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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)...

2

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

3

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) Subtitle E contains three sections (secs. 1251, 1252, and 1254) that add additional "States-must-consider" standards to the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). Specifically, EPACT 2005 adds five new Federal standards to PURPA Section 111(d): (11) NET METERING (see EPACT 2005 Sec. 1251 for details) (12) FUEL SOURCES (see EPACT 2005 Sec. 1251 for details) (13) FOSSIL FUEL GENERATION EFFICIENCY (see EPACT 2005 Sec. 1251 for details) (14) TIME-BASED METERING AND COMMUNICATIONS (see EPACT 2005 Sec.

4

"List of Covered Electric Utilities under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)- 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility

5

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 International Electricity Regulation Presidential Permits Export Authorizations Pending Applications NEPA Other Regulatory...

6

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility that Title I applies to. [See PURPA SEC. 102(c).] The following list is being released by DOE in August 2006 for review and comment by state public utility commissions. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric

7

Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility that Title I applies to. [See PURPA SEC. 102(c).] The following list is being released by DOE in August 2006 for review and comment by state public utility commissions. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric

8

Topic: Regulatory & Policy Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Regulatory & Policy Recommendations. The impact of regulations and policies on the manufacturing industry in areas such as tax, energy, trade ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) and US Geothermal Industry: Current controversies and trends in federal and state implementation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an analysis of the issues confronting US energy policymakers and the US geothermal industry as the result of the implementation and interpretation of the 1978 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, commonly known as PURPA. It seeks to answer four sets of questions about PURPA: (1) What has the existence of PURPA meant to the US geothermal industry. (2) How has the interpretation of PURPA evolved over the past decade. (3) What particular portions of PURPA rule making have been most crucial to the growth and development of the geothermal industry. (4) What aspects of PURPA have been most troubling to utilities purchasing or developing geothermal energy.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Practices Act) implementation: Policy issues and choices: The Northeast Regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide some guidance in the structuring of state rules for the implementation of Public Utility Regulatory Practices Act (PURPA) of 1978. The problem posed here is how might rules be structured to allow for the development of biomass facilities which qualify, but which are not biased in favor of non-renewable resources. Such protects are likely to have different requirements necessary for their development than, for example, hydroelectric facilities. In a general comparison of the two, biomass projects will be fuel and fuel contract dependent, less capital intensive, and more likely to be dispatchable on an annual basis. In addition, biomass facilities may be cogenerators and have available to them more than one revenue stream. Biomass facilities may also be more likely than the hydros to go out of business during the term of the contract.

Salgo, H.

1986-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

11

The economic and environmental performance of cogeneration under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this dissertation, we formulate and analyze a series of electric utility-cogeneration facility relationships to understand their ramifications on the economic welfare and environment. For (more)

Daniel, Shantha Esther

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The economic and environmental performance of cogeneration under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, we formulate and analyze a series of electric utility-cogeneration facility relationships to understand their ramifications on the economic welfare and environment. (more)

Daniel, Shantha Esther

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in

14

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.demandresponsesmartgrid.org/Resources/Documents/State%20Policy%20S Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/demand-response-smart-grid-state-legi Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Enabling Legislation This report reviews the implementation of utility efficiency programs in the United States at both the state and federal levels. In addition, the updated report catalogues regulatory commission action, independent of

15

Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from The National Association of Regulatory Utility from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) on the Smart Grid RFI Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) on the Smart Grid RFI The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) appreciates the opportunity to provide comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on this Request for Information (RFI) regarding the policy and logistical challenges of the smart grid. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). More Documents & Publications RE: NBP RFI: Data Access In the Matter of Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid; Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy, 75 Federal Register 33611 (June 14, 2010).

16

Utility Conservation Programs: A Regulatory and Design Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investing in opportunities to conserve electricity is frequently very economic to the energy user. Often, it also is in society's, ratepayers', or a utility's economic interest to promote this conservation by the utility providing a financial incentive to the customer for the investment. Such a conservation program, whether undertaken by a utility on its own initiative or required by a public service commission, raises several issues of public policy that must be carefully examined. First, a regulatory framework is necessary to ensure compatibility between the design of a conservation program and its stated goals. At times, regulatory policies inconsistent with the stated goal of a conservation program have been applied. Second, constraints that necessitate the utility offering less than the theoretical maximum amount of a financial incentive under the applicable regulatory policy need to be recognized. Finally, a methodology to assess the induced impacts of the conservation program is necessary to evaluate the program's cost-effectiveness under any of the chosen regulatory policies.

Norland, D. L.; Wolf, J. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Title Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Ryan H. Wiser, Amol Phadke, and Charles A. Goldman Pagination 28 Date Published 03/2009 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords carbon emissions, electric utilities, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system planning Abstract Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demandside resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers

18

Confidential data in a competitive utility environment: A regulatory perspective  

SciTech Connect

Historically, the electric utility industry has been regarded as one of the most open industries in the United States in sharing information but their reputation is being challenged by competitive energy providers, the general public, regulators, and other stakeholders. As the prospect of competition among electricity power providers has increased in recent years, many utilities have been requesting that the data they submit to their utility regulatory commissions remain confidential. Withholding utility information from the public is likely to have serious and significant policy implications with respect to: (1) consumer education, the pursuit of truth, mutual respect among parties, and social cooperation; (2) the creation of a fair market for competitive energy services; (3) the regulatory balance; (4) regional and national assessments of energy-savings opportunities; (5) research and development; and (6) evaluations of utility programs, plans, and policies. In a telephone survey of all public utility commissions (PUCs) that regulate electric and gas utilities in the U.S., we found that almost all PUCs have received requests from utility companies for data to be filed as confidential, and confidential data filings appear to have increased (both in scope and in frequency) in those states where utility restructuring is being actively discussed. The most common types of data submitted as confidential by utilities dealt with specific customer data, market data, avoided costs, and utility costs.

Vine, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

SunShot Initiative: Policy and Regulatory Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Regulatory Environment Policy and Regulatory Environment to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Policy and Regulatory Environment on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Policy and Regulatory Environment on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Policy and Regulatory Environment on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Policy and Regulatory Environment on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Policy and Regulatory Environment on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Policy and Regulatory Environment on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Non-Hardware Costs Lowering Barriers Fostering Growth Policy and Regulatory Environment Photo of a man speaking while seated at a table with men and women surrounding him.

20

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommenda...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Public Utility Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) Public Utility Regulatory Act, Alternative Energy Providers (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utility Commission of Texas Chapter 35 of the Public Utility Regulatory Act specifically addresses alternative energy providers, and contains provisions designed to aid such providers in selling power in Texas's competitive utility market. The

22

Presentation to the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners,  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Jay E. Hakes, EIA Administrator Presented to: National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Staff Subcommittee on Gas San Francisco, CA July 21, 1999

Information Center

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy and Regulatory Studies Policy and Regulatory Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, Country: Nicaragua, China, Mexico, Peru Central America, Eastern Asia, Central America, South America References: Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies[1] Resources Independent Evaluation of the ILZRO/RAPS Diesel/PV Hybrid System in Padre Cocha, the Amazon Region of Peru (CONSOLIDATED SUMMARY) Evaluating Impacts of Air Pollution in China on Public Health: Implications for Future Air Pollution and Energy Policies, Xiaoping Wang

24

General Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies General Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: General Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: General Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies[1] Resources Regulator's Handbook on Renewable Energy Programs & Tariffs, The Center for Resource Solutions. Conference Issue Paper, Renewables 2004, International Conference for Renewable Energies Electricity, Renewables and Climate Change: Searching for a Cost-Effective Policy, Karen Palmer and Dallas Burtraw, Resources for the

25

Strategic use of incentive mechanisms as a regulatory policy tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many quarters, traditional cost-plus regulation has come to be perceived as a failure. This perception is, in part, the result of a conjunction of events, changing philosophy, and measurable performance problems in the electric utility industry. Risk, competition and prudence issues will dominate the regulatory agenda in the 1990s. The experience being gained through application of alternative regulation in the telecommunications industry will have a significant impact on the willingness of regulators to experiment with new incentive approaches in the electric and natural gas industries. If the goals of a program are well specified, and if the incentive mechanism is designed in the appropriate fashion, incentives can play a major role in least-cost planning programs and in more accommodating regulatory environments. Significant attention has been given to alternative incentive programs in the electric power industry. The purpose of this paper is not to review the extensive literature on incentives, but rather to provide a nuts and bolts, common-sense analysis of the strategic value of incentive mechanisms as a regulatory policy. 14 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McDermott, K.A. (Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield (United States)); South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

27

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities January 21, 2011 Introduction At the request of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Research Universities, the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have assembled a set of ten recommendations for regulatory reform that would improve research universities' ability to carry out their missions without requiring a significant financial investment by the Federal government. We firmly believe that compliance and regulatory oversight are essential to the conduct of federally-supported research. Rationalizing the Federal regulatory infrastructure is essential to

28

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities At the request of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Research Universities, the Council on Governmental Relations (COGR), the Association of American Universities (AAU), and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) have assembled a set of ten recommendations for regulatory reform that would improve research universities' ability to carry out their missions without requiring a significant financial investment by the Federal government. Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations

29

California renewable energy policy and implementation issues: An overview of recent regulatory and legislative action  

SciTech Connect

This paper has three primary goals: (1) to provide a brief account of recent events in California renewables policy; (2) to outline the California State Legislature`s ultimate decision on renewable energy policy; and (3) to aid other states in their efforts with renewables policy by summarizing some of the key implementation issues and political conflicts that may occur when crafting some of the potential threats and opportunities that electricity restructuring presents to the development of renewable energy. We then outline the renewables policy debate in California since the California Public Utility Commission`s ``Blue Book``, including both regulatory and legislative developments. We also provide some insight into the minimum renewables purchase requirement (MRPR) versus surcharge-based renewables policy debate in California. Finally, we identify and discuss key renewables policy implementation issues that have driven the dialogue and recent decisions in California`s renewables policy.

Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.; Goldman, C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design, reliability/ availability, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples of some of the major factors which could impact the project developer and his economics, as well as discuss potential mitigation measures. Areas treated include wheeling, utility ownership interests, dispatchability, regulatory acceptance and other considerations which could significantly affect the plant definition and, as a result, its attendant business and financing structure. Finally, suggestions are also made for facilitating the process of integration with the electric utility.

Felak, R. P.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Natural Gas Regulatory Policy: Current Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Many changes have occurred in recent months in both federal and state natural gas regulation. Those changes have increased the options of industrial energy consumers for purchasing and moving natural gas. This panel will discuss important developments in federal and state regulatory arenas and their impacts on purchasing options. Among the issues discussed will be: 1. Federal Regulation a. Self-implementing transportation b. Service obligation c. Pipeline capacity brokering d. Non-regulated and partially regulated sales e. FERC Order No. 500 f. Rate treatments impacts 2. State Regulation a. Prorationing impacts b. Federal preemption of state conservation authority 3. Regulatory and Contract Problems Facing the Natural Gas Marketer 4. The Contours of the Current Marketplace "

Watkins, G.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A new FERC policy for electric utility mergers  

SciTech Connect

Section 203 of the FPA provides the FERC with significant authority to shape the future structure of the electric utility industry. The FERC should exercise this authority prudently, with due regard to the reality that competition works better than regulation. For the FERC, this means carefully selecting the type of regulation it pursues. Second guessing whether a particular merger makes good business sense or will create a more efficient firm are matters particularly ill-suited to the regulatory process. These decisions can generally be left to utility executives and shareholders. Competition will be more than adequate to discipline any mergers that do not live up to expectations. The goal should be to ensure that competition will remain a disciplining force following a merger. This means carefully considering the potential competitive impacts of a merger. In doing so, however, the FERC must remain cognizant of the interplay between its merger review standards and its other policies. FERC decisions regarding transmission pricing and future market institutions (such as Poolcos) will have a significant impact on the size and nature of markets. This, in turn, will affect the degree to which particular mergers may, or may not, harm competition. The FERC`s merger policies must not only be rational and clearly articulated, but coordinated with its other policies to achieve the common goal of more efficient bulk power markets.

Moot, J.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

34

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

35

EIA - Smart Grid Legislative and Regulatory Policies and Case Studies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Full report (4.0 mb) Full report (4.0 mb) Attachment A - U.S. State legislative and regulatory policies (2.0 mb) Attachment B - U.S. smart grid case studies (1.6 mb) Attachment C - International smart grid activities (0.6 mb) Maps below summarize smart grid legislation & regulation: U.S. smart meter penetration by State, 2010. Advanced metering legislation & regulation. Advanced metering legislation & regulation. Smart Grid Legislative and Regulatory Policies and Case Studies Release date: December 12, 2011 In recent years, a number of U.S. states have adopted or are considering smart grid related laws, regulations, and voluntary or mandatory requirements. At the same time, the number of smart grid pilot projects has been increasing rapidly. Recent activity includes the deployment of smart

36

Implications of the Public Utility Regulatory Act for Energy Efficiency in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Act (PURA) as amended in 1982 and the Substantive Rules of the Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) establish a comprehensive regulatory system for electric, telephone, and water utilities. The rules which cover electric utilities contain provisions requiring certain electric utilities to prepare energy efficiency plans. In their plans, utilities must consider the potential for economically producing capacity through supply-side and demand-side alternatives to new power plant construction. These alternatives are identified in the definition of energy efficiency included in the Rules. Supply-side alternatives are: optimizing existing and planned generation, transmission, and distribution facilities; purchasing power from cogenerators and small power producers; utilizing direct conversion of renewable resources; and improving power plant productivity and efficiency. Demand-side options are conservation and load management programs that can be implemented to improve customer utilization of energy. The initial plan submissions were made in December 1984, so the energy efficiency plan, and its implications are emerging. This paper describes and discusses the energy efficiency plan as it pertains to conservation and load management programs and its likely effects on the allowable cost of service expenditures for conservation and load management programs, policies for new power plant construction and cogeneration.

Biedrzycki, C. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Report State Clean Energy Policies NRELTP-6A2-47376 Analysis: State, Utility, and May 2010 Municipal Loan Programs Eric Lantz Technical Report State Clean Energy...

38

Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Since 1993, Federal Regulations have treated the four major large-volume CUB's -- fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts -- as solid wastes that do not warrant regulation as hazardous wastes under Subtitle C of RCRA, as long as these CUB’s were not co-managed with other waste materials. On May 22, 2000, EPA published a final Regulatory Determination [PDF-320KB] that retained the hazardous waste exemption for coal utilization by-products. EPA has concluded that fossil fuel combustion wastes do not warrant regulation as hazardous under Subtitle C of RCRA and is retaining the hazardous waste exemption for these wastes. However, the Agency has determined that national non-hazardous waste regulations under RCRA Subtitle D are needed for coal combustion wastes disposed in surface impoundments and landfills and used as minefilling. EPA also concluded beneficial uses of these wastes, other than for minefilling, pose no significant risk and no additional national regulations are needed. This determination affects more than 110 million tons of fossil fuel combustion wastes that are generated each year, virtually all from burning coal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

The US uranium industry: Regulatory and policy impediments  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 required the DOE to develop recommendations and implement government programs to assist the domestic uranium industry in increasing export opportunities. In 1993, as part of that effort, the Office of Nuclear Energy identified several key factors that could (or have) significantly impact(ed) export opportunities for domestic uranium. This report addresses one of these factors: regulatory and policy impediments to the flow of uranium products between the US and other countries. It speaks primarily to the uranium market for civil nuclear power. Changes in the world political and economic order have changed US national security requirements, and the US uranium industry has found itself without the protected market it once enjoyed. An unlevel playing field for US uranium producers has resulted from a combination of geology, history, and a general US political philosophy of nonintervention that precludes the type of industrial policy practiced in other uranium-exporting countries. The US has also been hampered in its efforts to support the domestic uranium-producing industry by its own commitment to free and open global markets and by international agreements such as GATT and NAFTA. Several US policies, including the imposition of NRC fees and licensing costs and Harbor Maintenance fees, directly harm the competitiveness of the domestic uranium industry. Finally, requirements under US law, such as those in the 1979 Nuclear Nonproliferation Act, place very strict limits on the use of US-origin uranium, limitations not imposed by other uranium-producing countries. Export promotion and coordination are two areas in which the US can help the domestic uranium industry without violating existing trade agreements or other legal or policy constraints.

Drennen, T.E.; Glicken, J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Integrated resource planning for local gas distribution companies: A critical review of regulatory policy issues  

SciTech Connect

According to the report, public utility commissions (PUCs) are increasingly adopting, or considering the adoption of integrated resource planning (IRP) for local gas distribution companies (LDCs). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires PUCs to consider IRP for gas LDCs. This study has two major objectives: (1) to help PUCs develop appropriate regulatory approaches with regard to IRP for gas LDCs; and (2) to help PUCs respond to the EPAct directive. The study finds that it is appropriate for PUCs to pursue energy efficiency within the traditional regulatory framework of minimizing private costs of energy production and delivery; and PUCs should play a limited role in addressing environmental externalities. The study also finds that in promoting energy efficiency, PUCs should pursue policies that are incentive-based, procompetitive, and sensitive to rate impacts. The study evaluates a number of traditional and nontraditional ratemaking mechanisms on the basis of cost minimization, energy efficiency, competitiveness, and other criteria. The mechanisms evaluated include direct recovery of DSM expenses, lost revenue adjustments for DSM options, revenue decoupling mechanisms, sharing of DSM cost savings, performance-based rate of return for DSM, provision of DSM as a separate service, deregulation of DSM service, price caps, and deregulation of the noncore gas market. The study concludes with general recommendations for regulatory approaches and ratemaking mechanisms that PUCs may wish to consider in advancing IRP objectives.

Harunuzzaman, M.; Islam, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

From the Editors---Brainstorming, Multiplicative Utilities, Partial Information on Probabilities or Outcomes, and Regulatory Focus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final issue under this Editor-in-Chief, so this column is fittingly coauthored with the associate editors, whose terms also end with this issue, to emphasize their major role in the leadership of the journal. We first introduce incoming Editor-in-Chief ... Keywords: Eagle Airlines, QALYs, alternatives, applications, copula, correlation aversion, creation of, decision analysis, decision trees, dependence, editorial, framing, fuzzy logic, gains, health utility analysis, identification of, interval arithmetic, life-cycle consumption planning, losses, medical decision making, multiattribute utility theory, objectives, practice, public policy, regulatory focus, risk, risk aversion, risk proneness, self-regulation, sensitivity to dependence, simulation, standard gamble, time trade-off, uncertainty, value-focused brainstorming, value-focused thinking, verbal protocols

L. Robin Keller; Ali Abbas; J. Eric Bickel; Vicki M. Bier; David V. Budescu; John C. Butler; Enrico Diecidue; Robin L. Dillon-Merrill; Raimo P. Hmlinen; Kenneth C. Lichtendahl; Jason R. W. Merrick; Jay R. Simon; George Wu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, Country: Peru, Philippines, Thailand South America, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References: Mini Grid Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies[1] Resources Promoting Electrification: Regulatory Principles and a Model Law. Kilian Reich, Bernard Tenenbaum and Clemenica Torres, ESMAP Independent Evaluation of the ILZRO/RAPS Diesel/PV Hybrid System in

47

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs Jump to: navigation, search Name State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner Eric Lantz Focus Area People and Policy, Renewable Energy Phase Evaluate Options Resource Type Guide/manual Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 5/1/2010 Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy10o References State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Highlights 3 Related Tools 4 References Overview This report is a continued and collaborative effort with the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE-EERE) to analyze the

48

EIA - Smart Grid Legislative and Regulatory Policies and Case Studies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... Smart Grid Legislative and Regulatory ... Recent activity includes the deployment of smart meters, distribution automation and ...

49

Does Private Money Buy Public Policy? Campaign Contributions and Regulatory Outcomes in Telecommunications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Is There So Little Money in U.S. Politics? Journal ofDoes Private Money Buy Public Policy? Campaign Contributionssignificant effect of private money on regulatory outcomes.

de Figueiredo, Rui J.P. Jr.; Edwards, Geoff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised 6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) More Documents & Publications "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the

51

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities; Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the policy of decoupling in utilities and how it can be used to encourage energy efficiency.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) More Documents & Publications Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility

53

Smart Grid Legislative and Regulatory Policies and Case Studies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the EPAct of 2005: A Summary for St ate Officials, Prepared by the U.S. DRCC for the NCEP, Fall 2008.

54

Status of State Regulatory Policies Affecting DER Market Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) have the potential to significantly transform the relationship of utilities and customers, and to introduce a much richer set of tools for providing not only power, but also reliability, security, flexibility and power quality in energy systems. However, the deployment of DER has lagged far behind the expectations. One of the most significant barriers is the manner in which the electricity industry has been built and historically operated -- to suit customer needs under...

2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, Country: China Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner Eric Lantz Focus Area People and Policy, Renewable Energy Phase Evaluate Options Resource Type Guidemanual Availability...

58

Impact of state regulatory practices on electric utility: an empirical analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of state regulatory practices on investor-owned electric utilities in the context of interactions among 5 variables: allowed rate of return; cost of capital; cost of electric service; price of electricity; and realized rate of return. A recursive system of 5 equations was constructed and the ordinary least-squares estimation was adopted. Data sets comprise 77 utilities in the US for 1976 and 1980. Results are: (1) allowed rate of return is principally determined by firm specific variables rather than by commission-specific variables, and the behavior of the public utility commission is adaptive; (2) high common equity ratio and a high market to book value ratio lower the cost of external capital, as proxies for financial strength and regulatory risk; (3) long-run average cost of electric service is nearly horizontal and any inter-firm difference in the cost is predominantly explained by the difference in the price of fuel that a utility plant uses; inclusion of Construction Work in Progress adversely affects the realized rate of return, not the cost or price; (4) electricity price is mostly determined by the average cost, and inter-firm differences in the allowed rate of return have little effect on the price; and (5) regulation is effective mainly in the sense that the realized rate of return is severely affected by the allowed rate of return.

Lee, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector December 10, 2010 - 3:42pm Addthis On December 8, 2010, the Department of Energy General Counsel's office hosted a seminar on the topic of spectrum policy, attended by approximately fifty representatives of the utility industry. At this spectrum policy seminar, senior officials from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) provided information on spectrum policy issues in light of the role wireless communications will play in the deployment of Smart Grid technologies. They reviewed the current spectrum management

60

Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector December 10, 2010 - 3:42pm Addthis On December 8, 2010, the Department of Energy General Counsel's office hosted a seminar on the topic of spectrum policy, attended by approximately fifty representatives of the utility industry. At this spectrum policy seminar, senior officials from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) provided information on spectrum policy issues in light of the role wireless communications will play in the deployment of Smart Grid technologies. They reviewed the current spectrum management process and discussed some of the federal programs currently available to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models for energy policy analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models developed for energy policy analysis. The models use the same principles (life cycle cost minimization, least operating cost dispatching, and incorporation of outages and reserve margin) as comprehensive utility capacity planning tools, but are faster and simpler. The models were not designed for detailed utility capacity planning, but they can be used to accurately project trends on a regional level. Because they use the same principles as comprehensive utility capacity expansion planning tools, the models are more realistic than utility modules used in present policy analysis tools. They can be used to help forecast the effects energy policy options will have on future utility power generation capacity expansion trends and to help formulate a sound national energy strategy. The models make renewable energy source competition realistic by giving proper value to intermittent renewable and energy storage technologies, and by competing renewables against each other as well as against conventional technologies.

Aronson, E.; Edenburn, M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities, Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decoupling Defined Decoupling Defined Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities Decoupling can be a win-win strategy to both utility companies and their customers by breaking the link between electricity and gas sales and revenue. A well-designed decoupling plan helps keep utility profits steady and customers' energy costs in check-and it removes the disincentive for utilities to promote energy efficiency programs. 1 These are costs that are relatively fixed in the short-run measured on the timescale between rate cases. 2 Variable costs-those that vary directly with consumption and production such as fuel, variable operation and maintenance, and purchased power-are typically excluded from the decoupling mechanism.

63

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bringing Better Planning and Energy Efficiency to Gas Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

being accelerated by recent policy changes at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. FERC Order 636 requires gas utilities to become active managers of their gas portfolios....

65

Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on December 8, 2010 Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on December 8, 2010 November 17, 2010 - 7:09pm Addthis On October 5, 2010, after an extensive public notice and comment process, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a report entitled, "Communications Requirements of Smart Grid Technologies". The complete text of the report, and of a second report addressing data access and privacy issues arising from the deployment of smart grid technologies, can be found here. One recommendation in the report was to provide more information to the utility sector on spectrum policy issues in light of the role wireless communications will surely play in the deployment of smart grid

66

File:Public Utility Regulatory Act - Texas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Utility Regulatory Act - Texas.pdf Public Utility Regulatory Act - Texas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Public Utility Regulatory Act - Texas.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 Go!

67

Utility rates and service policies as potential barriers to the market penetration of decentralized solar technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At present, economic and institutional concerns dictate that decentralized solar technologies generally require an auxiliary energy source to assure continuous service through periods of adverse weather. Utility rates and service policies regarding auxiliary energy service have a significant impact upon solar system economics, and thus the commercialization of solar energy. The scope of this paper evaluates three basic issues: (1) whether a utility can refuse to provide auxiliary service to solar users, (2) whether a utility can charge higher or lower than traditional rates for auxiliary service, and (3) whether a utility can refuse to purchase excess power generated by small power producers utilizing electricity-producing solar technologies. It appears that a utility cannot refuse to provide auxiliary service to a solar user unless the company can demonstrate that to provide such service, substantial harm would result to its existing customers. Statutes or case decisions also provide that utilities cannot unreasonably discriminate in rates charged to customers for the same service under like conditions. The ability of a utility to provide solar users lower than traditional rates may depend upon the jurisdiction's view of promotional rates. 681 references.

Feuerstein, R. J.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume III of III: software description. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is the software description for the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG). This is the third of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual describes the software which has been developed for NUREG. This includes a listing of the source modules. All computer code has been written in FORTRAN.

None

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems  

SciTech Connect

One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists some of these potential indirect energy market impacts, and identifies whether or not utilities

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists some of these potential indirect energy market impacts, and identifies whether or not utilities

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Collaborative Research: Metabolic Engineering of E. coli Sugar-Utilization Regulatory Systems for the Consumption of Plant Biomass Sugars.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to metabolically engineer the E. coli sugar-utilization regulatory systems (SURS) to utilize sugar mixtures obtained from plant biomass. Of particular relevance is the implementation of a metabolic engineering cycle aided by functional genomics and systems biology tools. Our findings will help in the establishment of a platform for the efficient production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. Our research has improved the understanding of the role of SURS in regulating sugar utilization and several other cellular functions. For example, we discovered that Mlc, a global regulatory protein, regulates the utilization of xylose and demonstrated the existence of an important link between catabolite repression and respiratory/fermentative metabolism. The study of SURS mutants also revealed a connection between flagellar biosynthesis and catabolite repression. Several tools were also developed as part of this project. A novel tool (Elementary Network Decomposition, END) to help elucidate the network topology of regulatory systems was developed and its utility as a discovery tool was demonstrated by applying it to the SURS in E. coli. A novel method (and software) to estimate metabolic fluxes that uses labeling experiments and eliminates reliance on extracellular fluxes was also developed. Although not initially considered in the scope of this project, we have developed a novel and superior method for optimization of HPLC separation and applied it to the simultaneous quantification of different functionalities (sugars, organic acids, ethanol, etc.) present in our fermentation samples. Currently under development is a genetic network driven metabolic flux analysis framework to integrate transcriptional and flux data.

Ramon Gonzalez (PI); J. V. Shanks (Co-PI); K-Y. San (Co-PI).

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Taking 'control': Federal energy regulatory Commission policy on acquisitions of electric utility securities  

SciTech Connect

Section 203 of the Federal Power Act remains subject to considerable uncertainty. Therefore, it is important to keep several rules in mind. Each potential acquisition must be separately analyzed under Section 203(a)(1) and 203(a)(2) of the Act. A proposed acquisition that is exempt or preapproved under one provision may still require prior FERC approval under the other one. (author)

Bloom, David I.; O'Brien, Angela D.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Legal and Regulatory | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legal and Regulatory Legal and Regulatory Legal and Regulatory Below are resources for Tribes on legal and regulatory issues. A Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-Profit Project Development A resource for community solar project development aimed at community organizers, solar advocates, government officials, and utility managers. Provides information on various community solar project models (utility-sponsored, special purpose entities, non-profits), state policies that support community solar projects (group billing, virtual net metering, joint ownership), and tax policies and incentives. Source: U.S. Department of Energy. An Introduction to Geothermal Permitting This guide tracks the geothermal permitting process through multiple levels, addressing such issues as the importance of where the geothermal

76

Evidence and belief in regulatory decisions - Incorporating expected utility into decision modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent changes in the assessment and management of risks has had the effect that greater importance has been placed on relationships between individuals and within groups to inform decision making. In this paper, we provide the theoretical underpinning ... Keywords: Decision support, Evidence support logic, Expected utility, Group decision making, Risk, TESLATM, Uncertainty

J. Li; G. J. Davies; G. Kendall; E. Soane; R. Bai; S. A. Rocks; S. J. T. Pollard

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities.

Information Center

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Federal policies to promote the widespread utilization of photovoltaic systems. Supplement: review and critique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is intended as a supplement to the two-volume report entitled Federal Policies to Promote the Widespread Utilization of Photovoltaic Systems that was submitted to Congress by the Department of Energy in February and April of 1980. This supplement contains review comments prepared by knowledgeable experts who reviewed early drafts of the Congressional report. Responses to the review comments by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, preparer of the Congressional report, are also included in this supplement. The Congressional report, mandated in the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590), discusses various issues related to promoting the deployment of photovoltaic systems through the Federal Photovoltaic Program. Various program strategies and funding levels are examined.

Smith, J.L.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal Loan Programs  

SciTech Connect

High initial costs can impede the deployment of clean energy technologies. Financing can reduce these costs. And, state, municipal, and utility-sponsored loan programs have emerged to fill the gap between clean energy technology financing needs and private sector lending. In general, public loan programs are more favorable to clean energy technologies than are those offered by traditional lending institutions; however, public loan programs address only the high up-front costs of clean energy systems, and the technology installed under these loan programs rarely supports clean energy production at levels that have a notable impact on the broader energy sector. This report discusses ways to increase the impact of these loan programs and suggests related policy design considerations.

Lantz, E.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

FINREG : a financialregulatory model for utility capacity expansion plan evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A corporate financial/regulatory model, called FINREG, is presented to simulate a utility's accounting practices, financial policy and constraints, and ratemaking environment. For each year of simulation FINREG will yield ...

Klosowicz, Peter C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Generic medicines and regulatory policies : The effects of differentiated price caps and co-payments on drug prices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When entering the market, pharmaceutical firms face various regulatory factors that will influence the producer prices for their products. Price competition occurs when generic medicines (more)

Hofmann, Karen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Enabling the simulation of service-oriented computing and provisioning policies for autonomic utility grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are key challenges in utility computing environments such as the provisioning, orchestration and allocation of resources to services. In these environments, providers need to decide how resources are allocated to service applications according ... Keywords: grid computing, resource provisioning, simulation framework, utility computing

Marcos Dias de Assuno; Werner Streitberger; Torsten Eymann; Rajkumar Buyya

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mason Emnett Mason Emnett Office of Energy Policy and Innovation Jonathan First Office of the General Counsel February 6, 2013 NOTE: Comments herein do not represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or its Commissioners Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands 2 Purpose of this Presentation * Describe the types of transactions that fall under FERC jurisdiction * Describe pertinent federal laws and how they apply - What does it mean to be a "public utility" or "transmitting utility" under federal law? - How does ownership and usage of a generation facility impact regulatory considerations? - When are parties required to register with NERC? 3 FERC-Related Statutes * Federal Power Act

85

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mason Emnett Mason Emnett Office of Energy Policy and Innovation Jonathan First Office of the General Counsel February 6, 2013 NOTE: Comments herein do not represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or its Commissioners Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands 2 Purpose of this Presentation * Describe the types of transactions that fall under FERC jurisdiction * Describe pertinent federal laws and how they apply - What does it mean to be a "public utility" or "transmitting utility" under federal law? - How does ownership and usage of a generation facility impact regulatory considerations? - When are parties required to register with NERC? 3 FERC-Related Statutes * Federal Power Act

86

Using consensus building to improve utility regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry and its regulatory environment are at a crossroads. Utilities, intervenors and even public utility commissions are no longer able to initiate and sustain changes unilaterally. Traditional approaches to regulation are often contentious and costly, producing results that are not perceived as legitimate or practical. Consensus building and alternative dispute resolution have the potential to help utilities, intervenors and regulators resolve a host of regulatory issues. This book traces the decline of consensus in utility regulation and delineates current controversies. It presents the theory and practice of alternative dispute resolution in utility regulation and offers a framework for evaluating the successes and failures of attempts to employ these processes. Four regulatory cases are analyzed in detail: the Pilgrim nuclear power plant outage settlement, the use of DSM collaboratives, the New Jersey resource bidding policy and the formation of integrated resource management rules in Massachusetts.

Raab, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power prices, natural gas prices, coal plant retirements, and load growth.Growth Regional Transmission Expansion Coal Plant Retirement Utility Avista Idaho Power

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Perspectives on the satellite services industry : analysis of challenges and opportunities in the market, policy and regulatory environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on Space Communications and combines engineering, economics, market, and policy analyses to identify challenges and opportunities in the industry that are beyond the scope of any one isolated discipline. ...

Torres-Padilla, Juan Pablo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$24/ton, levelized over 2020-2030) was for a scenario inUtility Resource Plans (2010-2030) .. xii Figure ES - 2.Resource Plans (2010-2030).. 10 Maximum Energy

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal electricity production capacity has grown over time because of multiple factors, including its renewable, baseload, and domestic attributes; volatile and high prices for competing technologies; and policy intervention. Overarching federal policies, namely the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), provided certainty to project investors in the 1980s, leading to a boom in geothermal development. In addition to market expansion through PURPA, research and development policies provided an investment of public dollars toward developing technologies and reducing costs over time to increase the market competitiveness of geothermal electricity. Together, these efforts are cited as the primary policy drivers for the currently installed capacity. Informing policy decisions depends on the combined impacts of policies at the federal and state level on geothermal development. Identifying high-impact suites of policies for different contexts, and the government levels best equipped to implement them, would provide a wealth of information to both policy makers and project developers.

Doris, E.; Kreycik, C.; Young, K.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NREL: Regulatory Support - Key Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Regulatory Support team assists the U.S. Department of Energy by providing regulatory information related to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and other legislation to help build...

92

California Renewable Energy Policy and Implementation Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-39247 UC-1321 California Renewable Energy Policy and Implementation Issues -- An Overview of Recent Regulatory and Legislative Action -- Ryan Wiser, Steven Pickle, and Charles Goldman Energy of Energy Efficiency and Renewabl e Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, Office of Energy Management

93

POLICY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2013 3, 2013 POLICY * Successful execution of this research and development (R&D) program will materially contribute to U.S. supply of oil and gas both today and beyond the 10 year R&D horizon. It is the consensus of this Committee that the resource potential impacted by this technology program is significant and of major importance to the Nation. There is a critical need for a sustainable and consistent approach to the technology challenges facing unconventional resource development. * The Committee believes the Plan and the procedures followed in its development to be professional and inclusive, with a significant infusion of industry knowledge. * These Independents are faced with unique and ever more difficult technical challenges in developing new unconventional resources, yet they often lack the

94

Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Processes Beginning with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, Congress has enacted a series of laws establishing federal appliance and equipment standards and...

95

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policy resolution on Clean and Diversified Energy for the West (WGA 2004). Nationally, the North American

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC), 2004. Form 714 - Annualutility-specific load factor (FERC 2004) Added back programutility-specific load factor (FERC 2004) Winter-peak demand

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

CAPITALIZING ON POLICY SYSTEMS & CORPORATE STRENGTHS TO APPLY REGULATORY & TECHNICAL ADVANTAGES IN DISPOSITIONING HAZARDOUS LOW LEVEL WASTES  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 2002, senior management representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE:), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) formed a committee, called the Cleanup, Constraints, and Challenge Team (C3T), to review and suggest ''breakthrough'' opportunities in accelerating cleanup on the Hanford Site. The team commissioned by this committee identified a potential opportunity with a waste stream stored at the Central Waste Storage Complex (CWC). The waste was originally generated as a part of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action and consisted of {approx}3900 m{sup 3} ({approx}12,000 containers) of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. This waste was the subject of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action, commenced in August of 2002, involving development of an Environmental Engineering/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) and issuance of an Action Memorandum. This effort resulted in regulatory approval to undertake RCRA equivalent treatment and disposal, which commenced in July of 2003. The result of this action has produced a disposed volume of approximately 1,270 cubic meters ({approx}4,000 85 gallon drums) to date, and will result in a 3 year reduction in project length, as well as a savings to taxpayers of approximately eight million dollars.

WESTCOTT, J.L.

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Some issues regarding regulatory policy, political participation, and social implications of geothermal resource development in the Imperial Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The early stages of geothermal resource development in the Imperial Valley have been characterized by an emphasis on the technological expertise of private developers and government officials. Government officials have created a complex array of Federal, state and county regulations to monitor the development. Local control is under the jurisdiction of the Imperial County government. The County has as its responsibility the protection of the general welfare of its residents, including any potentially adverse social, economic, or environmental impacts caused by geothermal resource development. Private developers and government officials are interested in the resources as a source of water desalination and electric power generation. An assessment of the interests and concerns of the public was made early in the development stage. In view of all these interests, it is essential in a democratic society that the various interests be identified so government can be representative of, and responsive to, those interests. Therefore, the four issues discussed in the paper are: (1) regulatory problems faced by local government officials in determining the course of development; (2) the social and political context in which the development is taking place; (3) the potential of geothermal development as perceived by community leaders and local government officials; and (4) the desirability of expanding citizen participation in geothermal decision-makingduring a period in which, as public opinion polls indicated, many citizens feel separated from government actions which may significantly affect their lives. Recommendations for regulations of geothermal resources and recommendations for improving public input into geothermal regulation are summarized in depth. (MCW)

Green, P.S.; Steinberger, M.F.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

These comments are submitted on behalf of the National Association of State These comments are submitted on behalf of the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates (NASUCA) in response to the request for information (RFI) of the Department of Energy (DOE) entitled "Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy." See 75 Fed. Reg. 26206 (May 11, 2010).1 NASUCA is a voluntary organization comprised of offices from 40 states and the District of Columbia, charged by their respective state laws to represent utility consumers before federal and state utility regulatory commissions, before other federal and state agencies, and before federal and state courts. Many NASUCA members have extensive experience with regulatory policies governing the utility

100

Utility Energy Efficiency Potential Calculator v2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of energy efficiency savings mandates in many states and other jurisdictions, utilities and policy makers have a keen interest in understanding the potential for energy efficiency at the national, regional, subregional, state, and service-territory levels. Many load serving entities are required by their regulatory commissions to submit ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Regulatory guidance document  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

NONE

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Regulatory and Hydropower Policy (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These statutes establish the State's authority to control and supervise activity that changes or will change the course, current, or cross section of public waters, including the construction,...

103

Essays on Environmental Regulatory Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Distribution Electrical Power Generation andNatural Gas Distribution TBD Electrical Power Generation andNatural Gas Extraction Industry Electrical Power Generation

Dobson, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Essays on Environmental Regulatory Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24. Printing 25. Oil Refineries 26. Industrial Gas 27.Automobile Manufacturing Oil Refineries Industry Industryindustry sectors from oil refineries. Costs from the measure

Dobson, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), which includes Arizona, California, Colorado,Colorado Puget Sound Energy Public Utilities Commission San Diego Gas & Electric Southern California Edison Western Electricity

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Lawrence E. Jones, Ph.D. Vice President, Regulatory Affairs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, Policy and Industry Relations, North America. ... Aid Wind Integration published in North American Wind Power Vol ...

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Other Regulatory Efforts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 International Electricity Regulation Presidential Permits Export Authorizations Pending Applications NEPA Other Regulatory...

108

Coal mining technology, economics and policy 1991  

SciTech Connect

The 1991 session papers from the American Mining Congress Coal Convention covered a variety of technical, economic, regulatory, and health and safety issues. The papers were grouped into the following categories: Coal mine ventilation technology; Coal policy; Coal utilization -- problems and opportunities; Dealing with spontaneous combustion; Energy taxation; Environmental issues; Ergonomics in the underground mine environment; Ground control technology; Lessons in compromise: the need to improve our communications strategies; Management - improving operations through organizational change; Productivity forum - how to improve the bottom line; Reclamation technology; Safety and health; Subsidence; Surface mining - technology and reclamation policy; Underground haulage - from the face to the surface.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC`S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC'S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks Current Resource Planning Practices in the West Title Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge Against Carbon Regulatory Risks Current Resource Planning Practices in the West Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Ryan H. Wiser, Amol Phadke, and Charles A. Goldman Pagination 12 Date Published 08/2008 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electric utilities, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, power system planning Abstract Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6% to almost 50% of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22% of all incremental resources in aggregate.

112

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Key Federal Statutes to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on AddThis.com... Home About Contacts Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Key Federal Statutes These are excerpts from federal statutes that established key Energy Policy Act (EPAct) transportation regulatory activities.

113

Other Policy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Other Policy Other Policy Jump to: navigation, search Incentive that does not fit under any of the other policy types. Other Policy Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 3) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (Massachusetts) Other Policy Massachusetts Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier CHP/Cogeneration Yes Community-Based Energy Development (C-BED) Tariff (Minnesota) Other Policy Minnesota Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Biomass Hydrogen Landfill Gas Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Thermal Electric Wind energy Yes Renewable Energy Pilot Program (Louisiana) Other Policy Louisiana Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Biomass

114

DOE Report to Congress„Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND REGIONAL POLICIES THAT AND REGIONAL POLICIES THAT PROMOTE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS CARRIED OUT BY ELECTRIC AND GAS UTILITIES A REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 139 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 MARCH 2007 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Sec. 139. Energy Efficient Electric and Natural Gas Utilities Study. a) IN GENERAL.-Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commis- sioners and the National Association of State Energy Offi- cials, shall conduct a study of State and regional policies that promote cost-effective programs to reduce energy con- sumption (including energy efficiency programs) that are carried out by- (1) utilities that are subject to State regulation; and

115

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.ornl.gov/~webworks/cppr/y2001/misc/99601.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/approaches-electric-utility-energy-ef Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Feebates This report, written for members of the Weatherization Assistance Program

116

Antitrust/Competition Commercial Damages Environmental Litigation and Regulation Forensic Economics Intellectual Property International Arbitration International Trade Product Liability Regulatory Finance and Accounting Risk Management Securities Tax Util  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development Overview Distributed Energy Resources (DER) are manifold: · PV · Wind, fuel cells, micro Safety / Reliability Maintained Cost Effective to Society / TRC Bill Savings to Participants Possible Cross Subsidization Issue / Disruption to Utility Model

Greer, Julia R.

117

Research on electric utility regulatory and policy matters relating to state and federal jurisdiction. Final report for period September 1, 1994 - February 28, 2001  

SciTech Connect

The projects funded by the above referenced grant, are based on the October 1992 proposal to the FERC, which outlined the need for closer dialogue between Federal and State energy officials. The project is designed to assist State commissioners in responding to outreach initiatives that were already forthcoming from the FERC and to further develop and refine proposals that were still outstanding.

Spahn, Andrew; Dwyer, Alix

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities, Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure) Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies for Utilities, Clean Energy Policies in States and Communities, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Brochure) This document discusses the policy of decoupling in utilities and how it can be used to encourage energy efficiency. 46606.pdf More Documents & Publications Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? April 2009 (Brochure) Greensburg, Kansas: A Better, Greener Place to Live (Revised) (Brochure) Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse

119

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Terms Key Terms to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Guidance Documents Statutes & Regulations Program Annual Reports Fact Sheets Newsletter Case Studies Workshops Tools Key Terms FAQs Key Terms The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) includes specific terminology related to

120

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Petitions to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Alternative Fuel Petitions Section 301(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992) defines

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Impact of Energy Saving Policies on Industries in China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current design and implementation of China's energy saving policies are characterized by multiple, mixed policy instruments and spatially based regulatory disparity. The dissertation replies on (more)

Zhu, Junming

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

123

Working Paper #70 Smart-Grid Policies: An International Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric power systems of many industrialized nations are challenged by the need to accommodate distributed renewable generation, increasing demands of a digital society, growing threats to infrastructure security, and concerns over global climate disruption. The smart grid with a two-way flow of electricity and information between utilities and consumers can help address these challenges, but various financial, regulatory, and technical obstacles hinder its rapid deployment. An overview of experiences with smart-grids policies in pioneering countries shows that many governments have designed interventions to overcome these barriers and to facilitate grid modernization. Smart-grid policies include a new generation of regulations and finance models such as regulatory targets, requirements for data security and privacy, renewable energy credits, and various interconnection tariffs and utility subsidies. *Corresponding author:

Marilyn A. Brown; Shan Zhou; Dr. Marilyn; A. Brown; D. M. Smith Building

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Jump to:...

125

POLICY CONCLUSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased integration of the global economy, there has been a rising concern over the effects of trade policy on the environment. Recent research has shown that trade liberalisation can act as a magnifier of governance problems in the forest sector if the regulatory and institutional capacity is weak. Recognising this risk, the US-Peru free trade agreement includes a binding Forest Annex, which specifies numerous measures to strengthen the legal and institutional framework of Perus forest sector. The Forest Annex also outlines an innovative rule-based, bi-national verification system, which may be of wider relevance in the debate about verification systems design. This paper explores the challenges of this innovative environmental addition to trade policy, and considers implications for forest governance in Peru.

Bernardo Ortiz-von Halle; Braulio Buenda; Chen Hin Keong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regulatory Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Tools Regulatory Tools Home CRA - 2004 Final Recertification Decision CRA Comments & Responses CCA - 1996 CRA CARDs & TSDs CCA CARDs & TSDs Regulatory Tools Title 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Re-Certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the 40 CFR Part 191 Disposal Regulations. Part I Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the Disposal Regulations; Alternative Provisions; Proposed Rule. Friday August 9, 2002. Part II Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Recertification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the Disposal Regulations: Certification Decision; Final Rule. May 18, 1998. Part III

127

Regulatory Compliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Compliance Regulatory Compliance Regulatory Compliance This photo shows the inside the K West Basin facility, where workers are retrieving highly radioactive sludge material under 17 feet of water. This photo shows the inside the K West Basin facility, where workers are retrieving highly radioactive sludge material under 17 feet of water. The Department of Energy is not a regulatory agency; however it does self-regulate its own radioactive waste. DOE is also affected by a variety of statutes, legislation, regulations, directives and guidance. Many of the current compliance-related actions revolve around waste and material disposition. These include National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Impact Statements and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Records of Decision. Links, below,

128

Regulatory overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end of 2012 and beginning of 2013 was a busy time for US regulators and standard-setters as two regulations and one consensus standard made the news. All have implications for oilseed processing and edible oil refining. Regulatory overview Public

129

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

130

Controlling acid rain : policy issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The policy and regulatory ramifications of U.S. acid rain control programs are examined; particularly, the alternative of a receptor-oriented strategy as constrasted to emission-oriented proposals (e.g., the Mitchell bill) ...

Fay, James A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office manages several Energy Policy Act (EPAct) transportation regulatory activities that aim to reduce U.S. petroleum consumption by building a core market for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). EPAct directed DOE to develop the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to manage regulatory activities, including the State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Program, which requires covered fleets to reduce petroleum consumption through one of two compliance methods. Features Discover how National Grid meets EPAct requirements Read the latest newsletter Learn about Alternative Compliance Quick Links Standard Compliance Reporting Standard Compliance Alternative Compliance

133

Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges in Implementing Smart Grid Solutions Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges in Implementing Smart Grid Solutions Honeywell comment on regulatory policy issues that need to be considered, and on implementation challenges and opportunities critical to deploying Smart Grid systems. Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges in Implementing Smart Grid Solutions More Documents & Publications NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Honeywell Responses To Request for Information (RFI) from the Department of Energy on Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities To Inform Federal Smart

134

PRE-SW Utility Energy Efficiency Potential Calculator v2.0, Beta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of energy efficiency savings mandates in many states and other jurisdictions, utilities and policy makers have a keen interest in understanding the potential for energy efficiency at the national, regional, subregional, state, and service-territory levels. Many load serving entities are required by their regulatory commissions to submit energy efficiency potential filings on a periodic basis; these undertakings typically require significant investment in consultants. ...

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States: Projected Spending and Savings to 2025 Title The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States: Projected Spending and Savings to 2025 Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2013 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Charles A. Goldman, Ian M. Hoffman, and Megan A. Billingsley Date Published 01/2013 Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable energy: policy Abstract We develop projections of future spending on, and savings from, energy efficiency programs funded by electric and gas utility customers in the United States, under three scenarios through 2025. Our analysis, which updates a previous LBNL study, relies on detailed bottom-up modeling of current state energy efficiency policies, regulatory decisions, and demand-side management and utility resource plans. The three scenarios are intended to represent a range of potential outcomes under the current policy environment (i.e., without considering possible major new policy developments).

136

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incentives: Advanced energy technologies can best be promoted with forward-thinking regulatory policies. Many statesIncentives: Ad- vanced energy technologies can best be promoted with forward-thinking regulatory policies. Many states

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In the United States, FIT policies may require utilities to purchase either electricity, or both electricity and the renewable energy (RE) attributes from eligible...

138

Approaches to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to Electric Utility Energy Efficiency for Low Income Customers in a Changing Regulatory Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name Approaches to Electric Utility Energy...

139

Workgroup #6 Rethinking Governance and Energy Efficiency Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workgroup #6 Rethinking Governance and Energy Efficiency Policies ­ How do we optimize the alignment of regulatory practice with public policy goals? Co-chairs: Sara Patton, Northwest Energy-group Chair: Sara Patton Rethinking Energy Efficiency Program Policies: How to align regulatory practice

140

GRR/Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process GRR/Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process 3-WA-c - Utility Franchise or Permit Process (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies WAC 468-34-060 WAC 468-34-080 WAC 468-34-110 WAC 468-34-160 WAC 468-34-170 Triggers None specified This flowchart illustrates the process of obtaining a franchise or permit through a state highway right of way in Washington State. A utility permit or franchise is required for occupancy of a highway right of way by utility facilities, including private lines. WAC 468-34-160. The process is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Processes Regulatory Processes Beginning with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, Congress has enacted a series of laws establishing federal appliance and equipment standards and the Department of Energy's (DOE) authority to develop, amend, and implement standards. To implement these laws, the Appliance and Equipment Standards program manages the regulatory processes described below. Standards Development and Revision Standards for a given product may be mandated by Congress or established by DOE pursuant to statutory authority. Standards established by DOE are developed through a multi-step rulemaking process that includes public participation. Test Procedure Development and Revision Most standards rulemakings are accompanied by a concurrent test procedure rulemaking. Test procedures detail how manufacturers must test their products to certify that they comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. (42 U.S.C. 6293; 6314) DOE also uses the test procedures to determine compliance with the applicable standards. (42 U.S.C. 6295(s))

142

Cogeneration: The Need for Utility-Industry Cooperation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is receiving increasing attention because of its potential for efficient utilization of energy. Many recent cogeneration studies, however, have concentrated on the benefits and costs of cogeneration to industry, giving little consideration to utility roles and perspectives. This paper provides an overview of a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate industrial cogeneration applications, taking into account utility interactions and impacts. Recent changes in federal legislation, particularly the enactment of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), have attempted to remove many of the institutional barriers which in the past made industry hesitant to invest in cogeneration. However, to implement the most attractive cogeneration systems industry must consider the changing economics of utility power generation. Also, despite the attractiveness of cogeneration, many industrial managers are reluctant to invest scarce capital in an area which they do not consider a natural extension of their business. At the same time, many utilities facing slower load growth and economic/environmental /institutional constraints on capacity expansion are willing to consider cogeneration as an option. Cogeneration projects can be highly complementary to the traditional utility business and possibly offer an attractive profit potential. Also, utilities can offer industry the needed expertise to implement and operate cogeneration systems. Considerable benefits may therefore be derived from cooperative cogeneration ventures among utilities and industrial firms. Many different organizational and financial arrangements can be structured, including third party financing. The, paper will briefly discuss the need for and benefits of cooperative efforts and provide illustrative examples of different institutional arrangements.

Limaye, D. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry's SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry`s SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Energy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind turbines Energy Policy Energy policy research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory covers a wide range of topics from the development of policy strategies to encourage...

146

GRR/Section 7-FD-a - Utilization Application Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FD-a - Utilization Application Process FD-a - Utilization Application Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-FD-a - Utilization Application Process 07-FD-a - PlantCommissioning.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Department of Defense United States Department of Energy Bureau of Indian Affairs Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act 43 CRF 3000.12 43 CFR 3272 43 CFR 3272.11 43 CFR 3273 43 CFR 3273.15 43 CFR 3273.19 43 CFR 3274 43 CFR 3275 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07-FD-a - PlantCommissioning.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

147

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 International Electricity Regulation Presidential Permits Export Authorizations Pending Applications NEPA Other Regulatory...

148

Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

GRR/Section 3-CO-e - Utility or Special Use Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-CO-e - Utility or Special Use Permit 3-CO-e - Utility or Special Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-CO-e - Utility or Special Use Permit 03COEUtilitySpecialUsePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies Rules and Regulations of the Colorado Department of Transportation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03COEUtilitySpecialUsePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Utility owners must obtain a permit from the Colorado Department of Transportation prior to performing any utility accommodation work,

150

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) appreciates the opportunity to provide comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on this Request for Information (RFI) regarding the policy and logistical challenges of the smart grid. 75 Fed. Reg. 57006 (Sept. 17, 2010). INTRODUCTION NARUC is the national organization of State commissions responsible for economic and safety regulation of utilities. Our members in the fifty States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands have the obligation under State law to ensure the establishment and maintenance of such energy utility services as may be required by the public convenience and

151

Policy Flash 2011-104 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Policy Flash 2011-104 Policy Flash 2011-104 - Sources for Office Supplies. The Department of Energy (DOE) supports utilization of: (1) the General Service Administration's...

152

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (January 15, 2013) In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission or FERC's) regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects reviewed the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington's (Snohomish PUD) application for a 10-year pilot license for the proposed Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project No. 12690, which would be located in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, near the City of Port Townsend, in Island County, Washington, and has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/EA-1949). In the EA, Commission staff analyzed the potential environmental effects of constructing and

153

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (August 9, 2013) In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission or FERC's) regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects reviewed the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington's (Snohomish PUD) application for a 10-year license for the proposed Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project No. 12690, which would be located in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, near the City of Port Townsend, in Island County, Washington, and has prepared a final environmental assessment (FEA) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE/EA-1949). In the FEA, Commission staff analyzed the potential environmental effects of

154

Diversity Policies; Diversity Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies: Brookhaven National Laboratory Diversity Policies: Brookhaven Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Policy Brookhaven Sexual Harassment Policy Brookhaven Veterans Policy...

155

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgFederal Policies for Renewable Electricity: Impacts and Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three types of policies that are prominent in the federal debate over addressing greenhouse gas emissions in the United States are a cap-and-trade program (CTP) on emissions, a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) for electricity production, and tax credits for renewable electricity producers. Each of these policies would have different consequences, and combinations of these policies could induce interactions yielding a whole that is not the sum of its parts. This paper utilizes the Haiku electricity market model to evaluate the economic and technology outcomes, climate benefits, and cost-effectiveness of three such policies and all possible combinations of the policies. A central finding is that the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions reductions from CTP can be significantly greater than those from the other policies, even for similar levels of renewable electricity production, since of the three policies, CTP is the only one that distinguishes electricity generated by coal and natural gas. It follows that CTP is the most cost-effective among these approaches at reducing CO2 emissions. An alternative compliance payment mechanism in an RPS program could substantially affect renewables penetration, and the electricity price effects of the policies hinge partly on the regulatory structure of electricity markets, which varies across the country.

Karen Palmer; Anthony Paul; Matt Woerman; Karen Palmer; Anthony Paul; Matt Woerman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Congeneration and utilities: Status and prospects: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The cogeneration industry has grown and changed considerably since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) in 1978. It has moved from infancy to a major industry that must be addressed in electric utility resource planning. This report examines the utility perspective on cogeneration. The report begins with a brief outline of the history of the US cogeneration industry, including an in-depth look at recent developments. An assessment of the industry as it currently stands is then presented. This assessment includes a look at who is cogenerating now and who is likely to be cogenerating in the future. It also includes an analysis of the key market sensitivities and how they affect the individuals who must make the decisions to cogenerate. These discussions provide a framework for the central issue addressed in the next section: the effect of cogeneration on the electric utilities. After the alternative responses to cogeneration are outlined, the report details the impacts of cogeneration on utility planning and policy. Special utility concerns relative to cogeneration are raised including potential ratemaking approaches, the issue of cogeneration reliability and approaches to planning for it, and the costs and benefits of cogeneration to non-participant ratepayers. Next the planning and economic benefits which can accrue from utility ownership of and participation in cogeneration projects are discussed in the context of cogeneration as an electric utility opportunity. The final sections of the report define and classify various types of cogeneration technologies and outline the current status of EPRI's cogeneration research. 21 figs., 22 tabs.

Limaye, D.R.; Jacobs, L.; McDonald, C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Regulatory incentives and prudence reviews  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past several years, numerous large prudence case disallowances have occurred throughout the United States. Many of these cases concerned the construction of large nuclear facilities. Disallowances occurred despite the presence of incentive mechanisms that were used by various state public utility commissions. The regulatory model used during that period assumed that incentives were useful. Incentives were often viewed, however, as an exploratory exercise that might provide benefits. Still, the real mechanism used to protect ratepayers was the classical prudence case. And, as we saw during the 1980s, such cases were frequently used to prohibit utilities from passing unreasonable costs on to ratepayers. To avoid the system breakdowns and the resulting prudence cases, utilities and regulators must develop incentives that affect utilities' behavior to provide an optimal level of safe and adequate service at the lowest reasonable cost. If the incentives are simply viewed as an exotic regulatory mechanism, without being properly understood and implemented from an operational perspective at the utilities, they may not produce the desired outcome. In some instances they may be irrelevant to the final result. Several relatively new incentive mechanisms are promising. These include incentives that provide utilities with increased profits for implementing good customer-service programs or for achieving good performance in demand-side management (DSM) programs. Those incentives usually link a monetary reward or penalty in the form of a change to the earned rate of return to specific actions, such as the customer complaint rate for the utility or its success in installing certain DSM devices. These are promising because they relate to discrete events that can be easily understood by utility management and measured by regulators.

Bronner, K.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electric utilities broaden their vision, again, and move beyond energy services...to communications services  

SciTech Connect

Energy production and delivery will be tightly coupled with telecommunications and information services for the foreseeable future. In order to control access to the customer and prevent erosion of their customer bases, utilities will be driven to become more aggressive in deploying both supply-side information technologies for improved operation of their generation, transmission, and distribution facilities; and demand side Energy Information Service (EIS). Those information services will enable utilities to provide higher quality services at lower cost with lower environmental impact, and to give their ratepayers better control over their power usage. Utilities have important assets that will be valuable in deploying telecommunications networks that support EIS and other value-added information services. Electric power utilities have the potential to become significant players in the National Information Infrastructure, providing commercial EIS, non-energy value-added services, and telecommunications services. Utility entry into telecommunications markets would bring more competition to those markets and contribute toward universal service goals. Regulatory restrictions on utility entry into telecommunications markets are inconsistent with more recent government policies promoting competition. Joint ventures and other forms of partnering will be necessary to build utility networks, and partnering with telecommunications companies will be especially important to utilities. Pivotal business alliances and regulatory policies that will shape the business environment for both industries are likely to be decided int the next few years. Utilities face a brief window of necessity and opportunity: the necessity to assess the EIS and telecommunications capabilities they will need to support their core business in the future; and the opportunity to consider what new sources of revenue could be opened up by those capabilities.

Mann, M. [Electric Power Research Institutes, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Utility Regulation (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation (Indiana) Regulation (Indiana) Utility Regulation (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission enforces regulations in this legislation that apply to all individuals, corporations, companies, and partnerships that may own, operate, manage, or control any equipment for the production, transmission, delivery, or furnishing of heat, light,

162

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 11:30AM to 1:00PM MDT The purpose of this webinar is to educate NRECA and APPA members, Tribes, and federal energy managers about a few of the regulatory issues that should be considered in developing business plans for distributed generation projects. This webinar is sponsored by the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, Western Area Power Administration, DOE Federal Energy Management Program, DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, and the American Public Power

163

Quality Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy110406 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - System Level Document Title: Quality Policy Document Number: Q-002 Rev. 110406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero...

164

Web Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Policies Web Policies Accessibility The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is part of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), which...

165

Natural Gas: Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This special report Web-based product presents a chronology of some of the key Federal legislative and regulatory actions that have helped shape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives from 1978 to October 2008. Separate reports provide brief descriptions of specific legislation, regulations, or policies, and their impacts on the natural gas market.

Information Center

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on December 8, 2010 Department of Energy to Host Spectrum Policy Seminar for the Utility Sector on...

167

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials This report represents a review of policy developments on demand response and other related areas such as smart meters and smart grid. It has been prepared by the Demand Response Coordinating Committ ee (DRCC) for the National Council on Electricity Policy (NCEP). The report focuses on State and Federal policy developments during the period from 2005 to mid-year 2008. It is an att empt to catalogue information on policy developments at both the federal and state level, both in the legislative and regulatory arenas. Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy

168

Evaluation of tools for renewable energy policy analysis: The ten federal region model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 establishes a program to support development of renewable energy technologies including a production incentive to public power utilities. Because there is a wide range of possible policy actions that could be taken to increase electric market share for renewables, modeling tools are needed to help make informed decisions regarding future policy. Previous energy modeling tools did not contain the region or infrastructure focus necessary to examine renewable technologies. As a result, the Department of Energy Office of Utility Technologies (OUT) supported the development of tools for renewable energy policy analysis. Three models were developed: The Renewable Energy Penetration (REP) model, which is a spreadsheet model for determining first-order estimates of policy effects for each of the ten federal regions; the Ten Federal Region Model (TFRM), which employs utility capacity expansion and dispatching decision; and the Region Electric Policy Analysis Model (REPAM), which was constructed to allow detailed insight into interactions between policy and technology within an individual region. These Models were developed to provide a suite of fast, personal-computer based policy analysis tools; as one moves from the REP model to the TFRM to the REPAM the level of detail (and complexity) increases. In 1993 a panel was formed to identify model strengths, weaknesses (including any potential biases) and to suggest potential improvements. The panel met in January 1994 to discuss model simulations and to deliberate regarding evaluation outcomes. This report is largely a result of this meeting. This report is organized as follows. It provides a description of the TFRM and summarizes the panel`s findings. Individual chapters examine various aspects of the model: demand and load, capacity expansion, dispatching and production costing, reliability, renewables, storage, financial and regulatory concerns, and environmental effects.

Engle, J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

SERN Policy and Regulation Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SERN Policy and Regulation Database SERN Policy and Regulation Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: SERN Policy and Regulation Database Agency/Company /Organization: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset References: REEEP SERN Policy and Regulation Database[1] "The SERN Policy database will allow project developers to understand the existing energy mix within a country and the regulatory barriers which they may have to overcome in implementing a renewable energy and/or energy efficiency project. The policy database is available online." References ↑ "REEEP SERN Policy and Regulation Database"

170

Electric-utility DSM programs: Terminology and reporting formats  

SciTech Connect

The number, scope, effects, and costs of electric-utility demand-site management programs are growing rapidly in the United States. Utilities, their regulators, and energy policy makers need reliable information on the costs of, participation in, and energy and load effects of these programs to make informed decisions. In particular, information is needed on the ability of these programs to cost-effectively provide energy and capacity resources that are alternatives to power plants. This handbook addresses the need for additional and better information in two ways. First, it discusses the key concepts associated with DSM-program types, participation, energy and load effects, and costs. Second, the handbook offers definitions and a sample reporting form for utility DSM programs. The primary purpose in developing these definitions and this form is to encourage consistency in the collection and reporting of data on DSM programs. To ensure that the discussions, reporting formats, and definitions will be useful and used, development of this handbook was managed by a committee, with membership from electric utilities, state regulatory commissions, and the US Department of Energy. Also, this data-collection form was pretested by seven people from six utilities, who completed the form for nine DSM programs.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Sabo, C. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluation of tools for renewable energy policy analysis: The renewable energy penetration model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 establishes a program to support development of renewable energy technologies including a production incentive to public power utilities. Because there is a wide range of possible policy actions that could be taken to increase electric market share for renewables, modeling tools are needed to help make informed decisions regarding future policy. Previous energy modeling tools did not contain the regional or infrastructure focus necessary to examine renewable technologies. As a result, the Department of Energy Office of Utility Technologies (OUT) supported the development of tools for renewable energy policy analysis. Three models were developed: The Renewable Energy Penetration (REP) model, which is a spreadsheet model for determining first-order estimates of policy effects for each of the ten federal regions; the Ten Federal Region Model (TFRM), which employs utility capacity expansion and dispatching decisions; and the Regional Electric Policy Analysis Model (REPAM) which was constructed to allow detailed insight into interactions between policy and technology within an individual region. In 1993, the OUT supported the Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) to form an expert panel to provide an independent review of the REP model and TFRM. This report contains the panel`s evaluation of the REP model; the TFRM is evaluated in a companion report. The panel did not review the REPAM. The panel met for a second time in January 1994 to discuss model simulations and deliberate regarding evaluation outcomes. This report is largely a result of this second meeting. The remainder of this chapter provides a description of the REP model and summarizes the panel`s findings. Individual chapters examine various aspects of the model: demand and load, capacity expansion, dispatching and production costing, reliability, renewables, storage, transmission, financial and regulatory concerns, and environmental effects.

Engle, J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Security Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M/S ACES Pvt. Ltd. Pakistan Page Security Policy ... 2013 M/S ACES Pvt. Ltd. Pakistan 5/27/2013 Page 2. [SECURITY POLICY] May 27, 2013 ...

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment : a study for the energy storage systems program.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.; Kirby, Brendan [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Expanding the Pool of Federal Policy Options to Promote Industrial Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Improving the energy efficiency of industry is essential for maintaining the viability of domestic manufacturing, especially in a world economy where production is shifting to low-cost, less regulated developing countries. Numerous studies have shown the potential for significant cost-effective energy-savings in U.S. industries, but the realization of this potential is hindered by regulatory, information, workforce, and financial obstacles. This report evaluates seven federal policy options aimed at improving the energy efficiency of industry, grounded in an understanding of industrial decision-making and the barriers to efficiency improvements. Detailed analysis employs the Georgia Institute of Technology's version of the National Energy Modeling System and spreadsheet calculations, generating a series of benefit/cost metrics spanning private and public costs and energy bill savings, as well as air pollution benefits and the social cost of carbon. Two of the policies would address regulatory hurdles (Output-Based Emissions Standards and a federal Energy Portfolio Standard with Combined Heat and Power); three would help to fill information gaps and workforce training needs (the Superior Energy Performance program, Implementation Support Services, and a Small Firm Energy Management program); and two would tackle financial barriers (Tax Lien Financing and Energy-Efficient Industrial Motor Rebates). The social benefit-cost ratios of these policies appear to be highly favorable based on a range of plausible assumptions. Each of the seven policy options has an appropriate federal role, broad applicability across industries, utilizes readily available technologies, and all are administratively feasible.

Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology; Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting DOE Directives & Manuals DOE Standards Central Technical Authorities (CTA) Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) Line Management SSO/ FAC Reps 48 CFR 970 48 CFR 952 Federal Acquisition Regulations External Oversight *Defense Nuclear Facility

176

DSW REGULATORY AND RESTRUCTURING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Committee on Appropriations House Committee on Appropriations Photo of lineman repairing transmission lines in desert Western's Regulatory & Restructuring Project Managers Ron...

177

Other Regulatory Efforts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In addition to regulating international electricity trade, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability participates in other regulatory activities. These include:

178

Restrospective Regulatory Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On January 18, 2011, President Obama issued Executive Order 13563, Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review, which directs federal agencies, among other things, to review existing regulations and...

179

FPCC Regulatory Barriers Submittal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Performance Contracting Coalition (FPCC) appreciates the opportunity to comment on reducing regulatory burdens on the Federal government, specifically as they pertain to federal energy...

180

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW GRR/Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-g - Utility Permit to Construct on ADOT&PF ROW 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Coast Guard Bureau of Indian Affairs Bureau of Land Management Federal Aviation Administration Alaska Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies 11 AAC 195.010: Anadromous Fish 17 AAC 15.021: Application for Utility Permit Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKGUtilityPermitToConstructOnADOTROW (1).pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute  Investor-Owned Electric Companies  Membership includes  200 US companies,  More than 65 international affiliates and  170 associates  US members  Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and  Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and  Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda Significant Industry Trends Utility Infrastructure Investments Generation and Fuel Landscape

183

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.aceee.org/research-report/u111 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carrots-utilities-providing-financial Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Cost Recovery/Allocation This report examines state experiences with shareholder financial incentives that encourage investor-owned utilities to provide energy

184

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) Watershed Management Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting It is state policy to manage groundwater and surface water resources from the perspective of aquifers, watersheds, and river basins to achieve

185

Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATES OF AMERICA STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC Project No. 12713-002 Oregon NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (December 3, 2010) In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission or FERC's) regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC's application for license for the Reedsport OPT Wave Park Project

187

Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Processes to Regulatory Processes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on AddThis.com... About History & Impacts Statutory Authorities & Rules Regulatory Processes Plans & Schedules Reports & Publications Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR® Popular Links Success Stories

188

Colorado/Transmission/Regulatory Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Colorado/Transmission/Regulatory Overview < Colorado‎ | Transmission Jump to: navigation, search Colorado Transmission Transmission Regulatory Overview Roadmap State Data Regulatory Overview General Transmission Permitting at a Glance In Colorado, local governments (counties and municipalities) have the authority to site high-voltage transmission lines. The State's authority in siting is limited to a backstop appeal process, by which utilities may submit an appeal to local government decisions to the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) for review and resolution.

189

Applications of economic principles in public utility industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy and transportation rank high among the economic concerns of American consumers and policymakers, and these concerns generate a host of technical, social, and political issues that impinge on the formulation of public utility regulatory policy. The collection of papers in this book provide evidence of the creative thinking that characterizes current approaches to the resolution of these issues. The book begins with a discussion of current attempts to develop a more comprehensive and timely definition of the concept of natural monopoly. The next three papers deal with various aspects of the problem on incorporating equity considerations into the development of rate structure. The fifth paper examines the potential impact of the current tariff structure on future explorations for oil, using the Trans-Alaska pipeline as a case study. The book concludes with two essays on various aspects of deregulation. 162 references, 4 tables.

Sichel, W.; Gies, T.G. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress, Volume 1, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Atomic Energy Act, Energy Reorganization Act, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act, and Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Other information included in this volume pertains to NRC user fees, NRC authorizations, the Inspector General Act, and the Administrative Procedure Act.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Model Policies | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Center Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Model Policies States and local jurisdictions across the nation have demonstrated leadership in developing programs and policies that both encourage and require compliance with energy codes, stretch codes (e.g., above-minimum codes) and green building techniques, energy-efficiency practices, and environmentally-friendly procedures. The laws and regulations behind these programs and policies can help states and jurisdictions establish unique policies to address their particular needs. Model policies for residential and commercial building construction have

192

Policies | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eureka Gadzooks Policies Pullback Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy Accounts Policy Data Policy INCITE Quarterly Report Policy ALCC...

193

Phenylpropanoid related regulatory protein-regulatory region associations  

SciTech Connect

Materials and methods for identifying lignin regulatory region-regulatory protein associations are disclosed. Materials and methods for modulating lignin accumulation are also disclosed.

Apuya, Nestor (Culver City, CA); Bobzin, Steven Craig (Malibu, CA); Park, Joon-Hyun (Oak Park, CA); Doukhanina, Elena (Newbury Park, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

195

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator, personal representative or private organization of any kind) who wishes to drill a mineral test hole (any hole in excess of one hundred (100) feet drilled during the exploration for minerals but shall exclude auger drilling in surficial or

196

The death spiral: An assessment of its likelihood in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

First, we present the death spiral hypothesis (high rate increases leading to bankruptcy), providing a historical background on its inception and discussing the observations provided in other industries of its occurrence through the years. Then we provide a discussion of the conditions necessary for the spiral effect. In doing this we provide insight into the assumptions implied by those who forecast such doom. Based on this discussion, we then provide the reader with a discussion of the implications such a concept has for regulatory policy. In addition, we conclude that given the structure of the regulatory process, the chances of a spiral effect for the electric utility industry have probably been overstated. It is shown that the occurrence of a death spiral is based on unrealistic conditions about the response of a utility's customers to higher rates, the incentives of and constraints facing regulators regarding pricing and permitting a utility to experience permanent financial distress, and the intense actions of a utility's management to avoid financial disaster.

Hemphill, R.C.; Costello, K.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ADR Revised Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Dispute Resolution Alternative Dispute Resolution AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Revised Policy Statement. SUMMARY: On October 24, 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) published an interim Statement of Policy on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) (60 FR 54482) to further its commitment to the use of ADR for resolving issues in controversy in a fair, timely, and cost efficient manner, and to comply with the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act (ADRA), 5 U.S.C. §571 et seq. Today, DOE publishes a revised Statement of Policy on Alternative Dispute Resolution to reaffirm its commitment to the use of ADR, including the use of Environmental Conflict Resolution (ECR) and other collaborative processes that may be utilized to prevent or avoid potential conflicts.

198

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program (SRP-UDP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. The SRP-UDP has been completed and the SRP-Maintenance Program (SRP-MP) is now maintaining this listing. Besides updating previous information, Revision 3 adds approximately 80 citations. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Enforcement Manual, Generic Letters, Inspection Manual, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, Standard Technical Specifications and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Nickolaus, J.R.; Bohlander, K.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Marketing Reordering of the Electric Utility Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELCON is a group of large industrial consumers of electricity with facilities in most of the 50 states and many foreign countries. Our members produce a wide range of products including steel, aluminum, chemicals, industrial gases, glass, motor vehicles, textiles and food. ELCON members consume approximately ten percent of all electricity sold to industrial customers and nearly five percent of all electricity consumed in the United States. We require an adequate and reliable supply of electricity at reasonable prices, so as you can imagine, we have a continuing interest in all aspects of the production, pricing, and delivery of electricity. ELCON member companies believe strongly that the electric utility industry is undergoing a market reordering that is being shaped by technological, institutional and legal forces. We see technical developments that now make small-scale generation economically attractive, if not downright desirable. Key regulatory and consumer institutions are taking fresh, new looks at issues such as wheeling and access to the grid that used to be considered sacred and untouchable. Some states are passing laws and implementing regulations that will require new thinking and new operating procedures on the part of utilities and consumers. I see these developments as logical reactions to changes in market forces. Change will take place. The relevant questions are: How will regulators and policy makers be influenced by market forces in the future? And: Will utilities, consumers and regulators attempt to benefit from market pressures or, alternatively, try to oppose what I believe is inevitable evolution to a more market-oriented electric industry?

Anderson, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

To mitigate or not to mitigate: Regulatory treatment of emissions trading and its effect on marketplace incentives  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (hereafter CAAA) have created a market-based mechanism that is designed to employ a profit-oriented incentive to enable electric utilities to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions at the least cost. One of the most important challenges facing state regulatory utility commissions in the next decade is the integration of this marker-based profit-incentive process into the traditional rate-base, rate-of-return, profit-control approach to regulation. How the struggle to meld two potentially contradictory control and incentive programs will be resolved remains to be seen. As of now, it is an open question. The purpose of this paper is to help clarify some of the issues that need to be addressed and to offer some policy recommendations that will allow regulators to employ the effectiveness of market forces while they still retain overall control of the evolution of the regulated electric supply market.

McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies); South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

To mitigate or not to mitigate: Regulatory treatment of emissions trading and its effect on marketplace incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (hereafter CAAA) have created a market-based mechanism that is designed to employ a profit-oriented incentive to enable electric utilities to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions at the least cost. One of the most important challenges facing state regulatory utility commissions in the next decade is the integration of this marker-based profit-incentive process into the traditional rate-base, rate-of-return, profit-control approach to regulation. How the struggle to meld two potentially contradictory control and incentive programs will be resolved remains to be seen. As of now, it is an open question. The purpose of this paper is to help clarify some of the issues that need to be addressed and to offer some policy recommendations that will allow regulators to employ the effectiveness of market forces while they still retain overall control of the evolution of the regulated electric supply market.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] December 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 244)] [Proposed Rules] [Page 71331-71333] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr21de99-21] ======================================================================= ----------------------------------------------------------------------- NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 RIN 3150-AG41 Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Types of Nuclear Waste AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering an amendment to its regulations that would require NRC licensees to notify

203

Estimating potential stranded commitments for U.S. investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

New technologies, low natural gas prices, and federal and state utility regions are restructuring the electricity industry. Yesterday`s vertically integrated utility with a retail monopoly franchise may be a very different organization in a few years. Conferences, regulatory-commission hearings, and other industry fora are dominated by debates over the extent and form of utility deintegration, wholesale competition, and retail wheeling. A key obstacle to restructuring the electricity industry is stranded commitments. Past investments, power-purchase contracts, and public-policy-driven programs that made sense in an era of cost-of-service regulation may not be cost-effective in a competitive power market. Regulators, utilities, and other parties face tough decisions concerning the mitigation and allocation of these stranded commitments. The authors developed and applied a simple method to calculate the amount of stranded commitments facing US investor-owned electric utilities. The results obtained with this method depend strongly on a few key assumptions: (1) the fraction of utility sales that is at risk with respect to competition, (2) the market price of electric generation, and (3) the number of years during which the utility would lose money because of differences between its embedded cost of production and the market price.

Baxter, L.; Hirst, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

OpenEI Community - regulatory  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now http:en.openei.orgcommunitybloggeothermal-regulatory-roadmap-featured-nrel-now

205

Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Regulatory Processes on Delicious Rank Building...

206

The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy Policy Act of 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products -- Products -- Challenges to Increased Utilization EUCI's Coal Combustion Product Optimization Conference Denver, CO August 31 - September 1, 2005 Thomas J. Feeley III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Feeley August 2005 Outline * What are coal combustion products and how can they be utilized * Technical and regulatory drivers that could challenge future utilization * DOE's research program * Summary T. Feeley August 2005 What are Coal Combustion Products? * Coal Combustion Products (a.k.a. CUB, CCB, CCW, FFCW, CCR ...) * DOE/NETL uses the term Coal Utilization Byproducts (CUB) to define the solid byproducts from the utilization of coal including: -Combustion -Gasification -Hybrid systems T. Feeley August 2005 Current Production and Utilization

208

Property:Policies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies Policies Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Policies Property Type String Description Policies as defined in cleanenergysolutions.org Allows the following values: Deployment Programs Financial Incentives Regulations Subproperties This property has the following 84 subproperties: 2 2010 Vehicle Technologies Market Report A A European Supergrid for Renewable Energy: Local Impacts and Far-Reaching Challenges A Strategy for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in the United Kingdom and Beyond Accelerating Successful Smart Grid Pilots Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (United States) Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Recent Efforts at Decoupling and Performance Incentives

209

Back to the Future: How Transportation Deregulatory Policies Foreshadow Evolution of Communications Policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The legal regulatory regimes for communication technologies evolve with technological, economic, and social change. This article asserts that, in the United States, the evolution of the legal regulatory regimes for the communications sector is following ... Keywords: broadband, common carriage, deregulation, liability, public utility, sustainability, telecommunications, transportation, universal service

Barbara A. Cherry

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

PILOTING UTILITY MODELING APPLICATIONS (PUMA) UTILITY BRIEFING PAPERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., wholesale, has members, wholesale with retail), number of customers, description of supply sources, and solid waste utilities, as well as engineering and customer services. SPU's Director reports to the Mayor wholesale customers created the Seattle Water Supply Operating Board. The board works on policy

211

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies (Iowa) Policies (Iowa) Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are required to establish and operate a comprehensive solid waste reduction program. These regulations discuss land application of processed wastes as well as requirements for sanitary landfills and for groundwater monitoring near land disposal sites

212

Utility solar water heating workshops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to explore the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM measure. Expected benefits from the workshops included an increased awareness and interest by utilities in solar water heating as well as greater understanding by federal research and policy officials of utility perspectives for purposes of planning and programming. Ultimately, the project could result in better information transfer, increased implementation of solar water heating programs, greater penetration of solar systems, and more effective research projects. The objective of the workshops was satisfied. Each workshop succeeded in exploring the problems and opportunities for utility participation with solar water heating as a DSM option. The participants provided a range of ideas and suggestions regarding useful next steps for utilities and NREL. According to evaluations, the participants believed the workshops were very valuable, and they returned to their utilities with new information, ideas, and commitment.

Barrett, L.B. (Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Authorization Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorization Policy Authorization Policy Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) OSCARS Case Study Documentation User Manual FAQ Design Specifications Functional Specifications Notifications Publications Authorization Policy Default Attributes Message Security Clients For Developers Interfaces Links Hardware Requirements DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Authorization Policy Introduction An authorization decision consists of deciding if an authenticated entity

214

POLICY FLASH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DATE: TO: FROM: January 28,2005 Procurement Directors Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, ME-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Changes in Small Business Contracting Policy SUMMARY: This Policy Flash forwards changes to the Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) price evaluation adjustment, new guidance from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) on improving subcontracting opportunities with small businesses, and the requirement for recertification of small business status. Page 1 of3 POLICY FLASH 2005-16 1. The statute for the SDB price evaluation adjustment implemented in FAR Subpart 19.11 is no longer in effect for civilian agencies, except the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Coast Guard. See the attached Civilian Agency Acquisition Council Letter, dated December 27,2004: ~ CAAC Letter 2004-04, Expirationc

215

POLICY FLASH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DATE: TO: FROM: February 10,2005 Procurement Directors Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, ME-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Guide Updates SUMMARY: This Policy Flash advises you of changes being made to five chapters of the Department of Energy Acquisition Guide. These changes are as follows: Pagel of 2 -_un - --- n__- Chapter 26.1 Energy Policy Act hnplementation - The changes to this chapter were updates and editorial style changes. Chapter 26.2 Energy Policy Act Cost Sharing Requirements - The changes to this chapter were updates and editorial style changes. Chapter 37.1 Support Service Contracting - Revisions were made to recognize performance based service acquisition. Other changes were updates and editorial style changes. Chapter39.1 Acquisitionof InformationResources- The changesto this chapterwere updates

216

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy/clean_energy_policies/strong-winds-opportunities-for-Energy Economics Wind Utility Consulting (WUC) UCS Rutgers CEEEP Center for Clean Air Policy (

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Documents Update San Diego, CA November 28, 2007 Deb Beattie & Karen Thomas Overview  Legislative & Executive Actions  Legal Opinions  Agency Guidance  Contracts  Sample Documents  Resources www.eere.energy.gov/femp/pdfs/28792.pdf Enabling Legislation for Utility Programs Energy Policy Act of 1992 Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Agencies:  Are authorized and encouraged to participate in utility programs generally available to customers  May accept utility financial incentives, goods, and services generally available to customers  Are encouraged to enter into negotiations with utilities to design cost effective programs to address unique needs of facilities used by agency

218

Regulation, public policy, and investment in communications infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A growing number of countries are reexamining telecommunications policies in search of approaches that better support investment and innovation in advanced communication networks and services. In addition to regulatory instruments, a broad range of fiscal ... Keywords: Broadband, Innovation, Network investment, Next-generation networks, Public policy, Regulation, Ultrabroadband

Johannes M. Bauer

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Policy User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

220

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

222

State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. March 2007 State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities More Documents & Publications State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

223

State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the energy policy act of 2005. March 2007 State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities More Documents & Publications State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

224

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory and licensing matters of interest to DOE, either as an NRC license applicant or in connection with related authorities and responsibilities of DOE and NRC on nuclear material, nuclear waste, and nuclear nonproliferation matters. GC-52 attorneys provide advice and support on a variety of NRC matters including regulation and licensing of DOE independent spent fuel storage facilities (ISFSIs) and a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility, consultation with NRC on certain DOE waste determinations, and imports and exports of nuclear materials and radioactive sealed sources.

225

Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fuel Distributor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation having possession or control of any natural gas well, oil well or coalbed natural gas well, whether as a contractor, owner, lessee, agent or manager, to use or permit the use of gas by direct well pressure. Any person or persons, firm, company or corporation violating any of the provisions of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be fined in any

226

Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Intrastate Regulatory Act (Florida) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmission Pipeline Intrastate Regulatory Act Transmission Pipeline Intrastate Regulatory Act (Florida) Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Intrastate Regulatory Act (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Florida Public Service Commission The regulation of natural gas intrastate transportation and sale is deemed to be an exercise of the police power of the state for the protection of the public welfare. The Public Service Commission is empowered to fix and regulate rates and services of natural gas transmission companies, including, without limitation, rules and regulations for determining the

227

Web Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies Policies /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Web Policies LANL places a high degree of emphasis on user experience and thus all webspaces are designed, developed, and tested thoroughly for usability and accessibility. Accessibility» Usability» Copyright, Legal» STC Summit Award» LOOK INTO LANL - highlights of our science, people, technologies close Scholarship fund changes lives Life-changing experience: springboard to a career in exercise science and physical therapy. READ MORE Jacob Leyba, recipient of the Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund Domenici scholarship Jacob Leyba, recipient of the Senator Pete Domenici Endowed Scholarship Fund. Contact Us Web Team Email More Like This Bradbury Science Museum Calendar Corporate Responsibility Fact Sheets Publications

228

Principle-agent Incentives, Excess Caution, and Market Inefficiency: Evidence from Utility Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

give LDCs incentives to reduce their natural gas purchasenatural gas distribution company may, due to regulatory incentives,incentives impose on utilities can distort forward natural gas

Borenstein, Severin; Busse, Meghan; Kellog, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Principal-agent incentives, excess caution, and market inefficiency: Evidence from utility regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

give LDCs incentives to reduce their natural gas purchasenatural gas distribution company may, due to regulatory incentives,incentives impose on utilities can distort forward natural gas

Borenstein, Severin; Busse, Meghan; KELLOGG, RYAN M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

regulatory | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

regulatory Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 5 August, 2013 - 14:18 Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now geothermal NREL...

231

The past, present, and future of U.S. utility demand-side management programs  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management or DSM refers to active efforts by electric and gas utilities to modify customers` energy use patterns. The experience in the US shows that utilities, when provided with appropriate incentives, can provide a powerful stimulus to energy efficiency in the private sector. This paper describes the range and history of DSM programs offered by US electric utilities, with a focus on the political, economic, and regulatory events that have shaped their evolution. It also describes the changes these programs are undergoing as a result of US electricity industry restructuring. DSM programs began modestly in the 1970s in response to growing concerns about dependence on foreign sources of oil and environmental consequences of electricity generation, especially nuclear power. The foundation for the unique US partnership between government and utility interests can be traced first to the private-ownership structure of the vertically integrated electricity industry and second to the monopoly franchise granted by state regulators. Electricity industry restructuring calls into question both of these basic conditions, and thus the future of utility DSM programs for the public interest. Future policies guiding ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency DSM programs will need to pay close attention to the specific market objectives of the programs and to the balance between public and private interests.

Eto, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Policy Print User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

233

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Print Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

234

User Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Print Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs assurance of adequate access to the facility. On the other hand, qualified groups that make a large commitment of time and resources need some assurance of an equitable return on their investment. A national facility should be accessible to all qualified researchers and at the ALS there are three modes of access: as a General User, a member of an Approved Program (AP), or as a member of a Participating Research Team (PRT). All proposals for research to be conducted at the ALS are evaluated based on the criteria endorsed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). These criteria are detailed on the IUPAP Web site at IUPAP Recommendations for the Use of Major Physics Users Facilities (pdf version).

235

POLICY CONTENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 31, 1999. It lists in alphabetical order the National Customs Rulings (NCR) that were made since the Memorandum was published. 2. Appendix B Supplement 1 is a supplement to Appendix B of Memorandum D11-11-2. It presents the policy content of the more recent NCRs, which are listed by numerical order of tariff items for greater ease of reference.

Um D; National Customs Rulings (ncrs

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

FUPWG Purpose, Policies, and Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP Purpose, Policies and Operations Draft - For Review and Comment Only Table of Contents: I. Introduction II. Membership III. Steering Committee Membership and Responsibilities IV. Meetings V. Meeting Content VI. Future Direction Appendices: 1) Vision Statement 2) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Commitment Statement 3) FUPWG Members 4) List of Steering Committee Members 5) List of Previous and planned Future Meetings 6) List of Topics Addressed By FUPWG 7) Speaker Guidelines 8) Host Responsibilities 1 Last Updated 7/22/2010 I. Introduction The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG or Working Group) was initiated by

237

FUPWG Purpose, Policies, and Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP Purpose, Policies and Operations Draft - For Review and Comment Only Table of Contents: I. Introduction II. Membership III. Steering Committee Membership and Responsibilities IV. Meetings V. Meeting Content VI. Future Direction Appendices: 1) Vision Statement 2) Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Commitment Statement 3) FUPWG Members 4) List of Steering Committee Members 5) List of Previous and planned Future Meetings 6) List of Topics Addressed By FUPWG 7) Speaker Guidelines 8) Host Responsibilities 1 Last Updated 7/22/2010 I. Introduction The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG or Working Group) was initiated by

238

ADR Revised Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revised Policy Revised Policy ADR Revised Policy SUMMARY: On October 24, 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) published an interim Statement of Policy on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) (60 FR 54482) to further its commitment to the use of ADR for resolving issues in controversy in a fair, timely, and cost efficient manner, and to comply with the Administrative Dispute Resolution Act (ADRA), 5 U.S.C. §571 et seq. Today, DOE publishes a revised Statement of Policy on Alternative Dispute Resolution to reaffirm its commitment to the use of ADR, including the use of Environmental Conflict Resolution (ECR) and othercollaborative processes that may be utilized to prevent or avoid potential conflicts. ADR Revised Policy More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - ADR Revised Policy82508Reformatted.doc

239

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input. Comments relevant to the following two sections of the RFI: "Long Term Issues: Managing a Grid with High Penetration of New Technologies" and "Reliability and Cyber-Security," US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input More Documents & Publications Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Reply Comments of Entergy Services, Inc. Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and

240

Transmission Planning Process and Opportunities for Utility-Scale Solar Engagement within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. Market barriers unrelated to technology often limit the expansion of utility-scale solar power, even in areas with exceptional resource potential. Many of these non-technical barriers have to do with policy, regulation, and planning, and hardly ever do they resolve themselves in a timely fashion. In most cases, pre-emptive intervention by interested stakeholders is the easiest way to remove/address such barriers, but it requires knowing how to navigate the institutional waters of the relevant agencies and boards. This report is a primer for solar developers who wish to engage directly in expediting the regulatory process and removing market barriers related to policy and planning. It focuses on the Western Interconnection (WI), primarily because the quality of solar resources in the Southwest makes utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics (PV) economically feasible, and because the relevant institutions have evolved in a way that has opened up opportunities for removing non-technical market barriers. Developers will find in this report a high-level field manual to identify the venues for mitigating and possibly eliminating systemic market obstacles and ensuring that the economic playing field is reasonably level. Project-specific issues such as siting for transmission and generation resources are beyond the scope of this report. Instead, the aim is to examine issues that pervasively affect all utility-scale PV and CSP in the region regardless of where the project may be. While the focus is on the WI, many of the institutions described here also have their counterparts in the Eastern and the Texas interconnections. Specifically, this report suggests a number of critical engagement points relating to generation and transmission planning.

Hein, J.; Hurlbut, D.; Milligan, M.; Coles, L.; Green, B.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

USNRC REGULATORY GUIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Guides are issued to describe and make available to the public methods acceptable to the NRC staff of implementing specific parts of the Commission's regulations, to delineate tech niques used by the staff in evaluating specific problems or postu lated accidents or to provide guidance to applicants. Regulatory Guides are not substitutes for regulations, and compliance with them is not required. Methods and solutions different from those set out in the guides will be acceptable If they provide a basis for the findings requisite to the Issuance or continuance of a permit or license by the Commission. This guide was issued after consideration of comments received from the public. Comments and suggestions for improvements in these guides are encouraged at all times, and guides will be revised, as appropriate, to accommodate comments and to reflect new Informa tion or experience. Comments should be sent to the Secretary of the Commission,

unknown authors

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

million in 2010. Perhaps more telling than the numbers themselves is a comparison of the rate of increase in compliance costs to other cost increases. For that same prominent...

243

Office of Safety and Health Regulatory and Policy Response Line  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

employees regarding applicability of worker safety and health standards and directives. The information contained in responses are technical clarifications to a DOE Rule...

244

NREL: Regulatory Support - What is the Energy Policy Act?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas and liquid fuels domestically produced from natural gas Liquefied petroleum gas (propane) Coal-derived liquid fuels Hydrogen Electricity Biodiesel (B100) P-Series The...

245

Avista Utilities - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type Net Metering Provider Avista Utilities Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities' net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar,

246

Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment : a study for the energy storage systems program.  

SciTech Connect

Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.; Kirby, Brendan [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Compendium of Regulatory Requirements Governing Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies.

Puder, Markus G.; Bryson, Bill; Veil, John A.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

248

Solar: A Clean Energy Source for Utilities (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts with utilities to remove the technical, regulatory, and market challenges they face in deploying solar technologies.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

REVISION POLICY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

REVISION POLICY REVISION POLICY March 2007 Data are collected at the million cubic feet per month level and all calculations mentioned below are carried out at that precision. However, the data published in the Form EIA-914 Monthly Gas Production Report are rounded to the nearest 0.01 billion cubic feet per day (roughly 300 million cubic feet per month). Monthly estimates of gross production published in the Natural Gas Monthly at the national level are rounded to billion cubic feet and those for marketed production at the State level are rounded to million cubic feet. The prior month's production estimate will always be revised each month, when the production estimate for the latest data month is released. For example, a June estimate would be revised when a July estimate is released.

250

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) brought about new awareness regarding the overall health-effects of stationary source fossil combustion emissions. Title III of the CAAA identified 189 pollutants, including mercury, as hazardous or toxic and required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate their emissions by source, health effects and environmental implications, including the need to control these emissions. These pollutants are collectively referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The provisions in Title III specific to electric generating units (EGU) were comprehensively addressed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaborative air toxic characterization programs conducted between 1990 and 1997. This work provided most of the data supporting the conclusions found in EPA's congressionally mandated reports regarding air toxic emissions from coal-fired utility boilers; the Mercury Study Report to Congress (1997)1 and the "Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units -- Final Report to Congress" (1998).2 The first report identified coal-fired power plants as the largest source of human-generated mercury emissions in the U.S. and the second concluded that mercury from coal-fired utilities was the HAP of "greatest potential concern" to the environment and human health that merited additional research and monitoring.

251

Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Utility FGD survey, Janurary--December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)) [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. (IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)) [IT Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Montana Environmental Policy Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Policy Act (Montana) Environmental Policy Act (Montana) Montana Environmental Policy Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality Council The Montana Environmental Policy Act aims to provide for the consideration

255

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible

256

Soil and Water Conservation Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy (Minnesota) Policy (Minnesota) Soil and Water Conservation Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute establishes that it is the responsibility of land occupiers to implement practices that conserve soil and water resources, and the policy

257

Policy Analysis Improved Accounting of Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scale energy storage include pumped hydro storage (PHS), advanced batteries, and hydrogen. Virtually allPolicy Analysis Improved Accounting of Emissions from Utility Energy Storage System Operation P A U proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing

Sheridan, Jennifer

258

POLICY STATEMENT ON TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two lettertype reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. They provide comments on a draft final policy statement on technical specifications improvements for nuclear power plants and additional implementation information for the NRC's regulation on requirements for the renewal of operating licenses for power reactors. The ACRS also sent a letter report to the NRC's Executive Director for Operations that provides comments on the NRC staff's proposed rule on advanced light water reactor severe accident performance. Attachments:

unknown authors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Forestry Policies (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Forestry Policies (Kentucky) Forestry Policies (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Kentucky Department of Natural Resources Kentucky's forests are managed by the State Energy and Environment Cabinet, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry. In 2010 the Division completed its Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources and Strategy: http://forestry.ky.gov/landownerservices/pages/forestlandassessment.aspx The document identifies several goals with respect to forest biomass for energy. The document does not directly create legislation in that regard,

260

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 2, No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nuclear regulatory legislation, 102d Congress. Volume 2, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nuclear regulatory legislation: 102d Congress. Volume 1, No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 1, No. 3  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Policy Flash 2012-67  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DATE: September 21, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors Head of Contracting Activities FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Savings Reporting Template Guidance SUMMARY: As part of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Acquisition Savings Initiative and the DOE Strategic Sourcing Program, a key challenge has been to address the requirements of reporting cost savings and cost avoidance data. In order for DOE to fully comply with reporting requirements, we are directing that the attached template be utilized for reporting acquisition savings/cost avoidance data effective as of October 1, 2012.

265

Utility Contract Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition Competition Utility Contract Competition October 7, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Opening utility energy service contracts to competing franchised utility companies ensures Federal agencies get the best value for their projects. Federal agencies are not legally required to compete for utility incentive services provided by the "established source" utility in the utility's franchised service territory. If services are available, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 states that there should be no restriction on Federal facilities directly benefiting from the services the same as any other customer. The exception is if there is more than one serving utility offering utility energy services (e.g., a gas company and an electric company). In this case, the Federal Acquisition Regulations and good fiscal management

266

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many state regulatory commissions and policymakers want utilities to aggressively pursue energy efficiency as a strategy to mitigate demand and energy growth, diversify the resource mix, and provide an alternative to building new, costly generation. However, as the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE 2007) points out, many utilities continue to shy away from aggressively expanding their energy efficiency efforts when their shareholder's fundamental financial interests are placed at risk by doing so. Thus, there is increased interest in developing effective ratemaking and policy approaches that address utility disincentives to pursue energy efficiency or lack of incentives for more aggressive energy efficiency efforts. New regulatory initiatives to promote increased utility energy efficiency efforts also affect the interests of consumers. Ratepayers and their advocates are concerned with issues of fairness, impacts on rates, and total consumer costs. From the perspective of energy efficiency advocates, the quid pro quo for utility shareholder incentives is the obligation to acquire all, or nearly all, achievable cost-effective energy efficiency. A key issue for state regulators and policymakers is how to maximize the cost-effective energy efficiency savings attained while achieving an equitable sharing of benefits, costs and risks among the various stakeholders. In this study, we modeled a prototypical vertically-integrated electric investor-owned utility in the southwestern US that is considering implementing several energy efficiency portfolios. We analyze the impact of these energy efficiency portfolios on utility shareholders and ratepayers as well as the incremental effect on each party when lost fixed cost recovery and/or utility shareholder incentive mechanisms are implemented. A primary goal of our quantitative modeling is to provide regulators and policymakers with an analytic framework and tools that assess the financial impacts of alternative incentive approaches on utility shareholders and customers if energy efficiency is implemented under various utility operating, cost, and supply conditions.We used and adapted a spreadsheet-based financial model (the Benefits Calculator) which was developed originally as a tool to support the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE). The major steps in our analysis are displayed graphically in Figure ES- 1. Two main inputs are required: (1) characterization of the utility which includes its initial financial and physical market position, a forecast of the utility?s future sales, peak demand, and resource strategy to meet projected growth; and (2) characterization of the Demand-Side Resource (DSR) portfolio ? projected electricity and demand savings, costs and economic lifetime of a portfolio of energy efficiency (and/or demand response) programs that the utility is planning or considering implementing during the analysis period. The Benefits Calculator also estimates total resource costs and benefits of the DSR portfolio using a forecast of avoided capacity and energy costs. The Benefits Calculator then uses inputs provided in the Utility Characterization to produce a ?business-as usual? base case as well as alternative scenarios that include energy efficiency resources, including the corresponding utility financial budgets required in each case. If a decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism are instituted, the Benefits Calculator model readjusts the utility?s revenue requirement and retail rates accordingly. Finally, for each scenario, the Benefits Calculator produces several metrics that provides insights on how energy efficiency resources, decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism impacts utility shareholders (e.g. overall earnings, return on equity), ratepayers (e.g., average customer bills and rates) and society (e.g. net resource benefits).

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

267

Utility Data Collection Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Collection Service Data Collection Service Federal-Utility Partnership Working Group 4 May 2006 Paul Kelley, Chief of Operations, 78 th CES, Robins AFB David Dykes, Industrial Segment Mgr, Federal, GPC Topics  Background  Commodities Metered  Data Collection  Cost  Results Background  Robins AFB (RAFB) needed to:  Control electricity usage and considered Demand Control  Track and bill base tenants for energy usage  Metering Project Originated in 1993  $$ requirements limited interest  Developed criteria for available $$  Energy Policy Act 2005:  All facilities sub-metered by 2012  $$ no longer restricts metering project Metering Criteria prior to EPACT 2005  All New Construction - (per Air Force Instructions)

268

COST IMPACT OF SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT COMPLIANCE FOR COMMISSION-REGULATED WATER UTILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NRRI) with funding provided by participating member commissions of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). The views and opinions of the authors do not necessarily state or reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the NRRI, the NARUC, or NARUC member commissions. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This study was prepared for state public utility commissioners and their staff in response to the growing concern about the effect of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) on water utilities under their jurisdiction. Compliance with the SDWA is expected to have a significant impact on water utilities and the rates they charge for service. A sensitivity analysis was developed for this report using a hypothetical water company to identify the costs associated with alternative treatment processes. A total of eighteen different treatment processes are considered, from conventional treatment to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and reverse osmosis. Capital costs for these processes range from $100,000 to $3.25 million for a water plant with a designed capacity of one million

Patrick C. Mann; Janice A. Beecher

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy policy options for Illinois. Proceedings. [26 papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-six papers presented at the Fifth Annual Oil Illinois Energy Conference are categorized into five sections, namely: An overview of U.S. and Illinois Energy Policy; Energy Policy; Conservation--Solar--Biomass and Solid Wastes; Energy Policy; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Energy Policy; Coal and Electric Utilities; and Economic and Consumer Concerns. One paper, A Perspective on Long-Range Nuclear Energy Options, by William O. Harms has previously appeared in EAPA 4: 1364. (MCW)

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Comments of Utilities Telecom Council | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Telecom Council Utilities Telecom Council Comments of Utilities Telecom Council Urgent action is needed to address utilities communications needs. Utilities and other CII are deploying smart grid and making investments in communications upgrades now. Promoting access to spectrum will accelerate the deployment of smart grid and other CII communications, which will in turn promote larger public policy goals for energy independence, infrastructure security, environmental quality and public safety. Therefore, UTC looks forward to working with the DOE, as well as the FCC and NTIA to support the communications needs of utilities and other CII. Comments of Utilities Telecom Council More Documents & Publications NBP RFI: Communications Requirements - Reply Comments of Utilities Telecom

271

Human Capital Policy Division (HC-11) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us » Organization » Policy, Accountability, and Technology About Us » Organization » Policy, Accountability, and Technology (HC-10) » Human Capital Policy Division (HC-11) Human Capital Policy Division (HC-11) Mission Statement This division serves as the HCM policy arm for the Department. It supports program objectives and missions of all DOE components by developing HCM-related policies and strategies and supplies advice and guidance across the Department. Functions Provide a full range of staff support to the Chief Human Capital Officer including support required for internal and external responsibilities. Develop and revise the agency human capital management strategy in support of the overall departmental strategic plan. Seek out, influence and translate legislative and regulatory direction into Departmental strategies, policies and programs to address

272

Environmental and regulatory aspects of compressed-air energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of fuel regulations, environmental protection laws, the National Environmental Policy Act, underground injection regulations, and state regulations on the development of compressed air storage systems and power plants are discussed. It is concluded that environmental regulatory concerns of conventional energy technologies are often different from those associated with new technologies such as compressed air energy storage (CAES). Confusion and uncertainty often results when the current environmental regulatory system is applied to new technologies. Evolution of the regulatory system must accompany and rapidly accommodate technological development if the benefits of such development are to be fully realized in a timely manner. Those responsible for technological development in the energy field must be aware of these disparities and conduct their efforts accordingly.

Beckwith, M.A.; Mathur, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages Title Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages Publication Type Report Year of...

275

State policies for geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The most prominent geothermal resources in the USA occur in fifteen Gulf and Western states including Alaska and Hawaii. In each state, authority and guidelines have been established for administration of geothermal leasing and for regulation of development. Important matters addressed by these policies include resource definition, leasing provisions, development regulations, water appropriation, and environmental standards. Some other policies that need attention include taxation, securities regulations, and utility regulations. It is concluded that conditions needed for the geothermal industry to pursue large-scale development are consumer (utility) confidence in the resource; equitable tax treatment; prompt exploration of extensive land areas; long and secure tenure for productive properties; prompt facility siting and development; and competitive access to various consumers. With these conditions, the industry should be competitive with other energy sectors and win its share of investment capital. This publication reviews for the states various technical, economic, and institutional aspects of geothermal development. The report summarizes research results from numerous specialists and outlines present state and Federal policies. The report concludes generally that if public policies are made favorable to their development, geothermal resources offer an important energy resource that could supply all new electric capacity for the fifteen states for the next two decades. This energy--100,000 MW--could be generated at prices competitive with electricity from fossil and nuclear power plants. An extensive bibliography is included. (MCW)

Sacarto, D.M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A right to vend : new policy framework for fostering street based entrepreneurs in New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Street vending remains one of the most highly regulated and least understood activities in New York City. The current regulatory framework is overly confusing and complex, leaving policy decisions about who gets to vend ...

Liu, Ya-Ting, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

NREL: Energy Analysis - Policy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

policy analysis evaluates policies that can advance-or provide alternatives to-renewable energy technologies in meeting national goals. Federal Policy NREL's federal policy team...

278

NERSC Account Policies and Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Account Policies Account Policies There are a number of policies which apply to NERSC users. These policies originate from a number of sources, such as DOE regulations and...

279

APS SAC Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Scientific Advisory Committee Policy Adopted 1/21/2003 The Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) inherits and expands the role of the former Program Evaluation Board (PEB). It advises the Associate Laboratory Director for the APS (ALD/APS) with the following responsibilities: Scope To evaluate the scientific output and facility utilization for all APS sectors. To examine performance and recommend appropriate beamtime allocation for existing Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). To evaluate Letters of Intent and scientific proposals for new and reconstituted CATs. To provide advice to and review decisions by APS management on special operations support for CATs. To review proposals for Partner User access, a new access mode that will guarantee 10-30% the beam time per year on any sector for a finite

280

Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Southern recognizes that many policy and logistical concerns must be addressed for the promises of smart grid technologies and applications to be fully realized in ways that are beneficial, secure, and cost-effective lor utility customers. Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges More Documents & Publications Re: DOE Request for Information - Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Optimizing password composition policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A password composition policy restricts the space of allowable passwords to eliminate weak passwords that are vulnerable to statistical guessing attacks. Usability studies have demonstrated that existing password composition policies can sometimes result ... Keywords: computational complexity, password composition policy, sampling

Jeremiah Blocki, Saranga Komanduri, Ariel Procaccia, Or Sheffet

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Forestry Policies (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (New Mexico) Forestry Policies (New Mexico) Forestry Policies (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department New Mexico's forests are managed by the State Forestry Department, within the New Mexico Energy, Minerals, and Natural Resources Department. In 2010 the Department issued the New Mexico Statewide Natural Resources Assessment and Strategy and Response Plans, including discussion of potential for biomass energy from forest biomass: http://www.emnrd.state.nm.us/SFD/documents/New_MexicoNatural_ResourceAss... New Mexico offers the Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax

284

Forestry Policies (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (Tennessee) Forestry Policies (Tennessee) Forestry Policies (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Tennessee Department of Agriculture Tennessee's forests are managed by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry Division. In 2010 the Division issued its Statewide Forest Action Plan, which includes a section detailing the bio-energy and biofuels potential and goals for the state, and quantifies among other things the potential energy from forest biomass: http://www.tn.gov/agriculture/publications/forestry/TN-FAP.pdf The document also specifies the goal of expanding markets for biomass forest products, to address several different issues including decline in

285

Rate-Making Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rate-Making Policy Rate-Making Policy Rate-Making Policy < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 2005 State Wisconsin Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin WI Act 7 states that, when proposing the purchase or construction of an electric generating facility, a utility may "apply to the [WI Public Service Commission] for an order specifying in advance the rate-making principles" that the Public Service Commission will use for "future rate-making proceedings." The Nuclear Energy Institute highlights that "There is no restriction on

286

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage and Transportation Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation Outline: Current Regulatory Framework Future Regulatory Needs Technical...

288

Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Policy Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and Publications Facilities and Infrastructure Federal...

289

b. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT POLICY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TMS Financial Management Policy establishes the methods and guidelines by which the .... INVESTMENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES. 5.1 The...

290

Rethinking the Informal Economy: Linkages with the Formal Economy and the Formal Regulatory Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic & Th is paper explores the relationship of the informal economy to the formal economy and the formal regulatory environment. It begins with a discussion of the concept of the informal economy and its size, composition, and segmentation. It then discusses the linkages between the informal economy and the formal economy and the formal regulatory environment. Th e conclusion suggests why and how more equitable linkages between the informal economy and the formal economy should be promoted through an appropriate inclusive policy and regulatory environment.

Martha Alter Chen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) State Energy Policy Goal and Development (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Montana Legislature, Legislative Services Division

292

Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (Connecticut) Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (Connecticut) Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection

293

Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) Connecticut Water Diversion Policy Act (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection This section describes regulations and permit requirements for projects or

294

Solid Waste Management Policy and Programs (Minnesota) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy and Programs (Minnesota) Policy and Programs (Minnesota) Solid Waste Management Policy and Programs (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting These statutes encourage the State and local governments to develop waste management strategies to achieve the maximum possible reduction in waste generation, eliminate or reduce adverse environmental impacts, encourage

295

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Western Interstate Energy Board Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in

296

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

297

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

298

Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 This is in reply to comments filed by the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) urging the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to repeal its energy conservation standards for direct heating equipment as applied to decorative vented gas fireplaces. I support HPBA's comments because I do not believe that decorative vented gas fireplaces were ever meant to be included under the term "direct heating equipment" as that term appears in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 More Documents & Publications .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden

299

Codes and standards and other guidance cited in regulatory documents. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a listing of industry consensus codes and standards and other government and industry guidance referred to in regulatory documents. In addition to updating previous information, Revision 1 adds citations from the NRC Inspection Manual and the Improved Standard Technical Specifications. This listing identifies the version of the code or standard cited in the regulatory document, the regulatory document, and the current version of the code or standard. It also provides a summary characterization of the nature of the citation. This listing was developed from electronic searches of the Code of Federal Regulations and the NRC`s Bulletins, Information Notices, Circulars, Generic Letters, Policy Statements, Regulatory Guides, and the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800).

Ankrum, A.; Nickolaus, J.; Vinther, R.; Maguire-Moffitt, N.; Hammer, J.; Sherfey, L.; Warner, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Forestry Policies (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (Massachusetts) Forestry Policies (Massachusetts) Forestry Policies (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Conservation and Recreation Massachusetts has over 3 million acres of forested land, almost all private, managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation Forestry Bureau. The State issued in 2010 its Assessment and Strategy documents, including discussion of the potential for better utilization of forestry residues for energy generation. The Strategies document also mentions proposed legislation in this regard: http://www.mass.gov/dcr/stewardship/forestry/docs/Assessment_of_Forest_R... http://www.mass.gov/dcr/stewardship/forestry/docs/Massachusetts_Forest_R...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Regulatory Drivers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Statutes and Regulations Relating to Legacy Management Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 10: Energy "Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste," 10 CFR 61 "Occupational Radiation Protection," 10 CFR 835 Title 40: Protection of Environment "National Primary Drinking Water Regulations," 40 CFR 141 "Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities," 40 CFR 264 "National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan," 40 CFR 300 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) "Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability

302

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Trends and Analysis  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A look at one of the primary tools utilities are using to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in the context of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

Information Center

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php

304

THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM 2002, IG-0569 THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM 2002,...

305

Utility Energy Efficiency Potential Calculator Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of energy efficiency savings mandates in many states and other jurisdictions, utilities and policy makers have a keen interest in understanding the potential for energy efficiency at the national, regional, subregional, state, and service-territory ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Aligning Utility Incentives with Investment in Energy Efficiency: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (United States) Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/documents/suca/incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/aligning-utility-incentives-investmen Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Deployment Programs" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property.

307

DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

308

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION ) Emergency Petition and Complaint of ) Docket No. EL05-145-000 District of Columbia Public Service Comm'n ) ) POTOMAC ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY'S MOTION TO INTERVENE AND COMMENT IN SUPPORT OF EMERGENCY PETITION AND COMPLAINT Pursuant to Rules 211 and 214 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC" or the "Commission"), 18 C.F.R. §§ 385.211 and 385.214 (2004), Potomac Electric Power Company ("Pepco") hereby moves to intervene in the above-captioned proceeding and supports the August 24, 2005 Emergency Petition and Complaint filed by the District of Columbia Public Service Commission ("DC PSC"). As discussed below, Mirant Corporation and its public utility subsidiaries (collectively, "Mirant")

309

Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dairyland Power Cooperative is a generation and transmission cooperative (G&T) that provides the wholesale electrical requirements and other services for 25 electric distribution cooperatives and 16 municipal utilities in the Upper Midwest. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges More Documents & Publications AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments to:DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Florida Power and Light Comments on Smart Grid Request For Information (RFI): Addressing Policy & Logistical Challenges.

310

Building Regulatory Capacity for Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Capacity for Change PRESENTED BY Sarah Spencer-Workman, LEED AP July 27, 2011 "How to identify and review laws relevant to buildings and find places and opportunities...

311

AHAM Comments Regulatory Burden RFI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) respectfully submits the following comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on its Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 47328 (Aug. 8, 2012).

312

Policy and Guidance | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Guidance Policy and Guidance Policy and Guidance The Chief Information Officer (CIO) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has primary responsibility to ensure that Information Technology (IT) is acquired and information resources are managed in a manner consistent with statutory, regulatory, and Departmental requirements and priorities. With this responsibility, the CIO provides information resources management advice and assistance to the Secretary of Energy and to other senior managers. The CIO also coordinates and articulates a shared vision and corporate perspective among the Department's information activities, which permits the CIO to champion Departmental initiatives that effectively manage information and provide for value-added corporate systems. In addition to this internal focus, DOE recognizes the need to integrate

313

Journal of Regulatory Economics ISSN 0922-680X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exploited.5 Figure 1 shows that by 1917, the minimum efficient scale of operation for electric power and network evolution: Lessons from electricity supply history. Information Economics and Policy, 3, 165 regulation of electric utilities in the United States. Journal of Economic History, 62, 1050­1072. Jarrell, G

Lyon, Thomas P.

314

Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Utilities Electric Utility Rates The Utilities Gateway houses OpenEI's free, community-editable utility rate repository. OpenEI users may browse, edit and add new electric utility rates to OpenEI's repository. EIA provides the authoritative list of utility companies in the United States, and thus OpenEI limits utility rates to companies listed by EIA. 43,031 rates have been contributed for 3,832 EIA-recognized utility companies. Browse rates by zip code Browse rates by utility name Create or edit a rate Number of Utility Companies by State Click on a state to view summaries for that state. See a list of all U.S. utility companies and aliases Utility Rate Database Description The Utility Rate Database (URDB) is a free storehouse of rate structure

315

Regulatory facility guide for Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

316

Workforce Restructuring Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides revised and consolidated policy and models intended to facilitate contractor workforce restructuring activities.

317

Overview of Utility Incentives Presentation to the Kansas Corporation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of Utility Incentives Presentation to the Kansas Overview of Utility Incentives Presentation to the Kansas Corporation Commission Energy Efficiency Incentives Workshop Overview of Utility Incentives Presentation to the Kansas Corporation Commission Energy Efficiency Incentives Workshop RAP is a non-profit organization providing technical and educational assistance to government officials on energy and environmental issues. RAP Principals all have extensive utility regulatory experience. Funded by US DOE & EPA, Energy Foundation and other foundations, and international agencies. We have worked in 40+ states and 16 nations. Overview of Utility Incentives Presentation to the Kansas Corporation Commission Energy Efficiency Incentives Workshop More Documents & Publications Decoupling: Mechanics and Issues, Presentation to the New Mexico Public

318

Proceedings of the distributed utility valuation project institutional issues workshop  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings summarize the discussions during a one-day working session on institutional issues related to the distributed utility (DU) concept. The purpose of the session was to provide an initial assessment of the {open_quotes}institutional{close_quotes} issues, including legal, regulatory, industry structure, utility organization, competition, and related matters that may affect the development and the relationships among distributed utility stakeholders. The assessment was to identify institutional barriers to utilities realizing benefits of the distributed concept (should these benefits be confirmed), as well as to identify opportunities for utilities and other stakeholders for moving ahead to more easily capture these benefits.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) Policy for Permitting Low-Emitting Sources (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting While this policy alleviates some requirements on low-emitting emission sources, it does not change the policy of requiring applicants to submit reasonable information concerning all potential emission sources.

320

141111111111111111 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

347) requires federal agencies to annually report their security and privacy programs. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provides instructions on complying with the requirements of FISMA. On July 17, 2006, OMB issued a memorandum for heads of executive departments and agencies, M-06-20, FY 2006 Reporting Instructions for the Federal Information Security Management Act and Agency Privacy Management requiring each agency to determine continued compliance with its public websites posted privacy policy. To that end, FERC will compare its information collection practices on its website with its posted FERC website privacy policy annually to ensure compliance with its stated website privacy policy. 2.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to establish FERC policy and procedures on auditing its compliance with its posted website privacy policy.

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The landlocked island: Information access and communications policy in Nepal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines information access in Nepal, its current limitations, and opportunities for expansion, particularly in rural areas. It argues that government policies and the regulatory environment have failed to create the competition necessary ... Keywords: Competition, Information access, Nepal, Rural development, Telecommunications

Robin Shields

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A scoping study on energy-efficiency market transformation by California Utility DSM Programs  

SciTech Connect

Market transformation has emerged as a central policy objective for future publicly-funded energy-efficiency programs in California. California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) Decision 95-12-063 calls for public funding to shift to activities designed to transform the energy-efficiency market. The CPUC envisions that funding {open_quotes}would only be needed for specific and limited periods of time to cause the market to be transformed{close_quotes}. At the same time, the CPUC also acknowledges that {open_quotes}there are many definitions of market transformation{close_quotes} ... and does {open_quotes}not attempt to refine those definitions today{close_quotes}. We argue that a definition of market transformation is essential. The literature is now replete with definitions, and an operational definition is needed for the CPUC to decide on which programs should be supported with public funds. The CPUC decision initially indicated a preference for programs that do not provide financial assistance 4-efficiency programs that rely on financial assistance to customers. However, energy customers have traditionally accounted for a substantial portion of California utility`s DSM programs, so the CPUC`s direction to use ratepayer funds to support programs that will transform the market raises critical questions about how to analyze what has happened in order to plan effectively for the future: Which utility energy-efficiency programs, including those that provide financial assistance to customers, have had market transforming effects? To what extent do current regulatory rules and practices encourage or discourage utilities from running programs that are designed to transform the market? Should the rules and programs be modified, and, if so, how, to promote market transformation?

Eto, J.; Prahl, R.; Schlegel, J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office manages

324

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: February 1995. Volume 41, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

This book contains an issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and a Director`s Decision. The issuance concerns consideration by the Commission of appeals from both the Initial Decision and a Reconsideration Order issued by the Presiding Officer involving two materials license amendment applications filed by the University of Missouri. The Director`s Decision from the Office of Enforcement denies petitions filed by Northeast Utilities employees requesting that accelerated enforcement action be taken against Northeast Utilities for activities concerned with NU`s fitness-for-duty program.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Legal, regulatory & institutional issues facing distributed resources development  

SciTech Connect

This report describes legal, regulatory, and institutional considerations likely to shape the development and deployment of distributed resources. It is based on research co-sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and four investor-owned utilities (Central & South West Services, Cinergy Corp., Florida Power Corporation, and San Diego Gas & Electric Company). The research was performed between August 1995 and March 1996 by a team of four consulting firms experienced in energy and utility law, regulation, and economics. It is the survey phase of a project known as the Distributed Resources Institutional Analysis Project.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

ARM Standards Policy Committee Report  

SciTech Connect

Data and metadata standards promote the consistent recording of information and are necessary to ensure the stability and high quality of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility data products for scientific users. Standards also enable automated routines to be developed to examine data, which leads to more efficient operations and assessment of data quality. Although ARM Infrastructure agrees on the utility of data and metadata standards, there is significant confusion over the existing standards and the process for allowing the release of new data products with exceptions to the standards. The ARM Standards Policy Committee was initiated in March 2012 to develop a set of policies and best practices for ARM data and metadata standards.

Cialella, A; Jensen, M; Koontz, A; McFarlane, S; McCoy, R; Monroe, J; Palanisamy, G; Perez, R; Sivaraman, C

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Iowa Utilities Board All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not rate-regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), are required to offer green power options to their customers. These programs allow customers to make voluntary contributions to support the development of renewable energy sources in Iowa. Utilities must file their program plans and tariff schedules with the IUB; however, the filings for non-rate-regulated utilities are intended to be for informational purposes only. This policy

328

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Research Program Authors: Antone L. Brooks Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities Richland, Washington The purpose of this project is to provide a focal point for communication of the research results from the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. The major communication tool provided by this project is a Website at Washington State University. The website is being maintained to provide communication between the scientific advances generated by the research program and scientists both in and outside the program, policy makers, regulators and the public. The website also contains a number of presentations and illustrations that are written so that they will be easy

329

Effective Grid Utilization: A Technical Assessment and Application Guide; April 2011 - September 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to more fully integrate renewable resources, such as wind and solar, into the transmission system, additional capacity must be realized in the short term using the installed transmission capacity that exists today. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Transmission and Grid Integration Group supported this study to assemble the history of regulations and status of transmission technology to expand existing grid capacity. This report compiles data on various transmission technology methods and upgrades for increased capacity utilization of the existing transmission system and transmission corridors. The report discusses the technical merit of each method and explains how the method could be applied within the current regulatory structure to increase existing transmission conductor and/or corridor capacity. The history and current state of alternatives to new construction is presented for regulators, legislators, and other policy makers wrestling with issues surrounding integration of variable generation. Current regulations are assessed for opportunities to change them to promote grid expansion. To support consideration of these alternatives for expanding grid capacity, the report lists relevant rules, standards, and policy changes.

Balser, S.; Sankar, S.; Miller, R.; Rawlins, A.; Israel, M.; Curry, T.; Mason, T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Policy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it possible to deliver electric power to off-grid locations using millimeter-wave beams and compact, efficient of very large utility-scale power plants, serving given areas in a hub-and-spoke arrangement. GridPolicy Issues for Retail Beamed Power Transmission Girish Chowdhary, Rajeev Gadre, Narayanan

331

Utility Rate | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rate Utility Rate Home > Utility Rate > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds American Clean Skies Foundation (1) API (3) Apps (1) bug (1) building load (1) building load data (1) challenge (1) clean energy (1) commercial load (1) data (2) dataset (1) datasets (1) developer (5) DOE (1) EIA (1) electric load data (1) energy efficiency (1) Energy Visions Prize (1) EZFeed (1) FOA (1) funding (1) Global Atlas (1) hackathon (1) Illinois State University (1) Incentives and Policies (1) 1 2 3 next › last » Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content There is currently no way to s... ranking of utilities by demand charge? FYI, OpenEI now accommodates t... Very useful information. Thank... The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated

332

National Environmental Policy of India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India India Jump to: navigation, search Name National Environmental Policy of India Agency/Company /Organization Government of India Sector Energy, Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://prod-http-80-800498448. Program Start 2006 Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References India-Environmental Policy[1] Summary "The National Environment Policy is intended to be a guide to action: in regulatory reform, programmes and projects for environmental conservation; and review and enactment of legislation, by agencies of the Central, State, and Local Governments. The policy also seeks to stimulate partnerships of different stakeholders, i.e. public agencies, local communities, academic and scientific institutions, the investment community, and international development

333

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of PolicyOptions and Practice  

SciTech Connect

Renewable energy certificates (RECs) represent the bundle of information that describes the characteristics of renewable electricity generation, and may be (and increasingly are) sold separately from the underlying electricity itself. RECs are a relatively new phenomenon, emerging as a tradable commodity in voluntary markets in the late 1990s, and gaining strength as a means of compliance with various state policy requirements affecting renewable generation in the early 2000s (Holt and Bird 2005). Twenty states and Washington, D.C. now have mandatory renewables portfolio standard (RPS) obligations, and most of these may be satisfied by owning and retiring RECs. Many states also have fuel source and emissions disclosure requirements, for which RECs are useful. Even where state policy does not allow unbundled and fully tradable RECs to meet these requirements, RECs may still be used as an accounting and verification tool (REC tracking systems are in place or under development in many regions of the U.S.). These applications, plus REC trading activity in support of voluntary green claims, give rise to potential ''double counting'' to the extent that the purchaser of the RECs and the purchaser of the underlying electricity both make claims to the renewable energy attributes of the facility in question (Hamrin and Wingate 2003). When renewable electricity is sold and purchased, an important question therefore arises: ''Who owns the RECs created by the generation of renewable energy?'' In voluntary transactions, most agree that the question of REC ownership can and should be negotiated between the buyer and the seller privately, and should be clearly established by contract. Claims about purchasing renewable energy should only be made if REC ownership can be documented. In many other cases, however, renewable energy transactions are either mandated or encouraged through state or federal policy. In these cases, the issue of REC ownership must often be answered by legislative or regulatory authorities. Some renewable energy contracts pre-date the existence of RECs, however, and in these cases the disposition of RECs is often unclear. Similarly, because of the recent appearance of RECs, legislation and regulation mandating the purchase of renewable energy has sometimes been silent on the disposition of the RECs associated with that generation. The resulting uncertainty in REC ownership has hindered the development of robust REC markets and has, in some cases, led to contention between buyers and sellers of renewable generation. The purpose of this report is to provide information and insight to state policy-makers, utility regulators, and others about different approaches to clarifying the ownership of RECs. We focus exclusively on three distinct areas in which REC ownership issues have arisen: (1) Qualifying Facilities (QFs) that sell their generation under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978; (2) Customer-owned generation that benefits from state net metering rules; and (3) Generation facilities that receive financial incentives from state or utility funds. This is a survey report. It reviews how both the federal government and states have addressed these issues to date, and highlights the arguments that have been raised for different REC ownership dispositions. Our aim is to describe the arguments on each side, and the context for the debates that are occurring. We do not, in this report, provide a list of policy recommendations for how policymakers should be addressing these issues.

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of PolicyOptions and Practice  

SciTech Connect

Renewable energy certificates (RECs) represent the bundle of information that describes the characteristics of renewable electricity generation, and may be (and increasingly are) sold separately from the underlying electricity itself. RECs are a relatively new phenomenon, emerging as a tradable commodity in voluntary markets in the late 1990s, and gaining strength as a means of compliance with various state policy requirements affecting renewable generation in the early 2000s (Holt and Bird 2005). Twenty states and Washington, D.C. now have mandatory renewables portfolio standard (RPS) obligations, and most of these may be satisfied by owning and retiring RECs. Many states also have fuel source and emissions disclosure requirements, for which RECs are useful. Even where state policy does not allow unbundled and fully tradable RECs to meet these requirements, RECs may still be used as an accounting and verification tool (REC tracking systems are in place or under development in many regions of the U.S.). These applications, plus REC trading activity in support of voluntary green claims, give rise to potential ''double counting'' to the extent that the purchaser of the RECs and the purchaser of the underlying electricity both make claims to the renewable energy attributes of the facility in question (Hamrin and Wingate 2003). When renewable electricity is sold and purchased, an important question therefore arises: ''Who owns the RECs created by the generation of renewable energy?'' In voluntary transactions, most agree that the question of REC ownership can and should be negotiated between the buyer and the seller privately, and should be clearly established by contract. Claims about purchasing renewable energy should only be made if REC ownership can be documented. In many other cases, however, renewable energy transactions are either mandated or encouraged through state or federal policy. In these cases, the issue of REC ownership must often be answered by legislative or regulatory authorities. Some renewable energy contracts pre-date the existence of RECs, however, and in these cases the disposition of RECs is often unclear. Similarly, because of the recent appearance of RECs, legislation and regulation mandating the purchase of renewable energy has sometimes been silent on the disposition of the RECs associated with that generation. The resulting uncertainty in REC ownership has hindered the development of robust REC markets and has, in some cases, led to contention between buyers and sellers of renewable generation. The purpose of this report is to provide information and insight to state policy-makers, utility regulators, and others about different approaches to clarifying the ownership of RECs. We focus exclusively on three distinct areas in which REC ownership issues have arisen: (1) Qualifying Facilities (QFs) that sell their generation under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978; (2) Customer-owned generation that benefits from state net metering rules; and (3) Generation facilities that receive financial incentives from state or utility funds. This is a survey report. It reviews how both the federal government and states have addressed these issues to date, and highlights the arguments that have been raised for different REC ownership dispositions. Our aim is to describe the arguments on each side, and the context for the debates that are occurring. We do not, in this report, provide a list of policy recommendations for how policymakers should be addressing these issues.

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIA - AEO2010 - No Sunset and Extended Policies cases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

No Sunset and Extended Policies cases No Sunset and Extended Policies cases Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 No Sunset and Extended Policies cases Background The AEO2010 Reference case is best described as a “current laws and regulations” case, because it generally assumes that existing laws and fully promulgated regulations will remain unchanged throughout the projection period, unless the legislation establishing them specifically calls for them to end or change. The Reference case often serves as a starting point for the analysis of proposed legislative or regulatory changes, a task that would be difficult if the Reference case included “projected” legislative or regulatory changes. As might be expected, it is sometimes difficult to draw a line between what should be included or excluded from the Reference case. Areas of particular uncertainty include:

336

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.demandresponsesmartgrid.org/Resources/Documents/Final_NCEP_Report_ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/demand-response-and-smart-metering-po Language: English Policies: Regulations

337

Policy Directive System Policy Review Webinar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their professional capacity. So .... Fisheries' HQ Communications Office developed a companion policy and guidelines (managed by HQ Comms) #12;Private Sector Certification of Fisheries 30-122 John Butterfield Policy Analysis of certification that were placed on fisheries by 3rd party organizations. · Key Elements - NMFS will: · Respond

338

Environmental technology and policy development in a regional system : transboundary water management and pollution prevention in southeastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to surmount the barriers to transboundary integration and coordination of environmental technology and regulatory policy in Southeastern Europe, the environmental capabilities and needs of the region are discussed, ...

Electris, Christi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Regulatory Uncertainty and Regulatory Scope Thomas P. Lyon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, is the shift from municipal to state regulation of natural gas and electricity that occurred in the first in the natural gas industry, and notes that "[S]tate regulatory commissions were less responsive to the demands of local voters and consumers. On average, state regulators tolerated higher gas rates than did local

Lyon, Thomas P.

340

Policies for Renewable Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies for Renewable Electricity Use Policies for Renewable Electricity Use Policies for Renewable Electricity Use October 16, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis The renewable energy screening should include an assessment of several key utility policies at the facility site. In addition to financial incentives, states and local governments have adopted policies to remove barriers to the use of renewable energy and to facilitate the use of these technologies in a safe and fair manner. These policies are focused on electric-generating technologies and enabling the economic use of on-site power generation at a customer's site. The screening needs to outline the key provisions at the facility site and assess the impact on the use of these technologies at the site under review. Key policies include: Interconnection

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NYP Policy and Procedure Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 of 3 TITLE: ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY POLICY: It is the policy of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital to design and...

342

FROM: FRANK MARCINOWSKI DEPUTY ASSISTANT S TECHNICAL AND REGULATORY SUPPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2012 , 2012 FROM: FRANK MARCINOWSKI DEPUTY ASSISTANT S TECHNICAL AND REGULATORY SUPPORT SUBJECT: Annual National Environmental Policy Act Planning Summary This memorandum transmits the 2012 Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEP A) Planning Summary for NEP A documents anticipated for the Office of Environmental Management (EM), Headquarters. The attached Summary contains data on environmental impact statements only. At this time, we do not expect Headquarters actions to warrant other NEP A reviews; if this should change during the year, we will, of course, work with your office to comply with all NEP A requirements as appropriate. In that the DOE NEP A Order provides for Field Managers to submit Annual NEP A Planning Summaries directly to your office, we are preparing a compilation of all NEP A

343

Routing Policy System Replication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RIPE database specifications and RPSL define languages used as the basis for representing information in a routing policy system. A repository for routing policy system information is known as a routing registry. A routing registry provides a means ...

C. Villamizar; C. Alaettinoglu; R. Govindan; D. Meyer

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

EERE: Web Site Policies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Web Site Policies The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has developed this page to detail its compliance with the Office of Management and Budget Policies for...

345

The relationship between regulation and competition policy for network utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prospect of competition in supply, well- head gas prices were regulated, creating huge inefficiencies after the oil price rises of the 1970s. The subsequent collapse of the market as long-term contracts were signed at the peak of the oil price boom... -head (to which gas is delivered by various oil and gas companies using their own pipelines). Fortunately, by the time the electricity supply industry (ESI) came to be privatised in 1990, the message of restructuring to introduce competition before...

Newbery, David

346

State of Ohio Approval Policy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

STATE OF OHIO STATE OF OHIO DIVISION OF STATE FIRE MARSHAL E 85 DISPENSER UTILIZATION APPROVAL POLICY When the Division of State Fire Marshal is involved in the approval process for a flammable/combustible liquid dispensing facility that utilizes E-blend, where a listed dispensing device is required by the state fire code and the proposed dispensing device is not specifically listed for the intended application, the following guidelines shall be followed in the approval process: As there are currently no approved dispensers, as tested and listed by Underwriters Laboratory or other approved authoritative source set forth in OAC 1301:7-7- 01(O)(2), OFC 115.2 , that can be used for the dispensing of E-blend fuels in Ohio in accordance with the existing and as filed revisions to the Ohio Fire Code, the

347

Incentives and Policies | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142285584 Varnish cache server Incentives and Policies Home Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 22 October, 2012 - 07:23 Semantic Mediawiki Semantic Forms update developer Incentives and Policies Semantic Mediawiki upgrade Utility Rates We have just updated Semantic Forms on OpenEI to version 2.4 to enable some upgrades to the utility rate forms (thanks Teresa!). If you see any problems in forms you use on OpenEI, please notify us by commenting on this

348

Environmental Policy Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Environmental Policy Statement. ... Ensuring that energy and water are used responsibly and conserved through innovative practices and procedures ...

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

349

policy statement - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SUBJECT: Policy for Financial Support for Students Attending ISSI-3. FROM: John Lewandowski - Arrangements Chair - ISSI-3. Third International Conference

350

EM Policies and Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management (EM) Desktop References This page offers Environmental Management (EM) operating policies, procedures, standards, workaids, organizational charts, and...

351

Implications for National Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The World Is Flat: Making Materials Matter. National Policy Implications. Toni Marechaux. Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. National Research...

352

NIST Publications Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Technical Publication Policy. All technical ... authors. NIST requires all scientific publications to be of high technical quality. In ...

353

Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Recent Efforts at Decoupling and Performance Incentives Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Aligning Utility Interests with Energy Efficiency Objectives: A Review of Recent Efforts at Decoupling and Performance Incentives Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.aceee.org/sites/default/files/publications/researchreports/u061.pd Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/aligning-utility-interests-energy-eff Language: English Policies: "Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Utility/Electricity Service Costs

354

Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alton Strategic Environmental Group Alton Strategic Environmental Group New Port Richey, FL charles.alton@earthlink.net April 4, 2011 Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency Office of the General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Cohen: I have reviewed the Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued

355

Regulatory Review and International Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a liberalised electricity market by developing a costs/benefit analysis of different regulatory designs Méditerranéen de l'Energie (OME), France For further information: Martin J.J. Scheepers Energy research Centre by the European Commission, Directorate-General for Energy and Transport, under the Energy Intelligent Europe (EIE

356

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory

357

Office of Enforcement - Regulatory Assistance Reviews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Assistance Reviews Regulatory Assistance Reviews Office of Enforcement and Oversight (formerly Program Reviews) Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Reviews evaluate contractor programs for identifying, evaluating, reporting and correcting noncompliances. The objective of these reviews is to work collaboratively with sites to identify areas where program effectiveness can be improved and ensure that noncompliances are being proactively self-identified. 2013 Office of Security Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of Battelle at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, July 18, 2013 Office of Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of L ATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, February 11, 2013 Office of Security Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of

358

An Update on Ethanol Production and Utilization in Thailand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thailand has continued to promote domestic biofuel utilization. Production and consumption of biofuel in Thailand have continued to increase at a fast rate due to aggressive policies of the Thai government in reducing foreign oil import and increasing domestic renewable energy utilization. This paper focuses on ethanol production and consumption, and the use of gasohol in Thailand. The paper is an update on the previous paper--Biofuel Infrastructure Development and Utilization in Thailand--in August 2008.

Bloyd, Cary N.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

UCSC EMPLOYEE EMERGENCY LOAN POLICY Policy ACG0024  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCSC EMPLOYEE EMERGENCY LOAN POLICY Policy ACG0024 Effective Date: 03/17/04 Page 1 of 5 UC Santa Cruz Policy Employee Emergency Loan Policy (Policy ACG0024) I. Purpose of the Policy UCSC makes available to its employees an emergency loan program. The purpose of this program is to provide loans

California at Santa Cruz, University of

360

Tempest in a teapot: utility advertising  

SciTech Connect

Utility sales programs represent a form of organizational slack. It is an expense that can be traded off in times of administrative stress, providing a satisfactory payment to the consumer while maintaining the integrity of the present institutional arrangement. Because it is a trade-off commodity, regulatory control of utility advertising will remain a ''tempest in a teapot.'' Marketing programs are an integral part of the selling process in the modern corporation, and severe restrictions on advertising must be temporary in nature. Court cases have pointed out that utility companies need to inform the consumer about the use of the product and to promote demand for the product. These actions will be considered legally reasonable no matter what the final disposition of current environmental regulations and energy restrictions. In fact, as acceptable social solutions develop for environmental and energy supply problems, the pressure on utility advertising can be expected to fall proportionately. However, the utility still represents the largest industrial concern in most locales. The utility advertising program makes the company even more visible. When there is public dissatisfaction with the more complex parts of the utility delivery system, the raucous voice of outrage will emerge from this tempestuous teapot.

Ciscel, D.H.

1976-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become an extremely popular subject when discussing conservation and energy saving techniques. One of the key factors which effect conservation is the utility viewpoint on PURPA and cogeneration rule making. These topics are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition to utilities and industry, third party owner/operation is also a viable option to cogeneration. These options are also discussed as to their impact on the utility and the potential of these ownership arrangements.

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute The Edison Electric Institute ("EEI"), on behalf of its member companies, hereby submits the following comments in response to the request by the Department of Energy ("DOE" or "Department") for information on a wide range of issues dealing with Smart Grid technology, applications, consumer interaction, policy initiatives and economic impacts, including the definition of Smart Grid; interactions with and implications for residential, commercial and industrial customers; Smart Grid costs and benefits; collaboration between utilities, device manufacturers and energy

363

NRC policy on Economic Performance Incentives  

SciTech Connect

The recognition by the NRC of the potential negative impact on safe nuclear plant operations of an expanded role for state and local governments in the regulation of commercial nuclear power plants is particularly poignant in its July 1991 Policy Statement on Possible Safety Impacts of Economic Performance Incentives (the 1991 Policy Statement). The 1991 Policy Statement is concerned with financial incentives provided to utilities with nuclear plants by state public utility commissions, in their regulation of electric power rates, to reward or penalize the economic performance of nuclear plants. Section 271 of the Act allows for regulation of electric power rates by state governments, which prerogative section 274(k) affirms. However, the NRC is concerned that the direct regulation of electric power rates could result in the indirect regulation of the radiological aspects of nuclear plant operations and could compromise the safe operation of nuclear plants. The 1991 Policy Statement indicates the NRC will continue to monitor the use of economic performance incentives. Finally, it requests that state public utility commissions advise the NRC of their economic performance incentive programs and of the rewards and penalties provided thereunder.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Policy Flash 2012-60  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Attached is Policy Flash 2012-60 Acquisition Guide Chapter 13.1, Purchase Card Policy and Operating Procedures

365

Office of Security Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Security Policy Office of Security Policy Mission and Functions The Office of Security Policy develops and promulgates safeguards and security policy governing the protection of National Security and other critical assets entrusted to the Department. Director's Perspective Welcome to the Office of Security Policy Jack Cowden, Director The Office of Security Policy analyzes, develops and interprets safeguards and security policy governing national security functions and the protection of related critical assets entrusted to the Department. This includes the protection of DOE nuclear facilities, nuclear weapons components, special nuclear materials and classified information. Our broad topical areas are organized as: Program Planning and Management, Protection Program Operations (which includes both physical security and protective forces), Information Security and Material Control and Accountability.

366

Safety Management System Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

POLICY POLICY Washington, D.C. Approved: 4-25-11 SUBJECT: INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT POLICY PURPOSE AND SCOPE To establish the Department of Energy's (DOE) expectation for safety, 1 including integrated safety management that will enable the Department's mission goals to be accomplished efficiently while ensuring safe operations at all departmental facilities and activities. This Policy cancels and supersedes DOE Policy (P) 411.1, Safety Management Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Policy, dated 1-28-97; DOE P 441.1, DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy, dated 4-26-96; DOE P 450.2A, Identifying, Implementing and Complying with Environment, Safety and Health Requirements, dated 5-15-96; DOE P 450.4, Safety Management

367

Checking Security Policy Compliance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensuring compliance of organizations to federal regulations is a growing concern. This paper presents a framework and methods to verify whether an implemented low-level security policy is compliant to a high-level security policy. Our compliance checking framework is based on organizational and security metadata to support refinement of high-level concepts to implementation specific instances. Our work uses the results of refinement calculus to express valid refinement patterns and their properties. Intuitively, a low-level security policy is compliant to a high-level security policy if there is a valid refinement path from the high-level security policy to the low-level security policy. Our model is capable of detecting violations of security policies, failures to meet obligations, and capability and modal conflicts.

Gowadia, Vaibhav; Kudo, Michiharu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Utility Rate | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rate Home > Utility Rate > Posts by term > Utility Rate Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: energy efficiency Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry energy efficiency FOA aimed at growing expansive database of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Incentives and Policies Graham7781 12 Dec 2012 - 11:30 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content FYI, OpenEI now accommodates t... Very useful information. Thank... The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Glad I could help get you on t... Nick, Thanks very much! That... more Group members (25) Managers: Dloomis Rmckeel Sfomail Recent members: Denizurla Bazouing Gdavis Shehant Anapettirossi Abkatzman BijouLulla Vbugnion

369

Utility Infrastructure Improvements Using GSA Areawide Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - May 22-23 3 - May 22-23 San Francisco, CA Linda L. Collins, Contracting Officer, GSA Richard Butterworth, General Counsel, GSA  Federal Property Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended - 40 U.S.C. 501  10 year authority for contracting  Prescribes policies and methods  Bundled utility service  Transportation/transmission services  Connections  Line Extensions  Transformers  Meters  Substations  Ancillary services for the provision of utility services  Agreements approved by Utility Commission   Term length same as other services  Government takes utility service in accordance with State Law  Green Button is an industry-led effort  Easy Access to usage data  Data provided as text file 

370

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Industry Recruitment/Support Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Program Grant Program Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal gasification. The statute also supports the development of projects using renewable energy sources as well

371

Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulatory Burden RFI Regulatory Burden RFI These comments are submitted by the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) in response to the U.S. Department of...

372

Regulatory Resources for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory information and references for 3-MCPD(3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )process contaminants. Regulatory Resources for Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certifi

373

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

375

Utility Rate | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives and Policies Incentives and Policies Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Incentives and Policies Semantic Mediawiki Semantic Forms update Rmckeel 22 Oct 2012 - 07:23 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content FYI, OpenEI now accommodates t... Very useful information. Thank... The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Glad I could help get you on t... Nick, Thanks very much! That... more Group members (25) Managers: Dloomis Rmckeel Sfomail Recent members: Denizurla Bazouing Gdavis Shehant Anapettirossi Abkatzman BijouLulla Vbugnion Marklane Cbonsig Verdel3c Wisconsin Weatherall Windows Payne Nlong Wzeng Nsbowde Rmbot Ewilson 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

376

Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTRACTS: ENABLING DOCUMENTS Karen Thomas National Renewable Energy Laboratory Overview * The Enabling Documents for Utility Energy Services Contracts (UESCs) - provide a selected set of background information that clarify the authority for Federal agencies to enter into UESCs. - and, is designed to assist Federal agency acquisition teams who are interested in implementing energy service projects. The Federal agencies' partners have benefited from the Enabling Documents as well. * Energy Policy Act of 2005 * 42 U.S.C. § 8256, Energy Policy Act of 1992 * 10 U.S.C. § 2865, Energy Savings at Military Installations * 10 U.S.C. § 2866, Water Conservation at Military Installations Legislative & Executive Actions * Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 41 - - Authorizes GSA to prescribe policy and methods for the

377

Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process Researchers at the Energy Analysis Program's (EAP) Utility Planning and Policy (UPP) Group are helping ensure that energy efficiency, renewable energy, and a host of other important issues are not overlooked as California and the nation restructure the electric power industry. The UPP staff is analyzing the potential impact of restructuring on efficiency and renewables, modeling a variety of potential restructuring policies, and assisting federal customers seeking to better understand emerging electricity markets. UPP Group Leader Chuck Goldman is participating in discussions on how to distribute surcharge funds set aside for energy efficiency in California, and Acting EAP Head Stephen Wiel is assisting state lawmakers and regulators by overseeing the National Council on

378

Regulatory Perspective on the Use of Cementitious ...  

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1 ... - Development of accelerated laboratory-scale test methods. - Compilation of a database of ...

379

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Utilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine whether municipalization would be a beneficial option for many California cities. Source: Bay Area Economic Forum. Establishing a Tribal Utility Authority Handbook Provides an introduction to electric utility operation and general guidance for the steps required to form a tribal utility authority. Funded by an economic development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development to the Ak-Chin Indian Community and its tribal utility authority, Ak-Chin Energy Services. Source: Leonard S. Gold, Utility Strategies Consulting Group,

382

Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs  

SciTech Connect

Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Building Regulatory Capacity for Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Capacity for Regulatory Capacity for Change PRESENTED BY Sarah Spencer-Workman, LEED AP July 27, 2011 "How to identify and review laws relevant to buildings and find places and opportunities that can accept changes that would support building energy objectives" Presentation Highlights Rulemaking Community and Stakeholder Identification To Support Code Changes Engagement: Building Capacity for Change Pay It Forward RULEMAKING : Plan Development and Research of Laws Relevant to Buildings How is it conducted? 'Landscape' Review Key words or phrases to look for Identify "home rule" jurisdictions Update and review cycle built in 'Landscape' Review:

384

Compendium of regulatory requirements governing underground injection of drilling waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of waste are produced when oil and gas wells are drilled. The two primary types of drilling wastes include used drilling fluids (commonly referred to as muds), which serve a variety of functions when wells are drilled, and drill cuttings (rock particles ground up by the drill bit). Some oil-based and synthetic-based muds are recycled; other such muds, however, and nearly all water-based muds, are disposed of. Numerous methods are employed to manage drilling wastes, including burial of drilling pit contents, land spreading, thermal processes, bioremediation, treatment and reuse, and several types of injection processes. This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies. The material included in the report was derived primarily from a review of state regulations and from interviews with state oil and gas regulatory officials.

Puder, M. G.; Bryson, B.; Veil, J. A.

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

385

FEMP Utility Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Services Utility Services Karen Thomas & Deb Beattie  SPONSORED BY THE FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM  Overview  UESC Project Support  Agency / Utility Partnerships  Renewable Project Support  Design Assistance  Agency Energy Implementation Plans * * * * * * UESC Project Support Education UESC Workshops Agency Briefings Utility Briefings On-site team training Communications Web site Enabling documents * Case studies UESC Project Support Direct Project Assistance Project facilitation Advise & Consult In depth Contract development Technical Proposal review Performance Verification Agency / Utility Partnerships Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Strategic Partnering Meeting Renewable Projects  Resource Screening: - PV - Solar Hot Water

386

Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable technologies. This policy complements Colorado's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires municipal utilities serving more than 40,000 customers to use renewable energy and energy recycling to account for 10% of retail sales by 2020.

387

Proceedings: Avian Interactions With Utility Structures: International Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Avian collisions and interactions with utility structures such as power lines, towers and guys, and buildings present a persistent and widespread problem. The first international workshop, cosponsored by EPRI and the Avian Power Line Interactions Committee (APLIC), featured presentations on conservation, research, engineering, and regulatory issues in this area.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Category:Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types Jump to: navigation, search Rules, Regulations and Policies Types. Pages in category "Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types" The following 15 pages are in this category, out of 15 total. A Appliance/Equipment Efficiency Standards B Building Energy Codes E Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Energy Standards for Public Buildings Equipment Certification Requirements G Green Power Purchasing I Interconnection Standards L Line Extension Analysis M Mandatory Utility Green Power Option N Net Metering P Public Benefit Funds R Renewables Portfolio Standards S Solar and Wind Permitting Standards Solar/Wind Access Policy Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Rules,_Regulations_%26_Policies_Incentive_Types&oldid=390305

389

State Energy Efficiency Policy Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency Policy Database Efficiency Policy Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State Energy Efficiency Policy Database Agency/Company /Organization: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.aceee.org/sector/state-policy Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/state-energy-efficiency-policy-databa Language: English DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Building Codes,Energy Standards" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

390

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Analysis Modeling System Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: clasponline.org/ResourcesTools/Tools/PolicyAnalysisModelingSystem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/policy-analysis-modeling-system-pams Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Net Metering & Interconnection" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

391

CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy Efficiency: Energy Performance Contracting and On-Bill Financing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy Efficiency: Energy Performance Contracting and On-Bill Financing Agency/Company /Organization: Clean Energy Solutions Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Finance, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Video, Presentation, Webinar, Training materials Website: cleanenergysolutions.org/online_training/webinars/FinancialPolicyInnov Cost: Free CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy Efficiency: Energy Performance Contracting and On-Bill Financing Screenshot

392

Demand Response - Policy: More Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information OE's commitment to ensuring non-wires options to modernize the nation's electricity delivery system includes ongoing support of a number of national and regional activities in support of demand response. The New England Demand Response Initiative (NEDRI), OE's initial endeavor to assist states with non-wire solutions, was created to develop a comprehensive, coordinated set of demand response programs for the New England regional power markets. NEDRI's goal was to outline workable market rules, public policies, and regulatory criteria to incorporate customer-based demand response resources into New England's electricity markets and power systems. NEDRI promoted best practices and coordinated

393

National US public policy on global warming derived from optimization of energy use and environmental impact studies  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss possible United States policy responses to global warming. The components of a voluntary program for emissions control will be presented as well as regulatory options, including a carbon tax and tradeable permits. The advantages and disadvantages of both options will be discussed as well as the need for a consistent overall policy response to climate change.

Reck, R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading **Subscription Required** Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Energy Efficiency Schemes: Savings Obligations and Trading **Subscription Required** Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy Impacts Website: dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12053-008-9024-8 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-energy-efficiency-schemes-sav Language: English Policies: "Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Mandates/Targets This paper attempts to answer the following questions: What is new about the recent raft of white certificate energy efficiency schemes and is there

395

GRR/Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-MT-a - Montana Environmental Policy Act 09MTAMontanaEnvironmentalPolicyAct.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Environmental Quality Montana Environmental Quality Council Regulations & Policies Montana Environmental Policy Act National Environmental Policy Act ARM 36-2-521 et seq ARM 17-4-607 General Requirements for MFWP Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 09MTAMontanaEnvironmentalPolicyAct.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

396

HEADQUARTERS POLICY FLASH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

----- - ----- - HEADQUARTERS POLICY FLASH DATE: June 29,2005 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, ME-6 1 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Department of Energy Rulemaking on Research Misconduct SUMMARY: This Policy Flash distributes the Department's interim final rules on research misconduct that were published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2005 and are effective on July 28, 2005. These rules includes a general statement of policy and standard financial assistance and procurement requirements that implement the government-wide policy on research misconduct issued by the White IIouse Office of Science and Technology Page 1 of 2 POLICY FLASH 2005-41 The attached Federal Register Notice promulgates a new 10 CFR Part 733, "Allegations of

397

Utility Brownfields Resource Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a program designed to assist utilities wishing to participate in local Brownfields redevelopment projects. EPRI developed this Brownfields guide to educate utility economic and real estate development personnel in identifying, screening, and supporting Brownfields projects.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

398

Understanding privacy policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Their is growing recognition that users of web-based systems want to understand, if not control, what customer's data is stored by whom, for what purpose, for what duration, and with whom it is shared. We inform current language-based privacy efforts ... Keywords: Clone detection, Domain-specific languages, Empirical study, Language understanding, Language usage, P3P, Policy compliance, Policy enforcement, Privacy, Privacy policies, Software language engineering, Software linguistics, Software metrics, Web-based systems

Ralf Lmmel; Ekaterina Pek

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rapid identification of buried utilities, blended coal ash, and non-spec./off-spec. aggregates and fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

400

NNSA POLICY LETTER  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

POLICY LETTER Approved: 12-11-13 QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of the Administrator NAP-26 CONTROLLED COPIES AVAILABLE AT: INITIATED BY:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

WIPP Privacy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Privacy Policy and Disclaimers NOTICE: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Internet Server is provided as a service of the Department of Energy (DOE) for distribution of...

402

Data Management Policy The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Policy The guidelines below describe Data Management procedures, processes and resources that need to be understood by both user projects and in-house research. 1....

403

Research Conduct Policies  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Research Conduct Policies Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Materials Sciences & Engineering (MSE) Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences (CSGB)...

404

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as outstanding...

405

Forestry Policies (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (Montana) Forestry Policies (Montana) Forestry Policies (Montana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Montana has over 20 million acres of public and private forested lands, about a quarter of the state's land area. Montana's Forests are managed by the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation's Forestry Division. The DNRC's 2010 Statewide Forest Resource Strategy document specifies the promotion and facilitation of forest biomass for energy generation as a key strategic goal: http://dnrc.mt.gov/Forestry/Assistance/Documents/SAResponseStrategy2010.pdf The DNRC also offers financial assistance under its Woody Biomass Utilization program, with a mission to promote the beneficial use of forest

406

Identification and Characterization of Prokaryotic Regulatory Networks: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have completed our characterization of both the transcriptional regulatory network and post-transcriptional regulatory motifs in Shewanella.

Gary D Stormo

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state's citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a How-To'' manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual. [Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state`s citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a ``How-To`` manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgNight of the Living Dead or Back to the Future? Electric Utility Decoupling, Reviving Rate-of-Return Regulation, and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution grid for delivering electricity to the user has been paid for as part of the charge per kilowatt-hour that covers the cost of the energy itself. Conservation advocates have promoted the adoption of policies that decouple electric distribution company revenues or profits from how much electricity goes through the lines. Their motivation is that usage-based pricing leads utilities to encourage use and discourages conservation. Because decoupling divorces profits from conduct, it runs against the dominant finding in regulatory economics in the last twenty yearsthat incentive-based regulation outperforms rate-of-return. Even if distribution costs are independent of use, some usage charges can be efficient. Price-cap regulation may distort utility incentives to inform consumers about energy efficiencygetting more performance from less electricity. Utilities will subsidize efficiency investments, but only when prices are too low. Justifying policies to subsidize energy efficiency requires either prices that are too low or consumers who are ignorant.

Timothy J. Brennan; Timothy J. Brennan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Public Policies, Private Choices: Consumer Desire and the Practice of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Policies, Private Choices: Consumer Desire and the Practice of Public Policies, Private Choices: Consumer Desire and the Practice of Energy Efficiency Speaker(s): Reuben Deumling Date: May 27, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose This talk explores refrigerator energy efficiency as a technical concept, a political framework, and a marketing strategy. Refrigerator energy consumption has been the subject of regulatory attention in the US for some thirty years. The results are celebrated as a successful model for how to combine regulatory objectives and consumer preferences in pursuit of environmental outcomes, with no losers. However, the per capita refrigerator energy consumption today remains (much) higher in the US than in virtually all other countries. In this talk I examine priorities shaping

411

Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, storage, and usage of compressed gas cylinders. 2.0 POLICY Colorado School of Mines ("Mines" or "the, storage, and usage requirements outlined below. This policy is applicable school-wide including all, or electrical circuits. Flammable gas cylinders must be stored in the building's gas cylinder storage cage until

412

Industrial Energy Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, & Opportunities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, & Opportunities Industrial Energy Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, & Opportunities presentation Industrial Energy Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, &...

413

NNSA POLICY LETTER  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

POLICY LETTER POLICY LETTER Approved: 6-20-13 WEAPON QUALITY POLICY NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NAP-24 AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://hq.na.gov Weapon Quality Division THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK NAP-24 1 6-20-13 WEAPON QUALITY POLICY 1. PURPOSE. The purpose of this document, NNSA Weapon Quality Policy (NAP-24), is to identify the quality requirements applicable to weapon activities of the NNSA, NNSA contractors and subcontractors. The requirements contained herein are in addition to the scope of quality requirements found in DOE Order 414.1D, Quality Assurance. NAP-24 establishes specific weapon and weapon-related product focused quality requirements for designing, producing and

414

National Energy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy Policy National Energy Policy Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound Energy for America's Future Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group "The National Energy Policy released today by President Bush marks an historic first step to addressing long-neglected energy challenges. Given our growing economy and rising standard of living we are faced with an energy crisis. The President's National Energy Plan balances America's supply needs through technology, diversity of supply and conservation and paves the way for America's energy future." -- Secretary of Energy, Spencer Abraham Complete Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group [PDF-2500KB] By individual chapter: Foreword [PDF-224KB] Overview [PDF-142KB] Chapter 1 - Taking Stock [PDF-1070KB]

415

National Energy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Policy May 2001 Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound Energy for America's Future Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group "America must have an energy policy that plans for the future, but meets the needs of today. I believe we can develop our natural resources and protect our environment." - President George W. Bush For Sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S Government Printing Office Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: (202) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2250 Mail: Stop SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-0001 ISBN 0-16-050814-2 Members of the National Energy Policy Development Group DICK CHENEY The Vice President COLIN L. POWELL The Secretary of State PAUL O'NEILL The Secretary of the Treasury

416

Policy #2009EE001 Campus Sustainability Policy--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in implementing the policy. Energy Desktop computers can draw 50-100 W when in full operation and a laptop between. Resource Efficiency and Emissions Electricity use at IIT results comes from a mix of coal, natural gas manufacture entering the atmosphere through incineration or ground water through landfill. Economy The energy

Heller, Barbara

417

Administrative Policy Understanding UC Davis Administrative Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The search engine will also find common synonyms if you enter ~ before your search term. For example by entering the acronym for that manual with your search phrase. The policy search engine is powered by Google results are returned directly from the Google index. Searching Techniques Use of multiple search terms

Ishida, Yuko

418

Merchant and Regulated Transmission: Theory, Evidence and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that are the basis of potential revenue. The pressures for transmission expansion and the option of merchant or private initiative investment are causing the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to reconsider its traditional open access transmission... policy. (FERC 2011a) EU regulators too, faced with ineffective unbundling and insufficient new interconnectors, are allowing incumbent transcos exemption from EC rules on third party access in order to encourage investment. De Hauteclocque and Rious...

Littlechild, Stephen

419

Interim On-Site Storage of Low Level Waste: Volume 1: Licensing and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an all-inclusive resource guide for evaluating a utility's on-site storage licensing requirements. Specifically, the report offers an extensive review of licensing and regulatory documents related to on-site storage of low level waste as well as a methodology for evaluating on-site storage licensing issues.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada Title Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2008 Authors Hopper, Nicole C., Galen L. Barbose, Charles A. Goldman, and Jeff Schlegel Journal Energy Efficiency Journal Volume Volume 2, Number 1 Pagination 24 Date Published 09/2008 Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This article examines the future role of energy efficiency as a resource in the Western US and Canada, as envisioned in the most recent resource plans issued by 16 utilities, representing about 60% of the region's load. Utility and third-party-administered energy-efficiency programs proposed by 15 utilities over a 10-year horizon would save almost 19,000 GWh annually, about 5.2% of forecast load. There are clear regional trends in the aggressiveness of proposed energy savings. California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) had the most aggressive savings targets, followed by IOUs in the Pacific Northwest, and the lowest savings were proposed by utilities in Inland West states and by two public utilities on the West Coast. The adoption of multiple, aggressive policies targeting energy efficiency and climate change appears to produce sizeable energy-efficiency commitments. Certain specific policies, such as mandated energy savings goals for California's IOUs and energy-efficiency provisions in Nevada's Renewable Portfolio Standard, had a direct impact on the level of energy savings included in the resource plans. Other policies, such as revenue decoupling and shareholder incentives and voluntary or legislatively mandated greenhouse gas emission reduction policies, may have also impacted utilities' energy-efficiency commitments, though the effects of these policies are not easily measured. Despite progress among the utilities in our sample, more aggressive energy-efficiency strategies that include high-efficiency standards for additional appliances and equipment, tighter building codes for new construction and renovation, as well as more comprehensive ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs are likely to be necessary to achieve a region-wide goal of meeting 20% of electricity demand with efficiency in 2020.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Policy and Regulations | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Regulations Policy and Regulations In supporting Department of Energy needs, we provide assistance in internal and external policy. DOE Policies Federal Regulations OMB...

422

Spectrum Policy Seminar | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrum Policy Seminar Spectrum Policy Seminar Slide show from FCC's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau's presenation on spectrum policy. Spectrum Policy Seminar More...

423

HQ EMS Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMS Policy HQ EMS Policy Office of Administration Environmental Management System (EMS) Policy for Managing Department of Energy HQ Facilities This policy statement sets forth...

424

OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Acquisition Guides OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides More Documents & Publications PolFlash10-31attach2.pdf OPAM Policy...

425

OpenEI Community - Utility+Utility Access Map  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Utility Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id  Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id.  From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id#comments

426

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Name Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns...

427

Electricity Market and Policy | Electricity Markets and Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Department The Electricity Markets and Policy Group conducts technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S....

428

The Utilities' Role in Conservation and Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry is uniquely qualified and positioned to serve as an effective 'deliverer' of energy conservation services and alternative energy supply options, such as cogeneration, rather than merely as a 'facilitator' of their development by other parties. Amendments to current legislation are required to remove the barriers to utility participation and to provide electric utilities with appropriate incentives to deliver conservation and alternative power sources in their own self-interest. That utility self-interest can take the form of benefits to its ratepayers or stockholders -- or, optimally, to both. Moreover, adequate, reliable and economical electric energy from the utility grid is vital to our nation's economic well-being. A financially healthy electric utility industry is essential to the realization of this goal. Therefore, as we continue to refine a national energy policy, we must give this requisite careful attention when developing positions on conservation, cogeneration, equitable rate design, and all of the other elements, for they are inextricably related.

Mitchell, R. C., III

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reliability and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and the Federal Reliability and the Federal and the Federal Reliability and the Federal Energy Regulatory Energy Regulatory Commission Commission Michael Peters Michael Peters Energy Infrastructure & Cyber Security Advisor Energy Infrastructure & Cyber Security Advisor Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 202 202 - - 502 502 - - 8461 8461 Michael.Peters@FERC.GOV Michael.Peters@FERC.GOV The views expressed in this The views expressed in this presentation do not represent the presentation do not represent the views of the Federal Energy views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or the United Regulatory Commission or the United States. States. These views are the personal opinion These views are the personal opinion of Mike Peters!!!! of Mike Peters!!!! ☺ ☺ ☺ ☺ ☺ ☺

430

IPsec Configuration Policy Information Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an object-oriented information model of IP Security (IPsec) policy designed to facilitate agreement about the content and semantics of IPsec policy, and enable derivations of task-specific representations of IPsec policy such ...

J. Jason; L. Rafalow; E. Vyncke

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cities - Policies | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies Cities Data Apps Challenges Policies Cities You are here Data.gov Communities Cities Policies The data on Cities.Data.gov is brought together from many official...

432

Security Policies Dr. Ahmad Almulhem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Policies Dr. Ahmad Almulhem Computer Engineering Department, KFUPM Spring 2008 Ahmad Almulhem - Network Security Engineering - 2008 1 / 51 #12;Security Policies Types of Security Policies Trust Types of Access Control Summary Part I Overview Ahmad Almulhem - Network Security Engineering

Almulhem, Ahmad

433

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are initiating business plans that enable them to play a more integral role in the solar power value chain. This report summarizes research completed to identify and track utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. EPRI and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort to evaluate the expanding range of utility activities in acquiring solar energy, including photovoltaic (PV) asset ownership. Throughout 2011, USBMs have been ca...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy Policy Commission (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Policy Commission (North Dakota) Energy Policy Commission (North Dakota) Energy Policy Commission (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 2007 State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Empower Commission Created in 2007 by the North Dakota Legislative Assembly, the EmPower North

435

Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1993. Volume 37, No. 5  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the issuances received during the specified period (May 1993) from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not deemed a part of these opinions or have any independent legal significance. Contents of this document include an Issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District and Issuances of Directors` Decisions concerning the Interstate Nuclear Service Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; and Texas Utilities Electric Company, et al. and All Nuclear Power Plants with Thermo-Lag Fire Barriers.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility regulatory policy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

443

Utility Energy Service Contracts Laws and Regulations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contracts Laws and Regulations Contracts Laws and Regulations Utility Energy Service Contracts Laws and Regulations October 7, 2013 - 2:19pm Addthis The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992 authorizes and encourages Federal agencies to participate in utility energy efficiency programs. Legislation authorizing utility energy service contracts (UESCs) is outlined below, along with legal opinions outlining the use of UESCs by Federal agencies. Laws and Regulations 42 USC Section 8256 (Energy Policy Act of 1992): Incentives for Federal agencies, legislation addressing contracts, the Federal Energy Efficiency Fund, utility incentive programs, and the Financial Incentive Program for Facility Energy Managers. 10 USC Section 2913: Outlines energy savings contracts and related activities, shared energy savings contracts, participation in gas or

444

Green Power Network: Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option A number of states have adopted policies requiring or encouraging electricity suppliers to offer green power options to consumers. This section provides summaries of these policies and links to the full text of the legislation or public utility commission rules. Connecticut Iowa Maine Minnesota Montana New Jersey New Mexico Oregon Vermont Virginia Washington Connecticut June 2003—On June 26, Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland signed a bill (SB 733) amending the state's Electric Restructuring Act and granting authority to the Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to require electric distribution companies to offer green power options. The legislation enables the DPUC to determine the terms and conditions of renewable energy or energy efficiency options, including the contract terms and the minimum percentage of electricity to be derived from renewable energy sources. The green energy options will be developed and implemented by third-party companies selected through a competitive bidding process.

445

Federal Energy Management Program: Utility Energy Service Contracts Laws  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contracts Laws and Regulations Contracts Laws and Regulations UESC: Enabling Documents For a compilation of UESC enabling regulations and guidance, read UESC: Enabling Documents. This document is the primary reference for Federal agencies and utility partners conducting UESC projects. The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992 authorizes and encourages Federal agencies to participate in utility energy efficiency programs. Legislation authorizing utility energy service contracts (UESCs) is outlined below, along with legal opinions outlining the use of UESCs by Federal agencies. Laws and Regulations 42 USC Section 8256 (Energy Policy Act of 1992): Incentives for Federal agencies, legislation addressing contracts, the Federal Energy Efficiency Fund, utility incentive programs, and the Financial Incentive Program for Facility Energy Managers.

446

Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Mining Regulatory and Reclamation Act (Massachusetts) This is the approved revision of...

447

Policy Flash 2012-55  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Division Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Requisitions in STRIPES SUMMARY: This Policy Flash disseminates updated guidance to STRIPES users on the use...

448

NSLS User Information | BNL Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Policies Policies are the highest level statements of Brookhaven Science Associate (BSA) philosophy for conducting business at BNL. As staff members, we are expected to...

449

Quality Assurance: Policy and Directives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy and Directives The Office of Quality Assurance is responsible for DOE's quality assurance (QA) policy and requirements, and for providing assistance with QA implementation....

450

Energy Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Energy Policy Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks with President Barack Obama. | Energy Department Photo Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks with President Barack Obama. |...

451

Energy Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Services Energy Economy Energy Policy Energy Policy Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks with President Barack Obama. | Energy Department Photo Energy Secretary Steven...

452

Utility+Utility Access Map | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: Category:Utility CompaniesEiaUtilityId::15248...

453

GRR/Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 2-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies [[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife]] Regulations & Policies Oregon Administrative Rules 635-415-0025 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12-OR-b - Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Policy (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the procedures required when a project will

454

Can incentive regulation improve utility performance. The inherent danger of a simple answer  

SciTech Connect

US electric utilities face fewer incentives for efficient performance than nonregulated firms that operate in competitive markets, so regulators have traditionally relied on regulatory lag and a scrutiny of costs and management procedures. Characterizing the incentive programs which have been implemented by many state regulatory commissions as misguided, the author identifies an alternative adjustment mechanism with a potential for more effective promotion of utility performance improvements. The automatic rate adjustment mechanism (ARAM) links adjustments to cost elements recovered in a utility's rates to changes in external cost indexes for those cost elements. Ratepayers and utility shareholders would be better served by a regulatory scheme that relies on market forces, not shadow managements, to ensure efficient performance.

Goins, D.

1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) (Redirected from Policy Analysis Modeling System) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Analysis Modeling System Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: clasponline.org/ResourcesTools/Tools/PolicyAnalysisModelingSystem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/policy-analysis-modeling-system-pams Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Net Metering & Interconnection" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

456

Policy Flash 2012-11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Policy Flash 2012-11 As part of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Acquisition Savings Initiative and the DOE Strategic Sourcing Program, a key challenge has been to address the requirements of reporting cost savings and cost avoidance data. In order for DOE to fully comply with reporting requirements, we are directing that the attached template be utilized for reporting Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 data. Attachment 1 - Memo regarding Standardized Cost Savings Definitions and Reporting Template Attachment 2 - Standardized Cost Savings Definitions and Reporting Template (excel) Policy_Flash_2012-11.pdf Policy_Flash_2012-11_Attachment_1.pdf Policy_Flash_2012-11_Attachment_2.xlsx More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2012-67 Contractor Purchasing Balanced Scorecard for FY 2012

457

IEP - Carbon Dioxide: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Regulatory Drivers In July 7, 2009 testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu made the following statements:1 "...Overwhelming scientific evidence shows that carbon dioxide from human activity has increased the atmospheric level of CO2 by roughly 40 percent, a level one- third higher than any time in the last 800,000 years. There is also a consensus that CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions have caused our planet to change. Already, we have seen the loss of about half of the summer arctic polar ice cap since the 1950s, a dramatically accelerating rise in sea level, and the loss of over two thousand cubic miles of glacial ice, not on geological time scales but over a mere hundred years.

458

United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

qU oSoLTJRC qU oSoLTJRC United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Protecting People and the Environment NUREG-1872, Vol. 2 HudcD [jE©wftamfsýýpc Wafm(M oran EA Office of New Reactors AVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material As of November 1999, you may electronically access NUREG-series publications and other NRC records at NRC's Public Electronic Reading Room at http:t/www.nrc..ov/reading-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments.

459

UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20555 AUG i 3 1979 ,,~---Y--*. FCAF:Wi3 )I 70-364 : i: SNM-414,jAmendment No. 3 --A Babcock and Wilcox Company Nuclear Materials Division ATTN: Mr. Michael A. Austin Manager, Technical Control 609 North Warren Avenue Apollo, Pennsylvania 15613 Gentiemen: (1 i' \ (. \ In accordance with your application dated June 18, 1979, and pursuant to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 70, Materials License SNM-414 is hereby amended to: 1. Delete the function of the Regulatory Projects Coordinator, and 2. Alter the experience requirements for the function of Licensing and Nuclear Safety Specialist. Replacement pages for the license and condition section of the application are attached. Included are changes to License SNM-414 pages to reflect

460

Regulatory Burden RFI: Revitalization of DOE's Role as a Regulatory Watchdog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Memorandum serves as an Executive Summary of Center for Regulatory Effectiveness (CREs) attached comments highlighting four issues:

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461

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Project No. 12711-005 Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Project No. 12711-005 NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED COBSCOOK BAY TIDAL ENERGY PROJECT (January 4, 2012) In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission or FERC's) regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC's application for an 8-year pilot license for the proposed Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Project (FERC Project No. 12711-005), which would be located in Cobscook Bay in Washington County, Maine, and has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy

462

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC Project No. 12713-002 Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC Project No. 12713-002 Oregon NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (December 3, 2010) In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission or FERC's) regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC's application for license for the Reedsport OPT Wave Park Project (FERC Project No. 12713-002), which would be located in Oregon State territorial waters about 2.5 nautical miles off the coast near Reedsport, in Douglas County, Oregon. Staff prepared an environmental assessment (EA), which analyzes the potential environmental effects of licensing the project and concludes that licensing the project,

463

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Participants October 7, 2013 - 3:22pm Addthis The following Federal agencies have participated in the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group or engaged in a utility energy service contract project. General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Forest Service U.S. Department of Commerce U.S. Department of Defense Defense Logistics Agency U.S. Air Force U.S. Army U.S. Army National Guard U.S. Navy U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bonneville Power Administration Federal Energy Management Program Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Pacific Northwest National Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory

464

NARUC Releases Cybersecurity Primer for Utility Regulators (June 2012) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NARUC Releases Cybersecurity Primer for Utility Regulators (June NARUC Releases Cybersecurity Primer for Utility Regulators (June 2012) NARUC Releases Cybersecurity Primer for Utility Regulators (June 2012) June 14, 2012 - 4:50pm Addthis The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) has released "Cybersecurity for State Regulators," a primer that explains conceptual cybersecurity basics and points to additional resources that can help regulators develop internal cybersecurity expertise, ask questions of their utilities, engage in partnerships with the public and private sector to develop and implement cost-effective cybersecurity, and begin to explore the integrity of their internal cybersecurity practices. The primer was developed by the State Electricity Regulators Capacity Assessment and Training (SERCAT) program and was funded by a $4 million