Sample records for utility resource planning

  1. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments...

  2. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  3. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  4. The process of integrated resource planning for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, M.; Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Yourstone, E. (Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper identifies six key issues in utility integrated resource planning that are expected to influence a plan's societal value and discusses the first four, which are related to the planning process. They are: (1) the relative emphasis placed on supply- and demand-side resources throughout the planning process; (2) the breadth of inputs considered during plan preparation from various in-house departments and non-utility interests; (3) the criteria used to select options for resource plans; and (4) the uncertainty analyses used and their application to the resource selection process. A number of opportunities exist for utilities and their regulators to improve the planning process in order to increase the value of the resource plans that are produced. Specifically, utilities and/or their state regulatory agencies can: (1) conduct comprehensive assessments of demand-side management (DSM) resources, avoid unduly restrictive screening methods, and expand data collection efforts concerning current energy-use patterns and existing DSM program performance; (2) increase the involvement of regulators and other interested non-utility parties in the resource planning process through mechanisms such as public meeting and the establishment of technical advisory boards; (3) when evaluating the cost-effectiveness of potential demand-side resources, use the Total Resource Cost Test or Societal Test instead of the more restrictive Ratepayer Impact Test, consider the environmental effects of the resources considered, and examine the effects of the entire mix of resource selection criteria used; and (4) focus uncertainty analysis on key uncertainties over the short-term time horizon and make sure that the results of this analysis are used in resource selection. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Assessing integrated resource plans prepared by electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Schweitzer, M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Yourstone, E. (Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Eto, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses guidelines for long-term resource plans, based on the written reports only. The word plan refers to both the program worked out beforehand to accomplish a goal and the report that describes the plan. The particular meaning should be clear from the context. The purpose of these guidelines is to assist PUC staff who review utility plans and utility staff who prepare such plans. These guidelines were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with contributions from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 45 refs.

  6. NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes.

  7. A good integrated resource plan: Guidelines for electric utilities and regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated resource planning helps utilities and state regulatory commissions consistently assess a broad range of demand and supply resources to meet customer energy-service needs cost-effectively. Key characteristics of this planning approach include: explicit consideration and fair treatment of a wide variety of demand and supply options, consideration of the environmental and other social costs of providing energy services, public participation in the development of the resource plan, and analysis of the uncertainties associated with different external factors and resource options. Integrated resource planning differs from traditional planning in the types and scope of resources considered, the owners of the resources, the organizations involved in resource planning, and the criteria for resource selection. This report presents suggestions to utilities on how to conduct such planning and what to include in their resource-planning reports. These suggestions are based on a review of about 50 resource plans as well as discussions with and presentations to regulators and utilities. The suggestions cover four broad topics; the technical competence with which the plan was developed; the adequacy, detail, and consistency (with the long-term plan) of the short-term action plan; the extent to which the interests of various stakeholders was considered, both in public participation in plan development and in the variety of resource plans developedand assessed; and the clarity and comprehensiveness of the utility`s report on its plan. Technical competence includes energy and demand forecasts, assessment of supply and demand resources, resource integration, and treatment of uncertainty. Issues associated with forecasts include forecasting approaches; links between the forecasts of energy use and peak demands; and links between the forecasts and the effects of past, present, and future demand-side management programs.

  8. A good integrated resource plan: Guidelines for electric utilities and regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated resource planning helps utilities and state regulatory commissions consistently assess a broad range of demand and supply resources to meet customer energy-service needs cost-effectively. Key characteristics of this planning approach include: explicit consideration and fair treatment of a wide variety of demand and supply options, consideration of the environmental and other social costs of providing energy services, public participation in the development of the resource plan, and analysis of the uncertainties associated with different external factors and resource options. Integrated resource planning differs from traditional planning in the types and scope of resources considered, the owners of the resources, the organizations involved in resource planning, and the criteria for resource selection. This report presents suggestions to utilities on how to conduct such planning and what to include in their resource-planning reports. These suggestions are based on a review of about 50 resource plans as well as discussions with and presentations to regulators and utilities. The suggestions cover four broad topics; the technical competence with which the plan was developed; the adequacy, detail, and consistency (with the long-term plan) of the short-term action plan; the extent to which the interests of various stakeholders was considered, both in public participation in plan development and in the variety of resource plans developedand assessed; and the clarity and comprehensiveness of the utility's report on its plan. Technical competence includes energy and demand forecasts, assessment of supply and demand resources, resource integration, and treatment of uncertainty. Issues associated with forecasts include forecasting approaches; links between the forecasts of energy use and peak demands; and links between the forecasts and the effects of past, present, and future demand-side management programs.

  9. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

  10. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

  11. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Markets for renewable energy have historically been motivated primarily by policy efforts, but a less widely recognized driver is poised to also play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Resource planning has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions where retail competition has failed to take root. In the western United States, the most recent resource plans contemplate a significant amount of renewable energy additions. These planned additions--primarily coming from wind power--are motivated by the improved economics of wind power, a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities, and an increasing recognition of the inherent risks (e.g., natural gas price risk, environmental compliance risk) in fossil-based generation portfolios. This report examines how twelve western utilities treat renewable energy in their recent resource plans. In aggregate, these utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. Our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable energy, and (2) to identify methodological/modeling issues, and suggest possible improvements to methods used to evaluate renewable energy as a resource option. Here we summarize the key findings of the report, beginning with a discussion of the planned renewable energy additions called for by the twelve utilities, an overview of how these plans incorporated renewables into candidate portfolios, and a review of the specific technology cost and performance assumptions they made, primarily for wind power. We then turn to the utilities' analysis of natural gas price and environmental compliance risks, and examine how the utilities traded off portfolio cost and risk in selecting a preferred portfolio.

  12. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  13. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts onRegional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the aftermath of the consumer price shocks and short-term power shortages of the 2000-01 electricity crisis, policymakers and regulators in Western states are placing increased emphasis on integrated resource planning (IRP), resource adequacy and assessment and a diversified portfolio of resources to meet the needs of electricity consumers. In some states, this has led to a resurgence in state and utility commitments to energy efficiency. Increasing interest in acquiring energy efficiency as a power-system resource is also driven by the desire to dampen high growth rates in electricity demand in some Western states, rapid increases in natural gas prices, concerns about the environmental impacts of electricity generation (e.g. water consumption by power plants, air quality), and the potential of energy efficiency to provide utility bill savings for households and businesses (WGA CDEAC 2006). Recognizing the cost-competitiveness and environmental benefits of energy efficiency, the Western Governor's Association (WGA) has set a high priority for energy efficiency, establishing a goal of reducing projected electricity demand by 20% across the West by 2020 in a policy resolution on Clean and Diversified Energy for the West (WGA 2004). Nationally, the need for improved tracking of demand-side resources in load forecasting is formalized in the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC)'s recently adopted reliability standards, which utilities and regional reliability organizations will need to comply with (NERC 2005a and 2005b). In this study, we examine the treatment of energy efficiency in recent resource plans issued by fourteen investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the Western United States and Canada. The goals of this study are to: (1) summarize energy-efficiency resources as represented in a large sample of recent resource plans prepared by Western utilities and identify key issues; (2) evaluate the extent to which the information provided in current resource plans can be used to support region-wide resource assessment and tracking of state/utility progress in meeting the WGA's energy-efficiency goals (WGA 2004); and (3) offer recommendations on information and documentation of energy-efficiency resources that should be included in future resource plans to facilitate comparative review and regional coordination. The scope of this report covers projected electric end-use efficiency investments reported in all Western utility resource plans that were publicly available as of February 2006. While a few utilities included additional demand-side resources, such as demand response, in their plans, we do not report that information. However, many of the issues and recommendations in reference to energy efficiency in this report are relevant to other demand-side resources as well. This report is organized as follows. Section 2 outlines the data sources and approach used in this study and conceptualizes methods and metrics for tracking energy-efficiency resources over time. Section 3 presents results from the review of the utility resource plans. Important issues encountered in reviewing the resource plans are discussed in section 4. Finally, section 5 concludes with recommendations for improving the tracking and reporting of energy efficiency in forthcoming resource plans.

  14. Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarelyobjectively evaluate renewable resources. Planned Renewableamount of planned renewable resource additions. In the case

  15. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricityindirect costs of renewable resources, as well as resourceamount of planned renewable resource additions. In the case

  16. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning with Renewable Resources. ” The Electricity14 4.1 Renewable Resources20 5. Renewable Resource Cost and Performance

  17. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    planning. First, early retirement of a utility’s own coal-would justify the early retirement of their own coal-fired

  18. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    planning. First, early retirement of a utility’s own coal-would justify the early retirement of their own coal-fired

  19. Recent Developments in the Regulation of Electric Utility Resource Planning in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Totten, J.; Adib, P.; Matlock, R.; Treadway, N.

    The Texas Legislature has charged the Public Utility Commission of Texas with the responsibility to license utility power plants and transmission lines, and develop a statewide electrical energy plan. Related duties include the encouragement...

  20. Utility Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict SolarJohnpotential-calc Sign InPages

  1. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

  2. Review of Utility Resource Plans in the West: Resource Strategies for a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofitting DoorsReview of SARAnalysis

  3. Strategic Plan for Utilizing Low Cost Engineering Resources at Generic Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veach, Michael

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, businesses have used several different options in an effort to alleviate engineering resource constraints. These included use of contract engineers, overtime of employees, or utilization of sister facilities ...

  4. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goal.6 Figure 2-2. Accounting for Energy Efficiency2-3. Accounting for Energy Efficiency Resources in LoadFigure 3-1. Plan Energy Efficiency Program Effects: Annual

  5. Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of NewRenewable Generation in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, markets for renewable generation--especially wind power--have grown substantially in recent years. This growth is typically attributed to technology improvements and resulting cost reductions, the availability of federal tax incentives, and aggressive state policy efforts. But another less widely recognized driver of new renewable generation is poised to play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in the late-1980s to mid-1990s, but relegated to lesser importance as many states took steps to restructure their electricity markets in the late-1990s, IRP has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions such as the western United States, where retail competition has failed to take root. As practiced in the United States, IRP is a formal process by which utilities analyze the costs, benefits, and risks of all resources available to them--both supply- and demand-side--with the ultimate goal of identifying a portfolio of resources that meets their future needs at lowest cost and/or risk. Though the content of any specific utility IRP is unique, all are built on a common basic framework: (1) development of peak demand and load forecasts; (2) assessment of how these forecasts compare to existing and committed generation resources; (3) identification and characterization of various resource portfolios as candidates to fill a projected resource deficiency; (4) analysis of these different ''candidate'' resource portfolios under base-case and alternative future scenarios; and finally, (5) selection of a preferred portfolio, and creation of a near-term action plan to begin to move towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarely considered seriously in utility IRP. In the western United States, however, the most recent resource plans call for a significant amount of new wind power capacity. These planned additions appear to be motivated by the improved economics of wind power, an emerging understanding that wind integration costs are manageable, and a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities. Equally important, utility IRPs are increasingly recognizing the inherent risks in fossil-based generation portfolios--especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation--and the benefits of renewable energy in mitigating those risks. This article, which is based on a longer report from Berkeley Lab,i examines how twelve investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the western United States--Avista, Idaho Power, NorthWestern Energy (NWE), Portland General Electric (PGE), Puget Sound Energy (PSE), PacifiCorp, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Nevada Power, Sierra Pacific, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)--treat renewable energy in their most recent resource plans (as of July 2005). In aggregate, these twelve utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. In reviewing these plans, our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable generation in the United States, and (2) to suggest possible improvements to the methods used to evaluate renewable generation as a resource option. As such, we begin by summarizing the amount and types of new renewable generation planned as a result of these twelve IRPs. We then offer observations about the IRP process, and how it might be improved to more objectively evaluate renewable resources.

  6. Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Hill, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Div.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is a form of utility regulation that strengthens the financial incentives to lower rates, lower costs, or improve nonprice performance relative traditional regulation, which the authors call cost-of-service, rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. Although the electric utility industry has considerable experience with incentive mechanisms that target specific areas of performance, implementation of mechanisms that cover a comprehensive set of utility costs or services is relatively rare. In recent years, interest in PBR has increased as a result of growing dissatisfaction with COS/ROR and as a result of economic and technological trends that are leading to more competition in certain segments of the electricity industry. In addition, incentive regulation has been used with some success in other public utility industries, most notably telecommunications in the US and telecommunications, energy, and water in the United Kingdom. In this report, the authors analyze comprehensive PBR mechanisms for electric utilities in four ways: (1) they describe different types of PBR mechanisms, (2) they review a sample of actual PBR plans, (3) they consider the interaction of PBR and utility-funded energy efficiency programs, and (4) they examine how PBR interacts with electric utility resource planning and industry restructuring. The report should be of interest to technical staff of utilities and regulatory commissions that are actively considering or designing PBR mechanisms. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Utility Metering- AGL Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses AGL Resources metering, including interruptible rate customers, large users, and meeting federal metering goals.

  8. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Load Forecasts to Support WGA and Resource Assessmentin Load Forecasts to Support WGA and Resource AssessmentMingst, 2006, “Resource Assessment in the West: Review of

  9. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of achieving 20% of energy resources with energy efficiencyEnergy Efficiency Resources2-3. Accounting for Energy Efficiency Resources in Load

  10. Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nichole

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    markets in which energy efficiency resources are allowed tousing the energy efficiency resource acquisitions proposeddelivering energy efficiency resources. The policy goal is

  11. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alternative CO 2 price projections in terms of the levelizedof utilities’ price projections, as well as differences inand high-range CO 2 price projections developed by Synapse

  12. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alternative CO 2 price projections in terms of the levelizedof utilities’ price projections, as well as differences inand high-range CO 2 price projections developed by Synapse

  13. Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nichole

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WGA CDEAC) (2006). Energy Efficiency Task Force Report.on Phase 1 Issues: Energy Efficiency Shareholder Mechanism,Schlegel, J. (2006). Energy Efficiency in Western Utility

  14. Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nichole

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CDEAC) (2006). Energy Efficiency Task Force Report. January.on Phase 1 Issues: Energy Efficiency Shareholder Mechanism,Schlegel, J. (2006). Energy Efficiency in Western Utility

  15. Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nichole

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coordinating Council (WECC) (2005). Hourly Demands 1998-Coordinating Council (WECC, 2005). 3 To compare utilities’one to three years. The WECC control area roughly includes

  16. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portland General Electric (PGE), 2004. “Final Action Plan:Electric Co. Portland General Electric Public Service of NewPG&E) • Portland General Electric (PGE) • Public Service of

  17. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for renewable energy, and its risk of permanent expiration,for renewable energy, and its risk of permanent expiration,to renewable energy) as a risk-mitigating resource

  18. Utilize Available Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Business Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business Planning Resources, a presentation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

  20. RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES PROCUREMENT PLAN This Renewable Energy Resources Procurement Plan ("RPS Procurement Plan" or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Eligible Renewable Energy Resources Biodiesel Fuel cells using renewable fuels Ocean wave, ocean thermalRENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES PROCUREMENT PLAN This Renewable Energy Resources Procurement Plan ("RPS California's electric utilities and other retail sellers to procure eligible renewable energy resources so

  1. Primer on gas integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

  2. Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Working with Utilities Peer...

  3. Utilize Available Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict SolarJohnpotential-calc

  4. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with New Renewable Resources 18Portfolios with New Renewable Resources No. of Candidateportfolios with new renewable resources comprising, at most,

  5. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We benchmark the carbon footprint of the new resourceand their associated carbon footprint, providing a bottom-updegrade a utility’s carbon footprint, as illustrated by

  6. Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hill, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summaries of the electric utilities performance-based rate plans for the following companies: Alabama Power Company; Central Maine Power Company; Consolidated Edison of New York; Mississippi Power Company; New York State Electric and Gas Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; PacifiCorp; Pacific Gas and Electric; Southern California Edison; San Diego Gas & Electric; and Tucson Electric Power. In addition, this document also contains information about LBNL`s Power Index and Incentive Properties of a Hybrid Cap and Long-Run Demand Elasticity.

  7. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    containing new pulverized coal generation without CCS. Ofwith any coal-fired generation. Of these utilities, four areor contracting with coal-fired generation lacking CCS.

  8. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expiring geothermal, small hydro, and biomass contracts).Plan Needs Geothermal Small Hydro or Upgrade Biomass Windwith geothermal, and four with small hydro or upgrades to

  9. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plan Needs Geothermal Small Hydro or Upgrade Biomass Windwith geothermal, and four with small hydro or upgrades toexpiring geothermal, small hydro, and biomass contracts).

  10. Community Energy Stategic Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Community Energy Strategic Planning Resources Technical Assistance Program January 24 th , 2013 2 Agenda 1. Welcome & overview 2. What is a community energy strategic plan and why...

  11. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  12. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers` short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners` (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  13. Community Energy Strategic Planning Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation for the Community Energy Stategic Planning Resources webinar, presented on January 24, 2013 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Assistance Program (TAP).

  14. Geology in coal resource utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, D.C. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 37 papers in this book were compiled with an overriding theme in mind: to provide the coal industry with a comprehensive source of information on how geology and geologic concepts can be applied to the many facets of coal resource location, extraction, and utilization. The chapters have been arranged to address the major coal geology subfields of Exploration and Reserve Definition, Reserve Estimation, Coalbed Methane, Underground Coal Gasification, Mining, Coal Quality Concerns, and Environmental Impacts, with papers distributed on the basis of their primary emphasis. To help guide one through the collection, the author has included prefaces at the beginning of each chapter. They are intended as a brief lead-in to the subject of the chapter and an acknowledgement of the papers' connections to the subject and contributions to the chapter. In addition, a brief cross-reference section has been included in each preface to help one find papers of interest in other chapters. The subfields of coal geology are intimately intertwined, and investigations in one area may impact problems in another area. Some subfields tend to blur at their edges, such as with reserve definition and reserve estimation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM) is a decision-support software product for resource-and-capacity planning. Users can evaluate changing constraints on schedule performance, projected cost, and resource use. IRPM is a unique software tool that can analyze complex business situations from a basic supply chain to an integrated production facility to a distributed manufacturing complex. IRPM can be efficiently configured through a user-friendly graphical interface to rapidly provide charts, graphs, tables, and/or written results to summarize postulated business scenarios. There is not a similar integrated resource planning software package presently available. Many different businesses (from government to large corporations as well as medium-to-small manufacturing concerns) could save thousands of dollars and hundreds of labor hours in resource and schedule planning costs. Those businesses also could avoid millions of dollars of revenue lost from fear of overcommitting or from penalties and lost future business for failing to meet promised delivery by using IRPM to perform what-if business-case evaluations. Tough production planning questions that previously were left unanswered can now be answered with a high degree of certainty. Businesses can anticipate production problems and have solutions in hand to deal with those problems. IRPM allows companies to make better plans, decisions, and investments.

  16. Utilities Department Resource Management Division

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLCEnergy)PeteforsythUtah/Wind Resources/FullDepartment

  17. Avista 2011 Integrated Resource Plan Clint Kalich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avista 2011 Integrated Resource Plan Clint Kalich Manager, Resource Planning & Power Supply Other #12;Conservation Avoided Cost Calculations For 1 MW Measure With Flat Delivery Item $/MWh Energy

  18. Utility planning tools catalog. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, M.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning methods new to the industry can help utilities steer a sound course in today's complex business environment. This catalog offers an overview of 23 innovative techniques drawn from other industries. The tools selected focus on supporting strategic analysis and decision making for utilities.

  19. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Project objectives: Techno-economic analysis of the potential of...

  20. Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency Guide describes information...

  1. Leveraging Utility Resources to Boost Efficiency for the Next...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leveraging Utility Resources to Boost Efficiency for the Next Generation of Space Travel: An Energy Efficiency Case Study of ATK Launch Systems Leveraging Utility Resources to...

  2. Light Duty Utility Arm Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1995-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes how validation testing of the software will be implemented for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm System (LDUA). The purpose of LDUA software validation testing is to demonstrate and document that the LDUA software meets its software requirements specification.

  3. OFFICE OF RESOURCE PLANNING OPERATING BUDGET UNIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leng, Chenlei

    OFFICE OF RESOURCE PLANNING Manager Sarah Teo OPERATING BUDGET UNIT Deputy Director (Operating, Strategic Initiatives & Consolidated Budgets) Tay Sok Kian Senior Director Ajith Prasad Senior Associate Initiatives & Research Budgets: (Planning & Budget Management) Revenue Policies & Planning: (Grants

  4. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market-Based Programs Technical Information Network SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility...

  5. Resource assessment/commercialization planning meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy and Division of Geothermal Resource Management, sponsored a Resource Assessment/Commercialization Planning meeting in Salt Lake City on January 21-24, 1980. The meeting included presentations by state planning and resource teams from all DOE regions. An estimated 130 people representing federal, state and local agencies, industry and private developers attended.

  6. Supply-side Resources & Planning Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - station Solar PV (from 6th Plan) 25 MW dc/20 MW net ac output using flat plate non concentrating single) ­ Storage Resource assessment data needs and applications R d f t Resources proposed for assessment Forecasts ProCost 46/19/2013 #12;6/19/2013 3 Resource data & planning assumptions Reference plant (New

  7. Geothermal Resources and Transmission Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project addresses transmission-related barriers to utility-scale deployment of geothermal electric generation technologies.

  8. Natural Resource Management Plan Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    wood industry, some farming in area of Solar Farm 3 #12;History of Natural Resource Management Formal

  9. Electric Utility Strategic Planning at the PUCT: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarnikau, J.

    . This paper provides a broad 'overview of electric utility atrategic planning activities at the PUCT, concentrating on each project's objec tives, methodology, and relationship to other projects. The role of planning activities at a regulatory agency... will be discussed. It is argued that planning projects at a regulatory agency can provide an invaluable validity check on a utility's planning programs, as well as a source of guidance, objective information, and new ideas. However, a regulatory agency...

  10. Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Hanford cultural resources management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatters, J.C. (ed.)

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Integrated Resource Planning: A Dialogue with ELCON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treadway, N.; Torrent, G.

    the building of generating units. Planning decisions would now include alternative energy sources 2 and demand side management. Also very important in the IRP process is the evaluation of external impacts of any planning decision with a special focus... and demand resources in electricity markets. In this paper we provide a definition of that concept and discuss two of its main features: Demand-side Management programs and environmental externalities. We also examine a number of positions taken by ELCON...

  13. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

  14. NREL's FY09 CSP Resource Assessment Plans: Solar Resource Assessment Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Resource Assessment Workshop, Denver CO, Oct 29, 2008 presentation: NREL's FY09 CSP Resource Assessment Plans

  15. Teacher Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teacher Resources For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Teacher Resources Scavenger...

  16. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun Williams

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at Idaho National Laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The Idaho National Laboratory is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable, bear valuable physical and intangible legacies, and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through regular reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  18. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Diana Lee

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a federal agency, the U.S. Department of Energy has been directed by Congress, the U.S. president, and the American public to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historic, and other cultural resources on the lands it administers. This mandate to preserve cultural resources in a spirit of stewardship for the future is outlined in various federal preservation laws, regulations, and guidelines such as the National Historic Preservation Act, the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, and the National Environmental Policy Act. The purpose of this Cultural Resource Management Plan is to describe how the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office will meet these responsibilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. This Laboratory, which is located in southeastern Idaho, is home to a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least 13,500 years of human occupation in the southeastern Idaho area. These resources are nonrenewable; bear valuable physical and intangible legacies; and yield important information about the past, present, and perhaps the future. There are special challenges associated with balancing the preservation of these sites with the management and ongoing operation of an active scientific laboratory. The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is committed to a cultural resource management program that accepts these challenges in a manner reflecting both the spirit and intent of the legislative mandates. This document is designed for multiple uses and is intended to be flexible and responsive to future changes in law or mission. Document flexibility and responsiveness will be assured through annual reviews and as-needed updates. Document content includes summaries of Laboratory cultural resource philosophy and overall Department of Energy policy; brief contextual overviews of Laboratory missions, environment, and cultural history; and an overview of cultural resource management practices. A series of appendices provides important details that support the main text.

  20. Community Energy Planning A Resource Guide for Remote Communities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canada Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Energy Planning A Resource Guide for Remote Communities in Canada AgencyCompany Organization Natural Resources Canada Sector...

  1. Operational efficiency through resource planning optimization and work process improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balwani, Siddharth (Siddharth Vashdev)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis covers work done at National Grid to improve resource planning and the execution of pipeline construction and maintenance work carried out at the yards. Resource Planning, the art of picking the right jobs for ...

  2. ISS Utilization Status and Plans NASA Advisory Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    ISS Utilization Status and Plans NASA Advisory Council Commercial Space Committee Joel Montalbano Deputy ISS Program Manager for Research NASA 1 March 2013 #12;Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø International Space Station,164 km/h (17,500 mph) = 7823.2 m/s (a bullet from a high powered rifle travels at ~1500 m/s) The solar

  3. Utility-Based Wireless Resource Allocation for Variable Rate Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Ng, Chun Sum

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For most wireless services with variable rate transmission, both average rate and rate oscillation are important performance metrics. The traditional performance criterion, utility of average transmission rate, boosts the average rate but also results in high rate oscillations. We introduce a utility function of instantaneous transmission rates. It is capable of facilitating the resource allocation with flexible combinations of average rate and rate oscillation. Based on the new utility, we consider the time and power allocation in a time-shared wireless network. Two adaptation policies are developed, namely, time sharing (TS) and joint time sharing and power control (JTPC). An extension to quantized time sharing with limited channel feedback (QTSL) for practical systems is also discussed. Simulation results show that by controlling the concavity of the utility function, a tradeoff between the average rate and rate oscillation can be easily made.

  4. HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES, and student body." From David Ward, "A Vision for the Future," p. 9. This document lists the human-resource goals and plans of the Office of Human Resources, the Equity and Diversity Resource Center

  5. The US Department of Energy's least-cost utility planning program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, L.; Hirst, E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Least-Cost Utility Planning Program (LCUP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) was created at the direction of Congress in 1986. The purpose of the program is to provide utility planners and regulators with data, analysis and evaluation tools that can assist with the selection of supply and demand options that deliver high-quality, low-cost energy services to customers. In 1987 fourteen grantees were selected by DOE to develop least-cost planning data and tools. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting an ongoing assessment of the fourteen DOE/LCUP projects which includes technical oversight and reviews of draft and final reports. ORNL is preparing a report that synthesizes across the individual projects to draw conclusions about the accomplishments of LCUP as a whole. This paper summarizes the types of data, models and planning tools developed by each of the fourteen grantees and suggests who could best use them for what purpose. The grantees are addressing a wide range of issues including: (1) data base development for demand-side planning, (2) the review, critique, selection, application and development of models for a variety of least-cost planning problems, (3) consensus building processes to support the development of organizational structures that will institutionalize least-cost planning activities, (4) the development of tools for incorporating renewable resources and cogeneration into utility planning processes, and (5) the analysis of legal issues related to the incorporation of least-cost planning objectives into bulk power transactions. The purpose of this paper is to familiarize readers with the resources available from the DOE/LCUP program and to summarize the program's primary accomplishments to date. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Combining Representations from Manufacturing, Machine Planning, and Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    -time controller. The controller uses four matrices: Fv and Sv describe ordering constraints between plan by allowing limited production capacity Inputs to Control System Researchers studying issues in intelligentCombining Representations from Manufacturing, Machine Planning, and Manufacturing Resource Planning

  7. Resource Planning Model: An Integrated Resource Planning and Dispatch Tool for Regional Electric Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Drury, E.; Eurek, K.; Bodington, N.; Lopez, A.; Perry, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report introduces a new capacity expansion model, the Resource Planning Model (RPM), with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be used for mid- and long-term scenario planning of regional power systems. Although RPM can be adapted to any geographic region, the report describes an initial version of the model adapted for the power system in Colorado. It presents examples of scenario results from the first version of the model, including an example of a 30%-by-2020 renewable electricity penetration scenario.

  8. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department The Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (LRES) will undertake a continuing assessment

  9. Warner College of Natural Resources 2005-2010 Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of renewable and non-renewable resources. #12;SOCIETAL GOALS Human dimensions (human understandingWarner College of Natural Resources 2005-2010 Strategic Plan Executive Summary #12;WARNER COLLEGE OF NATURAL RESOURCES 2005-2010 STRATEGIC PLAN Executive Summary Our Vision To be the global leader

  10. Water resource management planning guide for Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.E.; Stephenson, D.E.; Steele, J.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.); Gordon, D.E. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant)

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Resource Management Planning Guide provides an outline for the development of a Savannah River Plant Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP) to protect, manage, and monitor the site's water resources. The management plan is based on three principle elements: (1) protection of the water quality, (2) management of the water quantity, and (3) monitoring of the water quality and quantity. The plan will assure that changes in water quality and quantity are identified and that corrective action is implemented as needed. In addition, water management activities within and between Savannah River Plant (SRP) organizations and departments will be coordinated to ensure the proper management of water resources. This document is intended as a guide to suggest goals and objectives that will provide a basis for the development of a water resource plan for SRP. Planning should be flexible rather than rigid, and the plan outlines in this document was prepared to be modified or updated as conditions necessitate. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  11. aid resource planning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Planning Problems of Urban Water Resources in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: including the inventory and planning...

  12. Plan Your School Visit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Your School Visit For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Plan Your School Visit...

  13. Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2009-2010 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences: Ecology and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources Department Head: Tracy M. Sterling Assessment Coordinator: Cathy Zabinski Degrees/Majors/Options Offered

  15. BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING RESOURCES FOR SMALL-AND MEDIUM-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING RESOURCES FOR SMALL- AND MEDIUM- SIZED BUSINESSES May 2010 Prepared and supported by the Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security Business Continuity Planning Resources for Small- and Medium- Sized Businesses KS Judd AM Lesperance May 14, 2010 #12;DISCLAIMER

  16. Decoupling and Utility Business Model Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton: ENERGY8Decommissioning Plan|

  17. The role of competitive forces in integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahn, E.; Goldman, C.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we study the potential for competitive forces to enhance the efficiency of integrated resource planning and produce consumer cost reductions. We examine the efficiency gains from competition in the private power market, and ask whether similar forces can be successful on the demand-side of the market. The goal of this analysis is to identify and elucidate options available to state Public Utility Commissions (PUCs) to support competition in utility demand-side management programs to achieve efficiencies similar to those being achieved through development of competitive forces on the supply-side of the industry. We consider the entire market structure from upstream suppliers to distribution intermediaries to ultimate consumers. The market structure differs substantially between the demand-side and the supply-side of the electricity market. Demand-site electricity markets have a longer distribution chain and more intermediaries than the supply-side, which is attributable in part to the ultimately retail nature of demand and the wholesale nature of supply, and in part indicates market failures.

  18. Individual Development and Excutive Development Plan Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to OPM, an individual development plan (IDP) is a tool to assist employees in career and personal development. Its primary purpose is to help employees reach short and long-term career...

  19. BSBA IN MANAGEMENT -HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    BSBA IN MANAGEMENT - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION ASSESSMENT PLAN (REV. 7 in Human Resource Management (HRM), the goal is to provide a foundation of all areas of human resources countries. · Content Delivered in: MGT 350, MGT 405, & MGT 357. · Assessment Method: Culminating exam

  20. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  1. 2004 Power Marketing Plan - Base Resource Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Terminates the existing contract amendments that provide for a customer's right to purchase power from Western after 2004. Execution of the Base Resource contract sustains a...

  2. Local government involvement in long term resource planning for community energy systems. Demand side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program was developed to coordinate governmental, research, utility, and business energy savings efforts, and to evaluate future potential actions, based on actual field data obtained during the implementation of Phase I of the State Resource Plan. This has lead to the establishment of a state conservation and energy efficiency fund for the purpose of establishing a DSM Program. By taking a state wide perspective on resource planning, additional savings, including environmental benefits, can be achieved through further conservation and demand management. This effort has already blossomed into a state directive for DSM programs for the natural gas industry.

  3. Local government involvement in long term resource planning for community energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program was developed to coordinate governmental, research, utility, and business energy savings efforts, and to evaluate future potential actions, based on actual field data obtained during the implementation of Phase I of the State Resource Plan. This has lead to the establishment of a state conservation and energy efficiency fund for the purpose of establishing a DSM Program. By taking a state wide perspective on resource planning, additional savings, including environmental benefits, can be achieved through further conservation and demand management. This effort has already blossomed into a state directive for DSM programs for the natural gas industry.

  4. Seventh Power Plan: Generating Resources Advisory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Seventh Power Plan. ­ Included feedback and ideas from regional entities Council Members prioritized list of topics Council Members prioritized list of topics and identified four to focus on early in the process 2; strategies to help meet those needs Customer demand response, including its potential as a source of peaking

  5. Criteria for an effective water resource planning process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, James Myron

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In examining the present status of water resource planning in the Pacific Northwest, numerous critical inadequacies become readily apparent. One method of minimizing some of these inadequacies is through administrative ...

  6. BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Approved Resource Management Plan AmendmentsRecord of Decision for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  7. Resource-Optimal Planning For An Autonomous Planetary Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Della Penna, Giuseppe; Magazzeni, Daniele; Mercorio, Fabio; 10.5121/ijaia.2010.1302

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous planetary vehicles, also known as rovers, are small autonomous vehicles equipped with a variety of sensors used to perform exploration and experiments on a planet's surface. Rovers work in a partially unknown environment, with narrow energy/time/movement constraints and, typically, small computational resources that limit the complexity of on-line planning and scheduling, thus they represent a great challenge in the field of autonomous vehicles. Indeed, formal models for such vehicles usually involve hybrid systems with nonlinear dynamics, which are difficult to handle by most of the current planning algorithms and tools. Therefore, when offline planning of the vehicle activities is required, for example for rovers that operate without a continuous Earth supervision, such planning is often performed on simplified models that are not completely realistic. In this paper we show how the UPMurphi model checking based planning tool can be used to generate resource-optimal plans to control the engine of ...

  8. Developing an integrated resource plan and planning process at Puget Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Knutsen, C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the progress that Puget Sound Power and Light Company has made in pursuing a new project, Demand and Resource Evaluation (DARE), which began in early 1986. The purposes of DARE are to strengthen the integrated planning process within Puget Power and to develop an integrated resource plan for Puget Power.

  9. 1992 Resource Program, 10 Year Plan : Draft II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration`s primary process for deciding how to meet future electricity resource needs, how much new resources to develop, which types of resources to acquire or option and how to go about acquiring them, and how much BPA will have to spend for these resources. Recognizing that BPA must make a long-term commitment to acquiring conservation effectively, the 1992 Resource Program outlines a 10-year plan. Draft 2 of the 1992 Resource Program provides a framework for discussing the funding levels proposed in the Programs in Perspective (PIP) process. Previous final resource programs have been released prior to the PIP process. This version of the Resource Program recognizes that the PIP discussions are an integral part of the resource decision-making process and, therefore, it will be finalized after PIP.

  10. 1992 Resource Program, 10 Year Plan : Draft II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration's primary process for deciding how to meet future electricity resource needs, how much new resources to develop, which types of resources to acquire or option and how to go about acquiring them, and how much BPA will have to spend for these resources. Recognizing that BPA must make a long-term commitment to acquiring conservation effectively, the 1992 Resource Program outlines a 10-year plan. Draft 2 of the 1992 Resource Program provides a framework for discussing the funding levels proposed in the Programs in Perspective (PIP) process. Previous final resource programs have been released prior to the PIP process. This version of the Resource Program recognizes that the PIP discussions are an integral part of the resource decision-making process and, therefore, it will be finalized after PIP.

  11. An approach to understanding, representing, and managing uncertainty in integrated resource planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A.J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the issue of uncertainty in integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP is a process employed by electric utilities, often at the bellest of Public Utility Commissions (PUCs), to evaluate the acquisition of resources to meet forecast energy demands and other criteria such as energy efficiency and fuel diversity. Uncertainty plagues the preparation of IRPs, from forecasting energy prices and electricity demand to estimating costs and benefits expected from new resource acquisitions. As a result all those involved in the IRP process (including PUC commissioners and staff, utility decision makers, IRP analysts, and experts in particular areas) need to appreciate how uncertainty affects IRP and learn about available techniques to reduce its effects.

  12. Municipal geothermal heat utilization plan for Glenwood Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been made of the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing the geothermal resource underlying Glenwood Springs Colorado, to heat a group of public buildings. The results have shown that the use of geothermal heat is indeed feasible when compared to the cost of natural gas. The proposed system is composed of a wellhead plate heat exchanger which feeds a closed distribution loop of treated water circulated to the buildings which form the load. The base case system was designed to supply twice the demand created by the seven public buildings in order to take advantage of some economies of scale. To increase the utilization factor of the available geothermal energy, a peaking boiler which burns natural gas is recommended. Disposal of the cooled brine would be via underground injection. Considerable study was done to examine the impact of reduced operating temperature on the existing heating systems. Several options to minimize this problem were identified. Economic analyses were completed to determine the present values of heat from the geothermal system and from the present natural gas over a 30 year projected system life. For the base case savings of over $1 million were shown. Sensitivities of the economics to capital cost, operating cost, system size and other parameters were calculated. For all reasonable assumptions, the geothermal system was cheaper. Financing alternatives were also examined. An extensive survey of all existing data on the geology of the study has led to the prediction of resource parameters. The wellhead temperature of produced fluid is suspected to lie between 140 and 180/sup 0/F (60 and 82/sup 0/C). Flowrates may be as high as 1000 gpm (3800 liters per minute) from a reservoir formation that is 300 ft (90 m) thick beginning about 500 ft (150 m) below the suggested drill site in the proposed Two Rivers Park.

  13. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

  14. Project Management Plan Project Title: Natural Resources Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DEFINITION. The NRM Gateway is a knowledge management resource, designed to serve the needs of the NRMP; · Preserve institutional knowledge; · Develop practical and agency-approved webpages that provide usefulProject Management Plan Project Title: Natural Resources Management (NRM) Gateway Website

  15. The Commission Forecast 1992 Report: Important Resource Planning Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adib, P.

    -side management (DSM) programs, power plant life extension, purchased power from other utilities, and TABLE 4 Installed Capacity by Service Areas (MW) Utility 1991 Utility 2001 PUC 2001 TU Electric 19,928 HL&P 13,584 CPL 4,398 CPS 3,901 GSU 6... rate classes. 73 ESL-IE-92-04-12 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 PLANNING ISSUES The Commission staff predicts that present generating reserves, including plants under...

  16. Resources and Opportunities: 2015 Rural Utilities Study Under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Rural Utilities Study Under Way June 2, 2015 - 1:49pm Addthis The Shugnak power plant is one of nearly 30 rural utilities the RUS team is visiting in 2015. Photo from...

  17. Utility Driven Dynamic Resource Management in an Oversubscribed Energy-Constrained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    Utility Driven Dynamic Resource Management in an Oversubscribed Energy-Constrained Heterogeneous a monoton- ically decreasing utility function associated with it that represents the utility (or value the total utility earned from task completions while satisfying an energy constraint. We design an energy

  18. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    researchers that will evaluate low-temperature geothermal utilization for three different case studies: - A hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration system at Cornell University, - A...

  19. Information resources: How they are utilized by Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, S. [Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, Baton Rouge (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Louisiana, now in a developmental stage of policy and planning, has completed a project aimed at reducing hazardous releases of air toxics in thee state. The state is also conducting a Comparative Risk Project and is using risk assessment practices to develop its waste quality standards. In developing an air toxic list, Louisiana incorporated four major criteria into the ranking: emission levels, human health effects, potential population exposure, and persistence or accumulation in the environment. For the human health effects criterion, data for each substance was gathered from numerous sources, although the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database was used as a primary source for toxicological information. Following guidelines established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Office of Water Resources, Water Pollution Control Division, has developed numerical criteria for human health protection based on risk assessment procedures in the 1989 Water Quality Standards Revision. Currently over 30 toxic substances have risk-based criteria for th protection of human health in the standards. Numerical criteria were calculated for carcinogenic substances having an EPA Classification of A, B1, B2, or C. Cancer class designations along with cancer potency slopes and reference doses were extracted from the IRIS database, with the exception of those chemicals that had not been assessed in IRIS as of December 1, 1988. The parameters necessary for calculating human health criteria for the missing chemicals were taken from 1980, 1984, and 1985 ambient water quality criteria documents: data on bioconcentration factors were included. Currently, Louisiana is working on a Comparative Risk Project, a ranking of the environmental issues in the state relative to potential risk to the public, which is the basis for a widespread 1991 public outreach effort.

  20. Human Resources Staffing Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOSLEY, J.W.

    2000-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human Resources Staffing Plan quantified the equivalent staffing needs required for the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) and its subcontractors to execute the readiness to proceed baseline between FY 2000-2008. The TFC staffing needs were assessed along with the staffings needs of Fluor Hanford and the privatization contractor. The plan then addressed the staffing needs and recruitment strategies required to execute the baseline.

  1. Optimal planning for the sustainable utilization of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santibañez-Aguilar, José Ezequiel [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Ponce-Ortega, José María, E-mail: jmponce@umich.mx [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Betzabe González-Campos, J. [Institute of Chemical and Biological Researches, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); Serna-González, Medardo [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán 58060 (Mexico); El-Halwagi, Mahmoud M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Adjunct Faculty at the Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80204, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • An optimization approach for the sustainable management of municipal solid waste is proposed. • The proposed model optimizes the entire supply chain network of a distributed system. • A case study for the sustainable waste management in the central-west part of Mexico is presented. • Results shows different interesting solutions for the case study presented. - Abstract: The increasing generation of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a major problem particularly for large urban areas with insufficient landfill capacities and inefficient waste management systems. Several options associated to the supply chain for implementing a MSW management system are available, however to determine the optimal solution several technical, economic, environmental and social aspects must be considered. Therefore, this paper proposes a mathematical programming model for the optimal planning of the supply chain associated to the MSW management system to maximize the economic benefit while accounting for technical and environmental issues. The optimization model simultaneously selects the processing technologies and their location, the distribution of wastes from cities as well as the distribution of products to markets. The problem was formulated as a multi-objective mixed-integer linear programing problem to maximize the profit of the supply chain and the amount of recycled wastes, where the results are showed through Pareto curves that tradeoff economic and environmental aspects. The proposed approach is applied to a case study for the west-central part of Mexico to consider the integration of MSW from several cities to yield useful products. The results show that an integrated utilization of MSW can provide economic, environmental and social benefits.

  2. Survey of Western U.S. Electric Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, Jordan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    future peak power and energy demand, electricity generation,timelines, and energy demand. An inaccurate prediction ofto reduce their annual energy demand in 2020 by 39 TWh (

  3. UTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to jointly purchase NEMS ­ John Saven No one else needs much power either Only 1 other I-937 utility in groupUTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011 #12;Inland Overview - Power Don't need a lot of additional power 3 MW by 2016; 8 by 2020 Formed group of 20 smaller utilities

  4. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  5. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  6. An Incentive Compatible Mechanism for Distributed Resource Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, David

    process and their economic incentives. If agents are not provided with proper incentives, they mayAn Incentive Compatible Mechanism for Distributed Resource Planning Erhan Kutanoglu Department is that without proper incentives, agents may not reveal this information trufully and they may not behave

  7. FINREG : a financialregulatory model for utility capacity expansion plan evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klosowicz, Peter C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corporate financial/regulatory model, called FINREG, is presented to simulate a utility's accounting practices, financial policy and constraints, and ratemaking environment. For each year of simulation FINREG will yield ...

  8. Stochastic Programming Models for Strategic Planning: An Application to Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienstock, Daniel

    This paper reports on the application of stochastic programming with recourse models to strategic planning problems typical of those faced by an electric utility. A prototype model was constructed using realistic data, and ...

  9. Nutrient Management Educational & Planning Resources The Pennsylvania Nutrient Management Education Program provides a wide array of resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    v.08.2011 Nutrient Management Educational & Planning Resources The Pennsylvania Nutrient Management Education Program provides a wide array of resources to nutrient management specialists. These resources serve two purposes: · Education. These factsheets and publications are selected to supplement

  10. Proposed resource evaluation plan. Salton Sea scientific drilling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a plan for evaluating the deep geothermal resource in the Salton Sea area of Imperial County, California. The plan is divided into two testing programs, followed by the modeling and evaluation of the underground geothermal resource. The testing program related to geological data collection includes acquiring and analyzing the core, running geophysical and temperature/pressure logs in both the deep well and the injection well, and carrying out extensive mud-logging activities. The flow testing program includes temperature, pressure, and flow measurements made in the well and surface facilities. Sampling and analysis of fluid and scale both in the well and at the surface facilities will also be carried out. 6 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  11. USDA / NRCS Waste Utilization Standard and Management Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    agricultural wastes such as manure, wastewater, or other organic residues. #12;Waste Utilization Standard (633 and poultry operations; solids and wastewater from municipal treatment plants; and agricultural processing This practice applies where agricultural wastes including animal manure and contaminated water from livestock

  12. Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, J.; Hurlbut, D.; Milligan, M.; Coles, L.; Green, B.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. Market barriers unrelated to technology often limit the expansion of utility-scale solar power, even in areas with exceptional resource potential. Many of these non-technical barriers have to do with policy, regulation, and planning, and hardly ever do they resolve themselves in a timely fashion. In most cases, pre-emptive intervention by interested stakeholders is the easiest way to remove/address such barriers, but it requires knowing how to navigate the institutional waters of the relevant agencies and boards. This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. It focuses on the Western Interconnection (WI), primarily because the quality of solar resources in the Southwest makes utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) economically feasible, and because the relevant institutions have evolved in a way that has opened up opportunities for removing non-technical market barriers. Developers will find in this report a high-level field manual to identify the venues for mitigating and possibly eliminating systemic market obstacles and ensuring that the economic playing field is reasonably level. Project-specific issues such as siting for transmission and generation resources are beyond the scope of this report. Instead, the aim is to examine issues that pervasively affect all utility-scale PV and CSP in the region regardless of where the project may be. While the focus is on the WI, many of the institutions described here also have their counterparts in the Eastern and the Texas interconnections. Specifically, this report suggests a number of critical engagement points relating to generation and transmission planning.

  13. Utility Energy Services Contracts Guide: A Resource for Contracting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment of Energy OfficeFactEnergyDocumentOfficers

  14. Utility-Scale Financial Incentives and Programs Resources | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment of EnergyThe following presentations are

  15. Resources and Opportunities: 2015 Rural Utilities Study Under Way |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department ofEMSpentResidential Clothes WashersServices

  16. Resources on Utility Energy Service Contracts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuickEnergyforDepartmentSystemsProgram Areas »Project

  17. Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard2015 RDSHARP Supporting ElementsDepartment of

  18. Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergy Metal OrganicDepartment of

  19. Utility Energy Services Contracts Guide: A Resource for Contracting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFactEnergy Utah| DepartmentOfficers

  20. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmiteInExploration At Geothermal

  1. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NMPerformance |Should2.1.0.301StochasticDepartment of

  2. Solar resource-utility load matching assessment: NREL photovoltaic project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many utility planners may be unfamiliar with the potential for the development of photovoltaics (PV) in their service areas. The goal of the research summarized in this document is to provide information on the match existing between the output of PV powder plants and the load requirements of US utilities. This material indicates whether or not the effective capacity (hence the value) of this renewable resource should be higher than that traditionally assigned to an intermittent resource.

  3. Energy-Efficient, Utility Accrual Scheduling under Resource Constraints for Mobile Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Binoy

    Corporation Redmond, WA 98052, USA pengli@microsoft.com Abstract We present an energy-efficient, utility voltage scaling (DVS) is a common mechanism studied in the past to save CPU energy [3Energy-Efficient, Utility Accrual Scheduling under Resource Constraints for Mobile Embedded Systems

  4. Civil Works Planning Overview Civil Works (CW) Planning offers a structured, rational approach to solving water resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , the current design and construction program is largely a result of project authorizations. · Planning); and several implementing policies. · CW Planning is the start of the "pipeline" for addressing water resources

  5. Bureau of Land Management - Plan of Utilization Checklist | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington:

  6. Evaluation of the Impacts of Deep Penetration of Wind Resources on Transmission Utilization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Terms--wind generation, grid integration, trans- mission utilization, stability analysis, dynamic perfor- tion of wind generation resources into the power grids requires the evaluation of the impacts of wind quantification of the impacts of wind resource integration on the system. The evaluation of these impacts

  7. Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don (University of Chicago, Chicago, IL); Hanson, Jason (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Grimsrud, Kristine (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Thacher, Jennifer (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Broadbent, Craig (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brookshire, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chemak, Janie (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockeril Consulting, Boone, NC); Aragon, Carlos (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

  8. SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED lamp or luminaire can generally be found that matches or exceeds the efficacy of benchmark technologies in a given product category, and LED products continue to expand into ever-higher lumen output niches. However, the price premium for LED continues to pose a barrier to adoption in many applications, in spite of expected savings from reduced energy use and maintenance. Other factors—such as dimmability and quality of light—can also present challenges. The appropriate type, timing, and magnitude of energy efficiency activities will vary from organization to organization based on local variables and the method of evaluation. A number of factors merit consideration when prioritizing activities for development. Category-specific projections for pricing and efficacy are provided herein to assist in efficiency program planning efforts.

  9. Information Resources Management Strategic Plan FY2014-2018

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmitRoad2007Department, 2008 TO:Plan

  10. Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune-YearEffect of Intake onDepartment

  11. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  12. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parr, P.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Evans, J.W. (Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Sciences Division.

  13. Tank Farm Contractor Operation and Utilization Plan [SEC 1 Thru 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KIRKBRIDE, R.A.

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Operation and Utilization Plan updates the operating scenario and plans for the delivery of feed to BNFL Inc., retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks, and the overall process flowsheets for Phases I and II of the privatization of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The plans and flowsheets are updated with the most recent tank-by-tank inventory and sludge washing data. Sensitivity cases were run to evaluate the impact or benefits of proposed changes to the BNFL Inc. contract and to evaluate a risk-based SST retrieval strategy.

  14. The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

  15. Appalachian State University Water Resources Planning Committee Impacts of Urbanization on Headwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Temperature surges (Summer Months): · Contact and runoff from impervious surfaces during afternoon rain storms by groundwater influx UPSTREAM MIDSTREAM DOWNSTREAM #12;Appalachian State University ­ Water Resources Planning

  16. Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans--Update

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides guidelines for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

  17. Light Duty Utility Arm system pre-operational (cold test) test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.L.

    1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Duty Utility (LDUA) Cold Test Facility, located in the Hanford 400 Area, will be used to support cold testing (pre- operational tests) of LDUA subsystems. Pre-operational testing is composed of subsystem development testing and rework activities, and integrated system qualification testing. Qualification testing will be conducted once development work is complete and documentation is under configuration control. Operational (hot) testing of the LDUA system will follow the testing covered in this plan and will be covered in a separate test plan

  18. Strategic Planning -College -Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources Unit Assessment Report -Four Column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    Strategic Planning - College - Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources Unit Assessment Report - Four Column Texas Tech University Priorities Means of Assessment & Criteria / Tasks Results Action & Natural Resources - 2013 Priority 1_Increase Enrollment and Promote Student Success (CASNR - Outcome 1

  19. Introducing the use of integrated Decision Support System in Natural Resources Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hye Yeon, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The target subject of Natural Resources Planning (NRP) includes various systems and their elements, all of which are centered around the natural resource system. Given this characteristic complexity and a high degree of ...

  20. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parr, P.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Evans, J.W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

  1. Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

  2. The justification of budget requests utilizing a grounds resource inventory at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Vivian Lee

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS ARM UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Record of Study THE JUST1FICATION OF BUDGET REQUESTS UTILIZING A GROUNDS RESOURCE INVENTORY AT THE FORT WORTH BOTANIC GARDEN A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Vivian Lee Powers Submitted to the College of Agriculture... budget requests. Anaheim City Park's Superintendent Chris Jarvi knew that when the new Riverdaie Park was completed it would require him to hire 1. 3 addition maintenance workers. (I) He could also prove this to the budget analysts, city manager...

  3. OSU Human Resources 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 OKLAHOMA COLLEGE SAVINGS PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    OSU Human Resources ­ 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 OKLAHOMA COLLEGE SAVINGS PLAN The Oklahoma College Savings Plan (OCSP) provides OSU employees with a way to save and in certain situations abroad. Advantages of Using the Oklahoma College Savings Plan to Save for College

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - applying electrical utility Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the USA Summary: Integrated resource planning Electric and gas utilities in the USA Eric Hirst, Charles Goldman... to encourage integrated re source planning. Keywords:...

  5. INTRODUCTION Ukiah Electric Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Ukiah Electric Utility Renewable Energy Resources Procurement Plan Per Senate Billlx 2 renewable energy resources, including renewable energy credits, as a specified percentage of Ukiah's total,2011 to December 31, 2013, Ukiah shall procure renewable energy resources equivalent to an average of at least

  6. A CULTURAL RESOURCES MONITORING AND DISCOVERY PLAN FOR MAINTENANCE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to potential discovery situations and to evaluate the discoveries eligibility for NRHP listing. FINAL Monitoring and Discovery Plan 12 EPG Western Area Power Administration...

  7. Market study for direct utilization of geothermal resources by selected sectors of economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive analysis is presented of industrial markets potential for direct use of geothermal energy by a total of six industry sectors: food and kindred products; tobacco manufactures; textile mill products; lumber and wood products (except furniture); chemicals and allied products; and leather and leather products. A brief statement is presented regarding sectors of the economy and major manufacturing processes which can readily utilize direct geothermal energy. Previous studies on plant location determinants are summarized and appropriate empirical data provided on plant locations. Location determinants and potential for direct use of geothermal resources are presented. The data was gathered through interviews with 30 senior executives in the six sectors of economy selected for study. Probable locations of plants in geothermal resource areas and recommendations for geothermal resource marketing are presented. Appendix A presents factors which impact on industry location decisions. Appendix B presents industry executives interviewed during the course of this study. (MHR)

  8. Scenario Planning as the Development of Leadership Capability and Capacity; and Virtual Human Resource Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McWhorter, Rochell 1963-

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    SCENARIO PLANNING AS THE DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP CAPABILITY AND CAPACITY; AND VIRTUAL HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT A Dissertation by ROCHELL RAE MCWHORTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... Capability and Capacity; and Virtual Human Resource Development Copyright 2011 Rochell Rae McWhorter SCENARIO PLANNING AS THE DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP CAPABILITY AND CAPACITY; AND VIRTUAL HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT A Dissertation...

  9. Planning for Mining Operations with Time and Resource Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir Lipovetzky

    2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 5, 2014 ... Abstract: We study a daily mine planning problem where, given a set of blocks we wish to mine, our task is to generate a mining sequence for ...

  10. Enhancement of existing geothermal resource utilization by cascading to intensive aquaculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachritz, W.H., II; Polka, R.; Schoenmackers

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A demonstration high rate aquaculture production system utilizing a cascaded geothermal resource was designed, constructed and operated to fulfill the objectives of this project. Analysis of the energy and water balances for the system indicated that the addition of an Aquaculture Facility expanded the use of the existing resource. This expanded use in no way affected the up- stream processes. Analysis of the system`s energy and water requirements indicated that the present resource was under-utilized and could be expanded. Energy requirements appeared more limiting than water use, but the existing system could be expanded to a culture volume of 72,000 gal. This system would have a potential production capacity of 93,600 lb/yr with a potential market value of $280,00/yr. Based on the results of this study, the heat remaining in the geothermal fluid from one square foot of operating greenhouse is sufficient to support six gallons of culture water for a high density aquaculture facility. Thus, the over 1.5M ft{sup 2} of existing greenhouse space in New Mexico, has the potential to create an aquaculture industry of nearly 9M gal. This translates to an annual production potential of 11.7M lb with a market value of $35.lM.

  11. Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Sierra Club Natural Resources Defense Council Citizens' Utility Board of Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Energy Coalition Renewable Northwest Project Sierra Club Natural Resources Defense and renewable resources will be acquired and by whom. Strong accountability for results through measurement; second to renewable resources..." [16 U.S. Code section 839b(e)(1)] BPA's utility customers have released

  12. Issues and methods in incorporating environmental externalities into the integrated resource planning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.; Galen, P.S.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a review of current practices and policies in considering environmental externalities in the integrated resource planning and performance based regulation (IRP/PBR) process. The following issues are presented and examined: What are the pros and cons of treating environmental externalities in the IRP process? How are potential future environmental regulations being treated? Are externalities being qualitatively or quantitatively considered, or monetized? Are offsets being allowed? How are externality policies being coordinated among different levels and branches of governments? Should environmental externalities be considered in dispatching a utility`s existing resources? What are the procedures for addressing uncertainty in incorporating environmental externalities into IRP? How are externalities valued? What are other approaches to addressing environmental externalities. This report describes seven major approaches for addressing environmental externalities in the IRP process: qualitative treatment, weighting and ranking, cost of control, damage function, percentage adders, monetization by emission, and multiattribute trade-off analysis. The discussion includes a taxonomy of the full range of alternative methods for addressing environmental externalities, a summary of state PUC actions, the role of state laws, the debate on environmental adders, and the choice of methodologies. In addition, this report characterizes the interests of stakeholders such as the electric industry, fuel suppliers, energy consumers, governmental agencies, public interest groups, consultants, and others. It appears that the views, positions, and interests of these stakeholders are affected by their perceptions of the potential impacts on their economic interests or the viability of their position on environmental policy, by the societal perspective they take, and by the orientation of the analysts toward market competition and their respective accumulated expertise.

  13. What is a business plan? A business plan is a tool used to organize a business idea, resources, management and clients. The tool is meant to plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    at by investors very carefully. It should detail costs, expenses, capital, break-even analysis, estimated cash1 What is a business plan? A business plan is a tool used to organize a business idea, resources do you get the product to your client(s)? What are the costs to make the product? What should

  14. Water resources planning under climate change and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hara, Jeffrey Keith

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenario to Climatic Changes. Water Resources Management 19:2006) Quantifying the Urban Water Supply Impacts of Climateto the Shape of Supply? Water Demand Under Heterogeneous

  15. Jicarilla Apache Utility Authority Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Strategic Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabago, K.R.

    2008-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Strategic Plan Report is to provide an introduction and in-depth analysis of the issues and opportunities, resources, and technologies of energy efficiency and renewable energy that have potential beneficial application for the people of the Jicarilla Apache Nation and surrounding communities. The Report seeks to draw on the best available information that existed at the time of writing, and where necessary, draws on new research to assess this potential. This study provides a strategic assessment of opportunities for maximizing the potential for electrical energy efficiency and renewable energy development by the Jicarilla Apache Nation. The report analyzes electricity use on the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in buildings. The report also assesses particular resources and technologies in detail, including energy efficiency, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and small hydropower. The closing sections set out the elements of a multi-year, multi-phase strategy for development of resources to the maximum benefit of the Nation.

  16. Planning vs. dynamic control: Resource allocation in corporate clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    in a static way such that energy costs are minimized. Live migration technology allows for dynamic resource workloads of transactional business applications dynamic resource allocation does not increase energy operational and management costs. Virtual- ization allows splitting and assigning physical servers to virtual

  17. Regional secondary resource utilization parks: The industrial parks of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuusinen, T.L.; Beck, J.E.; Holter, G.M.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obstacles currently facing the solid waste recycling industry are often related to lack of public and investor confidence, issues of profitability and liability, and insufficient consumer identification with products made from recycled materials. Resolution of these issues may not be possible without major changes in the way the solid waste recycling business is structured. One potential solution takes the form of the secondary resource utilization park. The premise is simple: Provide a strategically located facility where a broad range of secondary resources are separated, refined or converted, and made into new products on the site. The secondary material resources would come from municipal solid waste, demolition waste, landscape trimmings, used tires, scrap metal, agricultural waste, food processing waste, and other non-hazardous forms. The park would consist of separation and conversion facilities, research and product standards laboratories, and industries that convert the materials into products and fuels. Energy conversion systems using some waste streams as fuel could be located at the park to supplement energy demands of the industrial operations. The strategic co-location of the resource providers and user industries would also minimize transportation costs and could provide a test case for an industrial ecology'' approach to sustainable economic development.

  18. Regional secondary resource utilization parks: The industrial parks of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuusinen, T.L.; Beck, J.E.; Holter, G.M.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obstacles currently facing the solid waste recycling industry are often related to lack of public and investor confidence, issues of profitability and liability, and insufficient consumer identification with products made from recycled materials. Resolution of these issues may not be possible without major changes in the way the solid waste recycling business is structured. One potential solution takes the form of the secondary resource utilization park. The premise is simple: Provide a strategically located facility where a broad range of secondary resources are separated, refined or converted, and made into new products on the site. The secondary material resources would come from municipal solid waste, demolition waste, landscape trimmings, used tires, scrap metal, agricultural waste, food processing waste, and other non-hazardous forms. The park would consist of separation and conversion facilities, research and product standards laboratories, and industries that convert the materials into products and fuels. Energy conversion systems using some waste streams as fuel could be located at the park to supplement energy demands of the industrial operations. The strategic co-location of the resource providers and user industries would also minimize transportation costs and could provide a test case for an ``industrial ecology`` approach to sustainable economic development.

  19. FY 1991--FY 1995 Information Technology Resources Long-Range Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has consolidated its plans for Information Systems, Computing Resources, and Telecommunications into a single document, the Information Technology Resources Long-Range Plan. The consolidation was done as a joint effort by the Office of ADP Management and the Office of Computer Services and Telecommunications Management under the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Administration, Information, and Facilities Management. This Plan is the product of a long-range planning process used to project both future information technology requirements and the resources necessary to meet those requirements. It encompasses the plans of the various organizational components within the Department and its management and operating contractors over the next 5 fiscal years, 1991 through 1995.

  20. Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Strategic Planning for Success (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, William E.

    2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    esas desviaciones no causen tanto da?o como para hacer que sus metas sean inalcanzables. Tener un plan a seguir, bien elaborado puede hacer la toma diaria de decisiones un poco menos dificil. Estableciendo Planes de Contingencia Un administrador sabio...

  1. Four Corners Wind Resource Center Webinar: Building Utility-Scale Wind: Permitting and Regulation Lessons for County Decision-Makers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Four Corners Wind Resource Center will host this webinar exploring lessons learned in the permitting of utility-scale wind projects and the development of ordinances and regulations for...

  2. The LEAD Roadmap: an Integrative Framework for Utilizing and Sharing Community Resources to Enhance Understanding and Impact of Weather1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    1 The LEAD Roadmap: an Integrative Framework for Utilizing and Sharing Community Resources ................................................................................................ 10 Introduction Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD; Plale et al. 2004, 2006, assimilation, modeling, mining, and cyberinfrastructure systems. LEAD empowers researchers and students

  3. Environmental guidelines for development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to the DOE field managements with responsibility for the development of an individual Cultural Resource Management Plan for each DOE facility and program.

  4. State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

  5. Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course... Casebolt of Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Lucas Gregory of Texas Water Resources Institute, Vanessa Escobar of the Texas Water Development Board, and Ernest Moran of the San Antonio River Author- ity calculate load duration curves...

  6. Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course...

  7. Business Continuity Planning Resources for Small- and Medium-Sized Businesses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document/memo summarizes existing resources and guidance on business continuity planning for small- to medium-sized businesses. DTRA will share this information with large commercial businesses who identified the need to help their suppliers and other key collaborators prepare business continuity plans in order to speed recovery from a wide-area bioterrorism incident.

  8. Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

  9. Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium 1999 plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium is to serve the Texas Panhandle, the State of Texas and the US Department of Energy by: conducting scientific and technical research; advising decision makers; and providing information on nuclear weapons materials and related environment, safety, health, and nonproliferation issues while building academic excellence in science and technology. This paper describes the electronic resource library which provides the national archives of technical, policy, historical, and educational information on plutonium. Research projects related to the following topics are described: Environmental restoration and protection; Safety and health; Waste management; Education; Training; Instrumentation development; Materials science; Plutonium processing and handling; and Storage.

  10. Information resources management long-range plan, FY1994--1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes IRM activities and the information technology resources and capabilities of the Department, the future requirements, and the strategies and plans to satisfy the identified requirements. The long-range planning process provides the systematic means to meet this objective and assists the Department in assuring that information technology (IT) support is provided in an efficient, effective, and timely manner so that its programmatic missions can be accomplished. Another important objective of the Plan is to promote better understanding, both within and external to the Department, of its IT environment, requirements, issues, and recommended solutions. This DOE IRM Plan takes into consideration the IRM requirements of approximately 50 different sites. The annual long-range planning cycle for supporting this Plan was initiated by a Call in August 1991 for site plans to be submitted in February 1992 by those Departmental components and contractors with major IRM requirements.

  11. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  12. Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-deWys, J. (ed.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, now in its fifteenth year, is entering the transition period to commercial use. The industry cost-shared proposals to the consortium, represented in the presentations included in these proceedings, attest to the interest developing in the industrial community in utilizing the geopressured-geothermal resource. Sixty-five participants attended these sessions, two-thirds of whom represented industry. The areas represented by cost-shared proposals include (1) thermal enhanced oil recovery, (2) direct process use of thermal energy, e.g., aquaculture and agriculture, (3) conversion of thermal energy to electricity, (4) environment related technologies, e.g., use of supercritical processes, and (5) operational proposals, e.g., a field manual for scale inhibitors. It is hoped that from this array of potential use projects, some will persist and be successful in proving the viability of using the geopressured-geothermal resource. Such industrial use of an alternative and relatively clean energy resource will benefit our nation and its people.

  13. Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  14. THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC UTILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CongestionStudy2009.pdf. 2012 Congestion Study Plan - Mass DPU Comments Page 3 and demand response resources. 3 Massachusetts utilities will achieve compliance with this...

  15. Renewable Resources: a national catalog of model projects. Volume 4. Western Solar Utilization Network Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of diverse conservation and renewable energy projects across the United States was prepared through the enthusiastic participation of solar and alternate energy groups from every state and region. Compiled and edited by the Center for Renewable Resources, these projects reflect many levels of innovation and technical expertise. In many cases, a critique analysis is presented of how projects performed and of the institutional conditions associated with their success or failure. Some 2000 projects are included in this compilation; most have worked, some have not. Information about all is presented to aid learning from these experiences. The four volumes in this set are arranged in state sections by geographic region, coinciding with the four Regional Solar Energy Centers. The table of contents is organized by project category so that maximum cross-referencing may be obtained. This volume includes information on the Western Solar Utilization Network Region. (WHK)

  16. Utility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict SolarJohn Keeler,Washington

  17. Rangeland Resource Management for Texans: Strategic Planning for Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, William E.

    2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    are. The mission should neither limit nor overextend the enterprise. It should be as broad as possible without being unrealistic. Setting Goals Once you have defined your mission you can set goals for fulfilling that mission. The best goals are SMART... attainable? How would you measure success or track progress toward such goals? An example of a SMART goal might be: ?To sustain the resource so that it maintains a 1,200 AU per year productiv- ity over my lifetime.? It is specific. It is measurable over...

  18. Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOralGovernmentStandardsIdahoby4and Example |June 24,

  19. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Planning Webpage | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60Alameda County,90DEC Water

  20. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Plans | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60Alameda County,90DEC WaterInformation

  1. Information Resources Management Strategic Plan Appendix FY2014-2018

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmitRoad2007Department, 2008 TO:

  2. India-Natural Resource Management Plan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP WindSatelliteInSAR JumpRenewable Energy

  3. Glenwood Springs Resource Management Plan (1984) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo, Maryland:Glenwillow, Ohio:

  4. CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t

  5. CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t i R y R y

  6. Title 43 CFR 1610 Resource Management Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty LtdOpen Energy

  7. DOD Instruction 4715.03 - Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCpWingCushing,DADEVELOPMENTItalyIP(INRMP)

  8. Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply Plans Webpage

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CERCollier Technologies IncCity,PublishedColorado| Open

  9. Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation BondEnergyQuality Quality

  10. Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation BondEnergyQuality Quality

  11. Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation BondEnergyQuality Quality

  12. Quality Work Plan Checklist and Resources - Section 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified Energy Conservation BondEnergyQuality Quality

  13. Understanding the Needs of Arkansas School Districts Relative to Building Use and Control Utility Tracking Personnel and Facility Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keazer, J. A.; Nutter, D. W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the Needs of Arkansas School Districts Relative to Building Use and Control, Utility Tracking, Personnel, and Facility Planning Jay A. Keazer Darin W. Nutter Mechanical Engineering Department University of Arkansas... Fayetteville, Arkansas ABSTRACT This paper documents the results and conclusions from a survey of Arkansas public school district superintendents as part of a project to analyze the energy performance and utility-related needs of Arkansas’ K-12...

  14. Evaluating Utility Executives' Perceptions of Smart Grid Costs, Benefits and Adoption Plans To Assess Impacts on Building Design and Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Ameya Vinayak

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    to be implemented in various magnitudes across utilities in the near future. To accommodate these technologies significant changes will have to be incorporated in building design construction and planning. This research paper attempts to evaluate public utility... for implementing a comprehensive smart grid system are extensive. Smart grid hardware and software technologies are in the evolving stage and returns on smart grid investments are uncertain. 1.2 NEED FOR RESEARCH The transformation of the electric system...

  15. Graduate Assessment Strategies 1. Sample assessment plans are online at http://inside.mines.edu/Assessment-Resources. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Assessment Strategies Resources: 1. Sample assessment plans are online at http://inside.mines.edu/Assessment-Resources. The graduate level assessment plans from OSU may be particularly helpful: http://oregonstate.edu/admin/aa/apaa/assessment/graduate-assessment/graduate- assessment-plans 2. A list of best practices is online at http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/Assessment

  16. The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rau, N.S.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

  17. AN EVALUATION OF SOLAR VALUATION METHODS USED IN UTILITY PLANNING AND PROCUREMENT PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Evaluation of Solar Valuation Methods Used in UtilityAN EVALUATION OF SOLAR VALUATION METHODS USED IN UTILITYAN EVALUATION OF SOLAR VALUATION METHODS USED IN UTILITY

  18. Utilization of Local Law Enforcement Aerial Resources in Consequence Management (CM) Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasiolek, Piotr T.; Malchow, Russell L.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was instrumental in enhancing the nation’s ability to detect and prevent a radiological or nuclear attack in the highest risk cities. Under the DHS Securing the Cities initiative, nearly 13,000 personnel in the New York City region have been trained in preventive radiological and nuclear detection operations, and nearly 8,500 pieces of radiological detection equipment have been funded. As part of the preventive radiological/nuclear detection (PRND) mission, several cities have received funding to purchase commercial aerial radiation detection systems. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Aerial Measuring System (AMS) program started providing Mobile Aerial Radiological Surveillance (MARS) training to such assets, resulting in over 150 HAZMAT teams’ officers and pilots from 10 law enforcement organizations and fire departments being trained in the aerial radiation detection. From the beginning, the MARS training course covered both the PRND and consequence management (CM) missions. Even if the law enforcement main focus is PRND, their aerial assets can be utilized in the collection of initial radiation data for post-event radiological CM response. Based on over 50 years of AMS operational experience and information collected during MARS training, this presentation will focus on the concepts of CM response using aerial assets as well as utilizing law enforcement/fire department aerial assets in CM. Also discussed will be the need for establishing closer relationships between local jurisdictions’ aerial radiation detection capabilities and state and local radiation control program directors, radiological health department managers, etc. During radiological events these individuals may become primary experts/advisers to Incident Commanders for radiological emergency response, especially in the early stages of a response. The knowledge of the existence, specific capabilities, and use of local aerial radiation detection systems would be critical in planning the response, even before federal assets arrive on the scene. The relationship between local and federal aerial assets and the potential role for the further use of the MARS training and expanded AMS Reachback capabilities in facilitating such interactions will be discussed.

  19. Slow-Rate Utility-Based Resource Allocation in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    is to maximize the time-averaged utility rate subject to a stochastic total power constraint at the transmitter the time average utility rate, given a constraint on the total power transmitted by the base station. Since

  20. Statewide plan for utilization of scrap tires in Kansas. Final report, September 1993-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.G.; Hossain, M.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to determine the current and future supply of scrap tire rubber and the feasibility of using scrap tires in Kansas for various purposes. The goal was to determine if a sufficient quantity of recycled rubber existed and what the cost would be to meet the ISTEA (Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act) requirements for 1995 and thereafter. The four tasks included in the study were: surveying scrap tire utilization plans in other states; inventory scrap tires in Kansas; estimating scrap tire generation in the future; and determiming cost effectiveness of various uses of scrap tires. Currently there are 4.5 to 5.5 million scrap tires in Kansas and the annual generation of scrap tires is estimated to be 2 to 3 million. The ISTEA mandate would require an estimated 367,000 scrap tires be recycled annually. KDOT has used more rubber in 1993 and 1994 than will be required by 1997 when the 20% required by ISTEA is in effect.

  1. A Case Study of Danville Utilities: Utilizing Industrial Assessment Centers to Provide Energy Efficicency Resources for Key Accounts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015Gross Gamma-Ray Log CalibrationAby

  2. Test Planning and Test Resource Optimization for Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Test Planning and Test Resource Optimization for Droplet-Based Microfluidic Systems* Fei Su, Sule of droplet- based microfluidic systems for safety-critical biomedical applications. In order to ensure reliability, microsystems incorporating microfluidic components must be tested adequately. In this paper, we

  3. Make anthem.com your 24/7 resource for health plan information Anthem members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health care -- from doctors to dollars You should have the power to select your doctors, find the best prices on what you pay for health care services and choose how you get your health care informationMake anthem.com your 24/7 resource for health plan information Anthem members: Currently registered

  4. Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management -Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management - Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL of Calculus I or MATH 140* (GQ) Calculus With Analytic Geometry I 4 SOILS 101 (GN) Introductory Soil Science 3 AG 150S (First-Year Seminar) Be a Master Student! 2 SOILS 102 Introductory Soil Science Laboratory 1

  5. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy Key Findings, and preserve its existing electric infrastructure and research and develop technologies for the long-term improvement of the region's electricity supply. Scenario analysis showed that the electric power sector

  6. Resource/Data Sharing Plan (example as of 9-1-10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    will need to submit a request in writing, stating their intended use. Data will be made available at cost and raw data. We will consider the most cost-effective means for sharing data after a dataResource/Data Sharing Plan (example as of 9-1-10) We will make available study data while

  7. Environmental guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management plans. Working draft for comment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has stewardship responsibilities for managing the cultural resources remaining on DOE-owned and other lands impacted by DOE programs. Goal of the DOE-wide Cultural Resource Management (CRM) program is to identify and consolidate compliance actions associated with statutory and regulatory requirements. This document is to provide guidelines to DOE field managers; its implementation is intended to assure that each DOE facility and program complies with executive orders, statutes, and regulations governing the management of cultural resources. It covers CRM goals, existing conditions, CRM methods, CRM procedures and administration, and plan attachments. Glossary, legislation, and documents are covered in appendices.

  8. Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

  9. Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

  10. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

  11. COMPLEAT (Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies): A planning tool for publicly owned electric utilities. [Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies (Compleat)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPLEAT takes its name, as an acronym, from Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies. It is an electric utility planning model designed for use principally by publicly owned electric utilities and agencies serving such utilities. As a model, COMPLEAT is significantly more full-featured and complex than called out in APPA's original plan and proposal to DOE. The additional complexity grew out of a series of discussions early in the development schedule, in which it became clear to APPA staff and advisors that the simplicity characterizing the original plan, while highly desirable in terms of utility applications, was not achievable if practical utility problems were to be addressed. The project teams settled on Energy 20/20, an existing model developed by Dr. George Backus of Policy Assessment Associates, as the best candidate for the kinds of modifications and extensions that would be required. The remainder of the project effort was devoted to designing specific input data files, output files, and user screens and to writing and testing the compute programs that would properly implement the desired features around Energy 20/20 as a core program. This report presents in outline form, the features and user interface of COMPLEAT.

  12. Utility Goals for the Efficiency Resource: Impact of PUC Rulemaking Project No. 39674 on Future Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) and (3) No major changes to actual costs used Updates language to calculate avoided costs for nodal market Energy Efficiency Goals (e)(1) (e)(1) See rule for details Overall, no major changes. Potential debate: When will a utility be able to switch... deemed savings Costs to be Recovered: General (f)(1) - (5) (f)(1)(A) and (B) EECRF shall be calculated to recover forecasted program expenditures, over/under recovery including municipal and util ity EECRF proceeding expenses, performance bonus and EM...

  13. Tank Farm Contractor Operation and Utilization Plan [SEC 1 Thru 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KIRKBRIDE, R.A.

    2000-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates the operating scenario and plans for feed delivery to BNFL Inc. of retrieval and waste from single-shell tanks, and the overall process flowsheets for Phases 1 and 2 of the River Protection Project. The plans and flowsheets are updated with the most recent guidance from ORP and tank-by-tank inventory. The results provide the technical basis for the RTP-2 planning effort. Sensitivity cases were run to evaluate the effect of changes on key parameters.

  14. Solar resource: Utility load-matching assessment. Interim subcontract report, 20 September 1991--19 December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, R.; Seals, R.; Stewart, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed to estimate the load-matching capability of photovoltaics (PV) for a selected group of utilities in the continental United States. The report provides an initial quantitative estimate of this capability for 20 utilities. This characteristic is important because it may indicate that the effective capacity, hence the value, of PV is higher than is traditionally assigned to such non-controllable, non-dispatchable resources. Load-matching capability is determined experimentally by analyzing the interaction between the load requirements of each utility and the output of locally sited PV systems. This type of investigation requires site- and time-specific insolation data that are not commonly available. Here, the needed data were inferred from geostationary satellite remote sensing of the Earth`s cloud cover. A secondary objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of this approach. The results of this investigation are presented in this report.

  15. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sub-critical pulverized coal generation, representing thecontaining new pulverized coal generation without CCS. Ofthe operating cost of coal-fired generation without CCS, and

  16. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sub-critical pulverized coal generation, representing thecontaining new pulverized coal generation without CCS. Ofthe operating cost of coal-fired generation without CCS, and

  17. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA). 2005. “Annual Energy Outlook 2005 with Projections toSpecifically, the EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEOFor example, in its Annual Energy Outlook 2005, the EIA

  18. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal, solar PV, and landfill gas, while PGE initiallywave energy, solar, landfill gas, and MSW, but excluded each

  19. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by PSE and the coal and wind generators served by the newcalculating the ELCC of a wind generator should be done with

  20. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    translated into electricity price projections based on fuelused to develop electricity price projections for carbondeveloping electricity market price projections and modeling

  1. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    translated into electricity price projections based on fuelused to develop electricity price projections for carbondeveloping electricity market price projections and modeling

  2. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  3. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for renewable energy, and its risk of permanent expiration,Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in WesternCost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western

  4. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyhow energy planners might better address and manage the risk

  5. Direct utilization of geothermal energy resources in food processing. Final report, May 17, 1978-May 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, J.C.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 1978 financial assistance was granted for a project to utilize geothermal energy at Ore-Ida Foods, Inc.'s food processing plant in Ontario, Oregon. Specifically, the project included exploring, testing, and developing the potential geothermal resource; retrofitting the existing gas/oil-fired steam system; utilizing the geothermal resource for food processing, space heating, and hot potable water; and injecting the spent geothermal water back into a disposal well. Based on preliminary investigations which indicated the presence of a local geothermal resource, drilling began in August 1979. Although the anticipated resource temperature of 380/sup 0/F was reached at total well depth (10,054 feet), adequate flow to meet processing requirements could not be obtained. Subsequent well testing and stimulation techniques also failed to produce the necessary flow, and the project was eventually abandoned. However, throughout the duration of the project, all activities were carefully monitored and recorded to ensure the program's value for future evaluation. This report presents a culmination of data collected during the Ore-Ida project.

  6. Business Plan for a New Engineering Consulting Firm in the Electrical Utility Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gois, Roberto Cavalcanti

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    has been experiencing steady growth for more than ten years. Along with energy market regulatory agencies such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Southwest Power Pool (SPP), electrical utilities must ensure that the electricity...

  7. Energy-Efficient, Utility Accrual Scheduling under Resource Constraints for Mobile Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Binoy

    @mitre.org ABSTRACT We present an energy-efficient, utility accrual, real-time scheduling algorithm called in the past [16,29]. Saving energy without substantially affecting applica- tion performance is crucial voltage scaling (DVS) is a common mecha- nism studied in the past to save CPU energy [5, 12, 14, 15, 25

  8. Economically Optimum Agricultural Utilization of a Reclaimed Water Resource in the Texas Rolling Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacharias, T.; Taylor, C. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

    the effects of the initial assumptions on the measure of project benefits. The first scenario applied guidelines established by the Water Resources Council (WRC). WRC guidelines required the use of OBERS SERIES E' yield projections, normalized prices...

  9. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategies (building codes and energy- efficiency standards)Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Asilomar CA,ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs, building energy

  10. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interconnection overseen by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), which includes Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico,

  11. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is equivalent to NERC’s definition of “Net Energy for Load”,their energy-efficiency savings projections, this definition

  12. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PNM PSCO PSE PUC SDG&E SCE WECC average megawatts Britishwith appropriate NERC and WECC committees and subcommitteesconsistent across NERC, WECC and state/regional assessments

  13. Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nichole

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western United States and Canada Authors: Nicole Hopper 1 ,Western United States and Canada, as envisioned in the mostIn the Western U.S. and Canada, organized wholesale markets

  14. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission demand-side management energy efficiencyefficiency or other demand-side management programs (seeefficiency or other demand-side management programs (see

  15. Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernet al. 2006). Energy efficiency has valuable risk mitigationanalyzed the risk- mitigation benefits of energy-efficiency

  16. Integrated High-Level Waste System Planning - Utilizing an Integrated Systems Planning Approach to Ensure End-State Definitions are Met and Executed - 13244

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Lawrence T. [URS-Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H Room 2205, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [URS-Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H Room 2205, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Chew, David P. [URS-Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H Room 2426, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [URS-Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Building 766-H Room 2426, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy site which has produced nuclear materials for national defense, research, space, and medical programs since the 1950's. As a by-product of this activity, approximately 37 million gallons of high-level liquid waste containing approximately 292 million curies of radioactivity is stored on an interim basis in 45 underground storage tanks. Originally, 51 tanks were constructed and utilized to support the mission. Four tanks have been closed and taken out of service and two are currently undergoing the closure process. The Liquid Waste System is a highly integrated operation involving safely storing liquid waste in underground storage tanks; removing, treating, and dispositioning the low-level waste fraction in grout; vitrifying the higher activity waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility; and storing the vitrified waste in stainless steel canisters until permanent disposition. After waste removal and processing, the storage and processing facilities are decontaminated and closed. A Liquid Waste System Plan (hereinafter referred to as the Plan) was developed to integrate and document the activities required to disposition legacy and future High-Level Waste and to remove from service radioactive liquid waste tanks and facilities. It establishes and records a planning basis for waste processing in the liquid waste system through the end of the program mission. The integrated Plan which recognizes the challenges of constrained funding provides a path forward to complete the liquid waste mission within all regulatory and legal requirements. The overarching objective of the Plan is to meet all Federal Facility Agreement and Site Treatment Plan regulatory commitments on or ahead of schedule while preserving as much life cycle acceleration as possible through incorporation of numerous cost savings initiatives, elimination of non-essential scope, and deferral of other scope not on the critical path to compliance. There is currently a premium on processing and storage space in the radioactive liquid waste tank system. To enable continuation of risk reduction initiatives, the Plan establishes a processing strategy that provides tank space required to meet, or minimizes the impacts to meeting, programmatic objectives. The Plan also addresses perturbations in funding and schedule impacts. (authors)

  17. Identification of Management and Planning Problems of Urban Water Resources in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, K.; Shih, C. S.

    including the inventory and planning control for both surface and ground Water Resource Management of the San Antonio area are presented. Emphasis has been placed upon the identification of the probabilistic nature of various decision-making parameters...

  18. Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

  19. Batteries put to test in PV plan The technology could help utilities absorb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    companies and the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative is the ability to absorb increasing amounts of solar of solar power produced by rooftop photovoltaic panels. The project, in a neighborhood with one energy being generated by an unprecedented number of rooftop PV systems. The solar boom is raising grid

  20. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic Law of|EnergyCybersecurity for Energyinput

  1. Uranium resource utilization improvements in the once-through PWR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzie, R A [ed.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), Combustion Engineering, Inc. performed a comprehensive analytical study of potential uranium utilization improvement options that can be backfit into existing PWRs operating on the once-through uranium fuel cycle. A large number of potential improvement options were examined as part of a preliminary survey of candidate options. The most attractive of these, from the standpoint of uranium utilization improvement, economic viability, and ease of implementation, were then selected for detailed analysis and were included in a single composite improvement case. This composite case represents an estimate of the total savings in U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ consumption that can be achieved in current-design PWRs by implementing improvements which can be developed and demonstrated in the near term. The improvement options which were evaluated in detail and included in the composite case were a new five-batch, extended-burnup fuel management scheme, low-leakage fuel management, modified lattice designs, axial blankets, reinsertion of initial core batches, and end-of-cycle stretchout.

  2. Assessing the performance of human-automation collaborative planning systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Jason C. (Jason Christopher)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning and Resource Allocation (P/RA) Human Supervisory Control (HSC) systems utilize the capabilities of both human operators and automated planning algorithms to schedule tasks for complex systems. In these systems, ...

  3. Employment Opportunity at Plan-It Geo Natural Resources Technician ($13-16/hour dep. on qualifications/experience)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , water resources analysis, and decision support systems. We are seeking a full-time, entry-level team or background in forestry, urban ecology, ecosystems management, water/natural resources inventory, or land use involving GIS, remote sensing, and web- based solutions for urban forest planning, cost/benefit analysis

  4. Leveraging Utility Resources to Boost Efficiency for the Next Generation of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PMDepartment ofs oLetterExpositionSpace Travel:

  5. Metering Best Practices: A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency, Release 3.0

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergy Metal OrganicDepartment

  6. Regional Dialogue Guidebook: Background on Products, Rates, and Resource Support Services available to BPA's Public Utilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead5 IdleRegardingIndustrialPowerRegional

  7. Metering Best Practices, A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency, Release 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Greg; Hunt, W. D.; Pugh, Ray; Sandusky, William F.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This release is an update and expansion of the information provided in Release 1.0 of the Metering Best Practice Guide that was issued in October 2007. This release, as was the previous release, was developed under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The mission of FEMP is to facilitate the Federal Government's implementation of sound cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Each of these activities is directly related to achieving requirements set forth in the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, and the goals that have been established in Executive Orders 13423 and 13514 - and also those practices that are inherent in sound management of Federal financial and personnel resources.

  8. Utility-Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans & Proposals | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment of EnergyThe following presentations

  9. Title 43 CFR 3272 Utilization Plan and Facility Construction Permit | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldsonInformation 61 Drilling Operations:Energy

  10. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  11. Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Considering the Strategic Benefits of Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of major new renewable resource developments. To determinenumber of new renewable resources, which would reducegoals to integrate renewable energy resources and reduce

  12. RESOLUTION NO. 13-125 APPROVING AND ADOPTING A RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES PROCUREMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESOLUTION NO. 13-125 APPROVING AND ADOPTING A RENEWABLE ENERGY RESOURCES PROCUREMENT PLAN regulations require the adoption of a Renewable Energy Resources Procurement Plan that complies with the CEC Hercules Municipal Utility Renewable Energy Resources Procurement Plan, to comply with the CEC's October 1

  13. Geothermal utilization plan, Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. Final report, March 1-September 1, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghusn, G. Jr.; Flynn, T.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary engineering feasibility study of geothermal utilization was completed for the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California. The study incorporated previous studies of the geology, geophysics, and environment performed for the Center. In addition, information about fuel consumption and current heating methodology was provided by the Center's personnel. This information was integrated with design assumptions based on the best estimates available for geothermal resource temperature and flow rate. The result of the study is a recommended pipeline alignment and suggested geothermal service area. The estimated costs for construction of the system range from $4.5 to $5 million. The estimated savings in offset natural gas consumption after capital recovery is $3.8 million over a twenty year period. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response as a resource.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response the resource and describes some of the potential advantages and problems of the development of demand response. WHAT IS DEMAND RESPONSE? Demand response is a change in customers' demand for electricity corresponding

  15. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix K RENEWABLE RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA The renewable resource confirmation agenda is a set of coordinated research and wind resources. The activities include resource assessment, conflict resolution and renewable-power objectives. Table K-1 Status and Recommendations Regarding the Renewable Resources Confirmation Agenda

  16. SU-E-J-70: Feasibility Study of Dynamic Arc and IMRT Treatment Plans Utilizing Vero Treatment Unit and IPlan Planning Computer for SRS/FSRT Brain Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, S; Lee, S; Dagan, R; Malyapa, R; Mendenhall, N; Mendenhall, W; Ho, M; Hough, D; Yam, M; Li, Z [UFPTI, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of utilizing Dynamic Arc (DA) and IMRT with 5mm MLC leaf of VERO treatment unit for SRS/FSRT brain cancer patients with non-invasive stereotactic treatments. The DA and IMRT plans using the VERO unit (BrainLab Inc, USA) are compared with cone-based planning and proton plans to evaluate their dosimetric advantages. Methods: The Vero treatment has unique features like no rotational or translational movements of the table during treatments, Dynamic Arc/IMRT, tracking of IR markers, limitation of Ring rotation. Accuracies of the image fusions using CBCT, orthogonal x-rays, and CT are evaluated less than ? 0.7mm with a custom-made target phantom with 18 hidden targets. 1mm margin is given to GTV to determine PTV for planning constraints considering all the uncertainties of planning computer and mechanical uncertainties of the treatment unit. Also, double-scattering proton plans with 6F to 9F beams and typical clinical parameters, multiple isocenter plans with 6 to 21 isocenters, and DA/IMRT plans are evaluated to investigate the dosimetric advantages of the DA/IMRT for complex shape of targets. Results: 3 Groups of the patients are divided: (1) Group A (complex target shape), CI's are same for IMRT, and DGI of the proton plan are better by 9.5% than that of the IMRT, (2) Group B, CI of the DA plans (1.91+/?0.4) are better than cone-based plan, while DGI of the DA plan is 4.60+/?1.1 is better than cone-based plan (5.32+/?1.4), (3) Group C (small spherical targets), CI of the DA and cone-based plans are almost the same. Conclusion: For small spherical targets, cone-based plans are superior to other 2 plans: DS proton and DA plans. For complex or irregular plans, dynamic and IMRT plans are comparable to cone-based and proton plans for complex targets.

  17. Financial comparison of time-of-use pricing with technical DSM programs and generating plants as electric-utility resource options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing electricity prices to more closely reflect production costs has a significant impact on the consumption of electricity. It is known, for example, that most of the efficiency gains in the electric power sectors of the industrialized world since the first international oil price shock in 1973 are attributable to the rising trend of electricity prices. This was due to the rising average price of electricity. Because of the unique characteristics of producing electricity, its marginal cost is higher than its average cost during many hours of the day. This study shows that, for utilities not reflecting these cost differences in their rates, there is ample room to satisfy a portion of their resource needs by exploiting the load-shaping properties of time-of-use (TOU) rates. Satisfying a portion of resource requirements by implementing a TOU-pricing program, however, is not costless. Metering and administering TOU pricing requires a financial commitment by an electric utility. And the commitment has an opportunity cost. That is, the funds could be used to construct generating plants or run DSM programs (other than a TOU-pricing program) and satisfy the same resource needs that TOU pricing does. The question addressed in this study is whether a utility is better-served financially by (i) implementing TOU pricing or (ii) running technical DSM programs and building power plants. The answer is that TOU pricing compares favorably on a financial basis with other resources under a wide set of conditions that real-world utilities confront.

  18. Analytical Frameworks to Incorporate Demand Response in Long-term Resource Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential Role of Demand Response Resources in Maintaining Grid Stability and Integrating Variable Renewable Energy

  19. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 9: Developing a Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...................................................................................................................... 18 Renewable Energy Production Incentives ................................................................................ 18 Renewable Energy Credits........................................................................................................................ 19 Existing Renewable Portfolio Standard Resources

  20. Analytical Frameworks to Incorporate Demand Response in Long-term Resource Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Intohttp://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUC/energy/Demand+Response/Cost-Utilization of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response as

  1. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  2. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

  3. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

  4. Addressing Human Resource and Organizational Challenges in Emerging Market Utility Regulators: 10 Steps for the New Regulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, John P.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten recommendations can help regulatory agencies get off the ground in emerging markets. Behind them should be the guiding principle of planning and communication: address fundamental challenges early via thorough planning, and communicate with all stakeholders, particularly employees, the public, and other government institutions.

  5. System for developing real time economic incentives to encourage efficient use of the resources of a regulated electric utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chasek, N.E.

    1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronic system is described, that when superimposed over an electric utility and its associated power pool will emulate and automate commodity-like market operations for retailed electric energy through a melding of cost, supply and demand, and competitive factors represented by demand related hourly pricing, capped gross revenues, and bonus/surcharge attributions which in turn make possible minimally regulated utility operations, more efficient use of utility assets, improved incentives for conservation, and inter-utility competition, is comprised of: recording meters that indicate the individual customer's energy consumption by hour and date or in calendar-time; recording meters that indicate mean hourly power supplied by each generator in a utility system in calendar time; recording meters that indicate the amount of energy being exported and imported by a utility in calendar-time; a recording meter system that indicates hourly out-of-doors temperatures in calendar-time throughout the utility's region; means for collecting the metered information and feeding it into a utility's central computer; a utility central computer which processes the metered data computing gross-revenue-capped, import-adjusted demand-related hourly prices, bonus/surcharge attributions, and customer billing; means for feeding back condensed economic information that imparts to consumers the cost for using electric energy at any time; and a power pool sub system that collects and disseminates to all pool members anticipated demand-related hourly prices for electricity that will be available for export from each pool member, and the amount available, and then following buy decisions, computes interim credits and debits for the energy actually exported or imported, and later determines final prices by splitting differences between estimated and actual demand-related prices, and then adjusts each transaction as indicated.

  6. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the InorganicResources Resources Policies,

  7. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource ProgramResources

  8. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

  9. Document 2006-17 September 19, 2006 Pacific Northwest Resource Adequacy Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinating Council (WECC) is developing guidelines to recommend appropriate methodologies for assessing resource adequacy. Although the NERC and WECC efforts act as drivers, momentum is also building within

  10. Document 2006-22 November 15, 2006 Pacific Northwest Resource Adequacy Warning Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinating Council (WECC) is developing guidelines to recommend appropriate methodologies for assessing resource adequacy. Although the NERC and WECC efforts act as drivers, momentum is also building within

  11. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix A PACIFIC NORTHWEST GENERATING RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and generating capacity of power plants located in the Northwest is shown in Figure A-1 Capacity and primary NORTHWEST GENERATING RESOURCES This Appendix describes the electric power generating resources describing individual projects. GENERATING CAPACITY Over 460 electricity generating projects are located

  12. Evaluation of Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc.`s competitive bidding program for demand-side resources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, J.S.; Stucky, L.; Seratt, P.; Darden-Butler, D. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process evaluation reports on the implementation of Orange and Rockland Utilities demand-side bidding program in New York State during 1991 and 1992. The program is implemented by two energy service companies in Orange and rockland`s New York State service territory. The process evaluation methodology included interviews with utility staff (3), energy service company staff (2), and participating (6) and nonparticipating (7) utility customers. The two energy service companies had enrolled 14 customers in the program by summer 1992. One company had achieved 90% of their 2.75 MW bid and the other had achieved less than 90% of their 6.9 MW bid. Critical factors in success were determination of a reasonable bid amount for the market and marketing to the appropriate customers. Customers most interested in the program included those with limited access to capital and medium-sized firms with poor cash flows, particularly schools and hospitals. The findings also show that due to the incentive structure and associated need for substantial customer contributions, lighting measures dominate all installations. Customers, however, were interested in the potential savings and six of the nonparticipants chose to either install measures on their own or enroll in the utility`s rebate program.

  13. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Working with Utilities Peer Exchange Call: Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning Call Slides and Discussion Summary, August 2, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher|for1, 20114, 2013 Better1,9,,2, 2012

  14. Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Have a plan in place in case a natural disaster or other...

  15. Mississippi Public Utility Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Public Utility Act is relevant to any project that plans to generate energy. It requires that a utility must first obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN)...

  16. The EM SSAB Annual Work Plan Process: Focusing Board Efforts and Resources - 13667

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Ralph [Paducah Citizens Advisory Board (United States)] [Paducah Citizens Advisory Board (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most daunting tasks for any new member of a local board of the Environmental Management Site Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) is to try to understand the scope of the clean-up activities going on at the site. In most cases, there are at least two or three major cleanup activities in progress as well as monitoring of past projects. When planning for future projects is added to the mix, the list of projects can be long. With the clean-up activities involving all major environmental media - air, water, soils, and groundwater, new EM SSAB members can find themselves totally overwhelmed and ineffective. Helping new members get over this initial hurdle is a major objective of EM and all local boards of the EM SSAB. Even as members start to understand the size and scope of the projects at a site, they can still be frustrated at the length of time it takes to see results and get projects completed. Many project and clean-up timelines for most of the sites go beyond 10 years, so it's not unusual for an EM SSAB member to see the completion of only 1 or 2 projects over the course of their 6-year term on the board. This paper explores the annual work planning process of the EM SSAB local boards, one tool that can be used to educate EM SSAB members into seeing the broader picture for the site. EM SSAB local work plans divide the site into projects focused on a specific environmental issue or media such as groundwater and/or waste disposal options. Projects are further broken down into smaller segments by highlighting major milestones. Using these metrics, local boards of the EM SSAB can start to quantify the effectiveness of the project in achieving the ultimate goal of site clean-up. These metrics can also trigger board advice and recommendations for EM. At the beginning of each fiscal year, the EM SSAB work plan provides a road map with quantifiable checkpoints for activities throughout the year. When the work plans are integrated with site-specific, enforceable regulatory milestones, they can provide a comprehensive work plan for not only the board, but also regulators, site contractors, and DOE. Because the work plans are reviewed and approved by DOE, they carry some weight in holding local boards of the EM SSAB accountable. This structure provides the basis for local boards to achieve their primary function, to provide DOE with information, advice, and recommendations concerning issues affecting the EM program at the site. (authors)

  17. Vision Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 The History of theVision Plan

  18. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 12: Capacity and Flexibility Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................ 6 Flexibility Issues Raised By Wind Generation system capacity and flexibility a new priority. Wind generation needs back-up, flexible resources new wind generation with a more constrained hydrosystem, there are solutions. The first step

  19. Implications of U.S. experience for water resource planning in Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausser, Gordon C.; Caswell, Margriet F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be developed to fit Egypt's unique needs. ReferencesFOR RESOURCE PLAl'JNING IN EGYPT by Gordon C. Rausser andWA'lER RESOORCE PLANNI~ IN EGYPT by Gordon C. Rausser .and

  20. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007 Electricity Outlook. EIA, 2003, Analysis of S. 139, theAdministration, SR/OIAF/2003-02. EIA, 2007a, Energy MarketAdministration, SR/OIAF/2007- EIA, 2007b, Energy Market and

  1. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    study to develop natural gas price forecasts for each of itsits base-case natural gas price forecast. PSCo found that,develop separate natural gas price forecasts for each of its

  2. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of its Boardman coal plant above the cost of a new CCGT. PGEoperating cost of a super-critical coal-plant. Only threecost-effectiveness of retiring existing convention coal plants

  3. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lacking CCS, clearly have the potential to significantlyperceived potential to retrofit IGCC plants with CCS at a

  4. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Carbon Emission Price Projections in Utilitycarbon emission price projection (approximately $24/ton,carbon emission price projections to their base-case.

  5. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    develops its electricity price projection. Among our sample,forecast. Unlike electricity price projections developedcalculating electricity market prices from projections of

  6. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Westernand Risk Management in the US Electricity Sector,” Energyof energy efficiency in mitigating carbon regulatory risk (

  7. USEFUL RESOURCES. (Right) Aggressive eastern redcedar impacts a variety of Nebraska resources. Utilizing this species can help preserve rare native tree stands and increase available grazing land. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    , with severe impacts on rangeland productivity and grassland wildlife habitat. Each 40,000 acres of rangeland of 5.5 million tons of wood in redcedar forests. This renewable resource could be used for energy to heat and cool buildings, converted to pellets for fuel or livestock bedding, sawn for higher

  8. Public involvement in integrated resource planning: A study of demand-side management collaboratives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raab, J. (Raab (J.), Boston, MA (United States)); Schweitzer, M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many utilities and nonutility parties (NUPs) across the country have tried a new approach to reaching agreement on Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design and policy issues. Through this, which is called the DSM collaborative process, parties who have often been adversaries in the past attempt to reach consensus rather than using traditional litigation to resolve differences. We examined nine cases of DSM collaboration involving 24 utilities and approximately 50 NUPs in 10 states. This is the first comprehensive, in-depth review and assessment of collaboratives and it allows conclusions to be drawn about the collaborative process and the factors that contribute to successful efforts of this type. Collaboratives are described in terms of four major contextual and organizational characteristics: regulatory and legal history, parties involved and parties excluded, collaborative scope, and the collaborative process itself.

  9. The Electric Utility Industry--Change and Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. H.

    , quality circles, and strategic planning are but a few of the latest buzzwords making their way around utilities these days. The terms are frequently misunderstood, are sometimes intimidating, and consequently may get in the way of implementing improved... resource needs, be estimated so that intelligent decisions regarding resource allocation, timing and trade-offs can be made. Summgry The process outlined above most closely resembles strategic planning. This procedure represents a structured...

  10. Beta Test Plan for Advanced Inverters Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoke, A.; Chakraborty, S.; Basso, T.; Coddington, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a preliminary (beta) test plan for grid interconnection systems of advanced inverter-based DERs. It follows the format and methodology/approach established by IEEE Std 1547.1, while incorporating: 1. Upgraded tests for responses to abnormal voltage and frequency, and also including ride-through. 2. A newly developed test for voltage regulation, including dynamic response testing. 3. Modified tests for unintentional islanding, open phase, and harmonics to include testing with the advanced voltage and frequency response functions enabled. Two advanced inverters, one single-phase and one three-phase, were tested under the beta test plan. These tests confirmed the importance of including tests for inverter dynamic response, which varies widely from one inverter to the next.

  11. Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

  12. Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic

  13. Improving Electricity Resource-Planning Processes by Consideringthe Strategic Benefits of Transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budhraja, Vikram; Mobasheri, Fred; Ballance, John; Dyer, Jim; Silverstein, Alison; Eto, Joseph

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Current methods of evaluating the economic impacts of new electricity transmission projects fail to capture the many strategic benefits of these projects, such as those resulting from their long life, dynamic changes to the system, access to diverse fuels, and advancement of public policy goals to integrate renewable-energy resources and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. 194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS of the indicators, regional reservoir storage vulnerability, is a particularly useful index summarizing (U.S.) to investigate the integrated impacts of potential global warming on water resources. Impacts

  15. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility load management programs--including direct load control and interruptible load programs--were employed by utilities in the past as system reliability resources. With electricity industry restructuring, the context for these programs has changed; the market that was once controlled by vertically integrated utilities has become competitive, raising the question: can existing load management programs be modified so that they can effectively participate in competitive energy markets? In the short run, modified and/or improved operation of load management programs may be the most effective form of demand-side response available to the electricity system today. However, in light of recent technological advances in metering, communication, and load control, utility load management programs must be carefully reviewed in order to determine appropriate investments to support this transition. This report investigates the feasibility of and options for modifying an existing utility load management system so that it might provide reliability services (i.e. ancillary services) in the competitive markets that have resulted from electricity industry restructuring. The report is a case study of Southern California Edison's (SCE) load management programs. SCE was chosen because it operates one of the largest load management programs in the country and it operates them within a competitive wholesale electricity market. The report describes a wide range of existing and soon-to-be-available communication, control, and metering technologies that could be used to facilitate the evolution of SCE's load management programs and systems to provision of reliability services. The fundamental finding of this report is that, with modifications, SCE's load management infrastructure could be transitioned to provide critical ancillary services in competitive electricity markets, employing currently or soon-to-be available load control technologies.

  16. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /of Energy 3 BTOWebinarSupplies;IceUrinalsHeatinginput

  17. Proposed Resource Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Ely District

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary; i-C C1 1 1 14Ely

  18. Report: Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department ofEM Communications August 24,U.S.Report:

  19. "Just do it (replicate)" with Plans, Tools, and Resources | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, so are our best practicesSecurity andEnergy

  20. Community Energy Planning A Resource Guide for Remote Communities in Canada

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoatedCommunity Electric Coop Jump to:| Open Energy

  1. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | DepartmentDepartment of Energy Corps Takes

  2. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVAC |Departmentinput to the National Infrastructure

  3. BLM - Approved Resource Management Plan Amendments/Record of Decision for

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc Jump to:AurigaPlantillas JumpBESolar Energy Development in

  4. Strategic Energy Planning | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Resources Energy Resource Library Strategic Energy Planning Strategic Energy Planning Below are resources for Tribes on strategic energy planning. Alaska Strategic Energy...

  5. Section III: Sustainability/ 1 University of Colorado Boulder Master Plan utilization of existing buildings, before building new ones.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    buildings, before building new ones. The Boulder campus recently created a Space Manage- ment Advisory. Goal: ·Approach development with a smart growth ap- proach, which speaks to both campusdesignele key elements to the campus's smart growth princi- ples. Look first to better use existing resources

  6. THE MARS HOPPER: AN IMPULSE DRIVEN, LONG RANGE, LONG-LIVED MOBILE PLATFORM UTILIZING IN-SITU MARTIAN RESOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. O'Brien; Mark McKay; Brian Gross; JOnathan Webb

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements for performance by planetary exploration missions are increasing. Landing at a single location to take data is no longer sufficient. Due to the increasing cost, the missions that provide mobile platforms that can acquire data at displaced locations are becoming more attractive. Landers have also had limited range due to power limitations, limited lifetime of subsystems and the inability to negotiate rough terrain. The Center for Space Nuclear Research has designed an instrumented platform that can acquire detailed data at hundreds of locations during its lifetime - a Mars Hopper. The Mars Hopper concept utilizes energy from radioisotopic decay in a manner different from any existing radioisotopic power sources—as a thermal capacitor. By accumulating the heat from radioisotopic decay for long periods, the power of the source can be dramatically increased for short periods. Thus, a radioisotopic thermal rocket (RTR) is possible. The platform will be able to “hop” from one location to the next every 5-7 days with a separation of 5-10 km per hop. Each platform will weigh around 50 kgs unfueled which is the condition at deployment. Consequently, several platforms may be deployed on a single launch from Earth. With a lifetime estimated at 5-7 years, the entire surface of Mars can be mapped in detail by a couple dozen platforms. In addition, Hoppers can collect samples and deliver them to the Mars Science Laboratory for more detailed analysis. The design and performance of the Mars Hopper will be discussed.

  7. Utilization of geopressured resources in the oxidation of organic waste in supercritical water. Phase I, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, Alexander F.; Herzog, Howard J.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured resources are geothermal reservoirs containing dissolved methane in hot brine at pressures well in excess of their in situ hydrostatic pressure. In the US, geopressured resources are primarily located in the Gulf (of Mexico) Coast. The wells in this area are characterized by typical bottomhole temperatures of 120-180 C (250-360 F) (Negus-de Wys, 1991a) and bottomhole pressures of 675-1275 bar (9,800-18,500 psia) (Negus-de Wys, 1991b). Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the destruction of hazardous organic waste in which oxidation is carried out in a water medium above the critical point of pure water (374 C/705 F, 221 bar/3208 psia) (Tester et al., 1992). Geopressured resources are particularly suitable as an input stream to a SCWO waste treatment process due to the near critical conditions of their hot brine. By using a Rankine-type power cycle, electric power can be generated by capturing the available thermal and hydraulic energy from the geothermal resource and the chemical energy of the dissolved methane released by the oxidation process. In addition to oxidizing the methane to convert the chemical energy to thermal energy, auxiliary fuel in the form of an organic waste can be co-oxidized to increase the energy output to commercially sustainable levels. Coupling the treatment of geopressured brine with an organic waste in a SCWO process synergistically improves power production while providing a means for treating hazardous waste. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using geopressured resources to simultaneously detoxify hazardous waste and generate electric power. Our ultimate aim is to develop conceptual process designs for above-ground and fully or modified in situ approaches to co-processing organic waste with geopressured brine in supercritical water. As a preparatory step for investigating in situ approaches, a realistic above-ground conceptual design was developed in this study. In that concept, the waste, brine and oxidant (air or oxygen) are introduced into the SCWO reactor at the system pressure of 234 bar (3400 psia). The heat of oxidation raises the temperature of the system to about 600 C (1100 F). Due to the low solubility of inorganic salts in supercritical water (about 200 ppm or less) (Armellini and Tester, 1990, 1991a, 1991b), solid salt forms and falls to the lower section of the reactor, where it is cooled and quenched with water, creating a concentrated (organic-free) brine that would be mixed with brackish water and reinjected back to the geopressured well. Power is generated by the expansion of the products of the SCWO process through a series of multi-stage turboexpanden. A processing capacity of 100,000 gallons per day (gpd) was initially taken as the design basis, following some investigations carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Propp et al., 1990). The process was modeled using the ASPEN PLUS{trademark} process flowsheet simulator and material and energy balances were determined. Both the cases of using air and oxygen as oxidant were investigated. Toluene was chosen as the model compound to represent the organic waste. Turbine design calculations based on the volumetric flowrates obtained for a 100,000 gpd capacity resulted in unrealistically high rotor rotational speeds and small wheel pitch diameters to achieve optimum efficiencies. Higher SCWO effluent flowrates would lower rotor rotational speeds and increase wheel pitch diameters to more practical levels. Thus, a 42-fold larger design capacity of 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) was adopted as the basis for an above-ground base case. The results for the material and energy balances for a processing capacity of 100,000 bpd using air and oxygen as oxidant scale up linearly from the results for the 100,000 gpd case. The best case flowsheet corresponding to a 100,000 bpi case using oxygen as oxidant is given in Figure 1. Our conceptual design study suggests that simultaneous detoxification of hazardous waste and production of power is possible by co-pr

  8. Plan

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary; i-C C1 1 1 1

  9. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy; Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment contains a summary of the proposed water resources protection strategy developed to achieve compliance with US EPA ground water protection standards for the remedial action plan at the Slick Rock, CO uranium mill tailings sites. Included are the conceptual design considerations such as climate and infiltration, surface and subsurface drainage, and features for water resources protection such as disposal cell cover components, transient drainage and control of construction water, subsidence and disposal cell longevity. The disposal and control of radioactive materials and nonradioactive contaminants as it relates to ground water protection standards is discussed, and the plan for cleanup and control of existing contamination is outlined.

  10. Profiles in renewable energy: Case studies of successful utility-sector projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anson, S.; Sinclair, K.; Swezey, B.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As considerations of fuel diversity, environmental concerns, and market uncertainties are increasingly factored into electric utility resource planning, renewable energy technologies are beginning to find their place in the utility resource portfolio. This document profiles 10 renewable energy projects, utilizing six different renewable resources, that were built in the US throughout the 1980s. The resources include: biomass, geothermal, hydropower, photovoltaics, solar thermal, and wind. For each project, the factors that were key to its success and the development issues that it faced are discussed, as are the project`s cost, performance, and environmental impacts and benefits.

  11. Self-adaptive Cloud Capacity Planning Yexi Jiang, Chang-shing Perng, Tao Li, Rong Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    costs. Unused hardware not only causes under-utilized capital, but also results in more early purchase}@us.ibm.com Abstract--The popularity of cloud service spurs the increas- ing demands of cloud resources to the cloud a new method for cloud capacity planning with the goal of fully utilizing the physical resources, as we

  12. agriculture cea utilizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan ofthe Ukiah Electric Utility (Ukiah), as required for compliance Procurement Plan that requires the utility to procure a minimum quantity of electricity products from...

  13. Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 125, No. 3, pp. 143-153, May/June 1999 Some Derived Operating Rules for Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    1 Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 125, No. 3, pp. 143-153, May/June 1999 for reservoirs in series and in parallel for water supply, flood control, hydropower, water quality-term operation for hydropower production and energy storage. For reservoirs in parallel, additional new special

  14. 1992 Conversion Resources Supply Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years conservation of electric power has become an integral part of utility planning. The 1980 Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act) requires that the region consider conservation potential in planning acquisitions of resources to meet load growth. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed its first estimates of conservation potential in 1982. Since that time BPA has updated its conservation supply analyses as a part of its Resource Program and other planning efforts. Major updates were published in 1985 and in January 1990. This 1992 document presents updated supply curves, which are estimates of the savings potential over time (cumulative savings) at different cost levels of energy conservation measures (ECMs). ECMs are devices, pieces of equipment, or actions that increase the efficiency of electricity use and reduce the amount of electricity used by end-use equipment.

  15. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Working with Utilities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 2, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Working with Utilities Peer Exchange Call: Effective Strategies for Participating in Utility Planning Call Slides and...

  16. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 29, Rare plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pounds, L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Oberholster, S. [USDA Forest Service, Montgomery, AL (United States); Parr, P.; Mann, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, L. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Rosensteel, B. [JAYCOR Environmental, Vienna, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare plant species listed by state or federal agencies and found on or near the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Seventeen species present on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these are under review by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing as threatened or endangered species. Ten species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR; four are endangered in Tennessee, and one is a candidate for federal listing. A range of habitats supports the rare taxa on the ORR: River bluffs, calcareous barrens, wetlands, and deciduous forest. Sites for listed rare species on the ORR have been designated as Research Park Natural Areas. Consideration of rare plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act requires that federally funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. The list of rare plant species and their location on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated.

  17. University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources Sample Performance Evaluation and Development Planning Document For Monthly Staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    & Financial / Budget Management - Ability and extent to which the individual defines a project, gathers Planning Document For Monthly Staff For use with the administrative, professional, managerial, other monthly (exempt) staff. 1. The original Performance Evaluation and Development Planning Document

  18. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Corrie E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Harto, Christopher B. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Schroeder, Jenna N. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Martino, Louis E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Horner, Robert M. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2 describes the approach and methods for this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS binary plant, a 50-MW EGS binary plant, a 10-MW hydrothermal binary plant, and a 50-MW hydrothermal flash plant. The methods focus on (1) the collection of data to improve estimation of EGS stimulation volumes, aboveground operational consumption for all geothermal technologies, and belowground operational consumption for EGS; and (2) the mapping of the geothermal and water resources of the western United States to assist in the identification of potential water challenges to geothermal growth. Chapters 3 and 4 present the water requirements for the power plant life cycle. Chapter 3 presents the results of the current data collection effort, and Chapter 4 presents the normalized volume of fresh water consumed at each life cycle stage per lifetime energy output for the power plant scenarios evaluated. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, the majority of water is consumed by plant operations. For the EGS binary scenarios, where dry cooling was assumed, belowground operational water loss is the greatest contributor depending upon the physical and operational conditions of the reservoir. Total life cycle water consumption requirements for air-cooled EGS binary scenarios vary between 0.22 and 1.85 gal/kWh, depending upon the extent of belowground operational water consumption. The air-cooled hydrothermal binary and flash plants experience far less fresh water consumption over the life cycle, at 0.04 gal/kWh. Fresh water requirements associated with air- cooled binary operations are primarily from aboveground water needs, including dust control, maintenance, and domestic use. Although wet-cooled hydrothermal flash systems require water for cooling, these plants generally rely upon the geofluid, fluid from the geothermal reservoir, which typically has high salinity and total dissolved solids concentration and is much warmer than normal groundwater sources, for their cooling water needs; thus,

  19. Third Avenue and Edgehill Road Improvements The City of Columbus and private utility companies have completed plans for improving West Third

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Underground utility work will be performed by American Electric Power, Columbia Gas and a communication

  20. 1990 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study establishes the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) planning basis for supplying electricity to BPA customers. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this technical appendix detailing loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility, (2) a summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources, and (3) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads. This technical appendix provides utility-specific information that BPA uses in its long-range planning. It incorporates the following for each utility: electrical demand--firm loads--under the medium 1990 Draft Joint Load Forecast; generating resources; and contracts both inside and outside the region.

  1. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed future carbon price projections based specificallyalternative CO 2 price projections in terms of the levelizedtiming of utilities’ price projections. We benchmark these

  2. 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study establishes the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) planning basis for supplying electricity t6 BPA customers. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in two documents: (1) this technical appendix detailing loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility; and (2) a summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources. This analysis updates the 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study Technical Appendix published in December 1993. This technical appendix provides utility specific information that BPA uses in its long-range planning. It incorporates the following for each utility: (1) electrical demand-firm loads; (2) generating resources; and (3) contracts both inside and outside the region. This document should be used in combination with the 1994 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1994, because much of the information in that document is not duplicated here. This BPA planning document incorporates Pacific Northwest generating resources and the 1994 medium load forecast prepared by BPA. Each utility`s forecasted future firm loads are subtracted from its existing resources to determine whether it will be surplus or deficit. If a utility`s resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which the utility can sell to increase revenues. Conversely, if its firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity, and additional conservation, contract purchases, or generating resources will be needed to meet the utility`s load.

  3. Strategic plan for infrastructure optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents Fluor Daniel Hanford`s and DynCorp`s Tri-Cities Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 1998--2002, the road map that will guide them into the next century and their sixth year of providing safe and cost effective infrastructure services and support to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Hanford Site. The Plan responds directly to the issues raised in the FDH/DOE Critical Self Assessment specifically: (1) a strategy in place to give DOE the management (systems) and physical infrastructure for the future; (2) dealing with the barriers that exist to making change; and (3) a plan to right-size the infrastructure and services, and reduce the cost of providing services. The Plan incorporates initiatives from several studies conducted in Fiscal Year 1997 to include: the Systems Functional Analysis, 200 Area Water Commercial Practices Plan, $ million Originated Cost Budget Achievement Plan, the 1OO Area Vacate Plan, the Railroad Shutdown Plan, as well as recommendations from the recently completed Review of Hanford Electrical Utility. These and other initiatives identified over the next five years will result in significant improvements in efficiency, allowing a greater portion of the infrastructure budget to be applied to Site cleanup. The Plan outlines a planning and management process that defines infrastructure services and structure by linking site technical base line data and customer requirements to work scope and resources. The Plan also provides a vision of where Site infrastructure is going and specific initiatives to get there.

  4. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  5. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  6. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Potential for Energy Efficiency. San Francisco, Calif. :Economics. National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. 2007.Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies.

  7. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Potential for Energy Efficiency. San Francisco, Calif. :Economics. National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. 2007.Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies.

  8. Published in A. Drexl and A. Kimms (Eds), "Beyond Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II), Advanced Models and Methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), Advanced Models and Methods for Production Planning", Springer-Verlag, 1998, 379-411. Copyright, Springer (IDSS) to the lowest level of the PMS, namely the production activity control (PAC) subsystem. The IDSS the primitive Material Requirements Planning (MRP) features [22]. A production management system (PMS

  9. Planning Tool for Strategic Evaluation of Facility Plans - 13570

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, Virginia; Cercy, Michael [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Hall, Irin [Newport News Shipbuilding, 4101 Washington Ave., Newport News, VA 23607 (United States)] [Newport News Shipbuilding, 4101 Washington Ave., Newport News, VA 23607 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a strategic planning tool for the evaluation of the utilization of its unique resources for processing and research and development of nuclear materials. The Planning Tool is a strategic level tool for assessing multiple missions that could be conducted utilizing the SRNL facilities and showcasing the plan. Traditional approaches using standard scheduling tools and laying out a strategy on paper tended to be labor intensive and offered either a limited or cluttered view for visualizing and communicating results. A tool that can assess the process throughput, duration, and utilization of the facility was needed. SRNL teamed with Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, to create the next generation Planning Tool. The goal of this collaboration was to create a simulation based tool that allows for quick evaluation of strategies with respect to new or changing missions, and clearly communicates results to the decision makers. This tool has been built upon a mature modeling and simulation software previously developed by NNS. The Planning Tool provides a forum for capturing dependencies, constraints, activity flows, and variable factors. It is also a platform for quickly evaluating multiple mission scenarios, dynamically adding/updating scenarios, generating multiple views for evaluating/communicating results, and understanding where there are areas of risks and opportunities with respect to capacity. The Planning Tool that has been developed is useful in that it presents a clear visual plan for the missions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It not only assists in communicating the plans to SRS corporate management, but also allows the area stakeholders a visual look at the future plans for SRS. The design of this tool makes it easily deployable to other facility and mission planning endeavors. (authors)

  10. Identification of Water Resources Planning Problems in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio and its Associated Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, J. K.; Shih, C. S.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agencies, river authorities and interest groups in water resources management have evolved into a complicated system in this area. Thus, it was realized that an overview embedded with the systems approach for the current water resources problems is needed...

  11. Utility Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility Partnerships 7/10/12. Provides an overview of LEAP's (Charlottesville, VA) partnership with local utilities.

  12. Utility Community Solar Handbook- Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The "Utility Community Solar Handbook: Understanding and Supporting Utility Program Development" provides the utility's perspective on community solar program development and is a resource for government officials, regulators, community organizers, solar energy advocates, non-profits, and interested citizens who want to support their local utilities in implementing projects.

  13. LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONSTRAINTS, AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH’S UINTA BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Holt, Rebecca; Tanana, Heather; McNeally, Phoebe; Tribby, Clavin

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. Chief among the challenges facing prospective unconventional fuel developers is the ability to access these resources. Access is heavily dependent upon land ownership and applicable management requirements. Understanding constraints on resource access and the prospect of consolidating resource holdings across a fragmented management landscape is critical to understanding the role Utah’s unconventional fuel resources may play in our nation’s energy policy. This Topical Report explains the historic roots of the “crazy quilt” of western land ownership, how current controversies over management of federal public land with wilderness character could impact access to unconventional fuels resources, and how land exchanges could improve management efficiency. Upon admission to the Union, the State of Utah received the right to title to more than one-ninth of all land within the newly formed state. This land is held in trust to support public schools and institutions, and is managed to generate revenue for trust beneficiaries. State trust lands are scattered across the state in mostly discontinuous 640-acre parcels, many of which are surrounded by federal land and too small to develop on their own. Where state trust lands are developable but surrounded by federal land, federal land management objectives can complicate state trust land development. The difficulty generating revenue from state trust lands can frustrate state and local government officials as well as citizens advocating for economic development. Likewise, the prospect of industrial development of inholdings within prized conservation landscapes creates management challenges for federal agencies. One major tension involves whether certain federal public lands possess wilderness character, and if so, whether management of those lands should emphasize wilderness values over other uses. On December 22, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued Secretarial Order 3310, Protecting Wilderness Characteristics on Lands Managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Supporters argue that the Order merely provides guidance regarding implementation of existing legal obligations without creating new rights or duties. Opponents describe Order 3310 as subverting congressional authority to designate Wilderness Areas and as closing millions of acres of public lands to energy development and commodity production. While opponents succeeded in temporarily defunding the Order’s implementation and forcing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to adopt a more collaborative approach, the fundamental questions remain: Which federal public lands possess wilderness characteristics and how should those lands be managed? The closely related question is: How might management of such resources impact unconventional fuel development within Utah? These questions remain pressing independent of the Order because the BLM, which manages the majority of federal land in Utah, is statutorily obligated to maintain an up-to-date inventory of federal public lands and the resources they contain, including lands with wilderness characteristics. The BLM is also legally obligated to develop and periodically update land use plans, relying on information obtained in its public lands inventory. The BLM cannot sidestep these hard choices, and failure to consider wilderness characteristics during the planning process will derail the planning effort. Based on an analysis of the most recent inventory data, lands with wilderness characteristics — whether already subject to mandatory protection under the Wilderness Act, subject to discretionary protections as part of BLM Resource Management Plan revisions, or potentially subject to new protections under Order 3310 — are unlikely to profoundly impact oil shale development within Utah’s Uinta Basin. Lands with wilderness characteristics are likely to v have a greater impact on oil sands resources, particularly those resources found in the southern part of the state. Management requirements independent of l

  14. Dispute Resolution Process Utility Owner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    State One Call (GSOC) for "Design Call" Provide "as-builts", marked plans or field locates MnDOT Utility? Underground Utility? Contact Minnesota Office of Pipeline Safety Minnesota Office of Pipeline Safety Step 1 - Utility Identification for Construction Investigate and take appropriate action up to and including

  15. advanced energy utilization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Kumfer, ACERF Manager Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization Fly ash utilization Be a resourceADVANCED COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH...

  16. 1999 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands--firm loads--are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and ''contracted for'' resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads. The load forecast is derived by using econometric models and analysis to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA's Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit I) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. The PNCA defines the planning and operation of the regional hydrosystem. The 1999 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix (available electronically only) detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 2000-01 through 2009-10. The study shows the Federal system's and the region's monthly estimated maximum electricity demand, monthly energy demand, monthly energy generation, and monthly maximum generating capability--capacity--for OY 2000-01, 2004-05, and 2009-10. The Federal system and regional monthly capacity surplus/deficit projections are summarized for 10 operating years. This document analyzes the Pacific Northwest's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for wh

  17. Land-use planning for phosphate mining and resource areas: the central Florida case. A workshop synopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFevers, J. R.; Toner, W. J.; Guernsey, J. L.; Rifkin, E.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 19-20, 1978, a workshop was conducted in Bartow, Florida, on the topic of land-use and reclamation planning in the local phosphate mining region. More than 100 participants attended the workshop representing the phosphate mining industry, environmental groups, research organizations, planning agencies, news media, and governmental regulatory agencies. Various aspects of the environmental and land-use impacts of phosphate mining, together with the state-of-the-art of mitigating adverse impacts, were discussed. The participants were required to work cooperatively to develop a series of alternative land-use plans for a selected mining site that was the focus of a half-day field trip. Overall, the participants developed a number of rational land-use and reclamation plans for the site that were considered acceptable by the majority of the group. There was general agreement that the most valuable aspect of the workshop was the opportunity for individuals with such diverse interests to work cooperatively on a common problem and develop acceptable solutions.

  18. 2012 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The White Book is a planning analysis produced by BPA that informs BPA of its load and resource conditions for sales and purchases. The White Book provides a 10-year look at the expected obligations and resources in the Federal system and PNW region. The White Book is used as a planning tool for the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty) studies, as an information tool for customers and regional interests, and as a publication of information utilized by other planning entities for their analyses. The White Book is not used to guide day-to-day operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) or determine BPA revenues or rates.

  19. A case study review of technical and technology issues for transition of a utility load management program to provide system reliability resources in restructured electricity markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weller, G.H.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use (TOU) Time-of-Use (TOU) tariffs are pricing plans that3.2 Current Time of-Use (TOU) and Real-Time Pricing (RTP)Time of Use (TOU 3.2.2 Real-Time Pricing (

  20. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

  1. Integrated High Speed Intelligent Utility Tie Unit for Disbursed/Renewable Generation Facilities Worakarn Wongsaichua, Wei-Jen Lee Soontorn Oraintara Chiman Kwan Frank Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oraintara, Soontorn

    Integrated High Speed Intelligent Utility Tie Unit for Disbursed/Renewable Generation Facilities is to rejuvenate the idea of integrated resource planning and promote the distributed generation via traditional or renewable generation facilities for the deregulated utility systems. Fuel cell and photovoltaic are the most

  2. Business Plans for Agricultural Producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Dean; Bevers, Stan

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural resources Z Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities ? and threats (SWOT) Mission statement ? Objectives and goals ? Production plan ? Financial plan ? Market plan ? Legal and liability issues ? Insurance ? Succession and estate planning...

  3. Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at larger heights above ground level? The wind resource at a wind farm can be estimated in two ways: by measurement or by modeling

  4. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Utilization of Saline and Other Impaired Waters for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    used for turf irrigation and increase the efficiency of irrigation systems in turf areas. The study irrigation systems on changes in soil chemical properties at several depths in the turfgrass root zone://wrri.nmsu.edu Utilization of Saline and Other Impaired Waters for Turfgrass Irrigation Bernd Leinauer, Extension Plant

  5. DOE Publishes Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a new report, SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning. The report was created in response to requests from utilities and energy efficiency...

  6. Economic regulation of electricity distribution utilities under high penetration of distributed energy resources : applying an incentive compatible menu of contracts, reference network model and uncertainty mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Jesse D. (Jesse David)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing changes in the use and management of electricity distribution systems - including the proliferation of distributed energy resources, smart grid technologies (i.e., advanced power electronics and information and ...

  7. Coal resources of Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landis, E.R.; Bostick, N.H.; Gluskoter, H.J.; Johnson, E.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Harrison, C.D. [CQ Inc., Homer City, PA (United States); Huber, D.W.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The rugged, mountainous country of Kyrgyzstan contains about one-half of the known coal resources of central Asia (a geographic and economic region that also includes Uzbekistan, Tadjikistan and Turkmenistan). Coal of Jurassic age is present in eight regions in Kyrgyzstan in at least 64 different named localities. Significant coal occurrences of about the same age are present in the central Asian countries of Kazakhstan, China, and Russia. Separation of the coal-bearing rocks into individual deposits results more than earth movements before and during formation of the present-day mountains and basins of the country than from deposition in separate basins.Separation was further abetted by deep erosion and removal of the coal-bearing rocks from many areas, followed by covering of the remaining coal-bearing rocks by sands and gravels of Cenozoic age. The total resources of coal in Kyrgyzstan have been reported as about 30 billion tons. In some of the reported localities, the coal resources are known and adequately explored. In other parts of the republic, the coal resources are inadequately understood or largely unexplored. The resource and reserve inventory of Kyrgyzstan is at best incomplete; for some purposes, such as short-term local and long-range national planning, it may be inadequate. Less than 8% of the total estimated resources are categorized as recoverable reserves, and the amount that is economically recoverable is unknown. The coal is largely of subbituminous and high-volatile C bituminous rank, most has low and medium ash and sulfur contents, and coals of higher rank (some with coking qualities) are present in one region. It is recommended that appropriate analyses and tests be made during planning for utilization.

  8. Draft 1992 Resource Program : Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1992 Resource Program will propose actions to meet future loads placed on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It will also discuss and attempt to resolve resource-related policy issues. The Resource Program assesses resource availability and costs, and analyzes resource requirements and alternative ways of meeting those requirements through both conservation and generation resources. These general resource conclusions are then translated to actions for both conservation and generation. The Resource Program recommends budgets for the Office of Energy Resources for Fiscal Years (FY) 1994 and 1995. BPA's Resource Program bears directly on an important BPA responsibility: the obligation under the Northwest Power Act{sup 3} to meet the power requirements of public and private utility and direct service industrial (DSI) customers according to their contractual agreements. BPA's Draft 1992 Resource Program is contained in four documents: (1) 1992 Resource Program Summary; (2) Technical Report; (3) Technical Assumptions Appendix; and, (4) Conservation Implementation Plan. This volume is the Draft 1992 Resource Program Technical Report, a comprehensive document that provides supporting data and analyses for Resource Program recommendations.

  9. Draft 1992 Resource Program : Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1992 Resource Program will propose actions to meet future loads placed on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). It will also discuss and attempt to resolve resource-related policy issues. The Resource Program assesses resource availability and costs, and analyzes resource requirements and alternative ways of meeting those requirements through both conservation and generation resources. These general resource conclusions are then translated to actions for both conservation and generation. The Resource Program recommends budgets for the Office of Energy Resources for Fiscal Years (FY) 1994 and 1995. BPA`s Resource Program bears directly on an important BPA responsibility: the obligation under the Northwest Power Act{sup 3} to meet the power requirements of public and private utility and direct service industrial (DSI) customers according to their contractual agreements. BPA`s Draft 1992 Resource Program is contained in four documents: (1) 1992 Resource Program Summary; (2) Technical Report; (3) Technical Assumptions Appendix; and, (4) Conservation Implementation Plan. This volume is the Draft 1992 Resource Program Technical Report, a comprehensive document that provides supporting data and analyses for Resource Program recommendations.

  10. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of DR programs/tariffs: Questions for Pacific Northwest utilities o Conceptually, do you distinguish among different types of DR resources in your resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 06/14/2007 Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of DR programs/tariffs: Questions for Pacific of analytic process does your utility use to select DR programs/pricing tariffs (e.g., screening analysis vs-effectiveness screening analysis? o What are the various benefits and costs of DR programs/tariffs that you account

  11. The directory of United States coal & technology export resources. Profiles of domestic US corporations, associations and public entities, nationwide, which offer products or services suitable for export, relating to coal and its utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of available U.S. coal and coal related resources to potential purchasers of those resources abroad. The directory lists business entities within the US which offer coal related resources, products and services for sale on the international market. Each listing is intended to describe the particular business niche or range of product and/or services offered by a particular company. The listing provides addresses, telephones, and telex/fax for key staff in each company committed to the facilitation of international trade. The content of each listing has been formulated especially for this directory and reflects data current as of the date of this edition. The directory listings are divided into four primary classifications: coal resources; technology resources; support services; and financing and resource packaging. The first three of which are subdivided as follows: Coal Resources -- coal derivatives, coal exporters, and coal mining; Technology Resources -- advanced utilization, architects and engineers, boiler equipment, emissions control and waste disposal systems, facility construction, mining equipment, power generation systems, technical publications, and transport equipment; Support Services -- coal transport, facility operations, freight forwarders, sampling services and equipment, and technical consultants. Listings for the directory were solicited on the basis of this industry breakdown. Each of the four sections of this directory begins with a matrix illustrating which companies fall within the particular subclassifications specific to that main classification. A general alphabetical index of companies and an index by product/service classification are provided following the last section of the directory.

  12. General Services Administration Public Utility Contracting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the government utility bill, utility service characteristics, utility energy service contract (UESC) requirements, supplier diversity requirement, subcontracting plan requirements, reporting requirements, and the Subcontracting Orientation and Assistance Reviews (SOARs).

  13. 2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. This study incorporates information on Pacific Northwest (PNW) regional retail loads, contract obligations, and contract resources. This loads and resources analysis simulates the operation of the power system in the PNW. The simulated hydro operation incorporates plant characteristics, streamflows, and non-power requirements from the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). Additional resource capability estimates were provided by BPA, PNW Federal agency, public agency, cooperative, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers furnished through annual PNUCC data submittals for 2005 and/or direct submittals to BPA. The 2006 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2006 White Book analysis updates the 2004 White Book. This analysis shows projections of the Federal system and region's yearly average annual energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2007-2016. The study also presents projections of Federal system and region expected 1-hour monthly peak demand, monthly energy demand, monthly 1-hour peak generating capability, and monthly energy generation for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. BPA is investigating a new approach in capacity planning depicting the monthly Federal system 120-hour peak generating capability and 120-hour peak surplus/deficit for OY 2007, 2011, and 2016. This document analyzes the PNW's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency;

  14. Utility system integration and optimization models for nuclear power management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deaton, Paul Ferris

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power management model suitable for nuclear utility systems optimization has been developed for use in multi-reactor fuel management planning over periods of up to ten years. The overall utility planning model ...

  15. 2004 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of BPA and/or the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These deficits could be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the current Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The PNCA defines the planning and operation of seventeen U.S. Pacific Northwest utilities and other parties with generating facilities within the region's hydroelectric (hydro) system. The hydroregulation study used for the 2004 White Book incorporates measures from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) Biological Opinion dated December 2000, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 2000 Biological Opinion (2000 FCRPS BiOps) for the Snake River and Columbia River projects. These measures include: (1) Increased flow augmentation for juvenile fish migrations in the Snake and Columbia rivers in the spring and summer; (2) Mandatory spill requirements at the Lower Snake and Columbia dams to provide for non-turbine passage routes for juvenile fish migrants; and (3) Additional flows for Kootenai River white sturgeon in the spring; The hydroregulation criteria for this analysis includes the following: (1) Detailed Operation Plan operation for Treaty reservoirs for Operating Year (OY) 2004; (2) PNCA planning criteria for OY 2004; and (3) Juvenile fish bypass spill levels for 2000 FCRPS BiOps implementation. The 2004 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary document of Federal system and PNW region loads and resources, and (2) a technical appendix which presents regional loads, grouped by major PNW utility categories, and detailed contract and resource information. The technical appendix is available only in electronic form. Individual customer information for marketer contracts is not detailed due to confidentiality agreements. The 2004 White Book analysis updates the 2003 White Book. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for the study period, OY 2006 through 2015. The study shows the Federal s

  16. The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

  17. The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

  18. 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study: The White Book.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

  19. A Template for a Performance Assurance Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Template for a Performance Assurance Plan (draft) Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Performance Assurance Plan...

  20. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Resources The links below describe equipment, laboratories, capabilities, and sample environments that are available to users. Users must plan ahead and specify their needs...

  1. Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models, Stabilization of Data Logging Environment and Development of Metering Plan and Shopping List for Fort Hood, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N. F.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensors) at *ue west substation, and the installation of the ESL's Monitor software for use by the Energy Office at the base. The objective of Task C is to provide a metering plan and shopping list of necessary data points to provide CERL with energy... and EModel, and it was found that EModel gave more accurate modeling results than PRISM, and therefore EModel was used in the analysis. For Task B, a weather station that includes temperature, humidity and solar sensors was installed at the west substation...

  2. Business Model Resources | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Run a Program Getting Started Business Model Resources Business Model Resources Business Models Guide Business Model Planning Resources - Working with Partners Sample Program...

  3. A fuel cycle assessment guide for utility and state energy planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide, one in a series of documents designed to help assess fuel cycles, is a framework for setting parameters, collecting data, and analyzing fuel cycles for supply-side and demand-side management. It provides an automated tool for entering comparative fuel cycle data that are meaningful to state and utility integrated resource planning, collaborative, and regional energy planning activities. It outlines an extensive range of energy technology characteristics and environmental, social, and economic considerations within each stage of a fuel cycle. The guide permits users to focus on specific stages or effects that are relevant to the technology being evaluated and that meet the user`s planning requirements.

  4. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

  5. 1991 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides detailed documentation of the load forecast scenarios and assumptions used in preparing BPA's 1991 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (the Study). This is one of two technical appendices to the Study; the other appendix details the utility-specific loads and resources used in the Study. The load forecasts and assumption were developed jointly by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) staff. This forecast is also used in the Council's 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan (1991 Plan).

  6. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  7. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  8. 1995 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (WhiteBook), is published annually by BPA, and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the, information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. Aside from these purposes, the White Book is used for input to BPA`s resource planning process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC).

  9. Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Many state regulatory commissions and policymakers want utilities to aggressively pursue energy efficiency as a strategy to mitigate demand and energy growth, diversify the resource mix, and provide an alternative to building new, costly generation. However, as the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE 2007) points out, many utilities continue to shy away from aggressively expanding their energy efficiency efforts when their shareholder's fundamental financial interests are placed at risk by doing so. Thus, there is increased interest in developing effective ratemaking and policy approaches that address utility disincentives to pursue energy efficiency or lack of incentives for more aggressive energy efficiency efforts. New regulatory initiatives to promote increased utility energy efficiency efforts also affect the interests of consumers. Ratepayers and their advocates are concerned with issues of fairness, impacts on rates, and total consumer costs. From the perspective of energy efficiency advocates, the quid pro quo for utility shareholder incentives is the obligation to acquire all, or nearly all, achievable cost-effective energy efficiency. A key issue for state regulators and policymakers is how to maximize the cost-effective energy efficiency savings attained while achieving an equitable sharing of benefits, costs and risks among the various stakeholders. In this study, we modeled a prototypical vertically-integrated electric investor-owned utility in the southwestern US that is considering implementing several energy efficiency portfolios. We analyze the impact of these energy efficiency portfolios on utility shareholders and ratepayers as well as the incremental effect on each party when lost fixed cost recovery and/or utility shareholder incentive mechanisms are implemented. A primary goal of our quantitative modeling is to provide regulators and policymakers with an analytic framework and tools that assess the financial impacts of alternative incentive approaches on utility shareholders and customers if energy efficiency is implemented under various utility operating, cost, and supply conditions.We used and adapted a spreadsheet-based financial model (the Benefits Calculator) which was developed originally as a tool to support the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE). The major steps in our analysis are displayed graphically in Figure ES- 1. Two main inputs are required: (1) characterization of the utility which includes its initial financial and physical market position, a forecast of the utility?s future sales, peak demand, and resource strategy to meet projected growth; and (2) characterization of the Demand-Side Resource (DSR) portfolio ? projected electricity and demand savings, costs and economic lifetime of a portfolio of energy efficiency (and/or demand response) programs that the utility is planning or considering implementing during the analysis period. The Benefits Calculator also estimates total resource costs and benefits of the DSR portfolio using a forecast of avoided capacity and energy costs. The Benefits Calculator then uses inputs provided in the Utility Characterization to produce a ?business-as usual? base case as well as alternative scenarios that include energy efficiency resources, including the corresponding utility financial budgets required in each case. If a decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism are instituted, the Benefits Calculator model readjusts the utility?s revenue requirement and retail rates accordingly. Finally, for each scenario, the Benefits Calculator produces several metrics that provides insights on how energy efficiency resources, decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism impacts utility shareholders (e.g. overall earnings, return on equity), ratepayers (e.g., average customer bills and rates) and society (e.g. net resource benefits).

  10. Planning support systems for spatial planning through social learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodspeed, Robert (Robert Charles)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines new professional practices in urban planning that utilize new types of spatial planning support systems (PSS) based on geographic information systems (GIS) software. Through a mixed-methods ...

  11. Supply-side utility economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, H.D.

    1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This article makes two main points: that electricity is a necessary resource, and that utilities respond to incentives as do individuals. From them, the author deduces that the US will have a power shortage within the foreseeable future unless utility regulators begin to consider future power plant needs realistically.

  12. 1998 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: 1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and 2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. The load forecast is derived by using economic planning models to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA’s Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit 1) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The 1998 study uses the same economic forecast used for the 1997 study. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands—firm loads—are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and “contracted for” resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads.

  13. National Grid Energy Efficiency Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the National Grid Energy Efficiency plans and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  14. 41. DISCOVERY, SEARCH, AND COMMUNICATION OF TEXTUAL KNOWLEDGE RESOURCES IN DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS a. Discovering and Utilizing Knowledge Sources for Metasearch Knowledge Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamora, Antonio

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Natural Language Processing Tools for Web Information Retrieval, Content Analysis, and Synthesis. The goal of this SBIR was to implement and evaluate several advanced Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools and techniques to enhance the precision and relevance of search results by analyzing and augmenting search queries and by helping to organize the search output obtained from heterogeneous databases and web pages containing textual information of interest to DOE and the scientific-technical user communities in general. The SBIR investigated 1) the incorporation of spelling checkers in search applications, 2) identification of significant phrases and concepts using a combination of linguistic and statistical techniques, and 3) enhancement of the query interface and search retrieval results through the use of semantic resources, such as thesauri. A search program with a flexible query interface was developed to search reference databases with the objective of enhancing search results from web queries or queries of specialized search systems such as DOE's Information Bridge. The DOE ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus was processed to create a searchable database. Term frequencies and term co-occurrences were used to enhance the web information retrieval by providing algorithmically-derived objective criteria to organize relevant documents into clusters containing significant terms. A thesaurus provides an authoritative overview and classification of a field of knowledge. By organizing the results of a search using the thesaurus terminology, the output is more meaningful than when the results are just organized based on the terms that co-occur in the retrieved documents, some of which may not be significant. An attempt was made to take advantage of the hierarchy provided by broader and narrower terms, as well as other field-specific information in the thesauri. The search program uses linguistic morphological routines to find relevant entries regardless of whether terms are stored in singular or plural form. Implementation of additional inflectional morphology processes for verbs can enhance retrieval further, but this has to be balanced by the possibility of broadening the results too much. In addition to the DOE energy thesaurus, other sources of specialized organized knowledge such as the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), and Wikipedia were investigated. The supporting role of the NLP thesaurus search program was enhanced by incorporating spelling aid and a part-of-speech tagger to cope with misspellings in the queries and to determine the grammatical roles of the query words and identify nouns for special processing. To improve precision, multiple modes of searching were implemented including Boolean operators, and field-specific searches. Programs to convert a thesaurus or reference file into searchable support files can be deployed easily, and the resulting files are immediately searchable to produce relevance-ranked results with builtin spelling aid, morphological processing, and advanced search logic. Demonstration systems were built for several databases, including the DOE energy thesaurus.

  15. Utility solar water heating workshops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, L.B. [Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to explore the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM measure. Expected benefits from the workshops included an increased awareness and interest by utilities in solar water heating as well as greater understanding by federal research and policy officials of utility perspectives for purposes of planning and programming. Ultimately, the project could result in better information transfer, increased implementation of solar water heating programs, greater penetration of solar systems, and more effective research projects. The objective of the workshops was satisfied. Each workshop succeeded in exploring the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM option. The participants provided a range of ideas and suggestions regarding useful next steps for utilities and NREL. According to evaluations, the participants believed the workshops were very valuable, and they returned to their utilities with new information, ideas, and commitment.

  16. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle R.H.

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

  17. An integrated assessment of electric power resource options in the US Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chronowski, R.A. [Alternative Energy Development, Inc., Silver Springs, MD (United States); Shapiro, A.M. [Vermont Energy Investment Corp., Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As with other island-based, insular power systems, the avoided cost of power for the Water and Power Authority (WAPA) of the US Virgin Islands (USVI) is high relative to that of US mainland electric utilities. First, the need to produce potable water requires that WAPA`s electric generating system operate at efficiency levels lower than would result in the absence of the need to jointly produce water and power. Second, the inability to purchase power from neighboring utilities necessitates higher reserve margins. These two operating conditions suggest that integrated resource planning (IRP) should be especially attractive to WAPA. IRP is a planning paradigm that gives electric utilities more options to choose from when making resource selections and, therefore, generally results in lower costs. Utilities look to the demand side as a source of resources--i.e., demand side management (DSM)--in this planning process. They then select the least-cost mix of resource options. In this study, we take the first steps toward implementing an IRP process in the USVI. Using its existing resource base and the supply and DSM options that it has in the future, we simulated WAPA`s resource selection process over a 20-year planning horizon using SafePlan, an IRP planning model. The results suggest that WAPA can significantly reduce its cost of providing electricity by implementing DSM programs. The cost of generating electricity and the amount of kWh needed can be reduced nearly nine percent by implementing cost-effective DSM programs. Cost and kWh savings are greater under less favorable assumptions about (1) the input costs for generating electricity and (2) other conditions that WAPA will confront in the future. The results also indicate that DSM programs targeted at the residential sector can save, 500 gallons of water annually for participants in the program.

  18. State Lands Management Plan Rosemary Hill Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    resources . . . . . . . . . 21. Plans for Non-renewable Natural and Cultural Resources . . . . 22 and Improvements . . . . . . . . . 4. Proximity to Significant Public Resources . . . . . . . . . . . 5 RESOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. Resources Listed in the Florida Natural Areas Inventory . . . . 9

  19. Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

  20. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  1. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  2. CULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D installations. SERVICES · Planning level surveys for archaeological resources, traditional cultural properties and structures · Integrated Cultural Resource Management Plans (ICRMPs) · Archaeological resource monitoringCULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490

  3. David and the Goliaths: How a small environmental group helps reform electric-utility regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Swanson, S. [New York State Dept. of Public Services, Albany, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991 the Land and Water Fund of the Rockies (LAW Fund), a regional environmental organization, started an Energy Project with two lawyers and a scientist to challenge the energy-efficiency, renewable-resource and environmental-protection practices of utilities in the vast six-state Rocky Mountain region. Within three years, Colorado and Utah had adopted comprehensive integrated resource planning (IRP) rules, and several utilities had developed plans to expand their demand-side management (DSM) activities. The authors discuss the role that this small band of lawyers and policy analysts played in stimulating these changes, based on their first-hand experience with the LAW Fund. They also comment on the substantial influence and valuable services that such a small group can provide.

  4. Village of Cashton, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter LoggingVillage of Cashton, Wisconsin (Utility

  5. Village of Deshler, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter LoggingVillage of Cashton,Deshler, Ohio (Utility

  6. Village of Morrill, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter LoggingVillage ofVillageMorrill, Nebraska (Utility

  7. Village of Republic, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter LoggingVillageRepublic, Ohio (Utility Company) Jump

  8. Village of Riverton, Illinois (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter LoggingVillageRepublic, Ohio (Utility Company)

  9. Village of Spencerport, New York (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter LoggingVillageRepublic, Ohio (Utility

  10. Village of Woodville, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planningFlowmeter LoggingVillageRepublic,Woodville, Ohio (Utility

  11. Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  12. Solar Utility Networks: Replicable Innovations in Solar Energy (SUNRISE) Funding Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solar Utility Networks: Replicable Innovations in Solar Energy (SUNRISE) program is helping utilities develop adaptable and replicable practices, long-term strategic plans, and technical...

  13. Virginia Geothermal Resources Conservation Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to foster the development, production, and utilization of geothermal resources, prevent waste of geothermal resources, protect correlative rights to...

  14. Online Planning for Resource Production in Real-Time Strategy Games Hei Chan, Alan Fern, Soumya Ray, Nick Wilson and Chris Ventura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Nick Wilson and Chris Ventura School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97330 {chanhe,afern,sray,wilsonic,ventura}@eecs.oregonstate.edu Abstract Planning

  15. Regional vs. Utility Planning Power Committee Webinar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Webinar 7 January Capacity Reserve Margin Expected Build-Out Schedule -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50

  16. University of Alaska Fairbanks Utility Development Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    LPSteamPerMlbs Steam Down Rate # HP Steam = #s LP Steam 1 Turbine3 Capacity kWPerHr Capacity Units Per Hr 9600 Turbine3 Capacity HPSteamPerHr HP Steam in 138 Turbine3 Capacity LPStmPerHr 25 # Extraction 78 Turbine3 Capacity Restraint % of Capacity Restraint Assumes Linear Relationship 1.0 except Jun, Jul, Aug

  17. Light Duty Utility Arm System hot test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howden, G.F.; Conrad, R.B.; Kiebel, G.R.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Engineering Task Plan describes the scope of work and cost for implementing a hot test of the Light Duty Utility Arm System in Tank T-106 in September 1996.

  18. Utilizing optimization in municipal stormwater management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, Stephen Paul

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    planning methodology which utilizes an optimization routine as its primary decision making tool. A thorough literature review presents the historical and current trends in the general area of stormwater quality. A detailed explanation and analysis...

  19. Risk Management Strategies for Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheets, E.

    The Pacific Northwest has gone through an enormously expensive lesson in both the uncertainty and risk associated with power planning. The difficult lessons we have learned may benefit other parts of the country. In the 1970s, utility planners...

  20. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Clinical Engineering 2964 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE

  1. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008, New Mexico enacted H.B. 305, the Efficient Use of Energy Act, which created an Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS) for New Mexico’s electric utilities, and a requirement that all ...

  2. Volunteers - Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 TheVolker

  3. Computer resources Computer resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

  4. How intimacy affects resource conceptualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Allison L

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous research regarding Foa and Foa's Resource Theory does not address whether the level of intimacy shared between the actors affects their resource conceptualization. Furthermore, siblings have not been utilized as a separate intimacy group...

  5. How intimacy affects resource conceptualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Allison L

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous research regarding Foa and Foa's Resource Theory does not address whether the level of intimacy shared between the actors affects their resource conceptualization. Furthermore, siblings have not been utilized as a separate intimacy group...

  6. Protection of Forest Resources (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road...

  7. LIBRARY plan 2013 The Library aims to support ANU by 2020's goals of excellence in research and education and the University's role as a national policy resource.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in research and education and the University's role as a national policy resource. Services offered At a high resources and services through the Library, hosting nationally recognised collections that support research with the National Library by the end of 2013. Recognition of nationally significant collections by scholars

  8. Hopi Sustainable Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman Honie, Jr.; Margie Schaff; Mark Hannifan

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hopi Tribal Government as part of an initiative to ?Regulate the delivery of energy and energy services to the Hopi Reservation and to create a strategic business plan for tribal provision of appropriate utility, both in a manner that improves the reliability and cost efficiency of such services,? established the Hopi Clean Air Partnership Project (HCAPP) to support the Tribe?s economic development goals, which is sensitive to the needs and ways of the Hopi people. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded, Formation of Hopi Sustainable Energy Program results are included in the Clean Air Partnership Report. One of the Hopi Tribe?s primary strategies to improving the reliability and cost efficiency of energy services on the Reservation and to creating alternative (to coal) economic development opportunities is to form and begin implementation of the Hopi Sustainable Energy Program. The Hopi Tribe through the implementation of this grant identified various economic opportunities available from renewable energy resources. However, in order to take advantage of those opportunities, capacity building of tribal staff is essential in order for the Tribe to develop and manage its renewable energy resources. As Arizona public utilities such as APS?s renewable energy portfolio increases the demand for renewable power will increase. The Hopi Tribe would be in a good position to provide a percentage of the power through wind energy. It is equally important that the Hopi Tribe begin a dialogue with APS and NTUA to purchase the 69Kv transmission on Hopi and begin looking into financing options to purchase the line.

  9. 1999 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands—firm loads—are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and “contracted for” resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads. The load forecast is derived by using econometric models and analysis to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA’s Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit I) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. The PNCA defines the planning and operation of the regional hydrosystem.

  10. The Utility Battery Storage Systems Program Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility battery energy storage allows a utility or customer to store electrical energy for dispatch at a time when its use is more economical, strategic, or efficient. The UBS program sponsors systems analyses, technology development of subsystems and systems integration, laboratory and field evaluation, and industry outreach. Achievements and planned activities in each area are discussed.

  11. Utility Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict SolarJohn

  12. 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, Technical Appendix: Volume 2, Book 1, Energy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study establishes the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) planning basis for supplying electricity to BPA customers. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this technical appendix detailing loads and resources for each major Pacific and Northwest generating utility, (2) a summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources, and (3) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads. This analysis updates the 1992 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study Technical Appendix published in December 1992. This technical appendix provides utility-specific information that BPA uses in its long-range planning. It incorporates the following for each utility (1) Electrical demand firm loads; (2) Generating resources; and (3) Contracts both inside and outside the region. This document should be used in combination with the 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study, published in December 1993, because much of the information in that document is not duplicated here.

  13. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  14. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

  15. Extraction Utility Design Specification

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |Exelon GenerationExtraction Utility Design

  16. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geo-Heat Center provides technical assistance on geothermal direct heat applications to developers, consultants and the public which could include: data and information on low-temperature (< 1500 C) resources, space and district heating, geothermal heat pumps, greenhouses, aquaculture, industrial processes and other technologies. This assistance could include preliminary engineering feasibility studies, review of direct-use project plans, assistance in project material and equipment selection, analysis and solutions of project operating problems, and information on resources and utilization. The following are brief descriptions of technical assistance provided during the second quarter of the program.

  17. Teaching Direct Marketing and Small Farm Viability: Resources for Instructors, 2nd Edition. Unit 6 - Building Resilience: Small Farm Planning and Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    what-is-your-goal/ This web-based tutorial provides thosescandoclinks/ocm43610110.htm WEB-BASED RESOURCES ATTRA –links to other helpful web sites. Rural Tax Education

  18. The Carpe Diem West Academy: a compendium of tools, training, and best practices for water resources planning in an era of climate uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    The Carpe Diem West Academy: a compendium of tools, training, and best practices for water Academy (carpediemwestacademy.org). It reviews and characterizes over 100 extant tools, training resources

  19. EM Utility Contracts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Department ofNotices |Notice of38:3:1:EM OfficialAugustJulySSABEM2/2012 EM

  20. Center for Sustainable Resource Science RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazama, Hokto

    -resource-consuming, energy-efficient society. Project Leader: Hitoshi Sakakibara R&D Project of Metallic Elements Utilization

  1. Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency Programs gasutilityeewebinarnov2...

  2. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  3. Facility Utilization and Risk Analysis for Remediation of Legacy Transuranic Waste at the Savannah River Site - 13572

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles, Michael L.; Gilmour, John C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) completed the Accelerated TRU Project for remediating legacy waste at the Savannah River Site with significant cost and schedule efficiencies due to early identification of resources and utilization of risk matrices. Initial project planning included identification of existing facilities that could be modified to meet the technical requirements needed for repackaging and remediating the waste. The project schedule was then optimized by utilization of risk matrices that identified alternate strategies and parallel processing paths which drove the overall success of the project. Early completion of the Accelerated TRU Project allowed SRNS to pursue stretch goals associated with remediating very difficult TRU waste such as concrete casks from the hot cells in the Savannah River National Laboratory. Project planning for stretch goals also utilized existing facilities and the risk matrices. The Accelerated TRU project and stretch goals were funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). (authors)

  4. Utility FGD survey, Janurary--December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, systems designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

  6. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

  7. NET PRED UTILITY

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility  http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php 

  8. Constraints and AI Planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nareyek, A; Freuder, E C; Fourer, R; Giunchiglia, R P; Kautz, H; Rintanen, J; Tate, Austin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tackling real-world problems often requires to take various types of constraints into account. Such constraint types range from simple numerical comparators to complex resources. This article describes how planning techniques ...

  9. Market analysis methodology: a utility case study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, M.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The case study described in this report was conducted as part of EPRI Project RP1634 - Analytic Methods Used Outside the Electric Utility Industry. The primary objectives of the project were to: (1) explore planning and analysis techniques in use outside the utility industry, (2) identify those techniques which show promise for addressing utility issues, and (3) test them in actual utility situations to understand their real value, and the issues associated with adapting them to utility use.

  10. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

  11. Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules are promulgated under the authority of the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules require that utilities develop and maintain a diversified gas...

  12. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion: Project management/evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

    1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Management/Evaluation Plan are: (1) clarify management structure, task responsibilities and schedules, and (2) to be used as a basis for judging the Project Evaluation Report submitted as a part of the continuation application. The components addressed in the report are: management structure; project staff organization; management procedure; quality assurance plan; ES and H plan and environmental compliance reporting; task WBS and logic flow diagram; list and schedule of planned deliverables; diagram of existing facilities; industry interaction; and evaluation of technical and economic feasibility.

  13. Planning your business: The Business Plan A business plan is like a road map for your business. Careful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planning your business: The Business Plan A business plan is like a road map for your business. Careful planning is key to any successful business. A business plan ensures that resources are available, including (time, money, and opportunities). It helps you decide where you want to go with the business

  14. Disability Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDieselDirectionsDirectorateDisability Plans

  15. Plans, Procedures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Oursources |VisitPlans,

  16. Strategic Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSiteSeparationsRelevantStrategic Plan

  17. Medical Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDispositionMechanical R&DMakingMedical Plans

  18. State Lands Management Plan Randell Mound at Pineland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    resources . . . . . . . . . 21. Plans for Non-renewable Natural and Cultural Resources . . . . 22 and Improvements . . . . . . . . . 4. Proximity to Significant Public Resources . . . . . . . . . . . 5 RESOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. Resources Listed in the Florida Natural Areas Inventory . . . . 9

  19. State Lands Management Plan Clark Island at Cedar Key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    resources . . . . . . . . . 21. Plans for Non-renewable Natural and Cultural Resources . . . . 22 and Improvements . . . . . . . . . 4. Proximity to Significant Public Resources . . . . . . . . . . . 5 RESOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. Resources Listed in the Florida Natural Areas Inventory . . . . 9

  20. A Study to Determine the Effectiveness of Agriculture/Natural Resource Program Area Committees on the Texas AgriLife Extension Service Program Planning Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weems, Whit Holland

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    for over 50 years, serving on program area committees to develop programs that meet the needs of local clientele. This study evaluated Agriculture and Natural Resource Program Area Committee (Ag/NR PAC) members located in 36 Texas counties... accepted for 45 days. The data was analyzed using SPSS 16.0 for Windows software. iv The findings of this study showed that Ag/NR PAC members have an overall understanding of the purpose, responsibilities and qualifications of PAC?s. Overall...

  1. Utility+Utility Access Map | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AGUser pageUtility+Utility Access Map Home

  2. Gender, social roles and health care utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Jennifer Louise

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the fixed role hypothesis. This analysis estimates a model according to which the gender differential in health care utilization is attributable to the mediating effects of gender influenced social roles and the resources and psycho-social dispositions... to physical symptoms. The present analysis esumates a model according to which the gender differential in health care utilization is attributable to the mediating effects of gender influenced social roles and associated resources and dispositions...

  3. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  4. The National Coalition for Dialogue and Deliberation Resource...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Resource Guide on Public Engagement More Documents & Publications Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning: Step 2 Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning: Step 1...

  5. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Gunnison, Colorado. Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to meet background concentrations or the EPA maximum concentration limits (MCLS) for hazardous constituents in groundwater in the uppermost aquifer at the point of compliance (POC) at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site near Gunnison, Colorado. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment. A summary of the principal features of the water resources protection strategy for the Gunnison disposal site is included in this report.

  6. Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU)- Green for Green Home Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility, in partnership with the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) and the Home Builders Association of Delaware, is...

  7. Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search...

  8. Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  9. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > Utility RateGlobalUtilityUtility

  10. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate Home > UtilityUtility Rate HomeUtility

  11. Empirical Assessment of Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms Designs under Aggressive Savings Goals: Case Study of a Kansas"Super-Utility"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving significant reductions in retail electric sales is becoming a priority for policymakers in many states and is echoed at the federal level with the introduction of legislation to establish a national energy efficiency resource standard. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. In response to an information request from the Kansas Corporation Commission staff, we conducted a financial analysis to assess the utility business case in Kansas for pursuing more aggressive energy efficiency that complies with recent state legislation. Kansas' utilities are vertically integrated and don't face retail competition. With historically low retail rates and modest experience with energy efficiency, the achievement of rapid and substantial sales reductions from energy efficiency will require a viable utility business model. Using a conglomerate of the three largest utilities in Kansas, we quantitatively illustrate the tradeoff between ratepayer and shareholder interests when a 1percent reduction in incremental sales is achieved through energy efficiency both with and without the impact of future carbon regulation. We then assess if the utility can be compensated in a manner that produces a sufficient business case but leaves an adequate amount of net resource benefits for ratepayers at a cost that is not overly burdensome. Finally, we show how several common shareholder incentive mechanisms would be designed to achieve this balance.

  12. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    process on the most significant and timely issues that impact our ability to locate, permit, mine, process, transport, and utilize the nation's vast coal and mineral resources...

  13. 2013 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2013 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (2013 White Book) is BPA's latest projection of the Pacific Northwest regional retail loads, contract obligations, contract purchases, and resource capabilities. The 2013 White Book is a snapshot of conditions as of October 1, 2013, documenting the loads and resources for the Federal system and region for the 10-year study period OY 2014 through 2023. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). Starting with the 2012 White Book, BPA changed the annual production schedule for future White Books. BPA is scheduled to publish a complete White Book, which includes a Federal System Needs Assessment analysis, every other year (even years). In the odd-numbered years, BPA will publish a biennial summary update (Supplement) that only contains major changes to the Federal System and Regional System analyses that have occurred since the last White Book. http://www.bpa.gov/power/pgp/whitebook/2013/index.shtml.

  14. Institutional plan. Fiscal year, 1997--2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institutional Plan is the culmination of Argonne`s annual planning cycle. The document outlines what Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) regards as the optimal development of programs and resources in the context of national research and development needs, the missions of the Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory, and pertinent resource constraints. It is the product of ANL`s internal planning process and extensive discussions with DOE managers. Strategic planning is important for all of Argonne`s programs, and coordination of planning for the entire institution is crucial. This Institutional Plan will increasingly reflect the planning initiatives that have recently been implemented.

  15. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

  16. ACQUISITION PLANNING

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    as required by these agreements. Utility Services Prior to executing a utility service contract, the contracting officer shall conduct market surveys and perform acquisition...

  17. Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budhraja, Vikram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 20,000 MW of renewable resources to be developed will greater utilization of renewable  resources and meeting the of renewable resources. ..16 Table 8.

  18. Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 Steve Simmons Gillian Charles #12;2 9:30 AM plants 10:45 AM Break 11:00 AM Peaking Technologies Continued... 11:30 AM Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine and Utility Scale Solar PV Reference plant updates Levelized cost of energy 12:00 PM Lunch

  19. Utah - UC 54-2 - Public Utilities Definitions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and tools |UC 54-2 - Public Utilities

  20. Utah - UDOT - Accommodation of Utilities and the Control and Protection of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and tools |UC 54-2 - Public Utilities7-8

  1. Advanced Metering Plan for Monitoring Energy and Potable Water Use in PNNL EMS4 Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Jason E.; Olson, Norman J.; Berman, Marc J.; Schielke, Dale R.

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This updated Advanced Metering Plan for monitoring whole building energy use in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) EMS4 buildings on the PNNL campus has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), Section 103, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.2B, and Metering Best Practices, A Guide to Achieving Utility Resource Efficiency, Federal Energy Management Program, October 2007 (Sullivan et al. 2007). The initial PNNL plan was developed in July 2007 (Olson 2007), updated in September 2008 (Olson et al. 2008), updated in September 2009 (Olson et al. 2009), and updated again in August 2010 (Olson et al. 2010).

  2. Research results and utility experience workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop was sponsored by the Distributed Utility Valuation (DUV) Project-a joint effort of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E). The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for utilities, other research organizations, and regulatory agencies to share results and data on Distributed Utility (DU)-related research and applications. Up-to-date information provided insight into the various technologies available to utilities, the methods used to select the technologies, and case study results. The workshop was divided into three sessions: Planning Tools; Utility Experience; and Policy and Technology Implications. Brief summaries of the individual presentations from each session are attached as appendices.

  3. Environmental Evaluation of Water Resources Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, W. P.; Woods, C. E.; Blanz, R. E.

    Methodology for the utilization of LANDSAT-1 imagery and aerial photography on the environmental evaluation of water resources development is presented. Environmental impact statements for water resource projects were collected and reviewed...

  4. A .net based resource sharing framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaohan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an Internet resource sharing architecture. It allows users to access and utilize unused computer resources, such as CPU cycles and storage, without an expert's knowledge. It achieves this by providing ...

  5. Environmental Evaluation of Water Resources Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, W. P.; Woods, C. E.; Blanz, R. E.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methodology for the utilization of LANDSAT-1 imagery and aerial photography on the environmental evaluation of water resources development is presented. Environmental impact statements for water resource projects were collected and reviewed...

  6. Environmental implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, G.L.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, the Savannah River site environmental programs and plans from DOE contractors and Westinghouse Savannah River Company divisions/departments are presented along with the environmental coordinator for each program. The objectives are to enhase communication of existing or planned programs to do the following: identify activities required for meeting environmental needs; identify needing resources and a schedule to accomplish those activities; promote share-savings and consistency in those activities.

  7. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the Inspector General`s Strategic Planning Policy directive, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) annually updates its Strategic Plan with budgetary and program guidance for the next fiscal year. The program guidance identifies and establishes priorities for OIG coverage of important DOE issues and operations, provides the basis for assigning OIG resources, and is the source for issues covered in Assistant Inspectors General annual work plans. The Office of the Assistant Inspector General for Audits (AIGA) publishes an Annual Work Plan in September of each year. The plan includes the OIG program guidance and shows the commitment of resources necessary to accomplish the assigned work and meet our goals. The program guidance provides the framework within which the AIGA work will be planned and accomplished. Audits included in this plan are designed to help insure that the requirements of our stakeholders have been considered and blended into a well balanced audit program.

  8. MOWII Webinar: Wind Development Cultural Resource Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the planning stages, wind energy development can be affected by the regulatory process relative to cultural resource management issues. Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act ...

  9. Scheduling with Fixed Maintenance, Shared Resources and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christina N Burt

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 30, 2014 ... Scheduling with Fixed Maintenance, Shared Resources and Nonlinear Feedrate Constraints: a Mine Planning Case Study. Christina N Burt ...

  10. Quality electric motor repair: A guidebook for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schueler, V.; Douglass, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook provides utilities with a resource for better understanding and developing their roles in relation to electric motor repair shops and the industrial and commercial utility customers that use them. The guidebook includes information and tools that utilities can use to raise the quality of electric motor repair practices in their service territories.

  11. RCRA and operational monitoring (ROM): Multi-year program plan and fiscal year 96 work plan. WBS 1.5.3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the Hanford Site direct funded Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.01.05.03. The ROM Program Office is included in Hanford Technical Services, a part of Projects & Site Services of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP). The Multi-Year Program Plan takes its direction from the Westinghouse Planning Baseline Integration Organization. The MYPP provides both the near term, enhanced details and the long term, projected details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Change Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by near term details of this document. The MYPP process has been developed by WHC to meet its internal planning and integration needs and complies with the requirements of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Long Range Planning Process Directive (RLID 5000.2). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed the multi-year planning process for programs to establish the technical, schedule and cost baselines for program and support activities under WHC`s scope of responsibility. The baseline information is developed by both WHC indirect funded support services organization, and direct funded programs in WHC. WHC Planning and Integration utilizes the information presented in the program specific MYPP and the Program Master Baseline Schedule (PMBS) to develop the Site-Wide Integrated Schedule.

  12. hurricane plan UNO HURRICANE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    hurricane plan #12;UNO HURRICANE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................................... 1 I. HURRICANE EMERGENCY TEAMS Hurricane Emergency Implementation Team (HEIT)......................................... 2 PPoosstt

  13. Avista Utilities- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

  14. Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

  15. Power Sales to Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

  16. Optimizing the Day to Day Operation of Utility Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastwood, A.; Bealing, C.

    applications of this utility system software were set up for planning purposes, largely off-line. More recently, these applications have become more sophisticated and can operate on-line in real time. They include complex optimization routines to ensure...

  17. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  18. GSA- Utility Interconnection Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  19. Review of integrated resource bidding at Niagara Mohawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Stoft, S.S.; Cohen, S.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1988, the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) ordered the state's investor-owned utilities to develop competitive bidding programs that included both supply and demandside resource options. The New York State Energy Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy's Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the integrated bidding processes of two New York utilities, Niagara Mohawk and Consolidated Edison. This interim report focuses on Niagara Mohawk (NMPC). In terms of overall approach, our analysis is intended as a critical review of a large-scale experiment in competitive resource acquisition implemented by New York utilities at the direction of their state regulators. The study is not a formal impact or process evaluation. Based on priorities established jointly with project sponsors, the report focuses on selected topics: analysis of the two-stage scoring system used by NMPC, ways that the scoring system can be improved, an in-depth review of the DSM bidding component of the solicitation including surveys of DSM bidders, relationship between DSM bidding and other utility-sponsored DSM programs, and major policy issues that arise in the design and implementation of competitive resource procurements. The major findings of this report are: NMPC's solicitation elicited an impressive response from private power developers and energy service companies. In the initial ranking of bids, DSM projects were awarded significantly more points on price and environmental factors compared to supply-side bids. NMPC's scoring system gave approximately twice as much weight nominally to price as to non-price factors (850 vs. 460 points).

  20. Review of integrated resource bidding at Niagara Mohawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Stoft, S.S.; Cohen, S.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1988, the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) ordered the state`s investor-owned utilities to develop competitive bidding programs that included both supply and demandside resource options. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy`s Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the integrated bidding processes of two New York utilities, Niagara Mohawk and Consolidated Edison. This interim report focuses on Niagara Mohawk (NMPC). In terms of overall approach, our analysis is intended as a critical review of a large-scale experiment in competitive resource acquisition implemented by New York utilities at the direction of their state regulators. The study is not a formal impact or process evaluation. Based on priorities established jointly with project sponsors, the report focuses on selected topics: analysis of the two-stage scoring system used by NMPC, ways that the scoring system can be improved, an in-depth review of the DSM bidding component of the solicitation including surveys of DSM bidders, relationship between DSM bidding and other utility-sponsored DSM programs, and major policy issues that arise in the design and implementation of competitive resource procurements. The major findings of this report are: NMPC`s solicitation elicited an impressive response from private power developers and energy service companies. In the initial ranking of bids, DSM projects were awarded significantly more points on price and environmental factors compared to supply-side bids. NMPC`s scoring system gave approximately twice as much weight nominally to price as to non-price factors (850 vs. 460 points).