Sample records for utility scale wind

  1. NREL: Wind Research - Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6SiteUtility-Scale Wind

  2. Voltage Impacts of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although most utility-scale wind turbines in the United States are added at the transmission level in large wind power plants, distributed wind power offers an alternative that could increase the overall wind power penetration without the need for additional transmission. This report examines the distribution feeder-level voltage issues that can arise when adding utility-scale wind turbines to the distribution system. Four of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory taxonomy feeders were examined in detail to study the voltage issues associated with adding wind turbines at different distances from the sub-station. General rules relating feeder resistance up to the point of turbine interconnection to the expected maximum voltage change levels were developed. Additional analysis examined line and transformer overvoltage conditions.

  3. Feasibility Study for a Hopi Utility-Scale Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendrick Lomayestewa

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility for the generation of energy from wind and to parallel this work with the development of a tribal utility organization capable of undertaking potential joint ventures in utility businesses and projects on the Hopi reservation. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility for the generation of energy from wind and to parallel this work with the development of a tribal utility organization capable of undertaking potential joint ventures in utility businesses and projects on the Hopi reservation. Wind resource assessments were conducted at two study sites on Hopi fee simple lands located south of the city of Winslow. Reports from the study were recently completed and have not been compared to any existing historical wind data nor have they been processed under any wind assessment models to determine the output performance and the project economics of turbines at the wind study sites. Ongoing analysis of the wind data and project modeling will determine the feasibility of a tribal utility-scale wind energy generation.

  4. Four Corners Wind Resource Center Webinar: Building Utility-Scale Wind: Permitting and Regulation Lessons for County Decision-Makers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Four Corners Wind Resource Center will host this webinar exploring lessons learned in the permitting of utility-scale wind projects and the development of ordinances and regulations for...

  5. Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-Scale Wind Integration in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an analysis, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in May 2010, of the economic characteristics of a particular utility-scale wind configuration project that has been referred to as the 'Big Wind' project.

  6. Characterizing Inflow Conditions Across the Rotor Disk of a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Kelley, N.; Scott, G.; Jager, D.; Schreck, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-megawatt utility-scale wind turbines operate in a turbulent, thermally-driven atmosphere where wind speed and air temperature vary with height. Turbines convert the wind's momentum into electrical power, and so changes in the atmosphere across the rotor disk influence the power produced by the turbine. To characterize the inflow into utility scale turbines at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado, NREL recently built two 135-meter inflow monitoring towers. This poster introduces the towers and the measurements that are made, showing some of the data obtained in the first few months of operation in 2011.

  7. Utility Scale Wind Turbines on a Grid Connected Island Mohit Dua, Anthony L. Rogers, James F. Manwell,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Utility Scale Wind Turbines on a Grid Connected Island Mohit Dua, Anthony L. Rogers, James F utility scale wind turbines on Fox Islands, located 12 miles from the coast of Maine in the United States of electricity itself. Three locations are analyzed in detail as potential sites for wind turbine installations

  8. Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-scale Wind Integration in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for the scope of this work when considering alternatives. In 2009, recognizing the potential of the Big Wind project to contribute to the RPS goals, a series of studies...

  9. Impact of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind on Transmission-Level System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new renewable integration study that aims to assess the potential for adding distributed wind to the current power system with minimal or no upgrades to the distribution or transmission electricity systems. It investigates the impacts of integrating large amounts of utility-scale distributed wind power on bulk system operations by performing a case study on the power system of the Independent System Operator-New England (ISO-NE).

  10. Utility-Scale Wind Turbines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AGUser pageUtility+Utility Access Map

  11. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

  12. Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

  13. Reliable, Lightweight Transmissions For Off-Shore, Utility Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean-Claude Ossyra

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to reduce the technical risk for a hydrostatic transmission based drivetrain for high-power utility-size wind turbines. A theoretical study has been performed to validate the reduction of cost of energy (CoE) for the wind turbine, identify risk mitigation strategies for the drive system and critical components, namely the pump, shaft connection and hydrostatic transmission (HST) controls and address additional benefits such as reduced deployment costs, improved torque density and improved mean time between repairs (MTBR).

  14. Utility-Scale Wind & Solar Power in the U.S.: Where it stands...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dakota instead of Florida, just to employ North Dakotans? 13 Simplistic Energy Supply Potential from Wind * North Dakota alone could support 571,400 GE 1.6 MW turbines or...

  15. Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon’s Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up...

  16. Utilizing Wind: Optimal Wind Farm Placement in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    Utilizing Wind: Optimal Wind Farm Placement in the United States By: Yintao Sun Advisor: Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.4.1 Carbon-based Fuels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4.2 Solar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 iv #12;CONTENTS v 3 Designing Wind Farm Portfolios 27 3.1 Applying Markowitz Portfolio Theory

  17. Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

  18. Fatal Flaw Analysis of Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Generators at the West Haymarket Joint Public Agency. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatal flaw analysis of utility-scale wind turbines at the West Haymarket Joint Public Agency brownfields site in Lincoln, Nebraska, funded by EPA.

  19. Technical and Economic Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind at the Doepke-Holliday Superfund Site. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a technical and financial feasibility study of a utility-scale wind turbine on the Doepke Superfund site.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: characterizing Scaled Wind Farm...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility inflow Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyScaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) Facility Wind Turbine Controller Ground Testing Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) Facility Wind Turbine Controller Ground...

  2. Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

  3. Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennell, W.T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

  4. Renewable Energy: Utility-Scale Policies and Programs | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Policies & Programs Renewable Energy: Utility-Scale Policies and Programs Renewable Energy: Utility-Scale Policies and Programs Utility-scale renewable energy projects are...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: utility-scale power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    utility-scale power Sandia Has Signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Case Western Reserve University On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy...

  6. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  7. Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This two-day workshop will answer your questions about interconnecting wind and solar plants and other distributed generation applications to electric distribution systems while providing insight...

  8. Hawaii Utility Integration Initiatives to Enable Wind (Wind HUI) Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dora Nakafuji; Lisa Dangelmaier; Chris Reynolds

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To advance the state and nation toward clean energy, Hawaii is pursuing an aggressive Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), 40% renewable generation and 30% energy efficiency and transportation initiatives by 2030. Additionally, with support from federal, state and industry leadership, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is focused on reducing Hawaii's carbon footprint and global warming impacts. To keep pace with the policy momentum and changing industry technologies, the Hawaiian Electric Companies are proactively pursuing a number of potential system upgrade initiatives to better manage variable resources like wind, solar and demand-side and distributed generation alternatives (i.e. DSM, DG). As variable technologies will continue to play a significant role in powering the future grid, practical strategies for utility integration are needed. Hawaiian utilities are already contending with some of the highest penetrations of renewables in the nation in both large-scale and distributed technologies. With island grids supporting a diverse renewable generation portfolio at penetration levels surpassing 40%, the Hawaiian utilities experiences can offer unique perspective on practical integration strategies. Efforts pursued in this industry and federal collaborative project tackled challenging issues facing the electric power industry around the world. Based on interactions with a number of western utilities and building on decades of national and international renewable integration experiences, three priority initiatives were targeted by Hawaiian utilities to accelerate integration and management of variable renewables for the islands. The three initiatives included: Initiative 1: Enabling reliable, real-time wind forecasting for operations by improving short-term wind forecasting and ramp event modeling capabilities with local site, field monitoring; Initiative 2: Improving operators situational awareness to variable resources via real-time grid condition monitoring using PMU devices and enhanced grid analysis tools; and Initiative 3: Identifying grid automation and smart technology architecture retrofit/improvement opportunities following a systematic review approach, inclusive of increasing renewables and variable distributed generation. Each of the initiative was conducted in partnership with industry technology and equipment providers to facilitate utility deployment experiences inform decision making, assess supporting infrastructure cost considerations, showcase state of the technology, address integration hurdles with viable workarounds. For each initiative, a multi-phased approach was followed that included 1) investigative planning and review of existing state-of-the-art, 2) hands on deployment experiences and 3) process implementation considerations. Each phase of the approach allowed for mid-course corrections, process review and change to any equipment/devices to be used by the utilities. To help the island grids transform legacy infrastructure, the Wind HUI provided more systematic approaches and exposure with vendor/manufacturers, hand-on review and experience with the equipment not only from the initial planning stages but through to deployment and assessment of field performance of some of the new, remote sensing and high-resolution grid monitoring technologies. HELCO became one of the first utilities in the nation to install and operate a high resolution (WindNet) network of remote sensing devices such as radiometers and SODARs to enable a short-term ramp event forecasting capability. This utility-industry and federal government partnership produced new information on wind energy forecasting including new data additions to the NOAA MADIS database; addressed remote sensing technology performance and O&M (operations and maintenance) challenges; assessed legacy equipment compatibility issues and technology solutions; evaluated cyber-security concerns; and engaged in community outreach opportunities that will help guide Hawaii and the nation toward more reliable adoption of clean energy resources. Resu

  9. The EPRI/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvert, S.; Goldman, P. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); DeMeo, E.; McGowin, C. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Smith, B.; Tromly, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program (TVP). This paper provides an overview of the TVP, its purpose and goals, and the participating utility projects. Improved technology has significantly reduced the cost of energy from wind turbines since the early 1980s. In 1992, turbines were producing electricity for about $0.07--$0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) (at 7 m/s [16 mph sites]), compared with more than $0.30/kWh in 1980. Further technology improvements were expected to lower the cost of energy from wind turbines to $0.05/kWh. More than 17,000 wind turbines, totaling more than 1,500 MW capacity, were installed in the US, primarily in California and Hawaii. The better wind plants had availabilities above 95%, capacity factors exceeding 30%, and operation and maintenance costs of $0.01/kWh. However, despite improving technology, EPRI and DOE recognized that utility use of wind turbines was still largely limited to turbines installed in California and Hawaii during the 1980s. Wind resource assessments showed that other regions of the US, particularly the Midwest, had abundant wind resources. EPRI and DOE sought to provide a bridge from utility-grade turbine development programs under way to commercial purchases of the wind turbines. The TVP was developed to allow utilities to build and operate enough candidate turbines to gain statistically significant operating and maintenance data.

  10. POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

  11. Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii Contents Introduction

  12. Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development statue provides an expedited permitting pathway for proposed wind developments in certain designated locations, known as expedited...

  13. Utilization of localized panel resonant behavior in wind turbine blades.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shear webs and laminates of core panels of wind turbine blades must be designed to avoid panel buckling while minimizing blade weight. Typically, buckling resistance is evaluated by consideration of the load-deflection behavior of a blade using finite element analysis (FEA) or full-scale static loading of a blade to failure under a simulated extreme loading condition. This paper examines an alternative means for evaluating blade buckling resistance using non-destructive modal tests or FEA. In addition, panel resonances can be utilized for structural health monitoring by observing changes in the modal parameters of these panel resonances, which are only active in a portion of the blade that is susceptible to failure. Additionally, panel resonances are considered for updating of panel laminate model parameters by correlation with test data. During blade modal tests conducted at Sandia Labs, a series of panel modes with increasing complexity was observed. This paper reports on the findings of these tests, describes potential ways to utilize panel resonances for blade evaluation, health monitoring, and design, and reports recent numerical results to evaluate panel resonances for use in blade structural health assessment.

  14. Review of Historical and Modern Utilization of Wind Power Publications Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UTILIZATION TODAY WIND POWER TECHNOLOGY q Modern wind turbine technology q Concepts COST OF WIND ENERGY TYPES costs BEGINNERS GUIDE TO WIND ENERGY STUDIES q Selected text books on wind energy and wind turbines WECS - Wind Energy Conversion Systems. To co-ordinate the many terms derived from ancient Teutonic

  15. Utility Wind Interest Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and toolsoperationWind Interest Group Place:

  16. Scale Models & Wind Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG -EnergyProcess HeatingatSawDepartment ofScale

  17. Wind Scanner: A full-scale Laser Facility for Wind and Turbulence Measurements around large Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Scanner: A full-scale Laser Facility for Wind and Turbulence Measurements around large Wind Turbines Torben Mikkelsen, Jakob Mann and Michael Courtney Wind Energy Department, Risø National Laboratory:Torben.Mikkelsen@Risoe.dk Summary RISØ DTU has started to build a newly designed laser-based lidar scanning facility for remote wind

  18. Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power to wind speed variations, the wind shear and the tower shadow effects. The fluctuating power may be ableSILENT/PowerFactory. In this paper, the impacts of wind shear and tower shadow effects on the small signal stability of power systems

  19. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: functional wind-turbine blade scaling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind-turbine blade scaling National Rotor Testbed Functional Scaling Presented at American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2014 Scitech On April 15, 2014, in Energy,...

  1. Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them Federal and State Structures to Support Financing...

  2. Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

  3. Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the...

  4. Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

  5. Utility-scale AFBC projects - 1986 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, S.; Friedman, M.A.; Howe, W.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) offers several potential advantages over a conventional pulverized-coal steam generator, particularly when a conventional boiler would have to be equipped with a flue gas desulfurization system. AFBC can meet sulfur and nitrogen oxide emission regulations without add-on emission control equipment. Low coal-combustion temperatures in an AFBC eliminate slagging problems as well as low-NO/sub x/ levels. The major benefit of a low combustion temperature in an AFBC is that it permits a wide range of fuels to be fired in the same combustor. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is participating in three utility-scale AFBC demonstration projects expected to start operation in 1986, 1987, and 1988. Each project has unique characteristics (scope of supply, design configuration, fuel, location, starts per year, etc.) that make the three projects complementary. This report describes the development of AFBC technology, the three utility-scale AFBC demonstration plants, and the technical and economic information EPRI expects to derive from these projects.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE/Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More Efficient On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technologies Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Facility Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Baselining Project Accelerates Work On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable...

  8. Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection Willett Kemptona,1 , Felipe M regional estimate, Kempton et al. (2) calculated that two-thirds of the offshore wind power off the U in the U.S. Atlantic region is already underway. Fig. 1 shows as black squares offshore wind developments

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: utility-scale blade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blade Fabrication of AMI Demonstration Blade Begun On September 10, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The Advanced Manufacturing...

  10. Evaluation of the Impacts of Deep Penetration of Wind Resources on Transmission Utilization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Terms--wind generation, grid integration, trans- mission utilization, stability analysis, dynamic perfor- tion of wind generation resources into the power grids requires the evaluation of the impacts of wind quantification of the impacts of wind resource integration on the system. The evaluation of these impacts

  11. National-Scale Wind Resource Assessment for Power Generation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the current standards for conducting a national-scale wind resource assessment for power generation, along with the risk/benefit considerations to be considered when beginning a wind resource assessment. The presentation describes changes in turbine technology and viable wind deployment due to more modern turbine technology and taller towers and shows how the Philippines national wind resource assessment evolved over time to reflect changes that arise from updated technologies and taller towers.

  12. Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

  13. Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

  14. Large-Scale Wind Training Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Richard L. [Hudson Valley Community College

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project objective is to develop a credit-bearing wind technician program and a non-credit safety training program, train faculty, and purchase/install large wind training equipment.

  15. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants Part 2: Capacitycapacity factor of the wind power plant during the top 10

  16. Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

  17. Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aimone, P.E. National Security Global Business Battelle Memorial Institute Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development near DOD Installations Making the Case for Land Use...

  18. Impact of Distribution-Connected Large-Scale Wind Turbines on Transmission System Stability during Large Disturbances: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Allen, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the dynamic impacts of distributed utility-scale wind power during contingency events on both the distribution system and the transmission system. It is the first step toward investigating high penetrations of distribution-connected wind power's impact on both distribution and transmission stability.

  19. Generation of large-scale winds in horizontally anisotropic convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Hardenberg, J; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.

  20. FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savory, Eric

    FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include codes of practice, full-scale, wind tunnel are listed in the table below: Table 1. Relative advantages and disadvantages of wind engineering techniques

  1. Utility Scale Solar Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > UtilityUtility RatePalo Alto,

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, SWIFT, Systems Analysis, Wind Energy The National Rotor Testbed (NRT) team is examining the effect of airfoil choice on the final design of the new rotor for the Scaled...

  3. New Report: Integrating More Wind and Solar Reduces Utilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high levels of wind and solar generation. WWSIS found adding greater amounts of wind and solar power to be technically feasible if certain operational changes could be made, but...

  4. IntroductionIntroduction The use of small scale vertical axis wind turbinesThe use of small scale vertical axis wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    IntroductionIntroduction The use of small scale vertical axis wind turbinesThe use of small scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) is being studied at McMaster University using(VAWT) is being studied at McMaster University using a prototype wind turbine provided bya prototype wind turbine provided

  5. SOLAR WIND MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS TURBULENCE: ANOMALOUS SCALING AND ROLE OF INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salem, C.; Bale, S. D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mangeney, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F-92195 Meudon (France); Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Rende (Italy)], E-mail: salem@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a study of the scaling properties and intermittency of solar wind MHD turbulence based on the use of wavelet transforms. More specifically, we use the Haar Wavelet transform on simultaneous 3 s resolution particle and magnetic field data from the Wind spacecraft, to investigate anomalous scaling and intermittency effects of both magnetic field and solar wind velocity fluctuations in the inertial range. For this purpose, we calculated spectra, structure functions, and probability distribution functions. We show that this powerful wavelet technique allows for a systematic elimination of intermittency effects on spectra and structure functions and thus for a clear determination of the actual scaling properties in the inertial range. The scaling of the magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations are found to be fundamentally different. Moreover, when the most intermittent structures superposed to the standard fluctuations are removed, simple statistics are recovered. The magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations exhibit a well-defined, although different, monofractal behavior, following a Kolmogorov -5/3 scaling and a Iroshnikov-Kraichnan -3/2 scaling, respectively. The multifractal properties of solar wind turbulence appear to be determined by the presence of those most intermittent structures. Finally, our wavelet technique also allows for a direct and systematic identification of the most active, singular structures responsible for the intermittency in the solar wind.

  6. Superconductivity for Large Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Fair; W. Stautner; M. Douglass; R. Rajput-Ghoshal; M. Moscinski; P. Riley; D. Wagner; J. Kim; S. Hou; F. Lopez; K. Haran; J. Bray; T. Laskaris; J. Rochford; R. Duckworth

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design has been completed for a 10MW superconducting direct drive wind turbine generator employing low temperature superconductors for the field winding. Key technology building blocks from the GE Wind and GE Healthcare businesses have been transferred across to the design of this concept machine. Wherever possible, conventional technology and production techniques have been used in order to support the case for commercialization of such a machine. Appendices A and B provide further details of the layout of the machine and the complete specification table for the concept design. Phase 1 of the program has allowed us to understand the trade-offs between the various sub-systems of such a generator and its integration with a wind turbine. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) analysis have been completed resulting in the identification of high risk components within the design. The design has been analyzed from a commercial and economic point of view and Cost of Energy (COE) calculations have been carried out with the potential to reduce COE by up to 18% when compared with a permanent magnet direct drive 5MW baseline machine, resulting in a potential COE of 0.075 $/kWh. Finally, a top-level commercialization plan has been proposed to enable this technology to be transitioned to full volume production. The main body of this report will present the design processes employed and the main findings and conclusions.

  7. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Huei. 2005. Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications.Wan, Yih-Huei. 2004. Wind Power Plant Behaviors: Analysesof Long-Term Wind Power Data. National Renewable Energy Lab

  8. History of, and recent progress in, wind-energy utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soerensen, B. [Roskilde Univ. (Denmark)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review presents the current status of wind turbine technology and recent advances in understanding the long history of wind energy. Reasons for the convergence of technologies solutions towards a horizontal axis concept with two or three blades are discussed, and the advances in materials science are identified as determinants of the change toward increasing optimum turbine size. The modest environmental impacts of wind turbines are illustrated by recent life-cycle analyses, and the economic incentive structure and power buy-back rates in different countries are invoked to explain the variation in wind technology penetration in countries with similar resource potentials. Finally, the possible future role of wind technology is discussed, based on resource estimates, competing land demands, government commitments and technological trends, including the recent offshore wind farm developments. 83 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Making the Economic Case for Small-Scale Distributed Wind -- A Screening for Distributed Generation Wind Opportunities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Brown, E.; Dominick, J.; Jurotich, T.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was an offshoot of a previous assessment, which examined the potential for large-scale, greater than 50 MW, wind development on occupied federal agency lands. The study did not find significant commercial wind development opportunities, primarily because of poor wind resource on available and appropriately sized land areas or land use or aesthetic concerns. The few sites that could accommodate a large wind farm failed to have transmission lines in optimum locations required to generate power at competitive wholesale prices. The study did identify a promising but less common distributed generation (DG) development option. This follow-up study documents the NREL/Global Energy Concepts team efforts to identify economic DG wind projects at a select group of occupied federal sites. It employs a screening strategy based on project economics that go beyond quantity of windy land to include state and utility incentives as well as the value of avoided power purchases. It attempts to account for the extra costs and difficulties associated with small projects through the use of project scenarios that are more compatible with federal facilities and existing land uses. These benefits and barriers of DG are discussed, and the screening methodology and results are included. The report concludes with generalizations about the screening method and recommendations for improvement and other potential applications for this methodology.

  10. Research and Development Needs for Wind Systems Utilizing Controllable...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    areas: Grid Integration Manufacturing Research and Development Wind Turbine Power Electronics Advanced Grid Modeling and Simulation. This RFI is not intended to inform a...

  11. MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage define an extremely low power output gradient and demonstrate how decentralized energy storage conservative bids on the power market. Energy storage strikes the major problems of wind power and joining

  12. Estimation of turbulence level and scale for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, D.C.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified method is presented for estimating onsite turbulence variance within the wind turbine layer for horizontal wind speed. The method is based principally on estimating the probability distribution of wind speed and assigning a variance to each mean wind speed based on surface roughness estimates. The model is not proposed as an alternative to onsite measurement and analysis, but rather as an adjunct to such a program. A revision of the Kaimal neutral u-component spectrum is suggested to apply to the mix of the stabilities occurring during operational winds. Values of integral length scale calculated from data analysis are shown to contradict the length scale model implicit in turbulence power spectra. Also, these calculated values are shown to be extremely sensitive to the length of the time series and the detrending method used. The analysis and modeling are extended to the rotational frame of reference for a horizontal-axis wind turbine by modeling the ratios of harmonic spike variances (1P, 2P, etc.) in the rotational spectrum to the Eulerian turbulence variance. 15 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Wind system value analysis for electric utilities: a comparison of four methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, J.; Percival, D.; Flaim, T.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been several studies of how much Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) are worth to electric utilities. When attempting to compare the different results of these studies, questions arose concerning the effect of the different methodologies and models on the determined WECS values. This paper will report on the only known effort that used more than a single methodology for the value analysis of WECS to a specific utility. This paper will present and compare the WECS utility value analysis methodologies of Aerospace Corp., JBF Scientific Corp., and the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). Results of the application of these three methodologies were found for two large utilities. Breakeven values (the amount a utility can pay for a wind turbine over its lifetime and still breakeven economically) were found to be from $1600 to $2400 per kW of wind capacity in 1980 dollars. The reasons for variation in the results are discussed.

  14. Utility Scale PV Perspective on SunShot Progress and Opportunities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Utility Scale PV Perspective on SunShot Progress and Opportunities Utility Scale PV Perspective on SunShot Progress and Opportunities These slides correspond to a presentation...

  15. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis was done to determine if small-scale wind energy could be economically feasible on a cotton farm with 1,200 irrigated acres, a house, and a barn. Lubbock and Midland were locations chosen for this model farm and the twenty-year analysis. A...

  16. COLLISIONLESS DAMPING AT ELECTRON SCALES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Dorland, W., E-mail: jason-tenbarge@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MA 20742-3511 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissipation of turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma is governed by unknown kinetic mechanisms. Two candidates have been suggested to play an important role in the dissipation, collisionless damping via wave-particle interactions and dissipation in small-scale current sheets. High resolution spacecraft measurements of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum provide important constraints on the dissipation mechanism. The limitations of popular fluid and hybrid numerical schemes for simulation of the dissipation of solar wind turbulence are discussed, and instead a three-dimensional kinetic approach is recommended. We present a three-dimensional nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of solar wind turbulence at electron scales that quantitatively reproduces the exponential form of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum measured in the solar wind. A weakened cascade model that accounts for nonlocal interactions and collisionless Landau damping also quantitatively agrees with the observed exponential form. These results establish that a turbulent cascade of kinetic Alfven waves that is terminated by collisionless Landau damping is sufficient to explain the observed magnetic energy spectrum in the dissipation range of solar wind turbulence.

  17. A Tree Swaying in a Turbulent Wind: A Scaling Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theo Odijk

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A tentative scaling theory is presented of a tree swaying in a turbulent wind. It is argued that the turbulence of the air within the crown is in the inertial regime. An eddy causes a dynamic bending response of the branches according to a time criterion. The resulting expression for the penetration depth of the wind yields an exponent which appears to be consistent with that pertaining to the morphology of the tree branches. An energy criterion shows that the dynamics of the branches is basically passive. The possibility of hydrodynamic screening by the leaves is discussed.

  18. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1994, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions for the year, and outlines future work. The PVUSA project has five objectives. These are designed to narrow the gap between a large utility industry that is unfamiliar with PV and a small PV industry that is aware of a potentially large utility market but unfamiliar with how to meet its requirements. The objectives are: Evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of promising PV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components side by side at a single location; Assess PV system operation and maintenance in a utility setting; Compare US utilities hands-on experience in designing, procuring, and operating PV systems; and, Document and disseminate knowledge gained from the project.

  19. Utility Scale Solar PV Cost Steven SimmonsSteven Simmons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Generating Station. 4 #12;6/19/2013 3 EVEN MORE SUNNY HEADLINES New solar panels glisten6/19/2013 1 Utility Scale Solar PV Cost Steven SimmonsSteven Simmons Northwest Power Cost Forecast 5. Levelized Costs 1 SOLAR POWER SYSTEM HAS BRIGHT FUTURE 1. Modest environmental impacts

  20. FAST Code Verification of Scaling Laws for DeepCwind Floating Wind System Tests: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Goupee, A. J.; Kimball, R. W.; Swift, A. H. P.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates scaling laws that were adopted for the DeepCwind project for testing three different floating wind systems at 1/50 scale in a wave tank under combined wind and wave loading.

  1. POST-CONSTRUCTION WILDLIFE MONITORING AT THE ATLANTIC CITY UTILITIES AUTHORITY-JERSEY ATLANTIC WIND POWER FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    WIND POWER FACILITY PROJECT STATUS REPORT IV Submitted to: New Jersey Board of Public Utilities New Authority (ACUA) wind power facility. The period covered by this report is 1 January to 31 August 2009

  2. Fourth International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power and Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Farms,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Offshore Wind Farms, 20-21 October 2003, Billund, Denmark C. S. Nielsen, Hans F. Ravn, Camilla Schaumburg1 Fourth International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power and Transmission Networks of Denmark, B. 321, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark, csm@imm.dtu.dk Two wind power prognosis criteria and regulating

  3. A Review of "Small-Scale Wind Turbines Policy Perspectives and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    ERG/200607 A Review of "Small-Scale Wind Turbines ­ Policy Perspectives and Recommendations of Engineering Mathematics at Dalhousie University. #12;Hughes-Long: A Review of Small-Scale Wind Turbines proposed changes to their municipal Bylaws to allow the installation of "small-scale" wind turbines (i

  4. Wind Energy for Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: EnergyWind

  5. The Nature of Subproton Scale Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Xia, Q; Perez, J C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of subproton scale fluctuations in the solar wind is an open question, partly because two similar types of electromagnetic turbulence can occur: kinetic Alfven turbulence and whistler turbulence. These two possibilities, however, have one key qualitative difference: whistler turbulence, unlike kinetic Alfven turbulence, has negligible power in density fluctuations. In this Letter, we present new observational data, as well as analytical and numerical results, to investigate this difference. The results show, for the first time, that the fluctuations well below the proton scale are predominantly kinetic Alfven turbulence, and, if present at all, the whistler fluctuations make up only a small fraction of the total energy.

  6. WARP: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States)] [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)] [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kilowatts each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) Windframe, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user-friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/kWh, depending on the wind resource.

  7. Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtilityInformation Waiver of PreferentialWall Lake

  8. Effects of large-scale distribution of wind energy in and around Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of large-scale distribution of wind energy in and around Europe Gregor Giebel Niels Gylling energy in Europe? · Distribution of wind energy all over Europe leads to smoothing of the wind power energy can easily supply up to ~20% of the European demand. At this stage, · Less than 13% of the wind

  9. A Minnesota Blizzard Provides Insight into Utility-Scale Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the researchers were ready. They had positioned a large searchlight with reflecting optics designed to create a light sheet reflecting off snow particles in an area that was 36...

  10. Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    Optimal Selection of AC Cables for Large Scale Offshore Wind Farms Peng Hou, Weihao Hu, Zhe Chen@et.aau.dk, whu@iet.aau.dk, zch@iet.aau.dk Abstract--The investment of large scale offshore wind farms is high the operational requirements of the offshore wind farms and the connected power systems. In this paper, a new cost

  11. Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection September 8 Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's (NJDEP) "Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Management rules to address the development and permitting of wind turbines in the coastal zone

  12. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bel; C. P. Connaughton; M. Toots; M. M. Bandi

    2015-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  13. Cross-Scale Effects in Solar-Wind Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentini, F.; Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universita della Calabria, 87036 Rende (Serbia and Montenegro) (Italy); Califano, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Universita di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Mangeney, A. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding of the small-scale termination of the turbulent energy cascade in collisionless plasmas is nowadays one of the outstanding problems in space physics. In the absence of collisional viscosity, the dynamics at small scales is presumably kinetic in nature; the identification of the physical mechanism which replaces energy dissipation and establishes the link between macroscopic and microscopic scales would open a new scenario in the study of turbulent heating in space plasmas. We present a numerical analysis of kinetic effects along the turbulent energy cascade in solar-wind plasmas which provides an effective unified interpretation of a wide set of spacecraft observations and shows that, simultaneously with an increase in the ion perpendicular temperature, strong bursts of electrostatic activity in the form of ion-acoustic turbulence are produced together with accelerated beams in the ion distribution function.

  14. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bel, G; Toots, M; Bandi, M M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  15. Research and Development Needs for Wind Systems Utilizing Controllable Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuickEnergyfor aDepartmentSimulators and Full Scale

  16. Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

  17. The Association of Large-Scale Climate Variability and Teleconnections on Wind Energy Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Association of Large-Scale Climate Variability and Teleconnections on Wind Energy Resource over on Wind Energy Resource over Europe and its Intermittency Pascal Kriesche* and Adam Schlosser* Abstract

  18. Potential Climatic Impacts and Reliability of Very Large-Scale Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien

    Meeting future world energy needs while addressing climate change requires large-scale deployment of low or zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emission technologies such as wind energy. The widespread availability of wind power has ...

  19. Scale Models and Wind Turbines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department ofDepartment| DepartmentScale Models and Wind

  20. Utility-Scale Solar through the Years | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|Idahothe NewUtility-Scale Solar through the Years

  1. Property:PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration JumpPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVArea Jump to: navigation, search

  2. Property:PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration JumpPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVArea Jump to: navigation,

  3. Property:PotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration JumpPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVArea Jump to:

  4. Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration JumpPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVArea Jump

  5. Property:PotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration JumpPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVArea

  6. Large-scale structure of the fast solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Breen, A. R.; Habbal, S. Rifai; Jones, R. A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurements of Solar Wind velocity, in press, Journal of1992), The Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment, AstronomyA. Hewish (1967), The solar wind outside the plane of the

  7. Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of energy....

  8. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    29   Appendix A. PJM Windat Multiple Time Scales Appendix A. PJM Wind Data The windpower data for the PJM control area cover the period January

  9. Fully coupled dynamic analysis of a floating wind turbine system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withee, Jon E

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wind power is in a period of rapid growth worldwide and wind energy systems have emerged as a promising technology for utilizing offshore wind resources for the large scale generation of electricity. Drawing ...

  10. Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

  11. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants Part 2: Capac- ityas the capacity factor of the wind power plant during the 10Wind Plant Integration: Costs, Status, and Issues," IEEE Power &

  12. Large-scale hierarchical optimization for online advertising and wind farm planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eskenazi, Maxine

    Large-scale hierarchical optimization for online advertising and wind farm planning Konstantin (particularly, spon- sored search) and wind farm turbine-layout planning. Whereas very different in specifics annealing and integer linear programming as our principled approach. Wind farm layout optimization

  13. Ris-R-1392(EN) Full scale testing of wind turbine blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1392(EN) Full scale testing of wind turbine blade to failure - flapwise loading Erik R F. Sørensen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde June 2004 #12;Abstract A 25m wind turbine blade test of a 25m Vestas wind turbine blade. The major results of the entire project can be found

  14. Impacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    development of wind energy tech- nology and the current world-wide status of grid-connected as well as standImpacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems M. J systems and their dynamic behaviours to identify critical issues that limit the large-scale integration

  15. Large-scale structure of the fast solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisi, M. M.; Fallows, R. A.; Breen, A. R.; Habbal, S. Rifai; Jones, R. A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scintillation measurements of Solar Wind velocity, in press,K. Sakurai (1992), The Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment,Telescope for the SOHO Mission, Solar Physics, 162, 291–312.

  16. Coordinating Permit Offices and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinating Permit Offices and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal Energy 2013 Geothermal-Scale Geothermal Overview 1. Background and other Analysis 2. Specific Coordinating Permit Office Examples 3 and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal Background 2011 Islandbanki Report · Report stated on average

  17. Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  18. Multilevel Converter Topologies for Utility Scale Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essakiappan, Somasundaram

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy technologies have been growing in their installed capacity rapidly over the past few years. This growth in solar, wind and other technologies is fueled by state incentives, renewable energy mandates, ...

  19. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

  20. The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects The Falling Price of Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Projects Data courtesy of National Renewable Energy Lab. Chart by Daniel Wood. View...

  1. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating the Value of Utility- Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard J. Jorgenson, P. Denholm, and M. Mehos Technical Report NREL...

  2. 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

  3. Workshop title: Transmission and Utility Scale Solar Opportunities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose: A stakeholder communication with transmission customers, Tribes, developers, state and federal agencies, and utilities about Western Area Power Administration's (Western)...

  4. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    10 kW wind turbine on a 30m tower was installed and five different scenarios were calculated for both locations. Wind speeds for both locations were collected and analyzed to find the closest fitting distribution to incorporate the appropriate risk...

  5. CHANGES OF SYSTEM OPERATION COSTS DUE TO LARGE-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of EnergyIER Changes of System Operation CostsCHANGES OF SYSTEM OPERATION COSTS DUE TO LARGE-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION Derk Jan SWIDER1 , Rüdiger-Essen, Germany 3 Risoe International Laboratory, Denmark Business and Policy Track: Integrating wind

  6. Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

  7. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  8. Multilevel Converter Topologies for Utility Scale Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essakiappan, Somasundaram

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    sources like photovoltaics (PV) to the utility grid, some of which are multilevel topologies. Multilevel topologies allow for use of lower voltage semiconductor devices than two-level converters. They also produce lower distortion output voltage waveforms...

  9. Abstract--As a common tendency, large-scale wind farms are increasingly connected to the transmission system of modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    1 Abstract--As a common tendency, large-scale wind farms are increasingly connected on the integration of wind farms. One common requirement to wind farms is the function of system voltage control. This ancillary voltage control provided by wind farms could have some influence on the system small signal

  10. Fluidic: Grid-Scale Batteries for Wind and Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks to an ARPA-E award, Fluidic recognized the potential to transform how our nation stores and utilizes energy throughout the electric grid.

  11. Large Scale Wind and Solar Integration in Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Bernhard; Schreirer, Uwe; Berster, Frank; Pease, John; Scholz, Cristian; Erbring, Hans-Peter; Schlunke, Stephan; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides key information concerning the German experience with integrating of 25 gigawatts of wind and 7 gigawatts of solar power capacity and mitigating its impacts on the electric power system. The report has been prepared based on information provided by the Amprion GmbH and 50Hertz Transmission GmbH managers and engineers to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory representatives during their visit to Germany in October 2009. The trip and this report have been sponsored by the BPA Technology Innovation office. Learning from the German experience could help the Bonneville Power Administration engineers to compare and evaluate potential new solutions for managing higher penetrations of wind energy resources in their control area. A broader dissemination of this experience will benefit wind and solar resource integration efforts in the United States.

  12. Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation by Andrew D. Mills: ___________________________________________ Jane Stahlhut Date #12;Wind Energy in Indian Country A.D. Mills Abstract - ii - Abstract Utility-scale wind projects are increasingly being developed in rural areas of the United States. In the West

  13. The Association of Large-Scale Climate Variability and Teleconnections on Wind Energy Resource over Europe and its Intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriesche, Pascal

    In times of increasing importance of wind power in the world’s energy mix, this study focuses on a better understanding of the influences of large-scale climate variability on wind power resource over Europe. The impact ...

  14. UTILITY-SCALE SOLAR LOAD CONTROL Richard Perez, ASRC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    output data. 1 E.g., if the installed PV capacity is 10MW, the objective is for PV + SLC to meet 100% of the loads above a threshold equal to the utility peak minus 10 MW. 2 #12;UPEX-02 PV output data: PV output the report is PTC (AC output at 25 degrees ambient). Load data: Hourly SMUD system load data from 1996

  15. Prospects for large scale applications of wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generating wind turbine (1885) Historical development #12;20th century: first electricity generation USA development #12;After 1500: development of the horizontal axis mills La Cour, Askov (DK): First electricity: electricity generation DK: Gedser (1975) NL: De Traanroeier (1956) D: Hütter (1959) Historical development #12

  16. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

  17. Solar wind turbulence from MHD to sub-ion scales: high-resolution hybrid simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a high-resolution and large-scale hybrid (fluid electrons and particle-in-cell protons) two-dimensional numerical simulation of decaying turbulence. Two distinct spectral regions (separated by a smooth break at proton scales) develop with clear power-law scaling, each one occupying about a decade in wave numbers. The simulation results exhibit simultaneously several properties of the observed solar wind fluctuations: spectral indices of the magnetic, kinetic, and residual energy spectra in the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) inertial range along with a flattening of the electric field spectrum, an increase in magnetic compressibility, and a strong coupling of the cascade with the density and the parallel component of the magnetic fluctuations at sub-proton scales. Our findings support the interpretation that in the solar wind large-scale MHD fluctuations naturally evolve beyond proton scales into a turbulent regime that is governed by the generalized Ohm's law.

  18. Federal and State Structures to Support Financing Utility-Scale Solar Projects and the Business Models Designed to Utilize Them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-scale solar projects have grown rapidly in number and size over the last few years, driven in part by strong renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and federal incentives designed to stimulate investment in renewable energy technologies. This report provides an overview of such policies, as well as the project financial structures they enable, based on industry literature, publicly available data, and questionnaires conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  19. Buoyancy Effects on the Scaling Characteristics of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Fields in the Mesoscale Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliyanpilakkil, V P; Ruiz-Columbié, A; Araya, G; Castillo, L; Hirth, B; Burgett, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed long-term wind speed time-series from five field sites up to a height of 300 m from the ground. Structure function-based scaling analysis has revealed that the scaling exponents in the mesoscale regime systematically depend on height. This anomalous behavior is shown to be caused by the buoyancy effects. In the framework of the extended self-similarity, the relative scaling exponents portray quasi-universal behavior.

  20. Analysis of the Technical and Economic Potential for Mid-Scale Distributed Wind: December 2007 - October 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwartin, R.; Wolfrum, A.; Granfield, K.; Kagel, A.; Appleton, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the status, restrainers, drivers, and estimated development potential of mid-scale (10 kW - 5000 kW) distributed wind energy projects.

  1. Scaling Laws of Turbulence and Heating of Fast Solar Wind: The Role of Density Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte Bucci 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Liquid Crystal Laboratory, INFM/CNR, Ponte Bucci 33B, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Marino, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte Bucci 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Sorriso-Valvo, L. [Liquid Crystal Laboratory, INFM/CNR, Ponte Bucci 33B, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Noullez, A. [University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Bruno, R. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario-INAF, via Fosso del Cavaliere Roma (Italy)

    2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Incompressible and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in plasmas can be described by an exact relation for the energy flux through the scales. This Yaglom-like scaling law has been recently observed in the solar wind above the solar poles observed by the Ulysses spacecraft, where the turbulence is in an Alfvenic state. An analogous phenomenological scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, is observed more frequently in the same data set. Large-scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, thus play a crucial role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The turbulent cascade rate in the compressive case can, moreover, supply the energy dissipation needed to account for the local heating of the nonadiabatic solar wind.

  2. New Switches for Utility-Scale Inverters: First In-Class Demonstration of a Completely New Type of SiC Bipolar Switch (15kV-20kV) for Utility-Scale Inverters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ADEPT Project: The SiCLAB is developing a new power switch for utility-scale PV inverters that would improve the performance and significantly reduce the size, weight, and energy loss of PV systems. A power switch controls the electrical energy flowing through an inverter, which takes the electrical current from a PV solar panel and converts it into the type and amount of electricity that is compatible with the electric grid. SiCLAB is using silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductors in its new power switches, which are more efficient than the silicon semiconductors used to conduct electricity in most conventional power switches today. Switches with SiC semiconductors can operate at much higher temperatures, as well as higher voltage and power levels than silicon switches. SiC-based power switches are also smaller than those made with silicon alone, so they result in much smaller and lighter electrical devices. In addition to their use in utility-scale PV inverters, SiCLAB’s new power switches can also be used in wind turbines, railways, and other smart grid applications.

  3. Altered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance in Quercus stands on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Justin

    . Logistic regression revealed an increasing probability of mortality during wind disturbance with increasingAltered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance Structure Succession Wind a b s t r a c t Natural disturbances play important roles in shaping the structure

  4. Large scale risk-assessment of wind-farms on population viability of a globally endangered long-lived raptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrete, Martina

    through increments in mortality rates. For this purpose, we evaluate potential conse- quences of wind-term impacts of wind-farms rather than focusing on short-term mortality, as is often promoted by powerLarge scale risk-assessment of wind-farms on population viability of a globally endangered long

  5. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie; Eto, J.H.

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we develop and apply new methods of data analysis for high resolution wind power and system load time series, to improve our understanding of how to characterize highly variable wind power output and the correlations between wind power and load. These methods are applied to wind and load data from the ERCOT region, and wind power output from the PJM and NYISO areas. We use a wavelet transform to apply mathematically well-defined operations of smoothing and differencing to the time series data. This approach produces a set of time series of the changes in wind power and load (or ?deltas?), over a range of times scales from a few seconds to approximately one hour. A number of statistical measures of these time series are calculated. We present sample distributions, and devise a method for fitting the empirical distribution shape in the tails. We also evaluate the degree of serial correlation, and linear correlation between wind and load. Our examination of the data shows clearly that the deltas do not follow a Gaussian shape; the distribution is exponential near the center and appears to follow a power law for larger fluctuations. Gaussian distributions are frequently used in modeling studies. These are likely to over-estimate the probability of small to moderate deviations. This in turn may lead to an over-estimation of the additional reserve requirement (hence the cost) for high penetration of wind. The Gaussian assumption provides no meaningful information about the real likelihood of large fluctuations. The possibility of a power law distribution is interesting because it suggests that the distribution shape for of wind power fluctuations may become independent of system size for large enough systems.

  6. Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    on dispatchable generating capacity, such as coal and natural gas power plants, which can be cycled in responseProduction cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration David Luke Oates

  7. Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

  8. Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  9. WINDExchange: Residential-Scale 30-Meter Wind Maps

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAboutDeploymentAboutResidential-Scale

  10. Evidence of Early Enrichment of the Galactic Disk by Large-Scale Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, T; Freeman, K C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale homogeneous surveys of Galactic stars may indicate that the elemental abundance gradient evolves with cosmic time, a phenomenon that was not foreseen in existing models of Galactic chemical evolution (GCE). If the phenomenon is confirmed in future studies, we show that this effect, at least in part, is due to large-scale winds that once enriched the disk. These set up the steep abundance gradient in the inner disk (R <14 kpc). At the close of the wind phase, chemical enrichment through accretion of metal-poor material from the halo onto the disk gradually reduced the metallicity of the inner region, whereas a slow increase in the metallicity proceeded beyond the solar circle. Our "wind+infall" model accounts for flattening of the abundance gradient in the inner disk, in good agreement with observations. Accordingly, we propose that enrichment by large-scale winds is a crucial factor for chemical evolution in the disk. We anticipate that rapid flattening of the abundance gradient is the hallmark...

  11. Proceedings of the fourth biennial conference and workshop on wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kottler, R.J. Jr. (ed.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts are included for papers presented concerning research and development requirements and utility interface and institutional issues for small-scale systems; design requirements and research and development requirements for large-scale systems; economic and operational requirements of large-scale wind systems; wind characteristics and wind energy siting; international activities; wind energy applications in agriculture; federal commercialization and decentralization plans; and wind energy innovative systems.

  12. A Scaled, Performance Driven Evaluation of the Layered Sensing Framework Utilizing Polarimetric Infrared Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krim, Hamid

    sensing, distributed sensing, polarimetric, infrared, tracking, feature-aided, fusion, multi- sensor 1A Scaled, Performance Driven Evaluation of the Layered Sensing Framework Utilizing Polarimetric Infrared Imagery Hamilton Scott Clousea and Hamid Krima and Olga Mendoza-Schrockb aNorth Carolina State

  13. Analysis of the value of battery storage with wind and photovoltaic generation to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of an analysis to determine the economic and operational value of battery storage to wind and photovoltaic (PV) generation technologies to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) system. The analysis approach consisted of performing a benefit-cost economic assessment using established SMUD financial parameters, system expansion plans, and current system operating procedures. This report presents the results of the analysis. Section 2 describes expected wind and PV plant performance. Section 3 describes expected benefits to SMUD associated with employing battery storage. Section 4 presents preliminary benefit-cost results for battery storage added at the Solano wind plant and the Hedge PV plant. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations resulting from this analysis. The results of this analysis should be reviewed subject to the following caveat. The assumptions and data used in developing these results were based on reports available from and interaction with appropriate SMUD operating, planning, and design personnel in 1994 and early 1995 and are compatible with financial assumptions and system expansion plans as of that time. Assumptions and SMUD expansion plans have changed since then. In particular, SMUD did not install the additional 45 MW of wind that was planned for 1996. Current SMUD expansion plans and assumptions should be obtained from appropriate SMUD personnel.

  14. ARRA-Multi-Level Energy Storage and Controls for Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Wenzhong Gao

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Objective is to design innovative energy storage architecture and associated controls for high wind penetration to increase reliability and market acceptance of wind power. The project goals are to facilitate wind energy integration at different levels by design and control of suitable energy storage systems. The three levels of wind power system are: Balancing Control Center level, Wind Power Plant level, and Wind Power Generator level. Our scopes are to smooth the wind power fluctuation and also ensure adequate battery life. In the new hybrid energy storage system (HESS) design for wind power generation application, the boundary levels of the state of charge of the battery and that of the supercapacitor are used in the control strategy. In the controller, some logic gates are also used to control the operating time durations of the battery. The sizing method is based on the average fluctuation of wind profiles of a specific wind station. The calculated battery size is dependent on the size of the supercapacitor, state of charge of the supercapacitor and battery wear. To accommodate the wind power fluctuation, a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) consisting of battery energy system (BESS) and super-capacitor is adopted in this project. A probability-based power capacity specification approach for the BESS and super-capacitors is proposed. Through this method the capacities of BESS and super-capacitor are properly designed to combine the characteristics of high energy density of BESS and the characteristics of high power density of super-capacitor. It turns out that the super-capacitor within HESS deals with the high power fluctuations, which contributes to the extension of BESS lifetime, and the super-capacitor can handle the peaks in wind power fluctuations without the severe penalty of round trip losses associated with a BESS. The proposed approach has been verified based on the real wind data from an existing wind power plant in Iowa. An intelligent controller that increases battery life within hybrid energy storage systems for wind application was developed. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and simulation results are analyzed. A permanent magnet synchronous generator, coupled with a variable speed wind turbine, is connected to a power grid (14-bus system). A rectifier, a DC-DC converter and an inverter are used to provide a complete model of the wind system. An Energy Storage System (ESS) is connected to a DC-link through a DC-DC converter. An intelligent controller is applied to the DC-DC converter to help the Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) to regulate output power and also to control the operation of the battery and supercapacitor. This ensures a longer life time for the batteries. The detailed model is simulated in PSCAD/EMTP. Additionally, economic analysis has been done for different methods that can reduce the wind power output fluctuation. These methods are, wind power curtailment, dumping loads, battery energy storage system and hybrid energy storage system. From the results, application of single advanced HESS can save more money for wind turbines owners. Generally the income would be the same for most of methods because the wind does not change and maximum power point tracking can be applied to most systems. On the other hand, the cost is the key point. For short term and small wind turbine, the BESS is the cheapest and applicable method while for large scale wind turbines and wind farms the application of advanced HESS would be the best method to reduce the power fluctuation. The key outcomes of this project include a new intelligent controller that can reduce energy exchanged between the battery and DC-link, reduce charging/discharging cycles, reduce depth of discharge and increase time interval between charge/discharge, and lower battery temperature. This improves the overall lifetime of battery energy storages. Additionally, a new design method based on probability help optimize the power capacity specification for BESS and super-capacitors. Recommendations include experimental imp

  15. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  16. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillarythe integration of wind generation. Analysis of Wind Powerwind is far more similar to load than to conventional generation

  17. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wan, Yih-Huei. 2004. Wind Power Plant Behaviors: Analyses ofthe output of wind power plants. In a typical studyfluctuations across wind power plants located in the same

  18. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of power from wind turbines. Journal of PowerAWEA 2010. American Wind Energy Association ProjectsErik and Jason Kemper. 2009. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior.

  19. Utility-Scale Solar 2013: An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost, Performance, and Pricing Trends in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Other than the SEGS I-IX parabolic trough projects built in the 1980s, virtually no large-scale or "utility-scale" solar projects existed in the United States prior to 2007. By 2012 – just five years later – utility-scale had become the largest sector of the overall PV market in the United States, a distinction that was repeated in 2013 and is expected to continue for at least the next few years.

  20. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  1. Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhyankar, Nikit; Phadke, Amol

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale EE programs would modestly increase tariffs but reduce consumers' electricity bills significantly. However, the primary benefit of EE programs is a significant reduction in power shortages, which might make these programs politically acceptable even if tariffs increase. To increase political support, utilities could pursue programs that would result in minimal tariff increases. This can be achieved in four ways: (a) focus only on low-cost programs (such as replacing electric water heaters with gas water heaters); (b) sell power conserved through the EE program to the market at a price higher than the cost of peak power purchase; (c) focus on programs where a partial utility subsidy of incremental capital cost might work and (d) increase the number of participant consumers by offering a basket of EE programs to fit all consumer subcategories and tariff tiers. Large scale EE programs can result in consistently negative cash flows and significantly erode the utility's overall profitability. In case the utility is facing shortages, the cash flow is very sensitive to the marginal tariff of the unmet demand. This will have an important bearing on the choice of EE programs in Indian states where low-paying rural and agricultural consumers form the majority of the unmet demand. These findings clearly call for a flexible, sustainable solution to the cash-flow management issue. One option is to include a mechanism like FAC in the utility incentive mechanism. Another sustainable solution might be to have the net program cost and revenue loss built into utility's revenue requirement and thus into consumer tariffs up front. However, the latter approach requires institutionalization of EE as a resource. The utility incentive mechanisms would be able to address the utility disincentive of forgone long-run return but have a minor impact on consumer benefits. Fundamentally, providing incentives for EE programs to make them comparable to supply-side investments is a way of moving the electricity sector toward a model focused on providing energy services rather than providing electricity.

  2. DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentIOffshore Wind EconomicStudentService

  3. Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,NewEnergy Information Small Wind

  4. Impact of Increasing Distributed Wind Power and Wind Turbine Siting on Rural Distribution Feeder Voltage Profiles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many favorable wind energy resources in North America are located in remote locations without direct access to the transmission grid. Building transmission lines to connect remotely-located wind power plants to large load centers has become a barrier to increasing wind power penetration in North America. By connecting utility-sized megawatt-scale wind turbines to the distribution system, wind power supplied to consumers could be increased greatly. However, the impact of including megawatt-scale wind turbines on distribution feeders needs to be studied. The work presented here examined the impact that siting and power output of megawatt-scale wind turbines have on distribution feeder voltage. This is the start of work to present a general guide to megawatt-scale wind turbine impact on the distribution feeder and finding the amount of wind power that can be added without adversely impacting the distribution feeder operation, reliability, and power quality.

  5. Microsoft Word - 2014 Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Overview and Preliminary Results.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC: 215362227/15/13 1 of Scaled Wind Farm

  6. Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Yannick Degeilh, Justine Descloux, George Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Resources Yannick Degeilh, Justine-scale storage [3],[4] to facilitate the improved harnessing of the wind resources by storing wind energy Descloux, George Gross University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA Abstract ­ Utility-scale storage

  7. Utility-Scale Power Router: Dynamic Control of Grid Assets Using Direct AC Converter Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: Georgia Tech is developing a cost-effective, utility-scale power router that uses an enhanced transformer to more efficiently direct power on the grid. Existing power routing technologies are too expensive for widespread use, but the ability to route grid power to match real-time demand and power outages would significantly reduce energy costs for utilities, municipalities, and consumers. Georgia Tech is adding a power converter to an existing grid transformer to better control power flows at about 1/10th the cost of existing power routing solutions. Transformers convert the high-voltage electricity that is transmitted through the grid into the low-voltage electricity that is used by homes and businesses. The added converter uses fewer steps to convert some types of power and eliminates unnecessary power storage, among other improvements. The enhanced transformer is more efficient, and it would still work even if the converter fails, ensuring grid reliability.

  8. Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation for the European Wind Energy Conference held February 27--March 2, 2006, in Athens, Greece, showing grid impacts of wind power variability.

  9. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  10. Small Solar Wind Transients and Their Connection to the Large-Scale Coronal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I.G. : 2006, In situ solar wind and magnetic ?eld signaturesPenou, E. : 2008, The IMPACT Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (Heliospheric images of the solar wind at Earth. Astrophys.

  11. Small Solar Wind Transients and Their Connection to the Large-Scale Coronal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I.G. : 2006, In situ solar wind and magnetic ?eld signaturesE. : 2008, The IMPACT Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA).Heliospheric images of the solar wind at Earth. Astrophys.

  12. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a set of integrated wind farms increases, the behavior ofto the spatial distribution of wind farms and the total MW.line dates for the various wind farms were not provided, so

  13. Techno-economic Modeling of the Integration of 20% Wind and Large-scale Energy Storage in ERCOT by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross Baldick; Michael Webber; Carey King; Jared Garrison; Stuart Cohen; Duehee Lee

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study�¢����s objective is to examine interrelated technical and economic avenues for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grid to incorporate up to and over 20% wind generation by 2030. Our specific interests are to look at the factors that will affect the implementation of both high level of wind power penetration (> 20% generation) and installation of large scale storage.

  14. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  15. DOE/SNL-TTU scaled wind farm technology facility : research opportunities for study of turbine-turbine interaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; White, Jonathan

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed DOE/Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility (SWiFT) hosted by Texas Tech University at Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, TX, will provide a facility for experimental study of turbine-turbine interaction and complex wind farm aerodynamics. This document surveys the current status of wind turbine wake and turbine-turbine interaction research, identifying knowledge and data gaps that the proposed test site can potentially fill. A number of turbine layouts is proposed, allowing for up to ten turbines at the site.

  16. ToHajiilee Economic Development, Inc.(TEDI) Feasibility Study for Utility-Scale Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burpo, Rob

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ToÃ?Â?Hajiilee Economic Development, Inc. (TEDI) is the economic development entity representing the ToHajiilee Chapter of the Navajo Nation, also known as the CaÃ?Â?oncito Band of Navajo (CBN). Using DOE funding, TEDI assembled a team of qualified advisors to conduct a feasibility study for a utility-scale 30 MW Photovoltaic (PV) solar power generation facility on TEDI trust lands. The goal for this project has been to gather information and practical business commitments to successfully complete the feasibility analysis. The TEDI approach was to successively make informed decisions to select an appropriate technology best suited to the site, determine environmental viability of the site, secure options for the sale of generated power, determine practicality of transmission and interconnection of power to the local grid, and secure preliminary commitments on project financing. The feasibility study has been completed and provides TEDI with a practical understanding of its business options in moving forward with developing a solar project on CBN tribal lands. Funding from DOE has allowed TEDI and its team of professional advisors to carefully select technology and business partners and build a business model to develop this utility-scale solar project. As a result of the positive feasibility findings, TEDI is moving forward with finalizing all pre-construction activities for its major renewable energy project.

  17. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. � Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. � Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. � Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind�s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

  18. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) energy on the electric power system, the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. The goal is to understand the effects of variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. In the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 1, solar penetration was limited to 5%. Utility-scale PV was not included because of limited capability to model sub-hourly, utility-scale PV output . New techniques allow the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 to include high penetrations of solar - not only CSP and rooftop PV but also utility-scale PV plants.

  19. A Minnesota Blizzard Provides Insight into Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Wakes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a16-17, 2015 |7 Energy of the UnitedAllisonof|

  20. WINDExchange: Utility-Scale Land-Based 80-Meter Wind Maps

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and ShareMaps

  1. A Minnesota Blizzard Provides Insight into Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Wakes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA FewA LIMITEDA| Department of

  2. Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-scale Wind Integration in Hawaii |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIANManagement1, 2010

  3. Scaling anisotropy of the power in parallel and perpendicular components of the solar wind magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oughton, Sean

    superthermal particles and cosmic rays appear to be diffusively coupled to the solar wind, allowing exchange

  4. How Much Energy Is Transferred from the Winds to the Thermocline on ENSO Time Scales?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the winds (via wind power) and changes in the storage of available potential energy in the tropical ocean~o is characterized by a decrease in wind power that leads to a decrease in available potential energy, and hence to an increase in the available potential energy and a steeper thermocline. The wind power alters the available

  5. Small-scale wind turbines in cities and suburbs S Tullis, K Aly, R Bravo, A Fiedler, S Kooiman, K McLaren S Ziada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Small-scale wind turbines in cities and suburbs S Tullis, K Aly, R Bravo, A Fiedler, S Kooiman, K wind turbines in the urban environment: Current Research at McMaster University Nominal performance #12;Horizontal axis small wind turbines Numerous suppliers of turbines for tower/field installation

  6. Turbulence descriptors for scaling fatigue loading spectra of wind turbine structural components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The challenge for the designer in developing a new wind turbine is to incorporate sufficient strength in its components to safely achieve a 20- or 30-year service life. To accomplish this, the designer must understand the load and stress distributions (in a statistical sense at least) that the turbine is likely to encounter during its operating life. Sources of loads found in the normal operating environment include start/stop cycles, emergency shutdowns, the turbulence environment associated with the specific site and turbine location, and extreme or ``rare`` events that can challenge the turbine short-term survivability. Extreme events can result from an operational problem (e.g., controller failure) or violent atmospheric phenomena (tornadic circulations, strong gust fronts). For the majority of the operating time, however, the character of the turbulent inflow is the dominant source of the alternating stress distributions experienced by the structural components. Methods of characterizing or scaling the severity of the loading spectra (or the rate of fatigue damage accumulation) must be applicable to a wide range of turbulent inflow environments -- from solitary isolation to the complex flows associated with multi-row wind farms. The metrics chosen must be related to the properties of the turbulent inflow and independent of the nature of local terrain features.

  7. A full-scale simulation of streaming electrification in a large core-form transformer winding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, M.A.; Nelson, J.K.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A network based approach for streaming electrification developed elsewhere and experimentally calibrated is extended to a full-scale transformer structure. This model offers several improvements on the basic macroscopic electrification methodology first proposed by Roach and Templeton. A complete range of flow conditions from laminar to fully turbulent are considered and the effects of power frequency electric fields are included. In addition, the influence of temperature is recognized and static potentials are calculated based on an appropriate leakage current matrix. A complete section of an eight-pass core-form transformer winding has been examined under a variety of conditions. The results show that the size of the structure is critical and demonstrate the impact of entering charge from the cooling system. Static potentials in excess of 10 kV are shown to be possible under proper conditions with the potential distribution being highly dependent upon energization, flow rate and temperature.

  8. Utility-scale grid-tied PV inverter reliability workshop summary report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granata, Jennifer E.; Quintana, Michael A.; Tasca, Coryne Adelle (SRA International, Inc., Fairfax, VA); Atcitty, Stanley

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key to the long-term success of the photovoltaic (PV) industry is confidence in the reliability of PV systems. Inverters are the most commonly noted cause of PV system incidents triggered in the field. While not all of these incidents are reliability-related or even necessarily failures, they still result in a loss of generated power. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program, Sandia National Laboratories organized a Utility-Scale Grid-Tied Inverter Reliability Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 27-28, 2011. The workshop addressed the reliability of large (100-kilowatt+) grid-tied inverters and the implications when such inverters fail, evaluated inverter codes and standards, and provided discussion about opportunities to enhance inverter reliability. This report summarizes discussions and presentations from the workshop and identifies opportunities for future efforts.

  9. Segmented Ultralight Pre-Aligned Rotor for Extreme-Scale Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loth, E.; Steele, A.; Ichter, B.; Selig, M.; Moriarty, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To alleviate the mass-scaling issues associated with conventional upwind rotors of extreme-scale turbines, a downwind rotor concept is proposed which employs fixed blade curvature based on force alignment at rated conditions. For a given peak stress constraint, the reduction in downwind cantilever loads allows reduced shell and spar thickness, and thus a reduced blade mass as compared with a conventional upwind rotor, especially as rotor sizes approach extreme-scales. To quantify this mass reduction, a Finite Element Analysis was conducted for a 10 MW rated rotor based on the NREL offshore 5 MW baseline wind turbine. The results show that this 'pre-alignment' yields a net downstream deflection of 32 deg, a downward hub-pitch angle of 6 deg, a 20% increase in blade length (to maintain the same radius as the conventional blade), and a net mass savings of about 50% through decreased shell and spar thicknesses. The pre-alignment may also allow a more straightforward and efficient segmentation of the blade since shear stresses near joints are substantially reduced. Segmenting, in turn, can dramatically reduce costs associated with fabrication, transport and assembly for extreme-scale off-shore systems. The pre-aligned geometric curvature can also help alleviate tower wake effects on the blades since blade tips (where shadow effects can be most problematic) are shifted downstream where the tower wake is weaker. In addition, the portion of the tower that is upstream of the blade tips can be faired with an externally-rotating aerodynamic shroud. Furthermore, the downwind rotor can allow a floating off-shore tri-pod platform to reduce tower weight and yaw-control requirements. A simple economic analysis of the segmented ultralight pre-aligned rotor (SUPAR) concept suggests that the overall system cost savings can be as much as 25%, indicating that more detailed (numerical and experimental) investigations are warranted.

  10. Dynamics of large-scale solar-wind streams obtained by the double superposed epoch analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yermolaev, Yu I; Nikolaeva, N S; Yermolaev, M Yu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the OMNI data for period 1976-2000 we investigate the temporal profiles of 20 plasma and field parameters in the disturbed large-scale types of solar wind (SW): CIR, ICME (both MC and Ejecta) and Sheath as well as the interplanetary shock (IS). To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: re-scaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide. As the analyzed SW types can interact with each other and change parameters as a result of such interaction, we investigate separately 8 sequences of SW types: (1) CIR, (2) IS/CIR, (3) Ejecta, (4) Sheath/Ejecta, (5) IS/Sheath/Ejecta, (6) MC, (7) Sheath/MC, and (8) IS/Sheath/MC. The main conclusion is that the behavior of parameters in Sheath and in CIR are very similar both qualitatively and quantitatively. Both the high-speed stream (HSS) and the fast ICME play a role of pistons which push the pl...

  11. Influence of large scale oscillations on upwelling-favorable coastal wind off central Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahn, David A.

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Along the central coast of Chile is typically equatorward, upwelling-favorable wind associated with the southeast Pacific anticyclone. A coastal low-level jet often develops, and its wind speed is mostly controlled by the meridional pressure...

  12. Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Ram, B.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a summary of a 236-page NREL report that provides a broad understanding of today's offshore wind industry, the offshore wind resource, and the associated technology challenges, economics, permitting procedures, and potential risks and benefits.

  13. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H; Hand, Maureen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global wind power market has been growing at a phenomenal pace, driven by favorable policies towards renewable energy and the improving economics of wind projects. On a going forward basis, utility-scale wind power offers the potential for significant reductions in the carbon footprint of the electricity sector. Specifically, the global wind resource is vast and, though accessing this potential is not costless or lacking in barriers, wind power can be developed at scale in the near to medium term at what promises to be an acceptable cost.

  14. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao Shuo [School of Geophysics and Information Technology, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H. [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Marsch, E., E-mail: yaoshuo@cugb.edu.cn [Christian Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B{sub 0}(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle {theta}{sub xB} between B{sub 0}(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of {theta}{sub xB}. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B{sub 0}(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T < T{sub Parallel-To} derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind.

  15. Summary of Conclusions and Recommendations Drawn from the DeepCWind Scaled Floating Offshore Wind System Test Campaign: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Masciola, M. D.; Molta, P.; Goupee, A. J.; Coulling, A. J.; Prowell, I.; Browning, J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DeepCwind consortium is a group of universities, national labs, and companies funded under a research initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to support the research and development of floating offshore wind power. The two main objectives of the project are to better understand the complex dynamic behavior of floating offshore wind systems and to create experimental data for use in validating the tools used in modeling these systems. In support of these objectives, the DeepCwind consortium conducted a model test campaign in 2011 of three generic floating wind systems, a tension-leg platform (TLP), a spar-buoy (spar), and a semisubmersible (semi). Each of the three platforms was designed to support a 1/50th-scale model of a 5 MW wind turbine and was tested under a variety of wind/wave conditions. The focus of this paper is to summarize the work done by consortium members in analyzing the data obtained from the test campaign and its use for validating the offshore wind modeling tool, FAST.

  16. Hypermodular Self-Assembling Space Solar Power -- Design Option for Mid-Term GEO Utility-Scale Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitgab, Martin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a design for scaleable space solar power systems based on free-flying reflectors and module self-assembly. Lower system cost of utility-scale space solar power is achieved by design independence of yet-to-be-built in-space assembly or transportation infrastructure. Using current and expected near-term technology, this study describe a design for mid-term utility-scale power plants in geosynchronous orbits. High-level economic considerations in the context of current and expected future launch costs are given as well.

  17. The Ecological Society of America wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg Wind energy has become an increasingly important

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmers, Chris

    ). Environmental benefits of wind energy accrue from the replacement of energy generated by other means (eg fossil. 2003). However, development of the wind energy industry has led to some unexpected environmental costs at utility-scale wind energy facilities, espe- cially along forested ridgetops in the eastern US (Arnett 2005

  18. NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost. Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable EnergyNREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms. Today's utility-scale wind turbine structures are more complex and their compo- nents more

  19. Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

  20. Selenium And Arsenic Speciation in Fly Ash From Full-Scale Coal-Burning Utility Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.E.; Senior, C.L.; Chu, P.; Ladwig, K.; Huffman, G.P.; /Kentucky U. /Reaction Engin. Int. /Elect. Power Res. Inst., Palo Alto

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy has been used to determine directly the oxidation states and speciation of selenium and arsenic in 10 fly ash samples collected from full-scale utility plants. Such information is needed to assess the health risk posed by these elements in fly ash and to understand their behavior during combustion and in fly ash disposal options, such as sequestration in tailings ponds. Selenium is found predominantly as Se(IV) in selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) species, whereas arsenic is found predominantly as As(V) in arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) species. Two distinct types of selenite and arsenate spectra were observed depending upon whether the fly ash was derived from eastern U.S. bituminous (Fe-rich) coals or from western subbituminous or lignite (Ca-rich) coals. Similar spectral details were observed for both arsenic and selenium in the two different types of fly ash, suggesting that the post-combustion behavior and capture of both of these elements are likely controlled by the same dominant element or phase in each type of fly ash.

  1. Coordinating Permit Offices and the Development of Utility-Scale Geothermal Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, A.; Young, K.; Witherbee, K.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permitting is a major component of the geothermal development process. Better coordination across government agencies could reduce uncertainty of the process and the actual time of permitting. This presentation highlights various forms of coordinating permit offices at the state and federal level in the western United States, discusses inefficiencies and mitigation techniques for permitting natural resource projects, analyzes whether various approaches are easily adaptable to utility-scale geothermal development, and addresses advantages and challenges for coordinating permit offices. Key successful strategies identified include: 1. Flexibility in implementing the approach (i.e. less statutory requirements for the approach); 2. Less dependence on a final environmental review for information sharing and permit coordination; 3. State and federal partnerships developed through memorandum of understanding to define roles and share data and/or developer information. A few of the most helpful techniques include: 1. A central point of contact for the developer to ask questions surrounding the project; 2. Pre-application meetings to assist the developer in identifying all of the permits, regulatory approvals, and associated information or data required; 3. A permit schedule or timeline to set expectations for the developer and agencies; 4. Consolidating the public notice, comment, and hearing period into fewer hearings held concurrently.

  2. Water use and supply concerns for utility-scale solar projects in the Southwestern United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klise, Geoffrey Taylor; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Reno, Marissa Devan; Moreland, Barbara D.; Zemlick, Katie M.; Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As large utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are currently being built and planned for locations in the U.S. with the greatest solar resource potential, an understanding of water use for construction and operations is needed as siting tends to target locations with low natural rainfall and where most existing freshwater is already appropriated. Using methods outlined by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine water used in designated solar energy zones (SEZs) for construction and operations & maintenance, an estimate of water used over the lifetime at the solar power plant is determined and applied to each watershed in six Southwestern states. Results indicate that that PV systems overall use little water, though construction usage is high compared to O&M water use over the lifetime of the facility. Also noted is a transition being made from wet cooled to dry cooled CSP facilities that will significantly reduce operational water use at these facilities. Using these water use factors, estimates of future water demand for current and planned solar development was made. In efforts to determine where water could be a limiting factor in solar energy development, water availability, cost, and projected future competing demands were mapped for the six Southwestern states. Ten watersheds, 9 in California, and one in New Mexico were identified as being of particular concern because of limited water availability.

  3. Logistics, Costs, and GHG Impacts of Utility Scale Cofiring with 20% Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, Richard D.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Nichol, Corrie; Searcy, Erin M.; Westover, Tyler; Wood, Richard; Bearden, Mark D.; Cabe, James E.; Drennan, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Male, Jonathan L.; Muntean, George G.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of utility-scale biomass cofiring in large pulverized coal power plants. The purpose of this evaluation is to assess the cost and greenhouse gas reduction benefits of substituting relatively high volumes of biomass in coal. Two scenarios for cofiring up to 20% biomass with coal (on a lower heating value basis) are presented; (1) woody biomass in central Alabama where Southern Pine is currently produced for the wood products and paper industries, and (2) purpose-grown switchgrass in the Ohio River Valley. These examples are representative of regions where renewable biomass growth rates are high in correspondence with major U.S. heartland power production. While these scenarios may provide a realistic reference for comparing the relative benefits of using a high volume of biomass for power production, this evaluation is not intended to be an analysis of policies concerning renewable portfolio standards or the optimal use of biomass for energy production in the U.S.

  4. Utility-Scale Future, Continuum Magazine: Clean Energy Innovation at NREL, Spring 2011, Issue 1 Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on creating a utility-scale future.

  5. Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Ram, B.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper assesses the potential for U.S. offshore wind to meet the energy needs of many coastal and Great Lakes states.

  6. Advancing the Deployment of Utility-Scale Photovoltaic Plants in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofaro R.; Villaran, M; Colli, A.

    2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the premier research laboratories operated by the Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing an energy research agenda that focuses on renewable energy systems and will help to secure the nation's energy security. A key element of the BNL research is the advancement of grid-connected utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) plants, particularly in the northeastern part of the country where BNL is located. While a great deal of information has been generated regarding solar PV systems located in mostly sunny, hot, arid climates of the southwest US, very little data is available to characterize the performance of these systems in the cool, humid, frequently overcast climates experienced in the northeastern portion of the country. Recognizing that there is both a need and a market for solar PV generation in the northeast, BNL is pursuing research that will advance the deployment of this important renewable energy resource. BNL's research will leverage access to unique time-resolved data sets from the 37MWp solar array recently developed on its campus. In addition, BNL is developing a separate 1MWp solar research array on its campus that will allow field testing of new PV system technologies, including solar modules and balance of plant equipment, such as inverters, energy storage devices, and control platforms. These research capabilities will form the cornerstone of the new Northeast Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) being developed at BNL. In this paper, an overview of BNL's energy research agenda is given, along with a description of the 37MWp solar array and the NSERC.

  7. Ancillary Frequency Control of Direct Drive Full-Scale Converter Based Wind Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    as the studied power system. Simulation results show that the proposed control strategies are effective means into the modern power systems. In Denmark, the wind energy supplies around 20% of the annual electricity demand system frequency control solutions, such as frequency control from wind power plants may be needed

  8. Observation of Turbulent Intermittency Scaling with Magnetic Helicity in an MHD Plasma Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    . An unstable spheromak injected into the MHD wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment displays-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) [16,17] explores this possible relationship between indices. The scan is conducted on the wind-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment

  9. Grid Simulator for Testing MW-Scale Wind Turbines at NREL (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; McDade, M.; Wallen, R.; Mendoza, I.; Shirazi, M.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As described, an initiative by NREL to design and construct a 9-MVA grid simulator to operate with the existing 2.5 MW and new upcoming 5-MW dynamometer facilities will fulfill this role and bring many potential benefits to the U.S. wind industry with the ultimate goal of reducing wind energy integration costs.

  10. Wind energy: Program overview, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Wind Energy Program assists utilities and industry in developing advanced wind turbine technology to be economically competitive as an energy source in the marketplace and in developing new markets and applications for wind systems. This program overview describes the commercial development of wind power, wind turbine development, utility programs, industry programs, wind resources, applied research in wind energy, and the program structure.

  11. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, John P. [ABB Inc; Liu, Shu [ABB Inc; Ibanez, Eduardo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Pennock, Ken [AWS Truepower; Reed, Greg [University of Pittsburgh; Hanes, Spencer [Duke Energy

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States. A total of 54GW of offshore wind was assumed to be the target for the analyses conducted. A variety of issues are considered including: the anticipated staging of offshore wind; the offshore wind resource availability; offshore wind energy power production profiles; offshore wind variability; present and potential technologies for collection and delivery of offshore wind energy to the onshore grid; potential impacts to existing utility systems most likely to receive large amounts of offshore wind; and regulatory influences on offshore wind development. The technologies considered the reliability of various high-voltage ac (HVAC) and high-voltage dc (HVDC) technology options and configurations. The utility system impacts of GW-scale integration of offshore wind are considered from an operational steady-state perspective and from a regional and national production cost perspective.

  12. Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

  13. Access Framework: Model Text (November 2011) An Act to Establish a Framework for Development of Offshore Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of Offshore Wind Power Whereas, the offshore waters of [State] are ecologically and economically vital public, Whereas, offshore wind power provides utility-scale renewable energy at competitive costs, helps to meet consequences; and Whereas, offshore wind power, being a domestic source of energy enhances U.S. energy

  14. Large-Scale Wind Integration Studies in the United States: Preliminary Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Freeman, L.; Zavadil, B.; Schuerger, M.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is managing two large regional wind integration studies on behalf of the United States Department of Energy. These two studies are believed to be the largest ever undertaken in the United States.

  15. Potential Climatic Impacts and Reliability of Large-Scale Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien

    The vast availability of wind power has fueled substantial interest in this renewable energy source as a potential near-zero greenhouse gas emission technology for meeting future world energy needs while addressing the ...

  16. Physical modeling of wind turbine generators in a small scale analog system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xuntuo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project represents the physical modeling and experimental test of a Doubly-fed Induction Machine (DFIM), in order to substantially analyze the characteristic behaviors of wind turbines and its use in the micro-grid ...

  17. The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagerty, John Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

  18. Kahuku Wind Power (First Wind) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The project employs the integration of Clipper LibertyTM wind turbine generators and a control system to more efficiently integrate wind power with the utility's power grid....

  19. 7th International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Farms Models for HLI analysis of power systems with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    for Offshore Wind Farms 1 Models for HLI analysis of power systems with offshore wind farms and distributed power plants, distributed generation and offshore wind farms. Particular attention is paid to the latter]-[4], but there is a lack of models of offshore wind farms, which introduce new issues for their representation, due to some

  20. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Large-Scale Mono-Column Offshore Wind Turbine with a Single Tether Hinged in Seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jieyan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased interest in the offshore wind resource in both industry and academic and the extension of the wind field where offshore wind turbine can be deployed has stimulated quite a number of offshore wind turbines concepts. This thesis presents...

  1. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Large-Scale Mono-Column Offshore Wind Turbine with a Single Tether Hinged in Seabed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jieyan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased interest in the offshore wind resource in both industry and academic and the extension of the wind field where offshore wind turbine can be deployed has stimulated quite a number of offshore wind turbines concepts. This thesis presents...

  2. Manzanita Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trisha Frank

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. Manzanita has explored the wind resource potential on tribal land and developed a business plan by means of this wind energy feasibility project, which enables Manzanita to make informed decisions when considering the benefits and risks of encouraging large-scale wind power development on their lands. Technical consultant to the project has been SeaWest Consulting, LLC, an established wind power consulting company. The technical scope of the project covered the full range of feasibility assessment activities from site selection through completion of a business plan for implementation. The primary objectives of this feasibility study were to: (1) document the quality and suitability of the Manzanita Reservation as a site for installation and long-term operation of a commercially viable utility-scale wind power project; and, (2) develop a comprehensive and financeable business plan.

  3. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA?s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI?s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 9 wind turbineswind energy continues to decline as a result of lower wind turbine

  4. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 8 wind turbinesTurbine Market Report. Washington, D.C. : American Wind Energy

  5. Determining equivalent damage loading for full-scale wind turbine blade fatigue tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freebury, G.; Musial, W.

    2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simplified method for converting wind turbine rotor design loads into equivalent-damage, constant-amplitude loads and load ratios for both flap and lead-lag directions. It is an iterative method that was developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using Palmgren-Miner's linear damage principles. The general method is unique because it does not presume that any information about the materials or blade structural properties is precisely known. According to this method, the loads are never converted to stresses. Instead, a family of M-N curves (moment vs. cycles) is defined with reasonable boundaries for load-amplitude and slope. An optimization program iterates and converges on the constant amplitude test load and load ratio that minimizes the sensitivity to the range of M-N curves for each blade section. The authors constrained the general method to match the NedWind 25 design condition for the Standards, Measurements, and Testing (SMT) blade testing pro gram. SMT participants agreed to use the fixed S-N slope of m = 10 from the original design to produce consistent test-loads among the laboratories. Unconstrained, the general method suggests that slightly higher test loads should be used for the NedWind 25 blade design spectrum. NedWind 25 blade test loads were computed for lead-lag and flap under single-axis and two-axis loading.

  6. Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

  7. Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, J.; Hurlbut, D.; Milligan, M.; Coles, L.; Green, B.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. Market barriers unrelated to technology often limit the expansion of utility-scale solar power, even in areas with exceptional resource potential. Many of these non-technical barriers have to do with policy, regulation, and planning, and hardly ever do they resolve themselves in a timely fashion. In most cases, pre-emptive intervention by interested stakeholders is the easiest way to remove/address such barriers, but it requires knowing how to navigate the institutional waters of the relevant agencies and boards. This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. It focuses on the Western Interconnection (WI), primarily because the quality of solar resources in the Southwest makes utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) economically feasible, and because the relevant institutions have evolved in a way that has opened up opportunities for removing non-technical market barriers. Developers will find in this report a high-level field manual to identify the venues for mitigating and possibly eliminating systemic market obstacles and ensuring that the economic playing field is reasonably level. Project-specific issues such as siting for transmission and generation resources are beyond the scope of this report. Instead, the aim is to examine issues that pervasively affect all utility-scale PV and CSP in the region regardless of where the project may be. While the focus is on the WI, many of the institutions described here also have their counterparts in the Eastern and the Texas interconnections. Specifically, this report suggests a number of critical engagement points relating to generation and transmission planning.

  8. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to natural gas. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report 1% windforward gas market. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report 4.Market Report Wind Penetration (Capacity Basis) Arizona Public Service Avista Utilities California RPS Idaho Power Xcel-PSCo-2008 at 2006 Gas

  9. Analysis of wind shear models and trends in different terrains M.L. Ray *, A.L. Rogers, and J.G. McGowan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    of characterizing the wind shear at a given site for a utility scale wind turbine cannot be overemphasized. It is important to understand because it directly impacts the power available at different wind turbine hub heights and strongly influences the cyclic loading on the turbine blades. For decades, academic

  10. Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

  11. Radial Dependence of the Frequency Break Between Fluid and Kinetic Scales in the Solar Wind Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between $0.42$ and $5.3$ AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind $\\kappa_b\\sim R^{-1.08}$ in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate into the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  12. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Energy Finance (WEF), a free online cost of energy calculator developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory that provides quick, detailed economic evaluation of potential utility-scale wind energy projects. The brochure lists the features of the tool, the inputs and outputs that a user can expect, visuals of the screens and a Cash Flow Results table, and contact information.

  13. ESIF Plugs Utility-Scale Hardware into Simulated Grids to Assess Integration Effects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), integrated, megawatt-scale power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) capability allows researchers and manufacturers to test new energy technologies at full power in real-time simulations - safely evaluating component and system performance and reliability before going to market.

  14. Numerical Prediction of Experimentally Observed Behavior of a Scale Model of an Offshore Wind Turbine Supported by a Tension-Leg Platform: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prowell, I.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Stewart, G. M.; Goupee, A. J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Realizing the critical importance the role physical experimental tests play in understanding the dynamics of floating offshore wind turbines, the DeepCwind consortium conducted a one-fiftieth-scale model test program where several floating wind platforms were subjected to a variety of wind and wave loading condition at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands wave basin. This paper describes the observed behavior of a tension-leg platform, one of three platforms tested, and the systematic effort to predict the measured response with the FAST simulation tool using a model primarily based on consensus geometric and mass properties of the test specimen.

  15. Economic analysis of large-scale hydrogen storage for renewable utility applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, Susan M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work reported here supports the efforts of the Market Transformation element of the DOE Fuel Cell Technology Program. The portfolio includes hydrogen technologies, as well as fuel cell technologies. The objective of this work is to model the use of bulk hydrogen storage, integrated with intermittent renewable energy production of hydrogen via electrolysis, used to generate grid-quality electricity. In addition the work determines cost-effective scale and design characteristics and explores potential attractive business models.

  16. Calibration and Validation of a FAST Floating Wind Turbine Model of the DeepCwind Scaled Tension-Leg Platform: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Goupee, A.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the intent of improving simulation tools, a 1/50th-scale floating wind turbine atop a TLP was designed based on Froude scaling by the University of Maine under the DeepCwind Consortium. This platform was extensively tested in a wave basin at MARIN to provide data to calibrate and validate a full-scale simulation model. The data gathered include measurements from static load tests and free-decay tests, as well as a suite of tests with wind and wave forcing. A full-scale FAST model of the turbine-TLP system was created for comparison to the results of the tests. Analysis was conducted to validate FAST for modeling the dynamics of this floating system through comparison of FAST simulation results to wave tank measurements. First, a full-scale FAST model of the as-tested scaled configuration of the system was constructed, and this model was then calibrated through comparison to the static load, free-decay, regular wave only, and wind-only tests. Next, the calibrated FAST model was compared to the combined wind and wave tests to validate the coupled hydrodynamic and aerodynamic predictive performance. Limitations of both FAST and the data gathered from the tests are discussed.

  17. Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

  18. Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

  19. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open EnergyIGPIntevac Jump to:WindStudy)Study)

  20. *Smith, J. A., 1999: Observations of wind, waves, and the mixed layer: the scaling of surface motion. In The Wind-Driven Air-Sea Interface, edited by M. L. Banner, pp. 231-238. Published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    velocity scale measured by Doppler sonar to wind friction velocity and the surface Stokes' drift, velocity profiles, and surface fields of radial velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity have been made effects of improved understanding and measurement techniques. The fluxes are linked to both wave dynamics

  1. Barstow Wind Turbine Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Barstow Wind Turbine project for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  2. Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

  3. EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to improve grid performance and thereby aid in the integration of wind generation into the local electricity supply.

  4. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  5. Reference Manual for the System Advisor Model's Wind Power Performance Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, J.; Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Ferguson, T.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM) wind power performance model. The model calculates the hourly electrical output of a single wind turbine or of a wind farm. The wind power performance model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs. In SAM, the performance model can be coupled to one of the financial models to calculate economic metrics for residential, commercial, or utility-scale wind projects. This manual describes the algorithms used by the wind power performance model, which is available in the SAM user interface and as part of the SAM Simulation Core (SSC) library, and is intended to supplement the user documentation that comes with the software.

  6. Land-Based Wind Potential Changes in the Southeastern United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

  7. New National Wind Potential Estimates for Modern and Near-Future Turbine Technologies (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

  8. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 10 wind turbineswind energy became more challenging, orders for new turbines

  9. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA). 2010b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,html David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Tradewhich new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 2009 (

  10. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  11. Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter: Agile Direct Grid Connect Medium Voltage 4.7-13.8 kV Power Converter for PV Applications Utilizing Wide Band Gap Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ADEPT Project: Satcon is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levels—eliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers “step up” the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually “stepped down” to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the voltage is high and current is low. Satcon’s new power conversion devices will eliminate these heavy transformers and connect a utility-scale solar power system directly to the grid. Satcon’s modular devices are designed to ensure reliability—if one device fails it can be bypassed and the system can continue to run.

  12. TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turtle Mountain Community College

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

  13. Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  14. The identification of inflow fluid dynamics parameters that can be used to scale fatigue loading spectra of wind turbine structural components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently shown that the alternating load fatigue distributions measured at several locations on a wind turbine operating in a turbulent flow can be described by a mixture of at least three parametric statistical models. The rainflow cycle counting of the horizontal and vertical inflow components results in a similar mixture describing the cyclic content of the wind. We believe such a description highlights the degree of non-Gaussian characteristics of the flow. We present evidence that the severity of the low-cycle, high-amplitude alternating stress loads seen by wind turbine components are a direct consequence of the degree of departure from normality in the inflow. We have examined the details of the turbulent inflow associated with series large loading events that took place on two adjacent wind turbines installed in a large wind park in San Gorgonio Pass, California. In this paper, we describe what we believe to be the agents in the flow that induced such events. We also discuss the atmospheric mechanisms that influence the low-cycle, high-amplitude range loading seen by a number of critical wind turbine components. We further present results that can be used to scale the specific distribution shape as functions of measured inflow fluid dynamics parameters.

  15. Dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Handman, D. [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)] [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  16. Wind power today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

  17. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  18. Concrete Company Aims Higher for More Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, most steel towers that support utility-scale turbines stand about 80 meters tall, but the Tindall Corporation wants to go higher using precast concrete to raise turbines over 100 meters in height to capture stronger, steadier winds - and more energy.

  19. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

  20. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simplified Models for Wind Turbine Blades," in 53rd AIAA/in composite wind turbine blades," Journal of IntelligentState estimate of wind turbine blades using geometrically

  1. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in composite wind turbine blades," Journal of IntelligentState estimate of wind turbine blades using geometricallytests of CX-100 wind turbine blades. Part II: analysis," in

  2. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison in a composite wind turbine rotor blade." Thecrack detection in composite wind turbine blades." Thecomparison in a composite wind turbine rotor blade,"

  3. ANEMOS: Development of a Next Generation Wind Power Forecasting System for the Large-Scale Integration of Onshore &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -NTUA, Greece. * georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr, tel:+33-493957501, Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre d'Energetique 6% to 12% by 2010. Under this target, the problem of integration of RES and namely of wind energy

  4. NREL: Wind Research - Wind and Water Power Fact Sheets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6SiteUtility-ScaleWind

  5. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16% of global installed capacity in 2011, up slightly from82% of the cumulative installed capacity. Utility ownership2010, yielding a cumulative installed capacity of small wind

  6. Wind Development on the Rosebud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Wind Development on the Rosebud, given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  7. OETR OETR Symposium Utilization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    OETR OETR Symposium Utilization of Offshore Wind Energy for a New Landscape of Beautiful Japan OETR + OEAJ Two keys, Bankability and Public Acceptance A leading veri cation project for offshore wind eld 2 FIT program for offshore wind-power In order to further accelerate this momentum, two vital

  8. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the LIST Wind Turbine," in 2002 ASME Wind Energy Symposium ,from the LIST turbine," in 2001 ASME Wind Energy Symposium ,wind energy production site in the Great Plains. The Micon 65/13 model turbine

  9. WINS: Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Institute of Technology

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities: (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC). (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision results are often text-based demonstrations. WINS includes a powerful visualization tool and user interface capability for transmission analyses, planning, and assessment, which will be of great interest to power market participants, power system planners and operators, and state and federal regulatory entities. (3) WINS can handle extended transmission models for wind integration studies. WINS models include limitations on transmission flow as well as bus voltage for analyzing power system states. The existing decision tools often consider transmission flow constraints (dc power flow) alone which could result in the over-utilization of existing resources when analyzing wind integration. WINS can be used to assist power market participants including transmission companies, independent system operators, power system operators in vertically integrated utilities, wind energy developers, and regulatory agencies to analyze economics, security, and reliability of various options for wind integration including transmission upgrades and the planning of new transmission facilities. WINS can also be used by industry for the offline training of reliability and operation personnel when analyzing wind integration uncertainties, identifying critical spots in power system operation, analyzing power system vulnerabilities, and providing credible decisions for examining operation and planning options for wind integration. Researches in this project on wind integration included (1) Development of WINS; (2) Transmission Congestion Analysis in the Eastern Interconnection; (3) Analysis of 2030 Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern Interconnection; (4) Large-scale Analysis of 2018 Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern U.S. Interconnection. The research resulted in 33 papers, 9 presentations, 9 PhD degrees, 4 MS degrees, and 7 awards. The education activities in this project on wind energy included (1) Wind Energy Training Facility Development; (2) Wind Energy Course Development.

  10. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  11. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  12. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations – the Northern Study Area.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, Cathy [WindLogics

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results from research aimed at improving short-range (0-6 hour) hub-height wind forecasts in the NOAA weather forecast models through additional data assimilation and model physics improvements for use in wind energy forecasting. Additional meteorological observing platforms including wind profilers, sodars, and surface stations were deployed for this study by NOAA and DOE, and additional meteorological data at or near wind turbine hub height were provided by South Dakota State University and WindLogics/NextEra Energy Resources over a large geographical area in the U.S. Northern Plains for assimilation into NOAA research weather forecast models. The resulting improvements in wind energy forecasts based on the research weather forecast models (with the additional data assimilation and model physics improvements) were examined in many different ways and compared with wind energy forecasts based on the current operational weather forecast models to quantify the forecast improvements important to power grid system operators and wind plant owners/operators participating in energy markets. Two operational weather forecast models (OP_RUC, OP_RAP) and two research weather forecast models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) were used as the base wind forecasts for generating several different wind power forecasts for the NextEra Energy wind plants in the study area. Power forecasts were generated from the wind forecasts in a variety of ways, from very simple to quite sophisticated, as they might be used by a wide range of both general users and commercial wind energy forecast vendors. The error characteristics of each of these types of forecasts were examined and quantified using bulk error statistics for both the local wind plant and the system aggregate forecasts. The wind power forecast accuracy was also evaluated separately for high-impact wind energy ramp events. The overall bulk error statistics calculated over the first six hours of the forecasts at both the individual wind plant and at the system-wide aggregate level over the one year study period showed that the research weather model-based power forecasts (all types) had lower overall error rates than the current operational weather model-based power forecasts, both at the individual wind plant level and at the system aggregate level. The bulk error statistics of the various model-based power forecasts were also calculated by season and model runtime/forecast hour as power system operations are more sensitive to wind energy forecast errors during certain times of year and certain times of day. The results showed that there were significant differences in seasonal forecast errors between the various model-based power forecasts. The results from the analysis of the various wind power forecast errors by model runtime and forecast hour showed that the forecast errors were largest during the times of day that have increased significance to power system operators (the overnight hours and the morning/evening boundary layer transition periods), but the research weather model-based power forecasts showed improvement over the operational weather model-based power forecasts at these times. A comprehensive analysis of wind energy forecast errors for the various model-based power forecasts was presented for a suite of wind energy ramp definitions. The results compiled over the year-long study period showed that the power forecasts based on the research models (ESRL_RAP, HRRR) more accurately predict wind energy ramp events than the current operational forecast models, both at the system aggregate level and at the local wind plant level. At the system level, the ESRL_RAP-based forecasts most accurately predict both the total number of ramp events and the occurrence of the events themselves, but the HRRR-based forecasts more accurately predict the ramp rate. At the individual site level, the HRRR-based forecasts most accurately predicted the actual ramp occurrence, the total number of ramps and the ramp rates (40-60% improvement in ramp rates over the coarser resolution forecast

  13. Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy. Wind's variability does increase the day-to-day and minute-to- minute operating costs of a utility system because the wind variations do affect the operation of other plants. But investigations by utility

  14. Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

  15. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Kemper, J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing wind penetrations, utilities and operators (ISOs) are quickly trying to understand the impacts on system operations and planning. This report focuses on ramping imapcts within the Xcel service region.

  16. Wind Energy Systems Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee House Bill 809, enacted into law in Public Chapter 377, Acts of 2003 and codified under Title 67, Chapter 5, states that wind energy systems operated by public utilities, businesses or...

  17. Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xinxin

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system...

  18. Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xinxin

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system...

  19. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A PublicPrivate Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations The...

  20. american wind interest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Aeronautics and Astronautics Aeroelastic Modeling of Large Offshore Vertical-axis Wind Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Vertical-axis Wind...

  1. Vermont Wind Measurement Company Still Strong | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vermont Wind Measurement Company Still Strong Vermont Wind Measurement Company Still Strong April 9, 2010 - 3:16pm Addthis NRG's new building utilizes solar power, but their...

  2. ancient solar wind: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2006-02-03 5 Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production: Report to Congress Solar and Wind Technologies Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: )...

  3. Making european-style community wind power development work in theUnited States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Once primarily a European phenomenon, community wind power development--defined here as one or more locally owned, utility-scale wind turbines interconnected on either the customer or utility side of the meter--is gaining a foothold in an increasing number of states throughout the United States. This article describes the various policies and incentives that Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Massachusetts are using to support community wind power development, and how state and federal support influences the types of projects and ownership structures that are being developed. Experience in these states demonstrates that, with an array of incentives and creative financing schemes targeted at community-scale projects, there are opportunities to make community wind work in the United States.

  4. Wind Technology Modeling Within the System Advisor Model (SAM) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Ferguson, T.; Freeman, J.; Gilman, P.; Whitmore, J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster provides detail for implementation and the underlying methodology for modeling wind power generation performance in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM's wind power model allows users to assess projects involving one or more large or small wind turbines with any of the detailed options for residential, commercial, or utility financing. The model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs, and provides analysis to compare the absolute or relative impact of these inputs. SAM is a system performance and economic model designed to facilitate analysis and decision-making for project developers, financers, policymakers, and energy researchers. The user pairs a generation technology with a financing option (residential, commercial, or utility) to calculate the cost of energy over the multi-year project period. Specifically, SAM calculates the value of projects which buy and sell power at retail rates for residential and commercial systems, and also for larger-scale projects which operate through a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a utility. The financial model captures complex financing and rate structures, taxes, and incentives.

  5. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissecting Wind Turbine Costs. ” WindStats Newsletter, vol.A. Laxson. 2006. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.they can impact wind turbine costs but fall mostly outside

  6. Characterization of ash deposition and heat transfer behavior of coals during combustion in a pilot-scale facility and full-scale utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sushil Gupta; Rajender Gupta; Gary Bryant; Terry Wall; Shinji Watanabe; Takashi Kiga; Kimihito Narukawa [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research & Technology

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental measurements as well as theoretical models were used to investigate the impact of mineral matter of three coals on ash deposition and heat transfer for pulverized coal fired boilers. The ash deposition experiments were conducted in a pulverized fuel combustion pilot-scale facility and a full-scale unit. A mathematical model with input from computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy analysis of coal minerals was used to predict the effect of ash deposition on heat transfer. The predicted deposit thickness and heat flux from the model are shown to be consistent with the measurements in the test facility. The model differentiates the coals according to the deposits they form and their effect on heat transfer. The heat transfer predictions in the full-scale unit were found to be most suitable for the water wall under the furnace nose. The study demonstrates that the measurements in a full-scale unit can differ significantly from those in pilot-scale furnaces due to soot-blowing operations. 9 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Wind-To-Hydrogen Energy Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Rebenitsch; Randall Bush; Allen Boushee; Brad G. Stevens; Kirk D. Williams; Jeremy Woeste; Ronda Peters; Keith Bennett

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    WIND-TO-HYDROGEN ENERGY PILOT PROJECT: BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE In an effort to address the hurdles of wind-generated electricity (specifically wind's intermittency and transmission capacity limitations) and support development of electrolysis technology, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC) conducted a research project involving a wind-to-hydrogen system. Through this effort, BEPC, with the support of the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota, evaluated the feasibility of dynamically scheduling wind energy to power an electrolysis-based hydrogen production system. The goal of this project was to research the application of hydrogen production from wind energy, allowing for continued wind energy development in remote wind-rich areas and mitigating the necessity for electrical transmission expansion. Prior to expending significant funding on equipment and site development, a feasibility study was performed. The primary objective of the feasibility study was to provide BEPC and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to make a determination whether or not to proceed with Phase II of the project, which was equipment procurement, installation, and operation. Four modes of operation were considered in the feasibility report to evaluate technical and economic merits. Mode 1 - scaled wind, Mode 2 - scaled wind with off-peak, Mode 3 - full wind, and Mode 4 - full wind with off-peak In summary, the feasibility report, completed on August 11, 2005, found that the proposed hydrogen production system would produce between 8000 and 20,000 kg of hydrogen annually depending on the mode of operation. This estimate was based on actual wind energy production from one of the North Dakota (ND) wind farms of which BEPC is the electrical off-taker. The cost of the hydrogen produced ranged from $20 to $10 per kg (depending on the mode of operation). The economic sensitivity analysis performed as part of the feasibility study showed that several factors can greatly affect, both positively and negatively, the "per kg" cost of hydrogen. After a September 15, 2005, meeting to evaluate the advisability of funding Phase II of the project DOE concurred with BEPC that Phase I results did warrant a "go" recommendation to proceed with Phase II activities. The hydrogen production system was built by Hydrogenics and consisted of several main components: hydrogen production system, gas control panel, hydrogen storage assembly and hydrogen-fueling dispenser The hydrogen production system utilizes a bipolar alkaline electrolyzer nominally capable of producing 30 Nm3/h (2.7 kg/h). The hydrogen is compressed to 6000 psi and delivered to an on-site three-bank cascading storage assembly with 80 kg of storage capacity. Vehicle fueling is made possible through a Hydrogenics-provided gas control panel and dispenser able to fuel vehicles to 5000 psi. A key component of this project was the development of a dynamic scheduling system to control the wind energy's variable output to the electrolyzer cell stacks. The dynamic scheduling system received an output signal from the wind farm, processed this signal based on the operational mode, and dispatched the appropriate signal to the electrolyzer cell stacks. For the study BEPC chose to utilize output from the Wilton wind farm located in central ND. Site design was performed from May 2006 through August 2006. Site construction activities were from August to November 2006 which involved earthwork, infrastructure installation, and concrete slab construction. From April - October 2007, the system components were installed and connected. Beginning in November 2007, the system was operated in a start-up/shakedown mode. Because of numerous issues, the start-up/shakedown period essentially lasted until the end of January 2008, at which time a site acceptance test was performed. Official system operation began on February 14, 2008, and continued through the end of December 2008. Several issues continued to prevent consistent operation, resulting in operation o

  8. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine," in 2002 ASME Wind Energy Symposium , 2002, pp.turbine," in 2001 ASME Wind Energy Symposium , 2001, pp.Program," in 2001 ASME Wind Energy Symposium , 2001, pp.

  9. 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Mann; Christine Risch

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for '20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia'. The objective of this project was to examine the obstacles and constraints to the development of wind energy in West Virginia as well as the obstacles and constraints to the achievement of the national goal of 20% wind by 2030. For the portion contracted with WVU, there were four tasks in this examination of obstacles and constraints. Task 1 involved the establishment of a Wind Resource Council. Task 2 involved conducting limited research activities. These activities involved an ongoing review of wind energy documents including documents regarding the potential for wind farms being located on reclaimed surface mining sites as well as other brownfield sites. The Principal Investigator also examined the results of the Marshall University SODAR assessment of the potential for placing wind farms on reclaimed surface mining sites. Task 3 involved the conducting of outreach activities. These activities involved working with the members of the Wind Resource Council, the staff of the Regional Wind Energy Institute, and the staff of Penn Future. This task also involved the examination of the importance of transmission for wind energy development. The Principal Investigator kept informed as to transmission developments in the Eastern United States. The Principal Investigator coordinated outreach activities with the activities at the Center for Business and Economic Research at Marshall University. Task 4 involved providing technical assistance. This task involved the provision of information to various parties interested in wind energy development. The Principal Investigator was available to answer requests from interested parties regarding in formation regarding both utility scale as well as small wind development in West Virginia. Most of the information requested regarded either the permitting process for wind facilities of various sizes in the state or information regarding the wind potential in various parts of the state. This report describes four sub-categories of work done by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at Marshall University under this contract. The four sub-projects are: (1) research on the impacts of wind turbines on residential property values; (2) research on the integration of wind energy in regional transmission systems; (3) review of state-based wind legislation in consideration of model new policy options for West Virginia; and (4) promotion of wind facilities on former surface mine sites through development of a database of potential sites.

  10. The KAMM/WAsP Numerical Wind Atlas A powerful ingredient for wind energy planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    etc. §§ Legislation Master plans EIA GUIDELINES APPROVALS #12;Outline · Wind resource mapping for Environmental Prediction and National Center for Atmospheric Research (USA), United States Geological Survey. National scale wind resource overview · Input: numerical wind atlas database (large domains) · Output

  11. Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

  12. Dover Public Utilities- Green Energy Program Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delaware's municipal utilities provide incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, wind, geothermal, and fuel cell systems installed by their electric customers. Eligibility is limited...

  13. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scale additions of wind generation. The objectives of thisof large amounts of wind generation confronts the grid withhave been important as wind generation has gone from being a

  14. Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

  15. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations – the Southern Study Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Manobianco, John; Schroeder, John; Ancell, Brian; Brewster, Keith; Basu, Sukanta; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Flores, Isabel

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report presents a comprehensive description, findings, and conclusions for the Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP)--Southern Study Area (SSA) work led by AWS Truepower (AWST). This multi-year effort, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), focused on improving short-term (15-minute – 6 hour) wind power production forecasts through the deployment of an enhanced observation network of surface and remote sensing instrumentation and the use of a state-of-the-art forecast modeling system. Key findings from the SSA modeling and forecast effort include: 1. The AWST WFIP modeling system produced an overall 10 – 20% improvement in wind power production forecasts over the existing Baseline system, especially during the first three forecast hours; 2. Improvements in ramp forecast skill, particularly for larger up and down ramps; 3. The AWST WFIP data denial experiments showed mixed results in the forecasts incorporating the experimental network instrumentation; however, ramp forecasts showed significant benefit from the additional observations, indicating that the enhanced observations were key to the model systems’ ability to capture phenomena responsible for producing large short-term excursions in power production; 4. The OU CAPS ARPS simulations showed that the additional WFIP instrument data had a small impact on their 3-km forecasts that lasted for the first 5-6 hours, and increasing the vertical model resolution in the boundary layer had a greater impact, also in the first 5 hours; and 5. The TTU simulations were inconclusive as to which assimilation scheme (3DVAR versus EnKF) provided better forecasts, and the additional observations resulted in some improvement to the forecasts in the first 1 – 3 hours.

  16. Evaluation of Wind Shear Patterns at Midwest Wind Energy Facilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Randall, G.; Malcolm, D.; Kelley, N.; Smith, B.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) has included several wind energy facilities in the Midwestern United States. At several of these projects, a strong diurnal shear pattern has been observed. During the day, low and sometimes negative shear has been measured. During night hours, very high positive shear is frequently observed. These high nighttime shear values are of concern due to the potential for high stresses across the rotor. The resulting loads on turbine components could result in failures. Conversely, the effects of high nighttime wind shear could benefit wind generated energy production in the Midwest by providing a source of greater hub-height wind speeds, particularly for multi-megawatt turbines that utilize tall towers. This paper presents an overview of the observed wind shear at each of the Midwest TVP projects, focusing on diurnal patterns and the frequency of very high nighttime shear at the sites. Turbine fault incidence is examined to determine the presence or absence of a correlation to periods of high shear. Implications of shear-related failures are discussed for other Midwest projects that use megawatt-scale turbines. In addition, this paper discusses the importance of accurate shear estimates for project development.

  17. Small-scale magnetic islands in the solar wind and their role in particle acceleration. Part 1: Dynamics of magnetic islands near the heliospheric current sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khabarova, O; Li, G; Roux, J A le; Webb, G M; Dosch, A; Malandraki, O E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increases of ion fluxes in the keV-MeV range are sometimes observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during periods when other sources are absent. These resemble solar energetic particle (SEP) events, but the events are weaker and apparently local. Conventional explanations based on either shock acceleration of charged particles or particle acceleration due to magnetic reconnection at interplanetary current sheets are not persuasive. We suggest instead that recurrent magnetic reconnection occurs at the HCS and smaller current sheets in the solar wind (Zharkova & Khabarova 2012), of which a consequence is particle energization by the dynamically evolving secondary current sheets and magnetic islands (Zank et al. 2014; Drake et al. 2006a). The effectiveness of the trapping and acceleration process associated with magnetic islands depends in part on the topology of the HCS. We show that the HCS possesses ripples superimposed on the large-scale flat or wavy structure. We conjecture that the ripples c...

  18. Large-Scale Uncertainty and Error Analysis for Time-dependent Fluid/Structure Interactions in Wind Turbine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Juan J. [Stanford University; Iaccarino, Gianluca [Stanford University

    2013-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is the final report covering the entire period of this aforementioned grant, June 1, 2011 - May 31, 2013 for the portion of the effort corresponding to Stanford University (SU). SU has partnered with Sandia National Laboratories (PI: Mike S. Eldred) and Purdue University (PI: Dongbin Xiu) to complete this research project and this final report includes those contributions made by the members of the team at Stanford. Dr. Eldred is continuing his contributions to this project under a no-cost extension and his contributions to the overall effort will be detailed at a later time (once his effort has concluded) on a separate project submitted by Sandia National Laboratories. At Stanford, the team is made up of Profs. Alonso, Iaccarino, and Duraisamy, post-doctoral researcher Vinod Lakshminarayan, and graduate student Santiago Padron. At Sandia National Laboratories, the team includes Michael Eldred, Matt Barone, John Jakeman, and Stefan Domino, and at Purdue University, we have Prof. Dongbin Xiu as our main collaborator. The overall objective of this project was to develop a novel, comprehensive methodology for uncertainty quantification by combining stochastic expansions (nonintrusive polynomial chaos and stochastic collocation), the adjoint approach, and fusion with experimental data to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties from random variable, random field, and model form sources. The expected outcomes of this activity were detailed in the proposal and are repeated here to set the stage for the results that we have generated during the time period of execution of this project: 1. The rigorous determination of an error budget comprising numerical errors in physical space and statistical errors in stochastic space and its use for optimal allocation of resources; 2. A considerable increase in efficiency when performing uncertainty quantification with a large number of uncertain variables in complex non-linear multi-physics problems; 3. A solution to the long-time integration problem of spectral chaos approaches; 4. A rigorous methodology to account for aleatory and epistemic uncertainties, to emphasize the most important variables via dimension reduction and dimension-adaptive refinement, and to support fusion with experimental data using Bayesian inference; 5. The application of novel methodologies to time-dependent reliability studies in wind turbine applications including a number of efforts relating to the uncertainty quantification in vertical-axis wind turbine applications. In this report, we summarize all accomplishments in the project (during the time period specified) focusing on advances in UQ algorithms and deployment efforts to the wind turbine application area. Detailed publications in each of these areas have also been completed and are available from the respective conference proceedings and journals as detailed in a later section.

  19. Full-scale structural testing for severe wind, 1995. Proceedings of the INEL severe windstorm testing workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, C.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides brief background information and reports the discussions and findings of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Severe Windstorm Testing Workshop held November 29-30, 1995, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Section 1 presents a historical perspective on wind engineering and testing in the U.S. Section 2 discusses INEL`s and the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) interest in a new testing facility, and the efforts that led to the organization of the work-shop. The workshop discussions are then described in Sections 3 through 8. These sections focus on the interaction of the participants and are not intended to be exhaustive discussion of the subjects. A summary of the findings, along with the INEL`s recommendations, are presented in Section 9. A list of the workshop participants, a glossary, and additional technical information provided by selected participants are included in the Appendices.

  20. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loads from the wind inflow through rotor aerodynamics, drive train and power electronics is stillWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wächter ForWind-Center for Wind

  1. Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that provides more exact estimates of GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty. This involved a systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems in order to determine the causes of life cycle greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG estimates.

  2. Oregon Department of Energy Webinar: Offshore Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The intended audience for this webinar on offshore wind basics is decision-makers, energy industry practitioners, utilities, and those knowledgeable about renewable energy. The webinar will feature...

  3. Characterization of winds through the rotor plane using a phased array SODAR and recommendations for future work.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deola, Regina Anne

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable remote sensing devices are increasingly needed to cost effectively characterize the meteorology at a potential wind energy site as the size of modern wind turbines increase. A short term project co-locating a Sound Detection and Ranging System (SODAR) with a 200 meter instrumented meteorological tower at the Texas Tech Wind Technology Field Site was performed to collect and summarize wind information through an atmospheric layer typical of utility scale rotor plane depths. Data collected identified large speed shears and directional shears that may lead to unbalanced loads on the rotors. This report identifies suggestions for incorporation of additional data in wind resource assessments and a few thoughts on the potential for using a SODAR or SODAR data to quantify or investigate other parameters that may be significant to the wind industry.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: wind turbines produce rated power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind turbines produce rated power Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: test wind turbine blade structures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind turbine blade structures at an intermediate scale Wind-Turbine Blade Materials and Reliability Progress On May 21, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

  6. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  7. First International Workshop on Grid Simulator Testing of Wind Turbine Drivetrains: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Link, H.; McDade, M.; Mander, A.; Fox, J. C.; Rigas, N.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the First International Workshop on Grid Simulator Testing of Wind Turbine Drivetrains, held from June 13 to 14, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center, located south of Boulder, Colorado. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and cohosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Clemson University under ongoing collaboration via a cooperative research and development agreement. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum to discuss the research, testing needs, and state-of-the-art apparatuses involved in grid compliance testing of utility-scale wind turbine generators. This includes both dynamometer testing of wind turbine drivetrains ('ground testing') and field testing grid-connected wind turbines. Four sessions followed by discussions in which all attendees of the workshop were encouraged to participate comprised the workshop.

  8. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    first-year 2012 cost for wind energy under a power purchasecosts, we assumed that the super-utility had a preference for wind energy.Cost Study of the 2015 Wind Challenge: An Assessment of Wind Energy

  9. Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houlsby, Guy T.

    1 Offshore Wind Turbines: Some Technical Challenges Prof. Guy Houlsby FREng Oxford University House engineers concerned with installation of offshore wind turbines. The author is Professor of Civil University Civil Engineering Offshore wind power · Scale of offshore wind power developments · Engineering

  10. Utility Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility Partnerships 7/10/12. Provides an overview of LEAP's (Charlottesville, VA) partnership with local utilities.

  11. Sandia Energy - Computational Fluid Dynamics & Large-Scale Uncertainty...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Large-Scale Uncertainty Quantification for Wind Energy Home Highlights - HPC Computational Fluid Dynamics & Large-Scale Uncertainty Quantification for Wind Energy Previous Next...

  12. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Rhoads-Weaver, H. E.; Flowers, Larry T.; Gagne, Matthew N.; Pro, Boyd H.; Foster, Nikolas AF

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to quantify and summarize the 2013 U.S. distributed wind market to help plan and guide future investments and decisions by industry stakeholders, utilities, state and federal agencies, and other interested parties.

  13. Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna I.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial  Scale  Wind  Turbines  in  Canada. ”  April Development of China?s Wind Turbine  Manufacturing Industry duties  on  importing wind turbine components.   13   “

  14. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  15. VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatinderpal Singh

    Wind energy is currently the fastest-growing renewable source of energy in India; India is a key market for the wind industry, presenting substantial opportunities for both the international and domestic players. In India the research is carried out on wind energy utilization on big ways.There are still many unsolved challenges in expanding wind power, and there are numerous problems of interest to systems and control researchers. In this paper we study the pitch control mechanism of wind turbine. The pitch control system is one of the most widely used control techniques to regulate the output power of a wind turbine generator. The pitch angle is controlled to keep the generator power at rated power by reducing the angle of the blades. By regulating, the angle of stalling, fast torque changes from the wind will be reutilized. It also describes the design of the pitch controller and discusses the response of the pitch-controlled system to wind velocity variations. The pitch control system is found to have a large output power variation and a large settling time.

  16. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of variability of wind generation and costs related toLaxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.MW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India are

  17. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Global Wind Power." Journal of Geophysical2008. "The Economics of Wind Power with Energy Storage."Economics of Large-Scale Wind Power in a Carbon Constrained

  18. Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Evan Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1985. 23. Hau, E. Wind Turbines: Fundamentals, Technologies,for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines. Tech. no. NREL/CP-500-Full-scale Floating Wind Turbine." Statoil, 14 Oct. 2009.

  19. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  20. Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, a...

  1. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissecting Wind Turbine Costs. ” WindStats Newsletter, vol.A. Laxson. 2006. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.driven down wind energy costs (for a brief survey of the

  2. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  3. Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: reduce wind energy costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind plant research facility at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility is the first U.S. facility specifically designed and...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: understand complex wind flow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind plant research facility at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility is the first U.S. facility specifically designed and...

  6. 2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Flowers, L. T.; Gagne, M. N.; Pro, B. H.; Rhoads-Weaver, H. E.; Jenkins, J. O.; Sahl, K. M.; Baranowski, R. E.

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of 2012, U.S. wind turbines in distributed applications reached a 10-year cumulative installed capacity of more than 812 MW from more than 69,000 units across all 50 states. In 2012 alone, nearly 3,800 wind turbines totaling 175 MW of distributed wind capacity were documented in 40 states and in the U.S. Virgin Islands, with 138 MW using utility-scale turbines (i.e., greater than 1 MW in size), 19 MW using mid-size turbines (i.e., 101 kW to 1 MW in size), and 18.4 MW using small turbines (i.e., up to 100 kW in size). Distributed wind is defined in terms of technology application based on a wind project’s location relative to end-use and power-distribution infrastructure, rather than on technology size or project size. Distributed wind systems are either connected on the customer side of the meter (to meet the onsite load) or directly to distribution or micro grids (to support grid operations or offset large loads nearby). Estimated capacity-weighted average costs for 2012 U.S. distributed wind installations was $2,540/kW for utility-scale wind turbines, $2,810/kW for mid-sized wind turbines, and $6,960/kW for newly manufactured (domestic and imported) small wind turbines. An emerging trend observed in 2012 was an increased use of refurbished turbines. The estimated capacity-weighted average cost of refurbished small wind turbines installed in 2012 was $4,080/kW. As a result of multiple projects using utility-scale turbines, Iowa deployed the most new overall distributed wind capacity, 37 MW, in 2012. Nevada deployed the most small wind capacity in 2012, with nearly 8 MW of small wind turbines installed in distributed applications. In the case of mid-size turbines, Ohio led all states in 2012 with 4.9 MW installed in distributed applications. State and federal policies and incentives continued to play a substantial role in the development of distributed wind projects. In 2012, U.S. Treasury Section 1603 payments and grants and loans from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Energy for America Program were the main sources of federal funding for distributed wind projects. State and local funding varied across the country, from rebates to loans, tax credits, and other incentives. Reducing utility bills and hedging against potentially rising electricity rates remain drivers of distributed wind installations. In 2012, other drivers included taking advantage of the expiring U.S. Treasury Section 1603 program and a prosperous year for farmers. While 2012 saw a large addition of distributed wind capacity, considerable barriers and challenges remain, such as a weak domestic economy, inconsistent state incentives, and very competitive solar photovoltaic and natural gas prices. The industry remains committed to improving the distributed wind marketplace by advancing the third-party certification process and introducing alternative financing models, such as third-party power purchase agreements and lease-to-own agreements more typical in the solar photovoltaic market. Continued growth is expected in 2013.

  7. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  8. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  9. This introduction to wind power technology is meant to help communities in considering or planning wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    This introduction to wind power technology is meant to help communities in considering or planning wind power. It focuses on commercial and medium-scale wind turbine technology that is available in the United States. This fact sheet also discusses the integration of wind power into the electrical grid

  10. This paper presents stability analysis of wind farms in frequency domain. The interaction between the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    in order to emphasize differences between the two wind farms. Keywords: offshore wind farms, stability with full-scale back-to-back converters are more and more used in large offshore wind farms. This affects offshore wind farms tend to be bigger and bigger with more and more complex structures which can introduce

  11. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

  12. Community Wind: Once Again Pushing the Envelope of Project Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    bolinger, Mark A.

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, the 'community wind' sector - loosely defined here as consisting of relatively small utility-scale wind power projects that sell power on the wholesale market and that are developed and owned primarily by local investors - has historically served as a 'test bed' or 'proving grounds' for up-and-coming wind turbine manufacturers that are trying to break into the U.S. wind power market. For example, community wind projects - and primarily those located in the state of Minnesota - have deployed the first U.S. installations of wind turbines from Suzlon (in 2003), DeWind (2008), Americas Wind Energy (2008) and later Emergya Wind Technologies (2010), Goldwind (2009), AAER/Pioneer (2009), Nordic Windpower (2010), Unison (2010), and Alstom (2011). Thus far, one of these turbine manufacturers - Suzlon - has subsequently achieved some success in the broader U.S. wind market as well. Just as it has provided a proving grounds for new turbines, so too has the community wind sector served as a laboratory for experimentation with innovative new financing structures. For example, a variation of one of the most common financing arrangements in the U.S. wind market today - the special allocation partnership flip structure (see Figure 1 in Section 2.1) - was first developed by community wind projects in Minnesota more than a decade ago (and is therefore sometimes referred to as the 'Minnesota flip' model) before being adopted by the broader wind market. More recently, a handful of community wind projects built over the past year have been financed via new and creative structures that push the envelope of wind project finance in the U.S. - in many cases, moving beyond the now-standard partnership flip structures involving strategic tax equity investors. These include: (1) a 4.5 MW project in Maine that combines low-cost government debt with local tax equity, (2) a 25.3 MW project in Minnesota using a sale/leaseback structure, (3) a 10.5 MW project in South Dakota financed by an intrastate offering of both debt and equity, (4) a 6 MW project in Washington state that taps into New Markets Tax Credits using an 'inverted' or 'pass-through' lease structure, and (5) a 9 MW project in Oregon that combines a variety of state and federal incentives and loans with unconventional equity from high-net-worth individuals. In most cases, these are first-of-their-kind structures that could serve as useful examples for other projects - both community and commercial wind alike. This report describes each of these innovative new financing structures in some detail, using a case-study approach. The purpose is twofold: (1) to disseminate useful information on these new financial structures, most of which are widely replicable; and (2) to highlight the recent policy changes - many of them temporary unless extended - that have facilitated this innovation. Although the community wind market is currently only a small sub-sector of the U.S. wind market - as defined here, less than 2% of the overall market at the end of 2009 (Wiser and Bolinger 2010) - its small size belies its relevance to the broader market. As such, the information provided in this report has relevance beyond its direct application to the community wind sector. The next two sections of this report briefly summarize how most community wind projects in the U.S. have been financed historically (i.e., prior to this latest wave of innovation) and describe the recent federal policy changes that have enabled a new wave of financial innovation to occur, respectively. Section 4 contains brief case studies of how each of the five projects mentioned above were financed, noting the financial significance of each. Finally, Section 5 concludes by distilling a number of general observations or pertinent lessons learned from the experiences of these five projects.

  13. Wind energy systems information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with potential users of information on wind energy conversion. These interviews, part of a larger study covering nine different solar technologies, attempted to identify: the type of information each distinctive group of information users needed, and the best way of getting information to that group. Groups studied include: wind energy conversion system researchers; wind energy conversion system manufacturer representatives; wind energy conversion system distributors; wind turbine engineers; utility representatives; educators; county agents and extension service agents; and wind turbine owners.

  14. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Corrie E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Harto, Christopher B. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Schroeder, Jenna N. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Martino, Louis E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Horner, Robert M. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2 describes the approach and methods for this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS binary plant, a 50-MW EGS binary plant, a 10-MW hydrothermal binary plant, and a 50-MW hydrothermal flash plant. The methods focus on (1) the collection of data to improve estimation of EGS stimulation volumes, aboveground operational consumption for all geothermal technologies, and belowground operational consumption for EGS; and (2) the mapping of the geothermal and water resources of the western United States to assist in the identification of potential water challenges to geothermal growth. Chapters 3 and 4 present the water requirements for the power plant life cycle. Chapter 3 presents the results of the current data collection effort, and Chapter 4 presents the normalized volume of fresh water consumed at each life cycle stage per lifetime energy output for the power plant scenarios evaluated. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, the majority of water is consumed by plant operations. For the EGS binary scenarios, where dry cooling was assumed, belowground operational water loss is the greatest contributor depending upon the physical and operational conditions of the reservoir. Total life cycle water consumption requirements for air-cooled EGS binary scenarios vary between 0.22 and 1.85 gal/kWh, depending upon the extent of belowground operational water consumption. The air-cooled hydrothermal binary and flash plants experience far less fresh water consumption over the life cycle, at 0.04 gal/kWh. Fresh water requirements associated with air- cooled binary operations are primarily from aboveground water needs, including dust control, maintenance, and domestic use. Although wet-cooled hydrothermal flash systems require water for cooling, these plants generally rely upon the geofluid, fluid from the geothermal reservoir, which typically has high salinity and total dissolved solids concentration and is much warmer than normal groundwater sources, for their cooling water needs; thus,

  15. ENS-1363/99-0017 Wind farm production prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 The wind farm models 22 9 Utility experience 27 9.1 Power markets 27 9.2 Daily dispatch 27 9.3 Balance Wind power models 15 6.1 The wind farm model ( ¡ ¡¢ £¤ ¥¦ ) 17 6.2 The upscaling model. 4 ENS-1363/99-0017 #12;2 Introduction The amount of wind power install

  16. Surface Currents and Winds at the Delaware Bay Mouth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscarella, P A; Barton, N P; Lipphardt, B L; Veron, D E; Wong, K C; Kirwan, A D

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the circulation of estuaries and adjacent shelf waters has relied on hydrographic measurements, moorings, and local wind observations usually removed from the region of interest. Although these observations are certainly sufficient to identify major characteristics, they lack both spatial resolution and temporal coverage. High resolution synoptic observations are required to identify important coastal processes at smaller scales. Long observation periods are needed to properly sample low-frequency processes that may also be important. The introduction of high-frequency (HF) radar measurements and regional wind models for coastal studies is changing this situation. Here we analyze synoptic, high-resolution surface winds and currents in the Delaware Bay mouth over an eight-month period (October 2007 through May 2008). The surface currents were measured by two high-frequency radars while the surface winds were extracted from a data-assimilating regional wind model. To illustrate the utility of these monitoring tools we focus on two 45-day periods which previously were shown to present contrasting pictures of the circulation. One, the low-outflow period is from 1 October through 14 November 2007; the other is the high-outflow period from 3 March through 16 April 2008. The large-scale characteristics noted by previous workers are clearly corroborated. Specifically the M2 tide dominates the surface currents, and the Delaware Bay outflow plume is clearly evident in the low frequency currents. Several new aspects of the surface circulation were also identified. These include a map of the spatial variability of the M2 tide (validating an earlier model study), persistent low-frequency cross-mouth flow, and a rapid response of the surface currents to a changing wind field. However, strong wind episodes did not persist long enough to set up a sustained Ekman response.

  17. Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

  18. Operational behavior of a double-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Sivananda Kumjula

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greater efficiency in wind turbine systems is achieved by allowing the rotor to change its rate of rotation as the wind speed changes. The wind turbine system is decoupled from the utility grid and a variable speed operation ...

  19. Status of Centralized Wind Power Forecasting in North America: May 2009-May 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report surveys grid wind power forecasts for all wind generators, which are administered by utilities or regional transmission organizations (RTOs), typically with the assistance of one or more wind power forecasting companies.

  20. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  1. Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent emissions constraints; we find that at carbon prices above 150$/tCO2, over 90% of biomass in the energy system is used in combination with CCS. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, it is a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. CCS is also used heavily with other fuels such as coal and natural gas, and by 2095 a total of 1530 GtCO2 has been stored in deep geologic reservoirs. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels as two representative conversion processes and shows that both technologies may be important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Turbine Blade Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Turbine Blade Design National Rotor Testbed Functional Scaling Presented at American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2014 Scitech On April 15, 2014, in Energy,...

  3. Central Lincoln People's Utility District- Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central Lincoln People's Utility District provides financial incentives for its commercial and residential customers to install photovoltaic (PV), solar water heating, wind, and hydro electric...

  4. Central Lincoln People's Utility District- Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Oregon)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central Lincoln People's Utility District provides financial incentives for its commercial and residential customers to install photovoltaic (PV), solar water heating, wind, and hydro electric...

  5. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  6. altitude wind tunnel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helens Using NASA SRTM Digital Terrain Model M Alberta, University of 2 Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude Physics (arXiv) Summary: Ground based, wind energy extraction...

  7. The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    Australia is considered to have very good wind resources, and the utilization of this renewable energy resource is increasing. Wind power installed capacity increased by 35% from 2006 to 2011 and is predicted to account ...

  8. The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    Australia’s wind resource is considered to be very good, and the utilization of this renewable energy resource is increasing rapidly: wind power installed capacity increased by 35% from 2006 to 2011 and is predicted to ...

  9. Wind Energy and the Turbulent Nature of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wächter, Matthias; Hölling, Michael; Morales, Allan; Milan, Patrick; Mücke, Tanja; Peinke, Joachim; Reinke, Nico; Rinn, Philip

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The challenge of developing a sustainable and renewable energy supply within the next decades requires collaborative efforts as well as new concepts in the fields of science and engineering. Here we give an overview on the impact of small-scale properties of atmospheric turbulence on the wind energy conversion process. Special emphasis is given to the noisy and intermittent structure of turbulence and its outcome for wind energy conversion and utilization. Experimental, theoretical, analytical, and numerical concepts and methods are presented. In particular we report on new aspects resulting from the combination of basic research, especially in the field of turbulence and complex stochastic systems, with engineering applications.

  10. Osage Municipal Utilities Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany OilInformationPre-Tax Charge forIEMunicipal

  11. Towards Smart Integration of Wind Generation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Towards Smart Integration of Wind Generation. G. Giebela , P. Meiboma , P. Pinsonb , and G for the management of electricity grids with large-scale wind generation and to get a better handle on extreme events that integrate the full information on the expected wind generation. In order to demonstrate the value

  12. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  13. Colorado Springs Utilities- Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through its Renewable Energy Rebate Program, Colorado Springs Utilities (CSU) offers a rebate to customers who install grid-connected solar-electric (PV) systems, wind systems, and solar water...

  14. Advanced Control Design and Field Testing for Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-scale wind turbines require active control systems to operate at variable rotational speeds. As turbines become larger and more flexible, advanced control algorithms become necessary to meet multiple objectives such as speed regulation, blade load mitigation, and mode stabilization. At the same time, they must maximize energy capture. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed control design and testing capabilities to meet these growing challenges.

  15. Land-Based Wind Turbine Transportation and Logistics Barriers and Their Effects on U.S. Wind Markets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J.O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The average size of land based wind turbines installed in the United States has increased dramatically over time. As a result wind turbines are facing new transportation and logistics barriers that limit the size of utility scale land based wind turbines that can be deployed in the United States. Addressing these transportation and logistics barriers will allow for even further increases in U.S. turbine size using technologies under development for offshore markets. These barriers are important because larger taller turbines have been identified as a path to reducing the levelized cost of energy for electricity. Additionally, increases in turbine size enable the development of new low and moderate speed markets in the U.S. In turn, wind industry stakeholder support, market stability, and ultimately domestic content and manufacturing competitiveness are potentially affected. In general there is very little recent literature that characterizes transportation and logistics barriers and their effects on U.S. wind markets and opportunities. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to report the results of a recent NREL study that identifies the barriers, assesses their impact and provides recommendations for strategies and specific actions.

  16. Stellar Winds on the Main-Sequence I: Wind Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C P; Lüftinger, T; Toth, G; Brott, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 and 1.1 solar masses at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run ...

  17. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    all-in, first-year 2012 cost for wind energy under a powerO&M) costs for utility-sponsored wind and biofuel projectsovernight capital cost of the wind facility and the biofuel

  18. Wind Integration Datasets from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Wind Integration Datasets provide time-series wind data for 2004, 2005, and 2006. They are intended to be used by energy professionals such as transmission planners, utility planners, project developers, and university researchers, helping them to perform comparisons of sites and estimate power production from hypothetical wind plants. NREL cautions that the information from modeled data may not match wind resource information shown on NREL;s state wind maps as they were created for different purposes and using different methodologies.

  19. Optimization Online - Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Soroudi

    2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 3, 2015 ... Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind-thermal Generation Units in an Electric Utility. Alireza Soroudi (alireza.soroudi ***at*** ucd.ie)

  20. Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribal Government Utility Program Info State North Carolina Program Type SolarWind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County...

  1. assessment kotzebue wind: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Renewable Energy Center California Off-shore Wind Technology Assessment 12;California Renewable EnergyRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE...

  2. arctic wind technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Renewable Energy Center California Off-shore Wind Technology Assessment 12;California Renewable EnergyRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE...

  3. areal wind resource: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Renewable Energy Center California Off-shore Wind Technology Assessment 12;California Renewable EnergyRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE...

  4. aruba wind resource: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Renewable Energy Center California Off-shore Wind Technology Assessment 12;California Renewable EnergyRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE...

  5. Arizona/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Requirements Most utilities and other electricity providers require you to enter into a formal agreement with them before you interconnect your wind turbine with the...

  6. Model Ordinance for Siting of Wind-Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With respect to small wind turbines, the model ordinance addresses setbacks, access, lighting, noise, appearance, code compliance, utility notification, abandonment, and the permitting process....

  7. 20% Wind Energy By 2030 Meeting The Challenges Proceedings of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4) Impact on building U.S. manufacturing * Staff time for analysis * Analytic budget * Admedia budget * Outreach to key constituencies (agriculture, labor, utilities, wind...

  8. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an area that currently supports important populations of greater sage-grouse and has high wind energy development potential. This early model prototype demonstrated the utility of...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  10. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  11. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  12. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

  13. Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    in this paper. The largest wind farms in the world, Horns Rev 2 Offshore Wind Farm and Polish Karnice Onshore (WTs) with full-scale converters used in large offshore wind farms (OWFs) is increasing into consideration, the largest in the world Horns Rev 2 Offshore Wind Farm and located in Poland Karnice Onshore

  14. European Wind Energy Conference & Exhibition EWEC 2003, Madrid, Spain. Forecasting of Regional Wind Generation by a Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Wind Energy Conference & Exhibition EWEC 2003, Madrid, Spain. Forecasting of Regional Wind. Abstract-Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized nowadays as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind power in a power system. In the case of large-scale integration, end users

  15. Wind and Solar Energy Curtailment Practices (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Cochran, J.; Wang, X.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation to the fall 2014 technical meeting of the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group summarizes experience with curtailment of wind and solar in the U.S.

  16. Special Assessment for Wind Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purposes of property tax assessment, utility-owned wind projects are considered to have a value equal to their salvage value, with certain limitations. This incentive effectively lowers the...

  17. Harvesting the wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahn, R.D.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the wind farms in the Altamont Pass, the Tehachapi Mountains, and the San Gorgonio pass, all in California. The threat by Congress to eliminate federal tax credits could put the fledgling industry in the doldrums. The author shows how the selection of the right wind site can make the difference between a profitable venture and an expensive kinetic sculpture. To improve reliability wind-farm developers have turned to more durable Danish turbines from Zond, Windmatic, and Bonus. Recent research under DOE sponsorship has studied large-scale MOD-2 machines built by Boeing, several of which are now operating at a PGandL site north of San Francisco. The result of recent new standards may require the filing of quarterly reports on machine capacity, performance, and the amounts of electricity produced from the installation.

  18. Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wissemann, Chris [Freshwater Wind I, LLC] [Freshwater Wind I, LLC; White, Stanley M [Stanley White Engineering LLC] [Stanley White Engineering LLC

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabrication and installation. By having a marine contractor with experience with large marine projects as part of the team provides credibility to the LCOE developed by NREL. NREL then utilized the design and construction costing information as part of the LCOE model. The report summarizes the findings of the project. • Developed a cost model and “baseline” LCOE • Documented Site Conditions within Lake Erie • Developed Fabrication, Installation and Foundations Innovative Concept Designs • Evaluated LCOE Impact of Innovations • Developed Assembly line “Rail System” for GBF Construction and Staging • Developed Transit-Inspired Foundation Designs which incorporated: Semi-Floating Transit with Supplemental Pontoons Barge mounted Winch System • Developed GBF with “Penetration Skirt” • Developed Integrated GBF with Turbine Tower • Developed Turbine, Plant Layout and O&M Strategies The report details lowering LCOE by 22.3% and identified additional strategies that could further lower LCOE when building an utility scale wind farm in the Great Lakes.

  19. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  20. Wind Power Opportunities in St. Thomas, USVI: A Site-Specific Evaluation and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Warren, A.; Roberts, J. O.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL technical report utilizes a development framework originated by NREL and known by the acronym SROPTTC to assist the U.S. Virgin Islands in identifying and understanding concrete opportunities for wind power development in the territory. The report covers each of the seven components of the SROPTTC framework: Site, Resource, Off-take, Permitting, Technology, Team, and Capital as they apply to wind power in the USVI and specifically to a site in Bovoni, St. Thomas. The report concludes that Bovoni peninsula is a strong candidate for utility-scale wind generation in the territory. It represents a reasonable compromise in terms of wind resource, distance from residences, and developable terrain. Hurricane risk and variable terrain on the peninsula and on potential equipment transport routes add technical and logistical challenges but do not appear to represent insurmountable barriers. In addition, integration of wind power into the St. Thomas power system will present operational challenges, but based on experience in other islanded power systems, there are reasonable solutions for addressing these challenges.

  1. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

  2. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pdf/0554(2008).pdf European Wind Energy Association (EWEA).Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the European PowerPrepared by the European Wind Energy Association. http://

  3. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  4. Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States, new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 18The average size of wind turbines installed in the Uniteddominant manufacturer of wind turbines supplying the U.S.

  5. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  6. Estimating the Wind Resource in Uttarakhand: Comparison of Dynamic Downscaling with Doppler Lidar Wind Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Pukayastha, A.; St. Martin, C.; Newsom, R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous estimates of the wind resources in Uttarakhand, India, suggest minimal wind resources in this region. To explore whether or not the complex terrain in fact provides localized regions of wind resource, the authors of this study employed a dynamic down scaling method with the Weather Research and Forecasting model, providing detailed estimates of winds at approximately 1 km resolution in the finest nested simulation.

  7. Helping Utilities Make Smart Solar Decisions Utility Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    #12;About SEPA Developed by utilities to facilitate the integration of solar electric power. SEPA (insurance, disconnects, metering) · Balanced vs. best interconnection and net metering regimes #12;Managing Solar DecisionsSource: SEPA 2010 1,717 MW of utility scale solar or 63 % · Nevada & New Mexico 659 MW

  8. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rotor blade," Structural Health Monitoring, accepted 12-Novdeployed for structural health monitoring applications,"J. -R. Lee, "Structural health monitoring of research-scale

  9. Wave Models for Offshore Wind Turbines Puneet Agarwal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    Wave Models for Offshore Wind Turbines Puneet Agarwal§ and Lance Manuely Department of Civil. These wave modeling assumptions do not adequately represent waves in shallow waters where most offshore wind for estimating loads on the support structure (monopile) of an offshore wind turbine. We use a 5MW utility

  10. Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a large scale wind turbine are the tower, blades, and gearof large wind turbine (REpower MM92) Tower Rotor blades Gearwind turbine. Towers run from 40-100 meters, while blades

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: measure 3-D wind flow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind plant research facility at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility is the first U.S. facility specifically designed and...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: understand wind-turbine wakes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind plant research facility at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility is the first U.S. facility specifically designed and...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: how wind-turbine wakes interact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy One of the primary roles of Sandia's Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility will be to conduct detailed experiments on turbine wakes...

  14. Extended tension leg platform design for offshore wind turbine systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nicholas W. (Nicholas William)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise of reliable wind energy application has become a primary alternative to conventional fossil fuel power plants in the United States and around the world. The feasibility of building large scale wind farms has become ...

  15. Winding Trail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, the demand for clean renewable energy continues to rise drastically in Europe, the US, and other countries. Wind energy in the ocean can possibly be one of those future renewable clean energy sources as long...

  16. Wind Power Amercia Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Spangler, Kathi Montgomery and Paul Cartwright

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montana�¢����s vast wind resources for small, medium and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community and interested citizens. Through these efforts DEQ was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens as well as participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources.

  17. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

  18. This introduction to wind power technology is meant to help communities begin considering or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    call both liquids and gases "fluids" ­ i.e. things that flow). A wind turbine's blades use aerodynamic of a typical wind turbine are: - Rotor: a wind turbine's blades and the hub to which they attach form the rotor or planning wind power. It focuses on commercial and medium-scale wind turbine technology available

  19. 66 APRIL | 2010 The FuTure oF Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    in the form of large-scale wind farms, wind energy cooperatives, wind turbines owned by indi- vidual investors66 APRIL | 2010 The FuTure oF Wind Turbine diagnosTics Wind energy is undergoing expansion, and multinational exploration of remote sites and offshore locations. Despite the in- creasing rated capacity

  20. A comparison of predicted and observed turbulent wind fields present in natural and internal wind park environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, N D; Wright, A D

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper assesses the accuracy of simulated wind fields for both the natural flow and that within a wind park environment. The simulated fields are compared with the observed ones in both the time and frequency domains. Actual measurements of the wind fields and the derived kinematic scaling parameters upwind and downwind of a large San Gorgonio Pass wind park are used. The deviations in the modeled wind field from the observed are discussed. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine , S. Tullis2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine R. Bravo1 , S. Tullis2 , S. Ziada3 of electric production [1]. Although most performance testing for small-scale wind turbines is conducted vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT) in urban settings, full-scale wind tunnel testing of a prototype 3.5 k

  2. Wind Spires as an Alternative Energy Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majid Rashidi, Ph.D., P.E.

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discloses the design and development of an innovative wind tower system having an axisymmetric wind deflecting structure with a plurality of symmetrically mounted rooftop size wind turbines near the axisymmetric structure. The purpose of the wind deflecting structure is to increase the ambient wind speed that in turn results in an overall increase in the power capacity of the wind turbines. Two working prototypes were constructed and installed in the summer of 2009 and 2012 respectively. The system installed in the Summer of 2009 has a cylindrical wind deflecting structure, while the tower installed in 2012 has a spiral-shape wind deflecting structure. Each tower has 4 turbines, each rated at 1.65 KW Name-Plate-Rating. Before fabricating the full-size prototypes, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses and scaled-down table-top models were used to predict the performance of the full-scale models. The performance results obtained from the full-size prototypes validated the results obtained from the computational models and those of the scaled-down models. The second prototype (spiral configuration) showed at a wind speed of 11 miles per hour (4.9 m/s) the power output of the system could reach 1,288 watt, when a typical turbine installation, with no wind deflecting structure, could produce only 200 watt by the same turbines at the same wind speed. At a wind speed of 18 miles per hour (8 m/sec), the spiral prototype produces 6,143 watt, while the power generated by the same turbines would be 1,412 watt in the absence of a wind deflecting structure under the same wind speed. Four US patents were allowed, and are in print, as the results of this project (US 7,540,706, US 7,679,209, US 7,845,904, and US 8,002,516).

  3. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  4. IBM Center for Applied Insights Energy and Utilities The value of smarter energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as is Google with its investment in offshore wind energy. To compete, utilities need to think about new revenue. There are alternative sources of power in the form of renewables like wind and distributed generation

  5. Methods and apparatus for rotor load control in wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine having a rotor, at least one rotor blade, and a plurality of generators, of which a first generator is configured to provide power to an electric grid and a second generator is configured to provide power to the wind turbine during times of grid loss. The wind turbine is configured to utilize power provided by the second generator to reduce loads on the wind turbine during times of grid loss.

  6. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett Mattapoisett, Massachusetts December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  9. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  10. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  11. Venture Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate HomeVela Jump to:I Wind Farm Jump to:II Wind

  12. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  13. Is the Weibull distribution really suited for wind statistics modeling and wind power evaluation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drobinski, Philippe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind speed statistics is generally modeled using the Weibull distribution. This distribution is convenient since it fully characterizes analytically with only two parameters (the shape and scale parameters) the shape of distribution and the different moments of the wind speed (mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis). This distribution is broadly used in the wind energy sector to produce maps of wind energy potential. However, the Weibull distribution is based on empirical rather than physical justification and might display strong limitations for its applications. The philosophy of this article is based on the modeling of the wind components instead of the wind speed itself. This provides more physical insights on the validity domain of the Weibull distribution as a possible relevant model for wind statistics and the quantification of the error made by using such a distribution. We thereby propose alternative expressions of more suited wind speed distribution.

  14. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWind Industry SoarsWind

  15. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: wind-turbine rotor design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind-turbine rotor design National Rotor Testbed Functional Scaling Presented at American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2014 Scitech On April 15, 2014, in Energy,...

  17. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  18. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

  19. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

  20. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  1. Design Considerations for Monopile Founded Offshore Wind Turbines Subject to Breaking Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Garrett Reese 1987-

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of offshore wind farms utilize monopile substructures. As these wind farms are typically located in water depths less than 30 meters, the effect of breaking waves on these structures is of great concern to design engineers...

  2. Design Considerations for Monopile Founded Offshore Wind Turbines Subject to Breaking Waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Garrett Reese 1987-

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of offshore wind farms utilize monopile substructures. As these wind farms are typically located in water depths less than 30 meters, the effect of breaking waves on these structures is of great concern to design engineers...

  3. Avian issues in wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyea, J. [National Audubon Society, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lot of concern among wind supporters, I know, about Audubon`s position on wind power. There is concern that this is the wrong time to be critical, and the wrong time to be putting any doubts in investors` minds, and the wrong time to provide an excuse for utilities to stop buying windpower. The long-term future of biodiversity, including bird diversity, depends on development of renewable energy, and that will mean some wind development in the right places and with the right types of systems. For both the long-time survival of the wind industry and for protection of bird populations, Audubon cannot be quiet on this issue. To avoid mistakes that can kill the industry in the long run, expenditures for wind/avian research have to be increased way beyond their present scope. We are going to need about $5 million dollars per year, if we are to (1) understand the biology and physics of bird-wind plant interactions, (2) if we are to understand relevant bird flightpaths, and (3) if we are to design a strategy to protect bird populations.

  4. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Piwko, R.; Jordan, G.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.; Milligan, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. It was initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming (see study area map). WestConnect also includes utilities in California, but these were not included because California had already completed a renewable energy integration study for the state. This study was set up to answer questions that utilities, public utilities commissions, developers, and regional planning organizations had about renewable energy use in the west: (1) Does geographic diversity of renewable energy resource help mitigate variability; (2) How do local resources compare to out-of-state resources; (3) Can balancing area cooperation help mitigate variability; (4) What is the role and value of energy storage; (5) Should reserve requirements be modified; (6) What is the benefit of forecasting; and (7) How can hydropower help with integration of renewables? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and run by NREL with WestConnect as a partner organization. The study follows DOE's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, which did not find any technical barriers to reaching 20% wind energy in the continental United States by 2030. This study and its partner study, the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, performed a more in-depth operating impact analysis to see if 20% wind energy was feasible from an operational level. In DOE/NREL's analysis, the 20% wind energy target required 25% wind energy in the western interconnection; therefore, this study considered 20% and 30% wind energy to bracket the DOE analysis. Additionally, since solar is rapidly growing in the west, 5% solar was also considered in this study. The goal of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is to understand the costs and operating impacts due to the variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. This is mainly an operations study, (rather than a transmission study), although different scenarios model different transmission build-outs to deliver power. Using a detailed power system production simulation model, the study identifies operational impacts and challenges of wind energy penetration up to 30% of annual electricity consumption.

  5. Organization of Energetic Particles by the Solar Wind Structure During the Declining to Minimum Phase of Solar Cycle 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feldman, W.C. : 1978, Solar wind stream interfaces. J.of large-scale solar wind structures. Ph.D. dissertation,R.M. : 2008, Weaker solar wind from the polar coronal holes

  6. Community Solar and Wind Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) is offering grants for community-scale solar and wind projects located in Illinois. Eligible businesses can apply for up to 30%...

  7. AGN-driven winds on all scales in Markarian 231: from hot nuclear ultra-fast up to kpc-extended molecular outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feruglio, C; Carniani, S; Piconcelli, E; Zappacosta, L; Bongiorno, A; Cicone, C; Maiolino, R; Marconi, A; Menci, N; Puccetti, S; Veilleux, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the best sensitivity and angular resolution maps of the molecular disk and outflow of Mrk231, obtained with IRAM/PdBI, and an analysis of archival Chandra and NuSTAR data. We constrain the physical properties of both the molecular disk and outflow, the presence of a highly-ionized ultra-fast nuclear wind, and their connection. The CO(2-1) outflow has a size of ~1 kpc, and extends in all directions around the nucleus, being more prominent along the south-west to north-east direction, suggesting a wide-angle biconical geometry. Its maximum projected velocity is nearly constant out to ~1 kpc, thus implying that the density of the outflowing material must decrease from the nucleus outwards as ~ r^-2. This suggests that either a large part of the gas leaves the flow during its expansion, or that the bulk of the outflow has not yet reached ~1 kpc, implying a limit on its age of ~ 1 Myr. The mass and energy rates of the molecular outflow are dM/dt(OF)=[500-1000] Msun/yr and dE(kin,OF)/dt=[7-10] 10^43 erg/...

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  16. Net Energy Payback and CO{sub 2} Emissions from Three Midwestern Wind Farms: An Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Scott W. [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)], E-mail: whites@kgs.ku.edu

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper updates a life-cycle net energy analysis and carbon dioxide emissions analysis of three Midwestern utility-scale wind systems. Both the Energy Payback Ratio (EPR) and CO{sub 2} analysis results provide useful data for policy discussions regarding an efficient and low-carbon energy mix. The EPR is the amount of electrical energy produced for the lifetime of the power plant divided by the total amount of energy required to procure and transport the materials, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The CO{sub 2} analysis for each power plant was calculated from the life-cycle energy input data.A previous study also analyzed coal and nuclear fission power plants. At the time of that study, two of the three wind systems had less than a full year of generation data to project the life-cycle energy production. This study updates the analysis of three wind systems with an additional four to eight years of operating data.The EPR for the utility-scale wind systems ranges from a low of 11 for a two-turbine system in Wisconsin to 28 for a 143-turbine system in southwestern Minnesota. The EPR is 11 for coal, 25 for fission with gas centrifuge enriched uranium and 7 for gaseous diffusion enriched uranium. The normalized CO{sub 2} emissions, in tonnes of CO{sub 2} per GW{sub e}h, ranges from 14 to 33 for the wind systems, 974 for coal, and 10 and 34 for nuclear fission using gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion enriched uranium, respectively.

  17. January/February 1997 21 Utility Green

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of scale that favored a single provider--the electric utility--have been exhausted. Nonutility companies to choose their electricity suppliers. Anticipating this competition, some electric utility companies have pricing program. #12;22 SOLAR TODAY In an early effort to break the histori- cal utility monopoly

  18. NREL: Wind Research - Wind Career Map Shows Wind Industry Career

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6SiteUtility-Scale

  19. RIS-M-2411 A NOTE ON WIND GENERATOR INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;~ y . RISÃ?-M-2411 A NOTE ON WIND GENERATOR INTERACTION N.O. Jensen Abstract. A simple model for the wake behind a wind generator is given. The model is compared to some full scale experimen- tal results. The model is then used in an example where the production from a circular cluster of 10 wind generators

  20. Assessing Novel Foundation Options for Offshore Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    Assessing Novel Foundation Options for Offshore Wind Turbines B.W. Byrne, BE(Hons), BCom, MA, DPhil G.T. Houlsby, MA, DSc, FREng, FICE Oxford University, UK SYNOPSIS Offshore wind farms, and of these wind power is the only one to be exploited on a commercial scale at present. Three major offshore

  1. Floating Offshore Wind Technology Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floating Offshore Wind Technology Jeff King Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 1 to site) Potential interconnection to future offshore PNWCA intertie 4 #12;5 Ave wind speed >= 10 m. (2010) Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  2. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  3. Operating Reserve Implication of Alternative Implementations of an Energy Imbalance Service on Wind Integration in the Western Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past few years, there has been significant interest in alternative ways to manage power systems over a larger effective electrical footprint. Large regional transmission organizations in the Eastern Interconnection have effectively consolidated balancing areas, achieving significant economies of scale that result in a reduction in required reserves. Conversely, in the Western Interconnection there are many balancing areas, which will result in challenges if there is significant wind and solar energy development in the region. A recent proposal to the Western Electricity Coordinating Council suggests a regional energy imbalance service (EIS). To evaluate this EIS, a number of analyses are in process or are planned. This paper describes one part of an analysis of the EIS's implication on operating reserves under several alternative scenarios of the market footprint and participation. We improve on the operating reserves method utilized in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study and apply this modified approach to data from the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study.

  4. Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for intermediate and large wind farms Ole Rathmann1, 3 , Sten Frandsen1 , and Rebecca Barthelmie2, 1 1 Wind Energy.rathmann@risoe.dk Summary Modern, very large wind farms require large-scale effects to be taken into account when evaluating academic models for infinitely large wind farms and present-day engineering models, which take into account

  5. Sensitivity of Coastal Currents near Point Conception to Forcing by Three Different Winds: ECMWF, COAMPS, and Blended SSM/IECMWFBuoy Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Changming "Charles"

    Sensitivity of Coastal Currents near Point Conception to Forcing by Three Different Winds: ECMWF stress curls are weak in COAMPS. It is found that these small-scale variations in the wind field force against the wind direction and can force a poleward current nearshore when the wind relaxes (Oey 1996

  6. Robust 1550-nm single-frequency all-fiber ns-pulsed fiber amplifier for wind-turbine predictive control by wind lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    Oldenburg, Germany ABSTRACT Scaling of the power yield of offshore wind farms relies on the capacity powers [1]. To reach the ambitious and politically motivated aims of Multi-GW offshore wind farms belongs to this category. Clustered in wind farms, today's wind turbines produce Megawatt-level output

  7. WHITE-LIGHT OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS AND COMPARISON WITH AUXILIARY DATA SETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Reinard, A. A., E-mail: howard@boulder.swri.edu [NOAA/SEC Mail Code W/NP92, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results utilizing a new data processing pipeline for STEREO/SECCHI. The pipeline is used to identify and track 24 large- and small-scale solar wind transients from the Sun out to 1 AU. This comparison was performed during a few weeks around the minimum at the end of Solar Cycle 23 and the start of Cycle 24 (2008 December to 2009 January). We use coronagraph data to identify features near the Sun, track them through HI-2A, and identify their signatures with in situ data at the Earth and STEREO-B. We provide measurements and preliminary analysis of the in situ signatures of these features near 1 AU. Along with the demonstration of the utility of heliospheric imagers for tracking even small-scale structures, we identify and discuss an important limitation in using geometric triangulation for determining three-dimensional properties.

  8. Financial Innovation Among the Community Wind Sector in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the relatively brief history of utility-scale wind generation, the 'community wind' sector - defined here as consisting of relatively small utility-scale wind power projects that are at least partly owned by one or more members of the local community - has played a vitally important role as a 'test bed' or 'proving ground' for wind turbine manufacturers. In the 1980s and 1990s, for example, Vestas and other now-established European wind turbine manufacturers relied heavily on community wind projects in Scandinavia and Germany to install - and essentially field-test - new turbine designs. The fact that orders from community wind projects seldom exceeded more than a few turbines at a time enabled the manufacturers to correct any design flaws or manufacturing defects fairly rapidly, and without the risk of extensive (and expensive) serial defects that can accompany larger orders. Community wind has been slower to take root in the United States - the first such projects were installed in the state of Minnesota around the year 2000. Just as in Europe, however, the community wind sector in the U.S. has similarly served as a proving ground - but in this case for up-and-coming wind turbine manufacturers that are trying to break into the broader U.S. wind power market. For example, community wind projects have deployed the first U.S. installations of wind turbines from Suzlon (in 2003), DeWind (2008), Americas Wind Energy (2008) and later Emergya Wind Technologies (2010),1 Goldwind (2009), AAER/Pioneer (2009), Nordic Windpower (2010), Unison (2010), and Alstom (2011). Just as it has provided a proving ground for new turbines, so too has the community wind sector in the United States served as a laboratory for experimentation with innovative new financing structures. For example, a variation of one of the most common financing arrangements in the U.S. wind market today - the 'partnership flip structure' - was first developed by community wind projects in Minnesota more than a decade ago (and is therefore sometimes referred to as the 'Minnesota flip' model) before being adapted by the broader wind market. More recently, a handful of community wind projects built in the United States over the past year have been financed via new and creative structures that push the envelope of wind project finance in the U.S. - in many cases, moving beyond the now-standard partnership flip structures. These projects include: (1) a 4.5 MW project in Maine that combines low-cost government debt with local tax equity, (2) a 25.3 MW project in Minnesota using a sale/leaseback structure, (3) a 10.5 MW project in South Dakota financed by an intrastate offering of both debt and equity, (4) a 6 MW project in Washington state that taps into 'New Markets Tax Credits' using an 'inverted' or 'pass-through' lease structure, and (5) a 9 MW project in Oregon that combines a variety of state and federal incentives and loans with unconventional equity from high-net-worth individuals. In most cases, these are first-of-their-kind financing structures that could serve as useful examples for other projects - both community and commercial wind alike. This new wave of financial innovation occurring in the community wind sector has been facilitated by policy changes, most of them recent. Most notably, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 ('the Recovery Act') enables, for a limited time, wind power (and other types of) projects to elect either a 30% investment tax credit ('ITC') or a 30% cash grant (the 'Section 1603 grant') in lieu of the federal incentive that has historically been available to wind projects in the U.S. - a 10-year production tax credit ('PTC'). This flexibility, in turn, enables wind power projects to pursue lease financing for the first time - leasing is not possible under the PTC. Because they are based on a project's cost rather than energy generation, the 30% ITC and Section 1603 grant also reduce performance risk relative to the PTC - this, too, is an important enabler of lease financing. Finally, by providing a cash rather than ta

  9. River Falls Municipal Utilities- Renewable Energy Finance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The...

  10. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  11. Wind Farm Monitoring at Lake Benton II Wind Power Project - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-275

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term, high-resolution wind turbine and wind power plant output data are important to assess the impact of wind power on grid operations and to derive meaningful statistics for better understanding of the variability nature of wind power. These data are used for many research and analyses activities consistent with the Wind Program mission: Establish a database of long-term wind power similar to other long-term renewable energy resource databases (e.g. solar irradiance and hydrology); produce meaningful statistics about long-term variation of wind power, spatial and temporal diversity of wind power, and the correlation of wind power, other renewable energy resources, and utility load; provide high quality, realistic wind power output data for system operations impact studies and wind plant and forecasting model validation.

  12. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

  13. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  14. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  15. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar October 20, 2014 8:00AM EDT...

  16. Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

  17. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  18. WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montanaâ??s vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQâ??s wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the stateâ??s university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

  19. Coastal zone wind energy. Part I. Synoptic and mesoscale controls and distributions of coastal wind energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garstang, M.; Nnaji, S.; Pielke, R.A.; Gusdorf, J.; Lindsey, C.; Snow, J.W.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a method of determining coastal wind energy resources. Climatological data and a mesoscale numerical model are used to delineate the available wind energy along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. It is found that the spatial distribution of this energy is dependent on the locations of the observing sites in relation to the major synoptic weather features as well as the particular orientation of the coastline with respect to the large-scale wind.

  20. Guide to Using the WIND Toolkit Validation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman-Cribbin, W.; Draxl, C.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of using 20% wind energy by 2030, the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was created to provide information on wind speed, wind direction, temperature, surface air pressure, and air density on more than 126,000 locations across the United States from 2007 to 2013. The numerical weather prediction model output, gridded at 2-km and at a 5-minute resolution, was further converted to detail the wind power production time series of existing and potential wind facility sites. For users of the dataset it is important that the information presented in the WIND Toolkit is accurate and that errors are known, as then corrective steps can be taken. Therefore, we provide validation code written in R that will be made public to provide users with tools to validate data of their own locations. Validation is based on statistical analyses of wind speed, using error metrics such as bias, root-mean-square error, centered root-mean-square error, mean absolute error, and percent error. Plots of diurnal cycles, annual cycles, wind roses, histograms of wind speed, and quantile-quantile plots are created to visualize how well observational data compares to model data. Ideally, validation will confirm beneficial locations to utilize wind energy and encourage regional wind integration studies using the WIND Toolkit.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is assessing the likely impact of offshore wind development in the various regions of the U.S. from the electric utility perspective. This work includes developing energy...

  2. Saving Energy and Money with Wind: 5 Steps Before You Invest...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy systems, and is a clean, renewable energy source. By investing in a small wind system, you can reduce pollution, avoid the high costs of extending utility power...

  3. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  4. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  5. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab Helps Engineers Improve Wind Power On November 15, 2011, in Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Researchers at the Wind Energy...

  7. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  8. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 5: the East Central Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brode, R.; Stoner, R.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters. States include Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

  9. Importance of Second-Order Difference-Frequency Wave-Diffraction Forces in the Validation of a Fast Semi-Submersible Floating Wind Turbine Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couling, A. J.; Goupee, A. J.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To better access the abundant offshore wind resource, efforts across the world are being undertaken to develop and improve floating offshore wind turbine technologies. A critical aspect of creating reliable, mature floating wind turbine technology is the development, verification, and validation of efficient computer-aided-engineering (CAE) tools that can be relied upon in the design process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created a comprehensive, coupled analysis CAE tool for floating wind turbines, FAST, which has been verified and utilized in numerous floating wind turbine studies. Several efforts are currently underway that leverage the extensive 1/50th-scale DeepCwind wind/wave basin model test dataset, obtained at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) in 2011, to validate the floating platform functionality of FAST to complement its already validated aerodynamic and structural simulation capabilities. In this paper, further work is undertaken to continue this validation. In particular, the ability of FAST to replicate global response behaviors associated with dynamic wind forces, second-order difference-frequency wave-diffraction forces and their interaction with one another are investigated.

  10. On open boundary conditions for a limited-area coastal model off Oregon. Part 2: response to wind forcing from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Additional experiments forced by realistic, time-variable, but spatially uniform winds are included to allow in numerical experiments utilizing idealized wind forcing. The objective of this paper is to continue the study in a situation where realistic wind stress forcing with strong spatial and temporal variability is utilized

  11. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  12. Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered sites and were thus not very useful in assessing the wind resource at locations that are well exposed to the winds. Ship data were determined to be the most useful for estimating the large-scale wind flow and assessing the spatial distribution of the wind resource throughout the region. Techniques were developed for analyzing and correcting ship wind data and extrapolating these data to coastal and inland areas by considering terrain influences on the large-scale wind flow. In areas where extrapolation of ship wind data was not entirely feasible, such as interior areas of Central America, other techniques were developed for estimating the wind flow and distribution of the wind resource. Through the application of the various innovative techniques developed for assessing the wind resource throughout the Caribbean and Central America region, many areas with potentially good to outstanding wind resource were identified that had not been previously recognized. In areas where existing site data were available from exposed locations, the measured wind resource was compared with the estimated wind resource that was derived using the assessment techniques. In most cases, there was good agreement between the measured wind resource and the estimated wind resource. This assessment project supported activities being pursued by the U.S. Committee for Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade (CORECT), the U.S. government's interagency program to assist in overseas marketing and promote renewable energy exports. An overall goal of the program is to improve U.S. competitiveness in the world renewable energy market. The Caribbean and Central America assessment, which is the first of several possible follow-on international wind energy resource assessments, provides valuable information needed by the U.S. wind energy industry to identify suitable wind resource areas and concentrate their efforts on these areas.

  13. Wind Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warmingGlobal »Wind

  14. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly UserWhat's New Today aboutWind

  15. Reactive power control of grid-connected wind farm based on adaptive dynamic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Haibo

    Reactive power control of grid-connected wind farm based on adaptive dynamic programming Yufei Tang Wind farm Power system Adaptive control a b s t r a c t Optimal control of large-scale wind farm has of wind farm with doubly fed induction generators (DFIG). Specifically, we investigate the on

  16. Ris-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for Large-scale Off-shore Wind Farms Peter contains a preliminary investigation of site specific design of off- shore wind turbines for a large off using a design tool for wind turbines that involve numerical optimization and aeroelastic calculations

  17. Wind Energy Research Project under the 6th Framework Programme Peter Hjuler Jensen, Ris National Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of wind turbines for future very large-scale applications, e.g. offshore wind farms of several hundred MW in wind farms and grid design issues, are to be analyzed, and new design approaches and concepts developed turbine structures. New developments in the field of wind farm lay out, control, and grid connection

  18. How to improve the design of the electrical system in future wind power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    . Two of the Ph.D. projects focus specifically to offshore wind farms and full- scale converter wind known to appear in the collection grid of offshore wind farms. The academic and industrial partners Farms will provide in-depth knowledge of all relevant aspects related to harmonics in offshore wind

  19. Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-010, Fall 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-010, Fall 2008 Revised 10 October@udel.edu Class web site with lecture notes: www.udel.edu/sakai UD offshore wind research: http, plan, regulate, and develop offshore wind resources for large-scale power production. Offshore wind

  20. Land-use implications of wind-energy-conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noun, R.J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An estimated 20 utilities in the United States are now investigating potential wind machine sites in their areas. Identifying sites for wind machine clusters (wind farms) involves more than just finding a location with a suitable wind resource. Consideration must also be given to the proximity of sites to existing transmission lines, environmental impacts, aesthetics, and legal concerns as well as the availability of and alternative uses for the land. These issues have made it increasingly difficult for utilities to bring conventional power plants on-line quickly. Utilities are now required, however, to give careful consideration to specific legal, social, and environmental questions raised by the siting of wind energy conversion systems (WECS).

  1. Analysis of Loads and Wind Energy Potential for Remote Power Stations in Alaska University of Massachusetts Amherst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Analysis of Loads and Wind Energy Potential for Remote Power Stations in Alaska Mia Devine@avec.org ABSTRACT This report addresses the potential of utilizing wind energy in remote communities of Alaska. This report evaluates the village electric usage patterns, wind energy resource potential, and wind

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide (revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.