services for customers...

  12. (Findings of the Costa Rica power sector efficiency study)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddle, D.B.

    1990-10-08

    To present findings of the Costa Rica Power Sector Efficiency Study to the Instituto Costarricense de Electridad, and to the Ministry of Energy, Natural Resources and Mining. To discuss the progress and plans for the Central American Rural Electrification Project with US Agency for International Development (USAID)/Regional Office Central American Program (ROCAP). I traveled to San Jose, Costa Rica to present the findings of the Costa Rica Power Sector Efficiency Study to our counterparts in the utility and the Ministry of Energy. Discussions were held with line level managers at Instituto Costarricensede Electricidad (ICE) and Ministry of Energy Mines and Natural Resources (MIRENEM), as well as a plan of action set for the final stage of the project. Discussions were held for a one day period with both the bilateral Agency for International Development (AID) and the regional AID mission regarding the need for a similar study in Guatemala and matters directly pertaining to the Central American Rural Electrification Study (CARES) project.

  13. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to Commerce Department's Spectrum Advisory Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because of the role wireless technologies will play in the evolution toward a smarter national grid, one of the recommendations in DOE’s report, The Communications Requirements of Smart Grid...

  14. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communications Commission's Communications, Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because of the role communications technologies will play in the evolution toward a smarter national grid, DOE recommended in its October 2010 report, The Communications Requirements of Smart Grid...

  15. Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on December 8, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 5, 2010, after an extensive public notice and comment process, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a report entitled, "Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies". The...

  16. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update."

  17. The Flexible Solar Utility. Preparing for Solar's Impacts to Utility Planning and Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, John; Davidovich, Ted; Cory, Karlynn; Aznar, Alexandra; McLaren, Joyce

    2015-09-01

    This paper seeks to provide a flexible utility roadmap for identifying the steps that need to be taken to place the utility in the best position for addressing solar in the future. Solar growth and the emergence of new technologies will change the electric utility of tomorrow. Although not every utility, region, or market will change in the same way or magnitude, developing a path forward will be needed to reach the Electric System of the Future in the coming decades. In this report, a series of potential future states are identified that could result in drastically different energy mixes and profiles: 1) Business as Usual, 2) Low Carbon, Centralized Generation, 3) Rapid Distributed Energy Resource Growth, 4) Interactivity of Both the Grid and Demand, and 5) Grid or Load Defection. Complicating this process are a series of emerging disruptions; decisions or events that will cause the electric sector to change. Understanding and preparing for these items is critical for the transformation to any of the future states to be successful. Predicting which future state will predominate 15 years from now is not possible; however, utilities still will need to look ahead and try to anticipate how factors will impact their planning, operations, and business models. In order to dig into the potential transformations facing the utility industry, the authors conducted a series of utility interviews, held a working session at a major industry solar conference, and conducted a quantitative survey. To focus conversations, the authors leveraged the Rapid Distributed Energy Resource (DER) Growth future to draw out how utilities would have to adapt from current processes and procedures in order to manage and thrive in that new environment. Distributed solar was investigated specifically, and could serve as a proxy resource for all distributed generation (DG). It can also provide the foundation for all DERs.

  18. Philippines' downstream sector poised for growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    This paper reports that the Philippines' downstream sector is poised for sharp growth. Despite a slip in refined products demand in recent years, Philippines products demand will rebound sharply by 2000, East-West Center (EWC), Honolulu, predicts. Philippines planned refinery expansions are expected to meet that added demand, EWC Director Fereidun Fesharaki says. Like the rest of the Asia-Pacific region, product specifications are changing, but major refiners in the area expect to meet the changes without major case outlays. At the same time, Fesharaki says, push toward deregulation will further bolster the outlook for the Philippines downstream sector.

  19. Market leadership by example: Government sector energy efficiency in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Harris, Jeffrey; Breceda, Miguel; Campbell, Stephanie; Sachu, Constantine; della Cava, Mirka; Gonzalez Martinez, Jose; Meyer, Sarah; Romo, Ana Margarita

    2002-05-20

    Government facilities and services are often the largest energy users and major purchasers of energy-using equipment within a country. In developing as well as industrial countries, government ''leadership by example'' can be a powerful force to shift the market toward energy efficiency, complementing other elements of a national energy efficiency strategy. Benefits from more efficient energy management in government facilities and operations include lower government energy bills, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, less demand on electric utility systems, and in many cases reduced dependence on imported oil. Even more significantly, the government sector's buying power and example to others can generate broader demand for energy-efficient products and services, creating entry markets for domestic suppliers and stimulating competition in providing high-efficiency products and services. Despite these benefits, with the exception of a few countries government sector actions have often lagged behind other energy efficiency policies. This is especially true in developing countries and transition economies - even though energy used by public agencies in these countries may represent at least as large a share of total energy use as the public sector in industrial economies. This paper summarizes work in progress to inventory current programs and policies for government sector energy efficiency in developing countries, and describes successful case studies from Mexico's implementation of energy management in the public sector. We show how these policies in Mexico, begun at the federal level, have more recently been extended to state and local agencies, and consider the applicability of this model to other developing countries.

  20. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04

    million in2020. * Residential appliance ownership will show signs of saturation inurban households. The increase in residential energy consumption will belargely driven by urbanization, since rural homes will continue to havelow consumption levels. In urban households, the size of appliances willincrease, but its effect will be moderated by efficiency improvements,partially driven by government standards. * Commercial energy increaseswill be driven both by increases in floor space and by increases inpenetration of major end uses such as heating and cooling. Theseincreases will be moderated somewhat, however, by technology changes,such as increased use of heat pumps. * China's Medium- and Long-TermDevelopment plan drafted by the central government and published in 2004calls for a quadrupling of GDP in the period from 2000-2020 with only adoubling in energy consumption during the same period. A bottom-upanalysis with likely efficiency improvements finds that energyconsumption will likely exceed the goal by 26.12 EJ, or 28 percent.Achievements of these goals will there fore require a more aggressivepolicy of encouraging energy efficiency.

  1. Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector- New SEE Action Publication

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The SEE Action report "Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector" provides state regulators, utilities, and other program administrators with an overview of U.S. industrial energy efficiency programs delivered by a variety of entities. The report assesses some of the key features of programs that have helped lead to success in generating increased energy savings and identifies new emerging directions in programs that might benefit from additional research and cross-discussion to promote adoption.

  2. Flora Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flora Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Flora Utilities Place: Indiana Phone Number: 574-967-4971 Website: www.townofflora.orgflora-util Outage Hotline: 574-967-4971...

  3. UESC Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services.

  4. Industrial Energy Efficiency Utility Webinars

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    State, regional, and utility partners can learn how to help manufacturing customers save energy by reading the following presentations. Webinars feature experts from utilities, government, and...

  5. UESCs Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services.

  6. GSA-Utility Interconnection Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the General Service Administration's (GSA's) utility interconnection agreements.

  7. Cannelton Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cannelton Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cannelton Utilities Place: Indiana Phone Number: (812) 547-7919 Outage Hotline: (812) 547-7919 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  8. Hustisford Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hustisford Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hustisford Utilities Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (920) 349-3650 Website: www.hustisford.comindex.asp?S Outage Hotline:...

  9. Maryville Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryville Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Maryville Utilities Place: Tennessee Phone Number: 865.273.3900 or 865-273-3300 Website: www.maryvillegov.comutility-p...

  10. Slinger Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Slinger Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Slinger Utilities Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (262)644-5265 Website: www.vi.slinger.wi.govindex.as Outage Hotline: (262)...

  11. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar

  12. Utility Community Solar Handbook- Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development" provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  13. MTV Utility Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-02-29

    The MSV Java Utility Library contains software developed over many years for many sponsors. (This work is not a derivative of CB-EMIS), but rather support to the CB-EMIS software). Projects that have used and contributed to code in this library: CB-EMIS (PROTECT), BWIC, Fort Future, Teva, Integrated Oceans, ENKIMDU, RCW, JEMS, JWACS, EPA watershed, and many others. This library will continue to be used in other non-CB-EMIS related projects. The components include: Spatial components: Multi-coordinatemore » system spatial objects. 2D spatial indexing system, and polygon griding system. Data translation: Allows import and export of file based data to and from object oriented systems. Multi-platform data streams: Allows platform specific data streams to operate on any support platform. Other items include printing, custom GUI components, support for NIMA Raster Product Format, program logging utilities and others.« less

  14. Power Towers for Utilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towers for Utilities - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  15. Let the private sector handle energy conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajer, E.R.

    1982-08-23

    Mr. Bajer feels that elimination of many federal conservation programs will have no effect on the US goal of reducing oil imports because the private sector can do a better job of providing these efforts. He notes that many government programs were the result of overreaction to the 1973 oil embargo, when Congress misread the public's willingness to respond. The American people have taken the initiative, however, and have reduced their energy consumption and import rates. Mr. Bajer further notes that, according to the DOE Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis, DOE's conservation programs accounted for less than 5% of reduction of energy use per unit of GNP. He thinks that new policies will allow market forces to continue providing conservation incentives and will remove government intervention and competition with the private sector. (DCK)

  16. STEP Utility Bill Analysis Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Utility Bill Analysis Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  17. STEP Utility Data Release Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Utility Data Release Form, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  18. NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Erin Boedecker Owen Comstock Behjat Hojjati Kevin Jarzomski David Peterson Steve Wade October 4, 2012 | Washington, D.C. AEO2013 Preliminary Results WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview Buildings Working Group Forrestal 2E-069 | October 4, 2012 2 * Recap of project list

  19. US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On the cover: Trans-Alaska oil pipeline; aerial view of New Jersey refinery; coal barges on Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota; power plant in Prince George's County, Maryland; Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State; corn field near Somers, Iowa; wind turbines in Texas. Photo credits: iStockphoto U.S. ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME WEATHER Acknowledgements This report was drafted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Policy and International Affairs

  20. Sector 3 : High Resolution X-ray Scattering | Advanced Photon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & workshops IXN Group Useful Links Current APS status ESAF System GUP System X-Ray Science Division My APS Portal Sector 3 : High Resolution X-ray Scattering Sector 3 is...

  1. List of Companies in Wind Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Sector Jump to: navigation, search WindTurbine-icon.png Companies in the Wind energy sector: Add a Company Download CSV (rows 1-1693) Map of Wind energy companies Loading...

  2. Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector 2006 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector 2006 - Presentation to the 2008 ieRoadmap Workshop Roadmap to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector 2006 - Presentation ...

  3. List of Companies in Biofuels Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    List of Companies in Biofuels Sector Jump to: navigation, search BiomassImage.JPG Companies in the Biofuels sector: Add a Company Download CSV (rows 1-256) Map of Biofuels...

  4. Carbon Market Opportunities for the Forestry Sector of Africa...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the United Nations, Winrock International Sector: Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type:...

  5. Fact #619: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry Fact #619: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry According the latest Economic Census (2002), the trucking industry is the largest contributor of revenue in the transportation sector, contributing more than one-quarter of the sectors revenue. The air industry contributes just under one-quarter, as does other transportation and support activities, which include sightseeing, couriers and

  6. Low Carbon Society Toward 2050: Indonesia Energy Sector | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Global Environmental Strategies, Mizuho Information & Research Institute - Japan, Kyoto University, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) - Indonesia Sector: Energy Focus...

  7. Energy Impact Illinois: Overcoming Barriers in the Multifamily Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents how Energy Impact Illinois overcame barriers in the multifamily sector through financing partnerships and expert advice.

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    RenewableAlternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication...

  9. Chapter 2 - Energy Sectors and Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 - Energy Sectors and Systems Chapter 2 - Energy Sectors and Systems Chapter 2 - Energy Sectors and Systems Within and between the electricity, fuels, transportation, buildings, and manufacturing sectors, increasing interconnectedness and complexity are creating opportunities and challenges that can be approached from a systems perspective. Some of the most transformational opportunities exist at the systems level. They are enabled by the ability to understand, predict, and control very large

  10. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  11. Coming utility squeeze play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoiaken, L.N.

    1988-02-01

    Like a sleeping giant, utilities are waking up and preparing to participate in the increasingly competitive power production industry. Some are establishing subsidiaries to participate in join venture deals with independents. Others are competing by offering lucrative discount or deferral rates to important industrial and commercial customers considering cogeneration. And now, a third approach is beginning to shape up- the disaggregation of generation assets into a separate generation company, or genco. This article briefly discusses these three and also devotes brief sections to functional segmentation and The regulatory arena.

  12. Tribal Utility Formation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Tribal Utility Formation in the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory Ken Johnston Acting Tribal Affairs Manager BPA TRIBAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT JULY 2015 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 The Basics  BPA markets power from 31 Federal dams, the Columbia Generating Station Nuclear Plant, and several small non- Federal power plants  About 80% of the power BPA sells is hydroelectric  BPA accounts for about

  13. Tribal Utility Policy Issues

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Policy Issues New Mexico July 27, 2015 Margaret Schaff Kanim Associates, LLC (An Indian Owned Consulting Firm) 303-443-0182 mschaff@att.net *US Energy Information Administration New Mexico Energy Stats  Sixth in crude oil production in the nation in 2013.  5% of U.S. marketed natural gas production in 2012  Largest coal-fired electric power plants in NM both on Navajo Nation  2,100-megawatt Four Corners (Navajo Mine) (APS)  1,643-megawatt San Juan (San Juan Mines) (Public

  14. Electric utilities sales and revenue monthly report (EIA-826), 1987. Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, J.; Wilkins, S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of Form EI-826 formerly FERC-5, Electric Utility Company Monthly Statement, is to collect data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; identify near-term trends in energy use; and contingency analysis. The form is filed monthly by approximately 150 electric utilities. All privately owned electric utilities with annual electric operating revenues of $100,000,000 or more must respond. In addition, the sample includes other selected electric utilities. The reported data is expanded by factors, calculated using annual data from a previous period, to give electric sales data by state and sector. Other information collected includes data gathered on depreciation, construction, net income before taxes, and extraordinary items.

  15. Electric Utilities Monthly Sales and Revenue Report (EIA-826), current. Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Form EI-826, formerly FERC-5, Electric Utility Company Monthly Statement, collects data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; identify near-term trends in energy use; and contingency analysis. The form is filed monthly by approximately 150 electric utilities. All privately owned electric utilities with annual electric operating revenues of $100,000,000 or more must respond. In addition, the sample includes other selected electric utilities. The reported data is expanded by factors, calculated using annual data from a previous period, to give electric sales data by state and sector. Other information collected includes data gathered on depreciation, construction, net income before taxes, and extraordinary items.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation’s emergency sectors change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TEMA has issued revised emergency sectors for the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. These sectors, labeled A-Y, determine which areas should take action if an event occurs at one of DOE’s sites locally. The new sector boundaries have improved correlation with roads, waterways, and recognizable landmarks.

  17. Detection and Analysis of Threats to the Energy Sector: DATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfonso Valdes

    2010-03-31

    . This resulted in delays in finalizing agreements with commercial partners, and in particular the Invensys testbed was not installed until December 2008 (as opposed to the March 2008 plan). The project resulted in a number of conference presentations and publications, and was well received when presented at industry forums. In spite of some interest on the part of the utility sector, we were unfortunately not able to engage a utility for a full-scale pilot deployment.

  18. Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module is a simulation tool based upon economic and engineering relationships that models commercial sector energy demands at the nine Census Division level of detail for eleven distinct categories of commercial buildings. Commercial equipment selections are performed for the major fuels of electricity, natural gas, and distillate fuel, for the major services of space heating, space cooling, water heating, ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, and lighting. The algorithm also models demand for the minor fuels of residual oil, liquefied petroleum gas, steam coal, motor gasoline, and kerosene, the renewable fuel sources of wood and municipal solid waste, and the minor services of office equipment. Section 2 of this report discusses the purpose of the model, detailing its objectives, primary input and output quantities, and the relationship of the Commercial Module to the other modules of the NEMS system. Section 3 of the report describes the rationale behind the model design, providing insights into further assumptions utilized in the model development process to this point. Section 3 also reviews alternative commercial sector modeling methodologies drawn from existing literature, providing a comparison to the chosen approach. Section 4 details the model structure, using graphics and text to illustrate model flows and key computations.

  19. Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in the Indian Road and Rail Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

    2010-05-01

    This life cycle assessment of Jatropha biodiesel production and use evaluates the net greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (not considering land-use change), net energy value (NEV), and net petroleum consumption impacts of substituting Jatropha biodiesel for conventional petroleum diesel in India. Several blends of biodiesel with petroleum diesel are evaluated for the rail freight, rail passenger, road freight, and road-passenger transport sectors that currently rely heavily on petroleum diesel. For the base case, Jatropha cultivation, processing, and use conditions that were analyzed, the use of B20 results in a net reduction in GHG emissions and petroleum consumption of 14% and 17%, respectively, and a NEV increase of 58% compared with the use of 100% petroleum diesel. While the road-passenger transport sector provides the greatest sustainability benefits per 1000 gross tonne kilometers, the road freight sector eventually provides the greatest absolute benefits owing to substantially higher projected utilization by year 2020. Nevertheless, introduction of biodiesel to the rail sector might present the fewest logistic and capital expenditure challenges in the near term. Sensitivity analyses confirmed that the sustainability benefits are maintained under multiple plausible cultivation, processing, and distribution scenarios. However, the sustainability of any individual Jatropha plantation will depend on site-specific conditions.

  20. Utility Static Generation Reliability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-03-05

    PICES (Probabilistic Investigation of Capacity and Energy Shortages) was developed for estimating an electric utility''s expected frequency and duration of capacity deficiencies on a daily on and off-peak basis. In addition to the system loss-of-load probability (LOLP) and loss-of-load expectation (LOLE) indices, PICES calculates the expected frequency and duration of system capacity deficiencies and the probability, expectation, and expected frequency and duration of a range of system reserve margin states. Results are aggregated and printedmore » on a weekly, monthly, or annual basis. The program employs hourly load data and either the two-state (on/off) or a more sophisticated three-state (on/partially on/fully off) generating unit representation. Unit maintenance schedules are determined on a weekly, levelized reserve margin basis. In addition to the 8760-hour annual load record, the user provides the following information for each unit: plant capacity, annual maintenance requirement, two or three-state unit failure and repair rates, and for three-state models, the partial state capacity deficiency. PICES can also supply default failure and repair rate values, based on the Edison Electric Institute''s 1979 Report on Equipment Availability for the Ten-Year Period 1968 Through 1977, for many common plant types. Multi-year analysis can be performed by specifying as input data the annual peak load growth rates and plant addition and retirement schedules for each year in the study.« less

  1. Utilization Technology Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utilization Technology Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Utilization Technology Institute Place: Des Plaines, IL References: Utilization Technology Institute1...

  2. Utility Energy Service Contracts Training for Utility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar targets Federal staff, as well as utility representatives, and provides an understanding of the legal parameters, contracting requirements, financing options, and other aspects of utility energy service contracts (UESC).

  3. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group- Utility Interconnection Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses solar/photovoltaic (PV) projects to connect with utility in California and their issues.

  4. Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A.

    2009-07-01

    The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

  5. EM Utility Contracts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Contracts EM Utility Contracts Table providing summary information of EM awards for utility services. PDF icon EM Utility Contracts More Documents & Publications Land and ...

  6. utility rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    utility Utility Companies utility rate Utility Rates version 1 version 2 version 3 web service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next...

  7. Utility Partnership Webinar Series: State Mandates for Utility Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar highlights state mandates from throughout the country, and how they’ve influenced utility industrial energy efficiency programs.

  8. Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, R.; Singh, N.R.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, W.N.

    2007-03-20

    A hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H{sub 2}CAR) process for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is proposed wherein biomass is the carbon source and hydrogen is supplied from carbon-free energy. To implement this concept, a process has been designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recycled from the H{sub 2}-CO to liquid conversion reactor. Modeling of this biomass to liquids process has identified several major advantages of the H{sub 2}CAR process. The land area needed to grow the biomass is <40% of that needed by other routes that solely use biomass to support the entire transportation sector. Whereras the literature estimates known processes to be able to produce {approx}30% of the United States transportation fuel from the annual biomass of 1.366 billion tons, the H{sub 2}CAR process shows the potential to supply the entire United States transportation sector from that quantity of biomass. The synthesized liquid provides H{sub 2} storage in an open loop system. Reduction to practice of the H{sub 2}CAR route has the potential to provide the transportation sector for the foreseeable future, using the existing infrastructure. The rationale of using H{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}CAR process is explained by the significantly higher annualized average solar energy conversion efficiency for hydrogen generation versus that for biomass growth. For coal to liquids, the advantage of H{sub 2}CAR is that there is no additional CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere due to the replacement of petroleum with coal, thus eliminating the need to sequester CO{sub 2}.

  9. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vas Choudhry; Stephen Kwan; Steven R. Hadley

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the project entitled ''Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasification Slags'' was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of manufacturing low-unit-weight products from coal gasification slags which can be used as substitutes for conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates. In Phase I, the technology developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates from slag (termed SLA) was applied to produce a large batch (10 tons) of expanded slag using pilot direct-fired rotary kilns and a fluidized bed calciner. The expanded products were characterized using basic characterization and application-oriented tests. Phase II involved the demonstration and evaluation of the use of expanded slag aggregates to produce a number of end-use applications including lightweight roof tiles, lightweight precast products (e.g., masonry blocks), structural concrete, insulating concrete, loose fill insulation, and as a substitute for expanded perlite and vermiculite in horticultural applications. Prototypes of these end-use applications were made and tested with the assistance of commercial manufacturers. Finally, the economics of expanded slag production was determined and compared with the alternative of slag disposal. Production of value-added products from SLA has a significant potential to enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are considered.

  10. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6A2-44853 March 2009 Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment Jason Coughlin and Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-44853 March 2009 Solar Photovoltaic Financing:

  11. Interacting dark sector with transversal interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G.

    2015-03-26

    We investigate the interacting dark sector composed of dark matter, dark energy, and dark radiation for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background by introducing a three-dimensional internal space spanned by the interaction vector Q and solve the source equation for a linear transversal interaction. Then, we explore a realistic model with dark matter coupled to a scalar field plus a decoupled radiation term, analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era and find that our model is consistent with the recent measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropy coming from Planck along with the future constraints achievable by CMBPol experiment.

  12. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-10-10

    SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansionmore » configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.« less

  13. Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Generation Projects

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    LCOE/LACE Workshop July 25, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional"

  14. "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze

  15. Utility Connection | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    your utility company, then provide us a little information about yourself. Only one person from each utility can answer these questions and the results from your input will be...

  16. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning January 1, 2002, each electric utility must inform its customers on a quarterly basis of the voluntary option to purchase green power. The details of each utility's program must be...

  17. Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  18. Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  19. Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  20. Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  1. Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  2. Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  3. Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  4. Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  5. Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  6. Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  7. California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  8. Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  9. Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  10. Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  11. Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  12. Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  13. Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  14. Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  15. Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  16. Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  17. Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  18. Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  19. Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  20. Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  1. Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  2. Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  3. Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  4. Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  5. Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  6. Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  7. Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  8. Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  10. Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  11. Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  12. Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey...

  13. Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  14. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  15. Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  16. Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  17. Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  18. Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  19. Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  20. Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...