Sample records for utility power plants

  1. Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute requires a certificate of necessity from the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission for the construction, purchase, or lease of an electricity generation facility by a public utility.

  2. Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felak, R. P.

    UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

  3. Utilization of Estonian oil shale at power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ots, A. [Tallin Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Department

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Estonian oil shale belongs to the carbonate class and is characterized as a solid fuel with very high mineral matter content (60--70% in dry mass), moderate moisture content (9--12%) and low heating value (LHV 8--10 MJ/kg). Estonian oil shale deposits lie in layers interlacing mineral stratas. The main constituent in mineral stratas is limestone. Organic matter is joined with sandy-clay minerals in shale layers. Estonian oil shale at power plants with total capacity of 3060 MW{sub e} is utilized in pulverized form. Oil shale utilization as fuel, with high calcium oxide and alkali metal content, at power plants is connected with intensive fouling, high temperature corrosion and wear of steam boiler`s heat transfer surfaces. Utilization of Estonian oil shale is also associated with ash residue use in national economy and as absorbent for flue gas desulfurization system.

  4. COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

  5. Compiling Utility Requirements For New Nuclear Power Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrakka, Eero [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, 27160 Olkiluoto (Finland)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted in November 2000 to the Finnish Government an application for a Decision-in-Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland. The actual investment decision can be made first after a positive decision has been made by the Government and the Parliament. Parallel to the licensing process, technical preparedness has been upheld so that the procurement process can be commenced without delay, when needed. This includes the definition of requirements for the plant and preliminary preparation of bid inquiry specifications. The core of the technical requirements corresponds to the specifications presented in the European Utility Requirement (EUR) document, compiled by major European electricity producers. Quite naturally, an amount of modifications to the EUR document are needed that take into account the country- and site-specific conditions as well as the experiences gained in the operation of the existing NPP units. Along with the EUR-related requirements concerning the nuclear island and power generation plant, requirements are specified for scope of supply as well as for a variety of issues related to project implementation. (author)

  6. Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

  7. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  8. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus(R) with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH{sub 3} mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., k{sub NH3}< 4×10{sup -3} m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}). The effect of the CO{sub 2} mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., k{sub CO2}<4×10{{sup -6} m/s).

  9. Hypermodular Self-Assembling Space Solar Power -- Design Option for Mid-Term GEO Utility-Scale Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitgab, Martin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a design for scaleable space solar power systems based on free-flying reflectors and module self-assembly. Lower system cost of utility-scale space solar power is achieved by design independence of yet-to-be-built in-space assembly or transportation infrastructure. Using current and expected near-term technology, this study describe a design for mid-term utility-scale power plants in geosynchronous orbits. High-level economic considerations in the context of current and expected future launch costs are given as well.

  10. Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

  11. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  12. Project Profile: The Sacramento Municipal Utility District Consumnes Power Plant Solar Augmentation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), under the Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Development (HIBRED) program, is demonstrating a hybrid CSP solar energy system that takes advantage of an existing electrical generator for its power block and transmission interconnection.

  13. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

  14. POWER-GEN '91 conference papers: Volume 7 (Non-utility power generation) and Volume 8 (New power plants - Gas and liquid fuels/combustion turbines). [Independent Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is book 4 of papers presented at the Fourth International Power Generation Exhibition and Conference on December 4-6, 1991. The book contains Volume 7, Non-Utility Power Generation and Volume 8, New Power Plants - Gas and Liquid Fuels/Combustion Turbines. The topics of the papers include PUHCA changes and transmission access, financing and economics of independent power projects, case histories, combustion turbine based technologies, coal gasification, and combined cycle.

  15. An assessment of the use of direct contact condensers with wet cooling systems for utility steam power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.; Hoo, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); D`Errico, P. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)] [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential use of a direct contact condenser for steam recovery at the turbine exhaust of a utility power plant using a wet cooling system is investigated. To maintain condensate separate from the cooling water, a bank of plate heat exchangers is used. In a case study for a nominal 130-MW steam power plant, two heat rejection systems, one using a conventional surface condenser and another using a direct contact condenser together with a set of plate heat exchangers are compared on the basis of their performance, operation and maintenance, and system economics. Despite a higher initial cost for the direct contact system, the advantages it offers suggests that this system is viable both technically and economically. Key to the improvements the direct contact system offers is a higher equivalent availability for the power system. Reduction of dissolved oxygen and other metallic ions in the condensate, reduced use of chemical scavengers and polishers, and potential elimination of a plant floor are also major benefits of this system. Drawbacks include added plant components and higher initial cost. The potential for long-term cost reduction for the direct contact system is also identified.

  16. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the fullmore »FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.« less

  17. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xingshi [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gingerich, Daniel B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the full FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.

  18. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP while demonstrating the ICCT CT-121 FGD Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is performing comprehensive assessments of toxic emissions from eight selected coal-fired electric utility units. This program responds to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utility power plants for Potential health risks. The resulting data will be furnished to EPA utility power plants and health risk determinations. The assessment of emissions involves the collection and analysis of samples from the major input, process, and output streams of each of the eight power plants for selected hazardous Pollutants identified in Title III of the Clean Air Act. Additional goals are to determine the removal efficiencies of pollution control subsystems for these selected pollutants and the Concentrations associated with the particulate fraction of the flue gas stream as a function of particle size. Material balances are being performed for selected pollutants around the entire power plant and several subsystems to identify the fate of hazardous substances in each utility system. Radian Corporation was selected to perform a toxics assessment at a plant demonstrating an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project. The site selected is Plant Yates Unit No. 1 of Georgia Power Company, which includes a Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 demonstration project.

  19. Power Sales to Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

  20. Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  2. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  3. Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiji, Ashok

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

  4. Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

  5. Physical Plant Utility Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    of Massachusetts Amherst Electrical Distribution & Outdoor Lighting 3.0 Table of Contents Page 1 UMass Medium buses at the Eastside sub-station. The Eastside sub-station is comprised of two separate buses with a normally open bus tie. Each bus is automatically backed up by separate utility feeds. The Eastside Sub-station

  6. The Sacramento power utility experience in solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smeloff, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the development of three solar power technologies for use in Sacramento, California is provided. A central receiver power plant, Solar One, is being converted to a molten salt design with thermal energy storage by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and six other utilities. SMUD is also investigating a solar dish/sterling engine system and technologies to reduce photovoltaic conversion costs.

  7. Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas...

  8. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants: Evaluation of the combined cost of makeup water treatment and increased condenser fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Michael E.; Theregowda, Ranjani B.; Safari, Iman; Abbasian, Javad; Arastoopour, Hamid; Dzombak, David A.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Miller, David C.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is presented to calculate the total combined cost (TCC) of water sourcing, water treatment and condenser fouling in the recirculating cooling systems of thermoelectric power plants. The methodology is employed to evaluate the economic viability of using treated municipal wastewater (MWW) to replace the use of freshwater as makeup water to power plant cooling systems. Cost analyses are presented for a reference power plant and five different tertiary treatment scenarios to reduce the scaling tendencies of MWW. Results indicate that a 550 MW sub-critical coal fired power plant with a makeup water requirement of 29.3 ML/day has a TCC of $3.0 - 3.2 million/yr associated with the use of treated MWW for cooling. (All costs USD 2009). This translates to a freshwater conservation cost of $0.29/kL, which is considerably lower than that of dry air cooling technology, $1.5/kL, as well as the 2020 conservation cost target set by the U.S. Department of Energy, $0.74/kL. Results also show that if the available price of freshwater exceeds that of secondarytreated MWW by more than $0.13-0.14/kL, it can be economically advantageous to purchase secondary MWW and treat it for utilization in the recirculating cooling system of a thermoelectric power plant.

  9. State power plant productivity programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

  10. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  11. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inc. Experience curves for power plant emission controlfor Coal-Fired Utility Power Plants, U.S. Environmental1/2, 2004 Experience curves for power plant emission control

  12. Characterization of the chemical variation of feed coal and coal combustion products from a power plant utilizing low sulfur Powder River Basin coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, in collaboration with an Indiana utility, are studying a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin coal. This investigation involves a systematic study of the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a 1,300-megawatt (MW) power unit. The main goal of this study is to characterize the temporal chemical variability of the feed coal, fly ash, and bottom ash by looking at the major-, minor-, and trace-element compositions and their associations with the feed coal mineralogy. Emphasis is also placed on the abundance and modes of occurrence of elements of potential environmental concern that may affect the utilization of these CCPs and coals.

  13. An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell: a model of a central utility plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This central utilities plant model details the major elements of a central utilities plant for several classes of users. The model enables the analyst to select optional, cost effective, plant features that are appropriate to a fuel cell application. These features permit the future plant owner to exploit all of the energy produced by the fuel cell, thereby reducing the total cost of ownership. The model further affords the analyst an opportunity to identify avoided costs of the fuel cell-based power plant. This definition establishes the performance and capacity information, appropriate to the class of user, to support the capital cost model and the feasibility analysis. It is detailed only to the depth required to identify the major elements of a fuel cell-based system. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

  14. Electric Power Reliability in Chemical Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, M. B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at plants across the country? Has the quality and reliability of utility-generated power deteriorated over the past five or ten years? Or, has the perception of what constitutes reliable power changed with the advent, installation, and increasing usage...

  15. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  16. NOx Dispatching in Plant Utility Systems Using Existing Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nath, R.; Kumana, J. D.

    NO x DISPATCHING IN PLANT UTILITY SYSTEMS - USING EXISTING TOOLS Ravi Nath and Jimmy D. Kumana Linnhoff March ABSTRACT Localized NO x reduction during Ozone Alerts is a problem of increasing importance to process industries in and around.... Economic dispatching of plant utility systems is commonly done by the gas and electric power companies and software tools for such dispatching already exist even at the industrial plant level [2]. The purpose of this paper is to show...

  17. Electric utility of the year for 1984: Potomac Electric Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance, efficiency improvements, a modest construction program, a clear balance sheet, and an effort to expend power plant life were among the qualities that earned Potomac Electric Power (PEPCO) the title of 1984 Utility of the Year. Other key elements in the utility's selection were its strategy for purchasing power, a load management plan, diversified investments into subsidiary businesses, community concern that considers the aesthetics of transmission facilities, and its interest in personnel development, especially among minorities. 3 figures.

  18. TS Power Plant, Eureka County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R. [DTE Energy Services (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Not all coal-fired power plants are constructed by investor-owned utilities or independent power producers selling to wholesale markets. When Newmont Mining Corp. recognised that local power supplies were inadequate and too expensive to meet long-term electricity needs for its major gold- and copper-mining operations in northern Nevada, it built its own generation. What is more, Newmont's privately owned 200-MW net coal-fired plant features power plant technologies that will surely become industry standards. Newmont's investment in power and technology is also golden: the capital cost will be paid back in about eight years. 4 figs.

  19. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  20. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

  1. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  2. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  5. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  6. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  8. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  9. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  10. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  11. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  14. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  16. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  17. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  18. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  19. DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: utility-scale power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    utility-scale power Sandia Has Signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Case Western Reserve University On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy...

  1. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

  2. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

  3. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

  4. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

  5. LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled dpa) § Removes ion threat and mitigates x-ray threat ­ allows simple steel piping § No need

  6. Risk Aversion Asymptotics for Power Utility Maximization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutz, Marcel

    Risk Aversion Asymptotics for Power Utility Maximization Marcel Nutz ETH Zurich, Department consider the economic problem of optimal consumption and in- vestment with power utility. We study consumption is obtained for general semimartingale mod- els while the convergence of the optimal trading

  7. Physical Plant Power Plant - 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ) for producing single-node cuttings. Regardless of reapplication stages, nutrient termination on 1 Oct. caused taller plants with more nodes, more leaves, more flowering nodes, more total flowers, and fewer aborted flowers than those being terminated earlier...

  8. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible...

  9. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to meeting the requirements of the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... renewables portfolio standard], New Mexico investor-owned utilities...

  10. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  11. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  12. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 2, Topical reports: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. The research needs that have high priority in establishing the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of large-scale capture and disposal of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants are:(1) survey and assess the capacity, cost, and location of potential depleted gas and oil wells that are suitable CO{sub 2} repositories (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (2) conduct research on the feasibility of ocean disposal, with objectives of determining the cost, residence time, and environmental effects for different methods of CO{sub 2} injection; (3) perform an in-depth survey of knowledge concerning the feasibility of using deep, confined aquifers for disposal and, if feasible, identify potential disposal locations (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (4) evaluate, on a common basis, system and design alternatives for integration of CO{sub 2} capture systems with emerging and advanced technologies for power generation; and prepare a conceptual design, an analysis of barrier issues, and a preliminary cost estimate for pipeline networks necessary to transport a significant portion of the CO{sub 2} to potentially feasible disposal locations.

  13. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

  14. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  15. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  16. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

  17. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Project activities were focused on the design and construction the sub-scale hybrid Direct Fuel Cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant and modification of a Capstone Simple Cycle Model 330 microturbine. The power plant design work included preparation of system flow sheet and performing computer simulations based on conservation of mass and energy. The results of the simulation analyses were utilized to prepare data sheets and specifications for balance-of-plant equipment. Process flow diagram (PFD) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) were also completed. The steady state simulation results were used to develop design information for modifying the control functions, and for sizing the heat exchangers required for recuperating the waste heat from the power plant. Line and valve sizes for the interconnecting pipes between the microturbine and the heat recuperators were also identified.

  18. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief...

  19. Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis...

  20. EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission...

  1. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

  2. Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

  3. Automating An Industrial Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; McCowen, R. R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and electricity requirements of the Component Works as well as all of the heat and a portion of the electricity needed by the adjacent John Deere Foundry. This paper describes the automation of an eXisting industrial power plant and tells how the project...AUTlliATING AN INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT DAVID R. WILLIAMS, P.E. Energy Coordi?nator John Deere Component Works Waterloo, Iowa ABSTRACT The need for an upgrade of boiler and turbine controls in the 15 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant...

  4. Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

  5. Power Plant Dams (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across...

  6. MWM-Array Sensors for In Situ Monitoring of High-Temperature Components in Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheiretov, Yanko

    Utilization of America's substantial coal reserves for energy production has become a national priority. Advanced coal-fired power plants offer an environmentally friendly means to achieve that goal. These power plants, ...

  7. An Innovative Approach to Plant Utility Audits Yields Significant Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J. E.; Moore, D. A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents innovative methods to conduct powerhouse audits when applying advanced energy management to utility systems. Specifically, a new class of Energy Management and Reporting Systems (EMRS) applied to plant wide utility control...

  8. Fiberglass plastics in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

  9. Researching power plant water recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

  10. Unconventional energy - for a public-power utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leber, R.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a few of the hundreds of projects annually featured in the Public Power Innovation list published in the American Public Power Association's (APPA) Public Power magazine. These innovative approaches include feasibility studies, developments or demonstrations in the use of alternative fuels such as low-Btu corncob gas in a diesel generating set, the burning of corn waste in suitably modified steam boilers, anaerobic digestion of solid waste to produce methane, increasing the energy content of gas so produced from 350 Btu/cu ft to approximately 1000 Btu/cu ft by the Binax system, gasified peat for diesel power plants, the use of waste heat from diesel plants in a Rankine-cycle bottoming system, and the use of coal-derived liquid fuel in diesel engines. Other approaches include the phosphoric acid fuel cell, solar heating and cooling systems, photoelectric cell arrays, wind power, small low-head hydroelectric plants, and cogeneration systems. Other public electric utilities are providing free energy audits to their customers, and offering water-to-air heat pumps.

  11. Solar thermionic power plant (II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou-Elfotouh, F.; Almassary, M.; Fatmi, H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that the geometric configuration of a central receiver solar electric power plant (SEPP) can be optimized for the high power density and concentration required for the operation of a thermionic converter. The working period of a Thermionic Diode Converter constructed on the top of a SEPP in Riyadh area is found to be 5 to 6 hours per day in winter and 6 to 8 hours in summer. 17 refs.

  12. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the system, was demonstrated. System analyses of 40 MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, were carried out using CHEMCAD simulation software. The analyses included systems for near-term and long-term deployment. A new concept was developed that was based on clusters of one-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant, including the key equipment layout and the site plan, was completed. The process information and operational data from the proof-of-concept tests were used in the design of 40 MW high efficiency DFC/T power plants. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant was also prepared. Pilot-scale tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were conducted. The tests demonstrated that the concept has the potential to offer higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output and fuel utilization capabilities were also evaluated. Detailed design of the packaged sub-MW DFC/T Alpha Unit was completed, including equipment and piping layouts, instrumentation, electrical, and structural drawings. The lessons learned from the proof-of-concept tests were incorporated in the design of the Alpha Unit. The sub-MW packaged unit was fabricated, including integration of the Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) stack module with the mechanical balance-of-plant and electrical balance-of-plant. Factory acceptance tests of the Alpha DFC/T power plant were conducted at Danbury, CT. The Alpha Unit achieved an unsurpassed electrical efficiency of 58% (LHV natural gas) during the factory tests. The resulting high efficiency in conversion of chemical energy to electricity far exceeded any sub-MW class power generation equipment presently in the market. After successful completion of the factory tests, the unit was shipped to the Billings Clinic in Billings, MT, for field demonstration tests. The DFC/T unit accomplished a major achievement by successfully completing 8000 hours of operation at the Billings site. The Alpha sub-MW DF

  13. Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

  14. Coping with nuclear power risks: the electric utility incentives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starr, C.; Whipple, C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial risks associated with nuclear power accidents are estimated by interpolating between frequency-vs.-severity data from routine outages and the frequency-vs.-severity estimates from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). This analysis indicates that the expected costs of plant damage and lost power production are large compared to the public risks estimated in WASH-1400, using values from An Approach to Quantitative Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants (NUREG-0739), prepared by the NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. Analyses of the cost-effectiveness of accident-prevention investments that include only anticipated public safety benefits will underestimate the value of such investments if reductions in power plant damage risk are not included. The analysis also suggests that utility self-interest and the public interest in safety are generally coincident. It is argued that greater use could be made of this self-interest in regulation if the relationship between the NRC and the industry were more cooperative, less adversary in nature.

  15. DIRECT FUELCELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Shezel-Ayagh

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Detailed design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed for mechanical and piping layouts and for structural drawings. Procurement activities continued with delivery of major equipment items. Fabrication of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been initiated. Details of the process control philosophy were defined and control software programming was initiated.

  16. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  17. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  19. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Automating An Industrial Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; McCowen, R. R.

    AUTlliATING AN INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT DAVID R. WILLIAMS, P.E. Energy Coordi?nator John Deere Component Works Waterloo, Iowa ABSTRACT The need for an upgrade of boiler and turbine controls in the 15 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant... for the project was estimated at $860,OOO/year. The upgrading process began with a search for a design/ build contractor that could provide complete turn key capability, beginning with a site survey and ending with operator acceptanoe. The contractor...

  1. Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

  2. Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Power Plant Research and Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) to evaluate electric generation issues in the state and recommend responsible, long-term...

  3. Florida Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Power Plant Siting Act (PPSA) is the state’s centralized process for licensing large power plants. One license—a certification— replaces local and state permits. Local governments and state...

  4. Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

  5. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (MillionperYear Jan FebSamenuclear power plants,

  6. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing the SNOX innovative clean coal technology demonstration. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utilities. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study; Results presents the concentration data on HAPs in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data; and Special Topics report on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/solid distributions of HAPs. Volume 2: Appendices include quality assurance/quality control results, uncertainty analysis for emission factors, and data sheets. This study involved measurements of a variety of substances in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (ICCT) of the Wet Sulfuric Acid-Selective Catalytic Reduction (SNOX) process. The SNOX demonstration is being conducted at Ohio Edison`s Niles Boiler No. 2 which uses cyclone burners to burn bituminous coal. A 35 megawatt slipstream of flue gas from the boiler is used to demonstrate SNOX. The substances measured at the SNOX process were the following: 1. Five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; 2. Acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); 3. Ammonia and cyanide; 4. Elemental carbon; 5. Radionuclides; 6. Volatile organic compounds (VOC); 7. Semi-volatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); and 8. Aldehydes.

  7. Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    807 Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Paper 22-2 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant for power plant applications. The sensor utilizes quenching of the bright red fluorescence from inorganic. Motivation Combustion processes in power plants require the correct mix of fuel and oxygen to maximize

  8. ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS FOR ATTRACTIVE COMMERCIAL AND DEMONSTRATION TOKAMAK FUSION POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS FOR ATTRACTIVE COMMERCIAL AND DEMONSTRATION TOKAMAK FUSION POWER PLANTS Power Plant based on toka- mak confinement concept. It is obvious that the Fusion Demo should demonstrate that a commercial fusion power plant would be accepted by utility and industry (i

  9. ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like from the Duke Energy South Bay and Morro Bay power plants and the PG&E Diablo Canyon Power Plant

  10. Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Exploration of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants: Initial Results from ARIES-CS Study Farrokh, see: http://aries.ucsd.edu/ #12;Exploration and Optimization of Compact Stellarators as Power Plants in the context of power plant studies, e.g., particle loss Divertor (location, particle and energy distribution

  11. FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    FUSION POWER PLANTS ­ GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Farrokh Najmabadi Dept. of Electrical for fusion power plants is given and their economic, safety, and environmental features are explored. Concep- tual design studies predict that fusion power plants will be capital intensive and will be used

  12. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  13. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  14. Energy Efficiency in Process Plant Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, S.

    This article highlights some aspects of utility systems design and operations for energy efficiency. After years of relative stability, the energy costs have risen substantially. Electricity rates vary by the hour and in some cases are tied...

  15. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Investments to Power Plants J. Koorney, A.H.Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan Koorney,Pollution, and Avoid Power Plant Construction. Testimony

  16. What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

  17. Addressing employee concerns about welding in a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.C.; Hansen, D.D.; O'Leary, P.D.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A leading utility contracted with EG and G Idaho to perform a comprehensive, independent evaluation of the utility's welding program with respect to the safety-related welds made at one of its nuclear power plants. The purpose of this paper is to review a number of the employee concerns and the technical basis for the disposition of these concerns. In addition, recommendations are presented that may help to prevent the recurrence of employee concerns in future nuclear power plant construction, and thereby costly delays may be avoided and welding productivity and quality improved.

  18. Utility system integration and optimization models for nuclear power management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deaton, Paul Ferris

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power management model suitable for nuclear utility systems optimization has been developed for use in multi-reactor fuel management planning over periods of up to ten years. The overall utility planning model ...

  19. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 UFeet)nuclear power plants,

  20. Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers combined heat and power (CHP) and its uses, configurations, considerations, and more.

  1. Appendix S-50 - Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) - Public Utilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0 - Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) - Public Utilities Commission Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Instructions:...

  2. Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves...

  3. Correct Marginal Utility Costs Underwrite Plant Profitability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, S. M.; Robert, W. E.

    for an olefins plant. The base case for this system has excess 65 psig steam which is being condensed. This is quite common for olefins plants after furnace and turbine additions have occurred without a proportional increase in new 65 psig steam demand. Ge... of Step 1 and Step 2 for this analysis are shown iri Figure 1. Ba?? Loads Steam Rates Equipment EfficiencY MW 10001bs/h Boiler Process SteAm Generator 94.0 94.0 312 371 Turbine 1(600/200 9&19) 79.4 Turbine 2 (600/4"HII.abs.Cond)7J. 2 Turbine 3...

  4. An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

  5. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  6. Utilizing the Traction Drive Power Electronics System to Provide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Traction Drive Power Electronics System to Provide Plug-in Capability for PHEVs Utilizing the Traction Drive Power Electronics System to Provide Plug-in Capability for PHEVs 2009...

  7. Dirty kilowatts: America's most polluting power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, the US EPA tracked more than 1,400 fossil-fired power plants of varying sizes through its Acid Rain Program. This report ranks each of the 378 largest plants (generating at least 2 million megawatt-hours in 2006) for which both the most recent EPA emissions data and Energy Information Administration (EIA) electric generation data are available. The report ranks each plant based on emission rates, or pounds of pollutant for each megawatt-hour (or million megawatt-hours, in the case of mercury) the plant produced. It ranks the top fifty power plants polluters for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and mercury. A complete listing of all 378 plants is included as Appendix A. Appendix B contains overheads of an NETL presentation: Tracking new coal-fired power plants - coal's resurgence in electric power generation, 24 January 2007. The 12 states with the heaviest concentrations of the dirtiest power plants, in terms of total tons of carbon dioxide emitted, are: Texas (five, including two of the top 10 dirtiest plants); Pennsylvania (four); Indiana (four, including two of the top 10 dirtiest plants); Alabama (three); Georgia (three, including two of the top three dirtiest plants); North Carolina (three); Ohio (three); West Virginia (three); Wyoming (two); Florida (two); Kentucky (two); and New Mexico (two). Carbon dioxide emissions from power plants are now at roughly 2.5 billion tons per year. Power plants are responsible for about 30%-40% of all man-made CO{sub 2} emissions in the USA. Power plants, especially those that burn coal, are by far the largest single contributor of SO{sub 2} pollution in the United States. Power plant mercury emissions remain steady as compared to previous years. A searchable database ranking 378 U.S. power plants on carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and mercury pollution is available online at http://www.dirtykilowatts.org. 22 refs., 8 tabs., 2 apps.

  8. Electric Power Reliability in Chemical Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, M. B.

    The quality and reliability of utility-generated electric power is presently receiving a great deal of attention from the chemical and refining industry. What changes have taken place to make electric power reliability a major topic of discussion...

  9. Running Process Plant Utilities Like a Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.

    ........ 5700 '0IIII( 440 OJIIII( '0IIII( 9400 20000 1300 3400 3500 1500 6200 2500 Agua de Enfriamienlo (m3) Energia Electrica (kwh) Vapor de Alta (ton) Vapor de Media (Ion) Vapor de Baja (ton) Vapor de 60 kg/cm2 (ton) 114 ESL-IE-95....U1m.1 6766862...1Z Total Vapor Production mtlD Servjcios Agua Enlrjamiento a Va po m.Mm! Utility Consumptjon Energia Electrica a Vapor Ini.hL.m..l 4_4_6_21__~ DOWNTIME (HRS) 4 ? Real Programado 2 Fallas mecaoicas 2 Disparios De Planta...

  10. Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks Na Li, Lijun Chen different appliances including PHEVs and batteries and propose a demand response approach based on utility. The utility company can thus use dynamic pricing to coordinate demand responses to the benefit of the overall

  11. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, William L. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pines, Howard S. (El Cerrito, CA); Doyle, Padraic A. (Oakland, CA); Silvester, Lenard F. (Richmond, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant (10) to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine (22) fluid inlet state which is substantially in the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line (46).

  12. Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

    " of utilities exported from the power plant to the actual cost of the fuel and electricity required to produce them, generating a single number or "index." Variable cost performance is benchmarked by comparing the index from one period of time to the index...

  13. Microgrids, virtual power plants and our distributed energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asmus, Peter

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Opportunities for VPPs and microgrids will only increase dramatically with time, as the traditional system of building larger and larger centralized and polluting power plants by utilities charging a regulated rate of return fades. The key questions are: how soon will these new business models thrive - and who will be in the driver's seat? (author)

  14. EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    , energy sources. Power plant thermal cycle analysis. Cogeneration and combined cycles. Economics for energy conversion (oil, gas, coal, nuclear, solar) (4 lectures) 2. Energy sources and utilization, Electricity economics (4 lectures) 3. Conversion of chemical and nuclear energy (4 lectures) 4. Thermodynamic

  15. Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates the siting of large electric power generating plants, which are defined as plants designed for or capable of operating with a capacity of 50,000 kW or more. The policy of the...

  16. Turbocharged PFBC Power Plant Technical and Economic Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leppke, D.

    scale modularization techniques to both a bubbling-bed type PFBC, a circulating-bed type PFBC, and a 250MWe turbine-generator plant. Alternate PFBC designs using field construction techniques and prOViding more space for major maintenance...TURBOCHARGED PFBC POWER PLANT TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENTS DELBERT M. LEPPKE Senior Technical Manager Fluor Daniel Chicago, Illinois Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers are receiving considerable attention by the utility...

  17. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  18. Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional Scale: Phase III Report August 2010 DOE...

  19. Regional vs. Utility Planning Power Committee Webinar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Webinar 7 January Capacity Reserve Margin Expected Build-Out Schedule -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50

  20. Organizational learning at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, John S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

  1. Profit Maximization of a Power Plant Martin Kragelund, John Leth, Rafal Wisniewski, and Ulf Jonsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    consisting of wind energy and hydropower. Also in this work, the demand for balancing powerProfit Maximization of a Power Plant Martin Kragelund, John Leth, Rafal Wisniewski, and Ulf J¨onsson Abstract-- This paper addresses the problem of profit maximization of a power plant by utilizing three

  2. Efficiency and Environmental Impacts of Electricity Restructuring on Coal-fired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency and Environmental Impacts of Electricity Restructuring on Coal-fired Power Plants Hei efficiency, cost of coal purchases, and utilization among coal-fired power plants using a panel data set from recent years allows us to examine longer term impacts of restructuring; (2) the focus on coal-fired power

  3. Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

  4. Utility -Owned Central Plant Load Management at the Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilley, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dennis Lilley, CEM, PMP Customer Energy Solutions, Austin Energy Mission: Deliver clean, affordable, reliable energy and excellent customer service. Utility Owned Load Management – Thermal Energy Storage ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air... District – Ice Storage • Two (2) localized plants – Chilled Water Storage • An estimated 112,000 ton-hours of storage capacity 4 Austin Energy – Thermal Utility ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas...

  5. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

  6. HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    HARNESSING PLANT BIOMASS FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOMATERIALS Plant surface lipid biosynthetic pathways and their utility for metabolic engineering of waxes and hydrocarbon biofuels Reinhard Jetter1,2,* and Ljerka Kunst1 biosynthetic pathways can be used in metabolic engineering of plants for the production of hydrocarbon biofuels

  7. Power Control and Utility Optimization in Wireless Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    Power Control and Utility Optimization in Wireless Communication Systems Dimitrie C. Popescu@cs.utsa.edu Abstract-- In this paper we present an analysis of power control algorithms established over the past with power control algorithms based on game theory established relatively recently. The analysis shows

  8. UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS: INFORMING A PROGRAM TO STUDY Landing Power Plant (at center). Image from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library. #12; #12;i Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank many people who assisted with locating

  9. Power Transformer Application for Wind Plant Substations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, M. R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bloethe, W.G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Brooks, C. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Camm, E H [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Dilling, W. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Goltz, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Li, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Niemira, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Nuckles, K. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Patino, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Reza, M [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Richardson, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Samaan, N. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Schoene, Jens [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Walling, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Zahalka, G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power plants use power transformers to step plant output from the medium voltage of the collector system to the HV or EHV transmission system voltage. This paper discusses the application of these transformers with regard to the selection of winding configuration, MVA rating, impedance, loss evaluation, on-load tapchanger requirements, and redundancy.

  10. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  11. Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable...

  12. Simulation of the Visual Effects of Power Plant Plumes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -fired power plant with six 500 MW coal-fired power plants located at hypothetical sites in southeastern Utah coal-fired power plants are greater than those from oil or natural gas. If we must use more coal, how in a comparison of large and small coal-fired power plants in the West. Using hypothetical power plants

  13. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

  14. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  15. Characterizing toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant demonstrating the AFGD ICCT Project and a plant utilizing a dry scrubber/baghouse system: Bailly Station Units 7 and 8 and AFGD ICCT Project. Final report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dismukes, E.B.

    1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes results of assessment of the risk of emissions of hazardous air pollutants at one of the electric power stations, Bailly Station, which is also the site of a Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating the Pure Air Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization process (wet limestone). This station represents the configuration of no NO{sub x} reduction, particulate control with electrostatic precipitators, and SO{sub 2} control with a wet scrubber. The test was conducted September 3--6, 1993. Sixteen trace metals were determined along with 5 major metals. Other inorganic substances and organic compounds were also determined.

  16. Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

  17. Electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabayan, H.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lately, there has been a mounting concern about the electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear-power-plant systems mainly because of the effects due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse, and also because of the introduction of more-sophisticated and, therefore, more-susceptible solid-state devices into the plants. Questions have been raised about the adequacy of solid-state-device protection against plant electromagnetic-interference sources and transients due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, the author briefly reviews the environment, and the coupling, susceptibility, and vulnerability assessment issues of commercial nuclear power plants.

  18. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Edison, Renewable Power Purchase and Sale Agreement,utilities selling retail power to purchase from the small,

  19. Power generating system and method utilizing hydropyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolman, R.

    1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor transmission cycle is described which burns a slurry of coal and water with some of the air from the gas turbine compressor, cools and cleans the resulting low-Btu fuel gas, burns the clean fuel gas with the remaining air from the compressor, and extracts the available energy in the gas turbine. The cycle lends itself to combined-cycle cogeneration for the production of steam, absorption cooling, and electric power.

  20. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

  1. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. , The Central Reciever Power Plant: An Environmental,of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of Storage

  2. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process configurations for solar power plants with sensible-heatsolar power plant with sensible-heat storage since the chemical~heat storage processsolar power plant with a sulfur-oxide storage process. chemical~heat

  3. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topping of the Steam-Cycle Power Plant . A COMPARISON OFTOPPING OF THE STEAM-CYCLE POWER PLANT The proposed solarreceiver and a steam-cycle power plant. To transport heat, a

  4. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

  5. Sandia Energy - Power Towers for Utilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution Grid IntegrationOffshoreLiveSustainable Power

  6. Incremental costs and optimization of in-core fuel management of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, Hing Yan

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is concerned with development of methods for optimizing the energy production and refuelling decision for nuclear power plants in an electric utility system containing both nuclear and fossil-fuelled stations. ...

  7. The Guy at the Controls: Labor Quality and Power Plant James B. Bushnell and Catherine Wolfram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    ciency of power plants. Although electricity generation is a fuel and capital intensive enterprise a small fraction of generation costs. Yet, in extensive interviews with plant managers and utility personnel could make a signi cant di erence in the performance of generating plants. We focus on the role

  8. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

  9. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Richard

    Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring...

  10. Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page describes requirements for obtaining a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) or a Certificate of Authority (CA), one of which is required for any new power plant...

  11. Progress in estimation of power plant emissions from satellite retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    increase in SO2 emissions from Indian coal-fired power plants during 2005­2012 2 #12;Zifeng Lu, Progress doubled since 1996 ­ No SO2 emission control in Indian coal-fired power plants The latitude of India captive coal-fired power plants Improved Indian coal-fired power plant database ­ 165 plants, >720 units

  12. Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT COMMISSIONDECISION ENERGY COMMISSION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT GAS TURBINE PLANT SMALL POWER PLANT EXEMPTION DOCKET NO. 06-SPPE-1 The California Energy Commission

  13. Floating nuclear power plant safety assurance principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvonarev, B.M.; Kuchin, N.L.; Sergeev, I.V.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the north regions of the Russian federation and low density population areas, there is a real necessity for ecological clean energy small power sources. For this purpose, floating nuclear power plants, designed on the basis of atomic ship building engineering, are being conceptualized. It is possible to use the ship building plants for the reactor purposes. Issues such as radioactive waste management are described.

  14. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

  15. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

  16. Boron control system for a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W.W.; Van der Schoot, M.R.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchangers which reversibly store borate ions in a temperature dependent process are combined with evaporative boric acid recovery apparatus to provide a boron control system for controlling the reactivity of nuclear power plants. A plurality of ion exchangers are operated sequentially to provide varying amounts of boric acid to a nuclear reactor for load follow operations. Evaporative boric acid recovery apparatus is utilized for major changes in the boron concentration within the nuclear reactor.

  17. atomic power plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Denmark December 1991 12;Abstract. A computer model of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model...

  18. accelerator power plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Denmark December 1991 12;Abstract. A computer model of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model...

  19. atomic power plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Denmark December 1991 12;Abstract. A computer model of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model...

  20. analysis power plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis by Fault consider the impacts produced on a nuclear power plant (the critical plant) embedded in the connected power simulation. As outcome of...

  1. auxiliary power plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Denmark December 1991 12;Abstract. A computer model of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model...

  2. Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate Electricity Using Geothermal Water Resources Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate...

  3. A Survey of Power Plant Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ervin, Elizabeth K.

    University #12;Combustion Turbine Power Plant Open System The turbine burns either natural gas or oil. Fuel is mixed with compressed air in the combustion chamber and burned. High-pressure combustion gases spin. The Southaven Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbine Plant is located near Desoto County, Mississippi. Running

  4. Research and development of a 3 MW power plant from the design, development, and demonstration of a 100 KW power system utilizing the direct contact heat exchanger concept for geothermal brine recovery project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, A.W.; Wall, D.A.; Herlacher, T.L.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design phase for the 100 KW unit consumed the months of May through November 1978, with the final design selected as having a direct contact boiler and condenser, a single-stage radial inflow induction turbine-generator using isopentane as the working fluid, and a single cell ejector-type cooling tower. The unit was constructed on two, forty-foot flatbed trailers between the months of October 1978 and June 1979. Systems start-up testing, in-field modifications, unit operation, and performance testing were performed between July and December 1979. AP and L (Arkansas Power and Light) personnel assumed responsibility of the unit at that time and conducted further maintenance, operations, and testing through August 1980.

  5. Successful corrosion protection in FGD plants utilizing rubber lining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenner, J. [Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn (Germany); Peavy, M. [Smith Corrosion Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1970`s--and predominantly in the mid-1980`s--when the construction of flue gas desulfurization plants in Germany was still in its early stages, both the US and Japan had already accumulated several years of experience in the operation of such plants. Whereas Japan adopted the almost exclusive use of synthetic resin coatings--usually as flake coatings--applied on carbon steel as structural material, all three corrosion protection materials mentioned here (rubber linings, synthetic resin coatings, and stainless steel coatings) were applied in the US--in addition, stainless steel was also utilized as structural material. On the other hand, in Germany the use of soft rubber linings was much more widespread. The paper discusses rubber linings as corrosion protection and the experience gained with rubber linings in flue gas desulfurization plants.

  6. 'People Power' Saves Plant Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, B. G., Jr.; Kanewske, F. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    burner air registers ? Poor burner performance ? Leaking flue gas and draft sample lines ? Air leaks into firebox ? Refractory damage If inspections are not made until heaters are shut down, many of the above items will be hard to detect... of supervisory personnel from Manufacturing, Shipping, Maintenance, Engineer ing, Process Engineering and Utilities divisions. Typical topics discussed include the reduction of energy use in process operations by reducing reflux and recycle streams...

  7. The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power, Pennsylvania Presentation to the Natural Gas CCS Forum Washington, DC November 4, 2011 E.S. Rubin, Carnegie Mellon MotivationMotivation · Electric utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC

  8. Streamlining the Certification Process for New Power Plants in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treadway, N.

    are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the positions of the Public Utility Commission of Texas 77 ESL-IE-92-04-13 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 POWER PLANT... issues which came to light. The evolution of the issues provides insight into why the NOI rule was adopted in May 1991 and why the Commission's deliberations continue on this topic. Docket No. s.i2Q Texas-New Mexico Power Company (TNP) filed an NOI...

  9. Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 of the solar tower Pascal Richter · Optimization of solar tower power plants 2/20 #12;Model of solar tower

  10. California Energy Commission Media Office POWER PLANT FACT SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission Media Office POWER PLANT FACT SHEET Updated: 12/4/2012 (Includes: Lodi has licensed or given small power plant exemptions to 78 power plants, totaling 29,156* megawatts (MW). Fifty-four licensed power plants are in operation, producing 17,737 MW. Since Governor Brown took office

  11. Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

  12. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    be utilized in a steam power plant to produce electricitytemperature reactor. A steam power plant is a large scaleworking fluid. A simple steam power plant is illustrated in

  13. Fossil Power Plant Applications of Expert Systems: An EPRI Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divakaruni, S. M.

    the role of expert systems in the electric power industry, with particular emphasis on six fossil power plant applications currently under development by the Electric Power Research Institute....

  14. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

  15. Fossil Power Plant Applications of Expert Systems: An EPRI Perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divakaruni, S. M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the role of expert systems in the electric power industry, with particular emphasis on six fossil power plant applications currently under development by the Electric Power Research Institute....

  16. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  17. Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring Maria Kazandjieva the efficiency of such a computing system requires detailed data of both en- ergy consumption and energy waste to differentiate energy used well from energy waste. This is an important difference from pre- vious work [8, 14

  18. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this reporting period, a milestone was achieved by commencement of testing and operation of the sub-scale hybrid direct fuel cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant. The operation was initiated subsequent to the completion of the construction of the balance-of-plant (BOP) and implementation of process and control tests of the BOP for the subscale DFC/T hybrid system. The construction efforts consisted of finishing the power plant insulation and completion of the plant instrumentation including the wiring and tubing required for process measurement and control. The preparation work also included the development of procedures for facility shake down, conditioning and load testing of the fuel cell, integration of the microturbine, and fuel cell/gas turbine load tests. At conclusion of the construction, the process and control (PAC) tests of BOP, including the microturbine, were initiated.

  19. Just In-Time Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DR. Alexander G. Parlos

    2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project has been to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a new technology for maintenance engineering: a Just-In-Time Maintenance (JITM) system for rotating machines. The JITM system is based on several key developments at Texas A and M over the past ten years in emerging intelligent information technologies, which if integrated into a single system could provide a revolutionary approach in the way maintenance is performed. Rotating machines, such as induction motors, range from a few horse power (hp) to several thousand hp in size, and they are widely used in nuclear power plants and in other industries. Forced outages caused by induction motor failures are the reason for as much as 15% - 40% of production costs to be attributable to maintenance, whereas plant shutdowns caused by induction motor failures result in daily financial losses to the utility and process industries of $1 M or more. The basic components of the JITM system are the available machine sensors, that is electric current sensors and accelerometers, and the computational algorithms used in the analysis and interpretation of the occurring incipient failures. The JITM system can reduce the costs attributable to maintenance by about 40% and it can lower the maintenance budgets of power and process plants by about 35%, while requiring no additional sensor installation. As a result, the JITM system can improve the competitiveness of US nuclear utilities at minimal additional cost.

  20. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

  1. SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi Chevalier EDF R&D ­ Simulation and information Technologies for Power generation system Department 6, Quai Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

  2. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

  3. Strategies in tower solar power plant optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for optimizing a central receiver solar thermal electric power plant is studied. We parametrize the plant design as a function of eleven design variables and reduce the problem of finding optimal designs to the numerical problem of finding the minimum of a function of several variables. This minimization problem is attacked with different algorithms both local and global in nature. We find that all algorithms find the same minimum of the objective function. The performance of each of the algorithms and the resulting designs are studied for two typical cases. We describe a method to evaluate the impact of design variables in the plant performance. This method will tell us what variables are key to the optimal plant design and which ones are less important. This information can be used to further improve the plant design and to accelerate the optimization procedure.

  4. Inventory of power plants in the United States 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the US provides year-end statistics on generating units operated by electric utilities in the US (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). Statistics presented in this report reflect the status of generating units as of December 31, 1994. The publication also provides a 10-year outlook for generating unit additions. This report is prepared annually by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy (DOE). Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal, and State agencies; the electric utility industry; and the general public. This is a report of electric utility data; in cases where summary data of nonutility capacity are presented, it is specifically noted as such.

  5. Preliminary assessment of alternative atmospheric fluidized-bed-combustion power-plant systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianchini, J.; Rogali, R.; Wysocki, J.; Bradley, W.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a technical and economic evaluation of alternative atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) power plant systems with nominal capacities of 1000 MWe. Both eastern and western coal-fired power plants are evaluated for the following systems: baseline AFBC power plants with limestone beds; AFBC power plants with inert beds and wet FGC systems; AFBC power plant with inert beds and a dry FGD system (western coal only); AFBC power plants with limestone beds and limestone precalcination; AFBC power plants with limestone beds and agglomeration and recycle of spent solids; AFBC power plant with limestone beds and sorbent regeneration (eastern coal only); and reference pulverized coal-fired (PCF) power plants with wet FGC systems. The eastern coal-fired plants burn Illinois bituminous coal with a higher heating value of 10,1000 Btu/lb and a sulfur content of 4%. The western coal-fired plants burn Wyoming subbituminous coal with a higher heating value of 8020 Btu/lb and a sulfur content of 0.48%. The capital and operating cost estimates are based on boiler designs developed by Babcock and Wilcox, Inc., and on sorbent requirements estimated by Westinghouse R and D Center. Sorbent requirements for the baseline AFBC power plants are based on a calcium to sulfur mole ratio of 5:1 for the eastern coal-fired plant and 0.7:1 for the western coal-fired plant. The Ca/S mole ratio for the western coal plant allows for 30 percent utilization of the alkaline coal ash to reduce sorbent requirements to the fluidized bed combustor. The economic analyses are based on a plant located in the East Central region of the United States with a 30-year life and a 70 percent capacity factor.

  6. Microstructural Evolution in Power Plant Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    energy of the steam is converted to electrical energy by a system of turbines and a generator. Figure 2 temperature as possible. Progress in power-plant alloy design has allowed T1 to be increased from 370 C Steels Pump Cooling water Cooling water Electrical output Condenser Reheat Coal Boiler Superheater Ash HP

  7. Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

  8. Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

  9. SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF­MONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION) Aldo and identification are extremely important activities for the safety of a nuclear power plant. In particular inside huge and complex production plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Safety in nuclear power plants requires

  10. Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    working paper "CO2 Regulations and Electricity Prices: Cost Estimates for Coal-Fired Power Plants." We capabilities at new coal-fired power plants. The corresponding break-even values for natural gas plants source of CO2 emissions. For the U.S. alone, coal-fired and natural gas power plants contributed more

  11. Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT PRESIDINGMEMBER Member STANLEY VALKOSKY Chief Hearing Adviser GARRET SHEAN Hearing Officer Small Power Plant Exemption to construct and operate large electric power plants, including the authority to exempt proposals under 100 MW

  12. Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

  13. Overview of Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview of Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE Wayne Meier Deputy Program Leader Fusion Energy power plant are illustrated here Target Factory and Injector Fusion ChamberDriver Power Conversion Review 1/30/11 4 Tritium Processing #12;There have been >50 IFE chamber design concepts and power plant

  14. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice · Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants · Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs · Supply costs can reflect capital

  15. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  16. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  17. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

  18. Mutnovskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to:Muskingum County,Mustang,Power Plant

  19. UTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to jointly purchase NEMS ­ John Saven No one else needs much power either Only 1 other I-937 utility in groupUTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011 #12;Inland Overview - Power Don't need a lot of additional power 3 MW by 2016; 8 by 2020 Formed group of 20 smaller utilities

  20. Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 17, 2012 ... Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform re- ... Thermal power stations, using expensive resources such as coal.

  1. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insure constant output from a solar power plant. However. aoutput from the steam turbines is maintained. Equipment design for the proposed solar power

  2. Sandia nuclear-power-plant siting study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strip, D.R.; Aldrich, D.C.; Alpert, D.J.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Sprung, J.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NRC's Siting Analysis Branch requested Sandia National Laboratories to provide technical guidance for establishing (1) numerical criteria for population density and distribution surrounding future nuclear power plant sites and (2) standoff distances from plants for offsite hazards. The first task involved analyses in four areas, each of which could play a role in evaluating the impact of a siting policy. The four areas were risks from possible plant accidents, population distribution characteristics for existing sites, availability of sites, and socioeconomic impacts. The second task had two areas of concern: determination of which classes of offsite hazards are amenable to regulation by fixed standoff distances, and review of available models for the determination of appropriate standoff distances. Results, conclusions, and recommendations of the study are summarized.

  3. Quiz: Know Your Power Plants | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    11:14am Addthis Know Your Power Plants This quiz will test your knowledge of electricity generation in the U.S. Each map shows existing U.S. power plants for a specific fuel...

  4. COMMISSIONDECISION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................. 14 Transmission Line Safety & Nuisance...................................................... 15 to review and license proposals to construct and operate large electric power plants, includingCOMMISSIONDECISION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-2) Imperial County Order No: 07

  5. California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand September 20, 2012 - 1:15pm Addthis Ever...

  6. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  7. Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended...

  8. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

  9. Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1985 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1985. This Report, which is updated annually, was prepared to respond to the numerous requests received by the Energy Information Administration for the data collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction.''

  10. Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

  11. Inventory of power plants in the United States, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  12. Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

  13. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sites suitable for a solar plant with sulfur oxide TableProcess for a Steam Solar Electric Plant Report No. LBL-Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact

  14. Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

  15. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

  16. The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.H. [Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

  17. Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant Giancarlo Ferrari-Trecate, Domenico,mignone,castagnoli,morari}@aut.ee.ethz.ch Abstract In this work we present the model of a hydroelectric power plant in the framework of Mixed Logic with a model predictive control scheme. 1 Introduction The outflow control for hydroelectric power plants

  18. Ris9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ris9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant for Process Control and Diagnosis Finn Ravnsbjerg Nielsen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark December 1991 #12;Simulation of a PWR Power Plant *^R a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model directed towards process control

  19. THE ARIES-CS COMPACT STELLARATOR FUSION POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    THE ARIES-CS COMPACT STELLARATOR FUSION POWER PLANT F. NAJMABADI* and A. R. RAFFRAY Center stellarator power plants, ARIES-CS, has been conducted to explore attrac- tive compact stellarator by earlier stellarator power plant studies had led to cost projections much higher than those of the advanced

  20. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STARFIRE is a 1200 MWe central station fusion electric power plant that utilizes a deuterium-tritium fueled tokamak reactor as a heat source. Emphasis has been placed on developing design features which will provide for simpler assembly and maintenance, and improved safety and environmental characteristics. The major features of STARFIRE include a steady-state operating mode based on continuous rf lower-hybrid current drive and auxiliary heating, solid tritium breeder material, pressurized water cooling, limiter/vacuum system for impurity control and exhaust, high tritium burnup and low vulnerable tritium inventories, superconducting EF coils outside the superconducting TF coils, fully remote maintenance, and a low-activation shield. A comprehensive conceptual design has been developed including reactor features, support facilities and a complete balance of plant. A construction schedule and cost estimate are presented, as well as study conclusions and recommendations.

  1. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

  2. Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleva, E. F. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Mehrotra, V. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

  3. Public Power & Utility, Inc. (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:ThisPublic Power & Utility, Inc. (New York)

  4. Public Power & Utility, Inc. (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:ThisPublic Power & Utility, Inc. (New

  5. Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

  6. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

  7. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications AMaterials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

  8. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010, Graz,STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis submitted

  9. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications Afor Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications by Melina

  10. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants Matthew Lave, Jansolar photovoltaic (PV) power plant output given a singleproduce a simulated power plant output. The WVM is validated

  11. Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. Experience curves for power plant emission controlassessments of fossil fuel power plants with CO 2 capturethe future cost of power plants with CO 2 capture Edward S.

  12. Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

  13. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Connie Senior; Adel Sarofim; Bene Risio

    2002-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on the development of the IGCC workbench. A series of parametric CFD simulations for single stage and two stage generic gasifier configurations have been performed. An advanced flowing slag model has been implemented into the CFD based gasifier model. A literature review has been performed on published gasification kinetics. Reactor models have been developed and implemented into the workbench for the majority of the heat exchangers, gas clean up system and power generation system for the Vision 21 reference configuration. Modifications to the software infrastructure of the workbench have been commenced to allow interfacing to the workbench reactor models that utilize the CAPE{_}Open software interface protocol.

  14. Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that, in California, combined heat and power plants (CHP orout-of-state power plants serving California in 1990. Thesethat California utilities take power from these plants

  15. Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. The 5-megawatt power plant with 126 metre rotor diameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    The 5-megawatt power plant with 126 metre rotor diameter #12;Design data Rated power 5,000kW Cut and most powerful wind turbines in the world. The 5M sets new standards for the economic viability similar to conventional power plants. This in turn puts high demands on the control and regulation system

  17. AMERICAN ELECTRIC POWER'S CONESVILLE POWER PLANT UNIT NO.5 CO2 CAPTURE RETROFIT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl R. Bozzuto; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; Mark Palkes; John L. Marion

    2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with American Electric Power (AEP), ABB Lummus Global Inc. (ABB), the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies applied to an existing US coal-fired electric generation power plant. The motivation for this study was to provide input to potential US electric utility actions concerning GHG emissions reduction. If the US decides to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, action would need to be taken to address existing power plants. Although fuel switching from coal to natural gas may be one scenario, it will not necessarily be a sufficient measure and some form of CO{sub 2} capture for use or disposal may also be required. The output of this CO{sub 2} capture study will enhance the public's understanding of control options and influence decisions and actions by government, regulators, and power plant owners in considering the costs of reducing greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} emissions. The total work breakdown structure is encompassed within three major reports, namely: (1) Literature Survey, (2) AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study, and (3) Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation. The report on the literature survey results was issued earlier by Bozzuto, et al. (2000). Reports entitled ''AEP's Conesville Unit No.5 Retrofit Study'' and ''Bench-Scale Testing and CFD Evaluation'' are provided as companion volumes, denoted Volumes I and II, respectively, of the final report. The work performed, results obtained, and conclusions and recommendations derived therefrom are summarized.

  18. Power Plant Options Report for Thompson Island prepared by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Power Plant Options Report for Thompson Island A report prepared by the Renewable Energy Research....................................................................... 7 3. Grid-connected and Autonomous Renewable Power Systems ................................ 9 3.1. Renewable Power Sources .............................................................................. 9 3

  19. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction in NO x emissions from coal-fired power plants tocombustion of coal, emissions from coal-fired power plantsemission control technologies now required on all new coal-fired power

  20. Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

  1. Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell TestingGeothermal/Power Plant <

  2. Irem Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInterias Solar Energy JumpIrem Geothermal Power Plant Jump to:

  3. Takigami Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0 -TEEMP JumpTakigami Geothermal Power Plant

  4. Rotokawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County, Michigan:Rotokawa Geothermal Power Plant Jump to:

  5. Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and WildlifeFlash Steam Power Plant Jump to:

  6. Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and WildlifeFlash Steam Power Plant Jump

  7. Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

    2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

  8. Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology: handbook. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughery, K.R. Jr.; Carter, R.J.; Haas, P.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is Volume 1 of a two-part document which describes a project conducted to develop a methodology to evaluate the acceptability of nuclear power plant (NPP) simulation facilities for use in the simulator-based portion of NRC's operator licensing examination. The proposed methodology is to be utilized during two phases of the simulation facility life-cycle, initial simulator acceptance and recurrent analysis. The first phase is aimed at ensuring that the simulator provides an accurate representation of the reference NPP. There are two components of initial simulator evaluation: fidelity assessment and a direct determination of the simulation facility's adequacy for operator testing. The second phase is aimed at ensuring that the simulation facility continues to accurately represent the reference plant throughout the life of the simulator. Recurrent evaluation is comprised of three components: monitoring reference plant changes, monitoring the simulator's hardware, and examining the data from actual plant transients as they occur. Volume 1 is a set of guidelines which details the steps involved in the two life-cycle phases, presents an overview of the methodology and data collection requirements, and addresses the formation of the evaluation team and the preparation of the evaluation plan. 29 figs.

  9. Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes for Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants Anna Nagurney for the determination of optimal carbon taxes applied to electric power plants in the con- text of electric power supply portion of such policy inter- ventions directed at the electric power industry. The general framework

  10. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

    2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  11. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

    2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  12. Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

  13. Valuation of a Spark Spread: an LM6000 Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    report in the form of this academic paper. We have modified the plant- specific results in Section 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5 Monte Carlo Simulations 17 6 Modeling the Operating Characteristics 19 6.1 Plant Operating Modes power plant that can offer peaking capacity, and some baseload power delivery. We consider 4 operating

  14. 1984 power plant performance monitoring workshop: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An EPRI workshop on fossil plant performance monitoring and improvement was conducted in Washington, DC, October 23-25, 1984. The main theme of the workshop was the EPRI-PEPCo performance monitoring project (EPRI projects RP1681 and RP2153) highlighted in the opening session. The objective of this project is to develop an advanced instrumentation and monitoring system to improve heat rate, recover lost capacity, optimize system dispatch, and plan maintenance more effectively. Interim results of this project, which can now be used by the utility industry, were emphasized in the presentations including (1) the boiler parametric analysis program for optimizing boiler combustion efficiency and (2) the N2 packing monitor that measures the steam leakage from the high-pressure to the intermediate-pressure turbine. Other EPRI projects, such as RP1711-2 and RP1878-1, were also highlighted. RP1711-2 employs root-cause investigation techniques to trace plant heat-rate degradation problems and recommend cost-effective solutions, while RP1878-1 introduces a nonradioactive tracer technique to monitor turbine efficiency. Twenty-seven papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Section 6 - working group minutes - was not entered by itself. (LTN)

  15. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

  16. Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashadi, Sarah (Sarah Omer)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-combustion capture retrofits are expected to a near-term option for mitigating CO 2 emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. Much of the literature proposes using power from the existing coal plant and thermal ...

  17. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

  18. Potential of hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants in Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of Burbank and the Ralph M. Parsons Company studies showed several advantages for hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plants, as follows: (1) the estimated cost of producing electricity in hybrid plant is about 18.3 mills/kWh, compared to 19.3 mills/kWh in an all-coal fired power plant; (2) the coal requirements for a given plant can be reduced about 12 to 17%; and (3) the geothermal brines can be used for power plant cooling water, and in some cases, as boiler feedwater. The pertinent results of the City of Burbank studies are summarized and applied to the geothermal and coal resources of Arizona for possible future utilization.

  19. INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

  20. Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

    1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

  1. PERFORMANCE OF DISTRIBUTED UTILITY-BASED POWER CONTROL FOR WIRELESS AD HOC NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    PERFORMANCE OF DISTRIBUTED UTILITY-BASED POWER CONTROL FOR WIRELESS AD HOC NETWORKS Jianwei Huang network. The users exchange prices that reflect their loss in utility due to interference. The prices are then used to determine optimal (utility maximizing) power levels for each user. We present simulation

  2. Nuclear Power Plant Construction Support (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Language in the North Carolina Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard allows a utility to have incurred costs reviewed by the North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC)...

  3. Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD, 23, 106 gil, Yeongdong-daero, Gangnam-gu, 153-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task would be to make the model more sophisticated as a 'semi-tailored model' so that it can be applied to a certain country reflecting its unique conditions. In accordance with its degree of established infrastructure, we can adjust or modify the model. Despite lots of benefits of using this model, there remain limitations such as time and budget constraints. These problems, however, can be addressed by cooperating with international organization such as the IAEA and other companies that share the same goal of helping newcomer countries introduce nuclear power. (authors)

  4. Several studies have shown that the availability of solar power plants often is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    Several studies have shown that the availability of solar power plants often is high during times conditioning. These peaks are intensi- fied during heat waves, which are fueled by solar gain. Thus the utility, solar and research industries. Effective Capacity Metrics Simple metrics can be estimated

  5. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants. [US DOE Patent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Doyle, P.A.; Silvester, L.F.

    1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine fluid inlet state which is substantially on the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line.

  6. Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

  7. Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

  8. Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

  9. Efficient Power Converters for PV Arrays : Scalable Submodule Power Conversion for Utility-Scale Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ADEPT Project: SolarBridge is developing a new power conversion technique to improve the energy output of PV power plants. This new technique is specifically aimed at large plants where many solar panels are connected together. SolarBridge is correcting for the inefficiencies that occur when two solar panels that encounter different amounts of sun are connected together. In most conventional PV system, the weakest panel limits the energy production of the entire system. That’s because all of the energy collected by the PV system feeds into a single collection point where a central inverter then converts it into useable energy for the grid. SolarBridge has found a more efficient and cost-effective way to convert solar energy, correcting these power differences before they reach the grid.

  10. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  11. Simulation-based biagnostics and control for nuclar power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.C.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced simulation-based diagnostics and control guidance systems for the identification and management of off-normal transient events in nuclear power plants is currently under investigation. To date a great deal of progress has been made in effectively and efficiently combining information obtained through fuzzy pattern recognition and macroscopic mass and energy inventory analysis for use in multiple failure diagnostics. Work has also begun on the unique problem of diagnostics and surveillance methodologies for advanced passively-safe reactors systems utilizing both statistical and fuzzy information. Plans are also being formulated for the development of deterministic optimal control algorithms combined with Monte Carlo incremental learning algorithms to be used for the flexible and efficient control of reactor transients.

  12. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Connie Senior; Zumao Chen; Temi Linjewile; Adel Sarofim; Bene Risio

    2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on all aspects of the project. Calculations for a full Vision 21 plant configuration have been performed for two gasifier types. An improved process model for simulating entrained flow gasifiers has been implemented into the workbench. Model development has focused on: a pre-processor module to compute global gasification parameters from standard fuel properties and intrinsic rate information; a membrane based water gas shift; and reactors to oxidize fuel cell exhaust gas. The data visualization capabilities of the workbench have been extended by implementing the VTK visualization software that supports advanced visualization methods, including inexpensive Virtual Reality techniques. The ease-of-use, functionality and plug-and-play features of the workbench were highlighted through demonstrations of the workbench at a DOE sponsored coal utilization conference. A white paper has been completed that contains recommendations on the use of component architectures, model interface protocols and software frameworks for developing a Vision 21 plant simulator.

  13. Autonomous Control of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basher, H.

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor is a complex system that requires highly sophisticated controllers to ensure that desired performance and safety can be achieved and maintained during its operations. Higher-demanding operational requirements such as reliability, lower environmental impacts, and improved performance under adverse conditions in nuclear power plants, coupled with the complexity and uncertainty of the models, necessitate the use of an increased level of autonomy in the control methods. In the opinion of many researchers, the tasks involved during nuclear reactor design and operation (e.g., design optimization, transient diagnosis, and core reload optimization) involve important human cognition and decisions that may be more easily achieved with intelligent methods such as expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Many experts in the field of control systems share the idea that a higher degree of autonomy in control of complex systems such as nuclear plants is more easily achievable through the integration of conventional control systems and the intelligent components. Researchers have investigated the feasibility of the integration of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems with the conventional control methods to achieve higher degrees of autonomy in different aspects of reactor operations such as reactor startup, shutdown in emergency situations, fault detection and diagnosis, nuclear reactor alarm processing and diagnosis, and reactor load-following operations, to name a few. With the advancement of new technologies and computing power, it is feasible to automate most of the nuclear reactor control and operation, which will result in increased safety and economical benefits. This study surveys current status, practices, and recent advances made towards developing autonomous control systems for nuclear reactors.

  14. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Solid Waste and Recovering Minerals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although many geothermal power plants generate no appreciable solid waste, the unique characteristics of some geothermal fluids require special attention to handle entrained solid byproducts.

  15. Submerged Medium Voltage Cable Systems at Nuclear Power Plants...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Submerged Medium Voltage Cable Systems at Nuclear Power Plants: A Review of Research Efforts Relevant to Aging Mechanisms and Condition Monitoring. Re-direct Destination: In a...

  16. North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Author...

  17. Dutch Company Powers Streetlights With Living Plants; Will Your...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dutch Company Powers Streetlights With Living Plants; Will Your Cell Phone Be Next? Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 16...

  18. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  19. New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

  20. Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photo of a geothermal power plant. New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson and Raser Technologies, Inc. announced in late August that construction has begun on the first commercial...

  1. advanced power plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: character-izing solar-power-plant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    character-izing solar-power-plant output variability Sandia PV Team Publishes Book Chapter On January 21, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Modeling & Analysis,...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: simulating solar-power-plant output...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulating solar-power-plant output variability Sandia PV Team Publishes Book Chapter On January 21, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Modeling & Analysis,...

  4. advanced power plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  5. Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant...

  6. Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengy Barty

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 17, 2012 ... Abstract: Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform refueling and maintenance operations. The scheduling of the ...

  7. Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging ...

  8. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants Matthew Lave, Janoutput of a solar photovoltaic (PV) plant was presented andsimulating solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant output given

  9. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the WVM and other power plant simulation methods highlightedpower plant output ‘clear-sky index’ agrees with the simulationscale power plant in Copper Mountain, NV. The WVM simulation

  10. Vehicle bomb protection for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, J.W.; Veatch, J.D.; Goldman, L.; Massa, R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The six-step methodology presented in this paper can be applied to nuclear power reactors to provide protection measures and considerations against vehicle bomb threats. The methodology provides a structured framework for examining the potential vulnerability of a plant to a postulated vehicle bomb and for developing contingency planning strategies for dealing with such a possibility. The six steps are as follows: (1) identify system options available to establish and maintain a safe reactor shutdown; (2) identify buildings or other structures containing critical components and equipment associated with each system option; (3) determine survival envelopes for the system options; (4) review site features to determine vehicle access approach paths and distances as they relate to the survival envelopes; (5) identify measures to limit or thwart vehicle access, and protect and preserve preferred system options; (6) prepare contingency plans and make advance arrangements for implementation of contingency measures for a vehicle bomb attack. Portions of this methodology related to blast effects from vehicle bombs on power reactor components are implemented using BombCAD, a proprietary computer-aided design (CAD)-based blast effects analysis technique.

  11. Can New Nuclear Power Plants be Project Financed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Simon

    This paper considers the prospects for financing a wave of new nuclear power plants (NPP) using project financing, which is used widely in large capital intensive infrastructure investments, including the power and gas sectors, but has...

  12. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States); Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  13. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)); Kasturi, S. (MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)); Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  14. Guide for prioritizing power plant productivity improvement projects: handbook of availability improvement methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its program to help improve electrical power plant productivity, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a methodology for evaluating productivity improvement projects. This handbook presents a simplified version of this methodology called the Availability Improvement Methodology (AIM), which provides a systematic approach for prioritizing plant improvement projects. Also included in this handbook is a description of data taking requirements necessary to support the AIM methodology, benefit/cost analysis, and root cause analysis for tracing persistent power plant problems. In applying the AIM methodology, utility engineers should be mindful that replacement power costs are frequently greater for forced outages than for planned outages. Equivalent availability includes both. A cost-effective ranking of alternative plant improvement projects must discern between those projects which will reduce forced outages and those which might reduce planned outages. As is the case with any analytical procedure, engineering judgement must be exercised with respect to results of purely mathematical calculations.

  15. Reducing power production costs by utilizing petroleum coke. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath, K.C.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

  16. REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

  17. Generic seismic ruggedness of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, K.L. (Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report updates the results of a program with the overall objective of demonstrating the generic seismic adequacy of as much nuclear power plant equipment as possible by means of collecting and evaluating existing seismic qualification test data. These data are then used to construct ruggedness'' spectra below which equipment in operating plants designed to earlier earthquake criteria would be generically adequate. This document is an EPRI Tier 1 Report. The report gives the methodology for the collection and evaluation of data which are used to construct a Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectrum (GERs) for each equipment class considered. The GERS for each equipment class are included in an EPRI Tier 2 Report with the same title. Associated with each GERS are inclusion rules, cautions, and checklists for field screening of in-place equipment for GERS applicability. A GERS provides a measure of equipment seismic resistance based on available test data. As such, a GERS may also be used to judge the seismic adequacy of similar new or replacement equipment or to estimate the seismic margin of equipment re-evaluated with respect to earthquake levels greater than considered to date, resulting in fifteen finalized GERS. GERS for relays (included in the original version of this report) are now covered in a separate report (NP-7147). In addition to the presentation of GERS, the Tier 2 report addresses the applicability of GERS to equipment of older vintage, methods for estimating amplification factors for evaluating devices installed in cabinets and enclosures, and how seismic test data from related studies relate to the GERS approach. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

  19. Analysis of nuclear power plant component failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Items are shown that have caused 90% of the nuclear unit outages and/or deratings between 1971 and 1980 and the magnitude of the problem indicated by an estimate of power replacement cost when the units are out of service or derated. The funding EPRI has provided on these specific items for R and D and technology transfer in the past and the funding planned in the future (1982 to 1986) are shown. EPRI's R and D may help the utilities on only a small part of their nuclear unit outage problems. For example, refueling is the major cause for nuclear unit outages or deratings and the steam turbine is the second major cause for nuclear unit outages; however, these two items have been ranked fairly low on the EPRI priority list for R and D funding. Other items such as nuclear safety (NRC requirements), reactor general, reactor and safety valves and piping, and reactor fuel appear to be receiving more priority than is necessary as determined by analysis of nuclear unit outage causes.

  20. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant Richard Kemp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant Richard Kemp Gonville and Caius College University, The Hunting Of The Snark #12;Abstract Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react by the surrounding material struc- ture of the plant, transferring the heat of the reaction to an external cooling

  1. Inventory of Power Plants in the United States, October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inventory of Power Plants in the United States is prepared annually by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this publication is to provide year-end statistics about electric generating units operated by electric utilities in the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia). The publication also provides a 10-year outlook of future generating unit additions. Data summarized in this report are useful to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Data presented in this report were assembled and published by the EIA to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The report is organized into the following chapters: Year in Review, Operable Electric Generating Units, and Projected Electric Generating Unit Additions. Statistics presented in these chapters reflect the status of electric generating units as of December 31, 1992.

  2. Obtaining the right large power transformer for a hydro plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemen, D.M. [Harza Engineering Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transformer efficiency and reliability are important factors in determining the productivity of a hydroelectric generating plant. A well-supervised testing program can help plant owners and engineers improve the quality of equipment installed at their plant. This paper addresses such a program as applied to the selection of the generator step-up, or main power, transformer at a hydroelectric generating station.

  3. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, E.B. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the nuclear power plant operating status recognition issue is investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The objective is to train an ANN to classify nuclear power plant accident conditions and to assess the potential of future work in the area of plant diagnostics with ANNS. To this end, an ANN was trained to recognize normal operating conditions as well as potentially unsafe conditions based on nuclear power plant training simulator generated accident scenarios. These scenarios include; hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection, loss of offsite power, main steam line break, main feedwater line break and steam generator tube leak accidents. Findings show that ANNs can be used to diagnose and classify nuclear power plant conditions with good results.

  4. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, E.B. (Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the nuclear power plant operating status recognition issue is investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The objective is to train an ANN to classify nuclear power plant accident conditions and to assess the potential of future work in the area of plant diagnostics with ANNS. To this end, an ANN was trained to recognize normal operating conditions as well as potentially unsafe conditions based on nuclear power plant training simulator generated accident scenarios. These scenarios include; hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection, loss of offsite power, main steam line break, main feedwater line break and steam generator tube leak accidents. Findings show that ANNs can be used to diagnose and classify nuclear power plant conditions with good results.

  5. Intestinal fatty acid digestion and energy utilization in lambs infused with different plant oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Intestinal fatty acid digestion and energy utilization in lambs infused with different plant oils the effects of different plant oils infused into the abomasum on intestinal fatty acid digestion and energy oil (RO) with Cr-EDTA was continuously infused into the abomasum for 17 days of each period. The daily

  6. Vital area determination techniques at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, P.Y.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the vital area determination programs being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in evaluating nuclear power plant licensees' compliance with safeguards/security requirements. These projects, the Vital Area Analysis (VAA) Program and the Vital Equipment Determination Techniques Research Study (VEDTRS), are designed to identify a plant's vital areas and to develop protection strategies against adversary threats in nuclear power plants.

  7. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - tanks and pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blocker, E.; Smith, S.; Philpot, L.; Conley, J.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continued operation of nuclear power plants for periods that extend beyond their original 40-year license period is a desirable option for many U.S. utilities. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of operating license renewals is necessary before continued operation becomes a reality. Effective aging management for plant components is important to reliability and safety, regardless of current plant age or extended life expectations. However, the NRC requires that aging evaluations be performed and the effectiveness of aging management programs be demonstrated for components considered within the scope of license renewal before granting approval for operation beyond 40 years. Both the NRC and the utility want assurance that plant components will be highly reliable during both the current license term and throughout the extended operating period. In addition, effective aging management must be demonstrated to support Maintenance Rule (10 CFR 50.65) activities.

  8. Simulating solar power plant variability : a review of current methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, Matthew; Ellis, Abraham [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Stein, Joshua S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to be able to accurately simulate the variability of solar PV power plants for grid integration studies. We aim to inform integration studies of the ease of implementation and application-specific accuracy of current PV power plant output simulation methods. This report reviews methods for producing simulated high-resolution (sub-hour or even sub-minute) PV power plant output profiles for variability studies and describes their implementation. Two steps are involved in the simulations: estimation of average irradiance over the footprint of a PV plant and conversion of average irradiance to plant power output. Six models are described for simulating plant-average irradiance based on inputs of ground-measured irradiance, satellite-derived irradiance, or proxy plant measurements. The steps for converting plant-average irradiance to plant power output are detailed to understand the contributions to plant variability. A forthcoming report will quantify the accuracy of each method using application-specific validation metrics.

  9. Transaction Based Power Flow Analysis For Transmission Utilization Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transactions as well as the effect of reactive power on transmission losses and active power flows. Two the electric power industry moves into an era of supply competition and consumer choice, the power system electricity market at the ex ante phase; (ii) MW generations are decided by bilateral contracts and other

  10. MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage define an extremely low power output gradient and demonstrate how decentralized energy storage conservative bids on the power market. Energy storage strikes the major problems of wind power and joining

  11. Power Utility Maximization for Multiple-Supply Systems by a Load-Matching Switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Power Utility Maximization for Multiple-Supply Systems by a Load-Matching Switch Chulsung Park {chulsung,phchou}@uci.edu ABSTRACT For embedded systems that rely on multiple power sources (MPS), power systems General Terms Design, experimentation Keywords Solar energy, photovoltaics, power model, solar

  12. CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Westinghouse Atomic 1 U.S. Department of Energy Interim Residual Contamination and Waste Control Guidelines for bormerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) d Remote...

  13. Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voigt, Thiemo

    Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller propose to utilize solar power in wireless sensor networks, establishing a topology where ­ changing over propose and evaluate two protocols that perform solar- aware routing. The presented simulation results

  14. City of Mayfield Plant Board, Kentucky (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban TransportMartinsville, Virginia (Utility Company)

  15. Remarks Concerning the Public Utility Commission of Texas Study on Bulk Power Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweatman, R. T.

    REMARKS CONCERNING THE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS STUDY ON BULK POWER TRANSMISSION R. T. SWEATMAN Executive Director Electric Reliability Council of Texas The citizens of Texas need reliable electric service. Our economy, our way... amounts of transmission capacity must alwavs be available in the event generation is lost in one area, so that the other utility's power can be transmitted to the utility in need. A pipeline system can suffer equipment outages easily, without loss...

  16. Multilevel Converter Topologies for Utility Scale Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essakiappan, Somasundaram

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    sources like photovoltaics (PV) to the utility grid, some of which are multilevel topologies. Multilevel topologies allow for use of lower voltage semiconductor devices than two-level converters. They also produce lower distortion output voltage waveforms...

  17. WARP: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States)] [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)] [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kilowatts each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) Windframe, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user-friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/kWh, depending on the wind resource.

  18. The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

  19. Solar-Augment Potential of U.S. Fossil-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C.; Langle, N.; Bedilion, R.; Libby, C.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) systems utilize solar thermal energy for the generation of electric power. This attribute makes it relatively easy to integrate CSP systems with fossil-fired power plants. The 'solar-augment' of fossil power plants offers a lower cost and lower risk alternative to stand-alone solar plant construction. This study ranked the potential to add solar thermal energy to coal-fired and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants found throughout 16 states in the southeast and southwest United States. Each generating unit was ranked in six categories to create an overall score ranging from Excellent to Not Considered. Separate analysis was performed for parabolic trough and power tower technologies due to the difference in the steam temperatures that each can generate. The study found a potential for over 11 GWe of parabolic trough and over 21 GWe of power tower capacity. Power towers offer more capacity and higher quality integration due to the greater steam temperatures that can be achieved. The best sites were in the sunny southwest, but all states had at least one site that ranked Good for augmentation.

  20. Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. On Line Power Plant Performance Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahner, D. J.; Priestley, R. R.

    sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO). State of the art concepts i? instrumentation, performance calculations and models have been implemented on an advanced Performance Workstation... and ar l being evaluated and demonstrated at PEPCO's Morgantown pI nt. The results of this program and this workstation softw re are being made available to the power industry through EPRI nd Power Technologies, Inc. The software associated...

  2. The Guy at the Controls: Labor Quality and Power Plant Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compiles data on power plant operations and characteristicscharacteristics (e.g. power plant unit, state, grid controlBaseCase contains hourly power-plant unit-level information

  3. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

  4. Utility-Scale Power Router: Dynamic Control of Grid Assets Using Direct AC Converter Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: Georgia Tech is developing a cost-effective, utility-scale power router that uses an enhanced transformer to more efficiently direct power on the grid. Existing power routing technologies are too expensive for widespread use, but the ability to route grid power to match real-time demand and power outages would significantly reduce energy costs for utilities, municipalities, and consumers. Georgia Tech is adding a power converter to an existing grid transformer to better control power flows at about 1/10th the cost of existing power routing solutions. Transformers convert the high-voltage electricity that is transmitted through the grid into the low-voltage electricity that is used by homes and businesses. The added converter uses fewer steps to convert some types of power and eliminates unnecessary power storage, among other improvements. The enhanced transformer is more efficient, and it would still work even if the converter fails, ensuring grid reliability.

  5. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  6. Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions A Dissertation Submitted The recent growth in wind power is transforming the operation of electricity systems by introducing. As a result, system operators are learning in real-time how to incorporate wind power and its variability

  7. Use of neurals networks in nuclear power plant diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique using neural networks as a means of diagnosing transients or abnormal conditions in nuclear power plants is investigated and found to be feasible. The technique is based on the fact that each physical state of the plant can be represented by a unique pattern of sensor outputs or instrument readings that can be related to the condition of the plant. Neural networks are used to relate this pattern to the fault, problem, or transient condition of the plant. A demonstration of the ability of this technique to identify causes of perturbations in the steam generator of a nuclear plant is presented. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  8. System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

  9. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Structures - Overview of Methods and Related Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this limited study were to provide an overview of the methods that are available for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete and metallic structures, and to provide an assessment of the status of methods that address inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. In meeting these objectives a general description of nuclear power plant safety-related structures was provided as well as identification of potential degradation factors, testing and inspection requirements, and operating experience; methods for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures and containment metallic pressure boundaries were identified and described; and applications of nondestructive evaluation methods specifically related to inspection of thick-section reinforced concrete structures and inaccessible portions of containment metallic pressure boundaries were summarized. Recommendations are provided on utilization of test article(s) to further advance nondestructive evaluation methods related to thick-section, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary representative of nuclear power plant containments. Conduct of a workshop to provide an update on applications and needed developments for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear power plant structures would also be of benefit.

  10. Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements can support Clean Air Act regulations LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 19, 2014-Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from two coal-fired power plants in the Four...

  11. Mapping complexity sources in nuclear power plant domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasangohar, Farzan

    Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical for ensuring safe performance of both operators and the entire system. New ...

  12. Corrosion Investigations at Masned Combined Heat and Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrosion Investigations at Masnedø Combined Heat and Power Plant Part VI Melanie Montgomery Company Ole Hede Larsen Elsam ­ Fynsværket Fælleskemikerne February 2001. #12;CORROSION INVESTIGATIONS.................................................................................................. 16 3.1. Measured corrosion attack

  13. Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

  14. Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

  15. The Industrial Power Plant Management System - An Engineering Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aarnio, S. E.; Tarvainen, H. J.; Tinnis, V.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on energy studies in over 70 plants in the forest products industry, experience has shown that, in addition to process improvements, the most important energy conservation measures in mill power departments are: - Load shedding and fuel...

  16. Leasing of Nuclear Power Plants With Using Floating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.; Reshetov, V.A.; Moskin, V.A. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise, N.A. Dollezhal' Scientific-Research and Design Institute of Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposal to organize and realize the international program on leasing of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor compartments is brought to the notice of potential partners. The proposal is oriented to the construction of new NPPs or to replacement of worked-out reactor units of the NPPs in operation on the sites situated near water area and to the use of afloat technologies for construction, mounting and transportation of reactor units as a Reactor Compartment Block Module (RCBM). According to the offered project the RCBM is fabricated in factory conditions at the largest Russian defense shipbuilding plant - State Unitary Enterprise 'Industrial Association SEVMASHPREDPRIYATIE' (SEVMASH) in the city of Severodvinsk of the Arkhangelsk region. After completion of assembling, testing and preliminary licensing the RCBM is given buoyancy by means of hermetic sealing and using pontoons and barges. The RCBM delivery to the NPP site situated near water area is performed by sea route. The RCBM is brought to the place of its installation with the use of appropriate hydraulic structures (canals, shipping locks), then is lowered on the basement constructed beforehand and incorporated into NPP scheme, of which the components are installed in advance. Floating means can be detached from the RCBM and used repeatedly for other RCBMs. Further procedure of NPP commissioning and its operation is carried out according to traditional method by power company in the framework of RCBM leasing with enlisting the services of firm-manufacturer's specialists either to provide reactor plant operation and concomitant processes or to perform author's supervision of operation. After completion of lifetime and reactor unloading the RCBM is dismantled with using the same afloat technology and taken away from NPP site to sea area entirely, together with its structures (reactor vessel, heat exchangers, pumps, pipelines and other equipment). Then RCBM is transported by shipping route to a firm-manufacturer, for subsequent reprocessing, utilization and storage. Nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes are removed from NPP site also. Use of leasing method removes legal problems connected with the transportation of radioactive materials through state borders as the RCBM remains a property of the state-producer at all stages of its life cycle. (authors)

  17. Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

  18. Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

  19. Development of decontamination techniques for decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikura, T.; Miwa, T.; Onozawa, T.; Ohtsuka, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Plant and Components Dept.; Ishigure, K. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and System Science

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NUPEC has been developing various techniques to safely and efficiently decommission large commercial nuclear power plants. The development work, referred to as the verification tests, has been performed since 1982. The verification tests on decontamination techniques have focused on the reduction of both occupational radiation exposure and radioactive waste volume. Experiments on various decontamination methods have been carried out. Prospects of applying efficient decontamination techniques to commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning are bright due to the experimental results.

  20. Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

  1. Fault Analysis at a Wind Power Plant for One Year of Observation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Mills, Z.; Foster, R.; Conto, J.; Ellis, A.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the fault characteristics observed at a wind power plant, and the behavior of the wind power plant under fault events.

  2. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains chapters on each of the following topics: (1) radioactivity, (2) heat transport and energy conversion, (3) tritium systems, (4) electrical storage and power supplies, (5) support structure, (6) cryogenics, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) maintenance and operation, (9) balance of plant design, (10) safety and environmental analysis, (11) economic analysis, and (12) plant construction.

  3. Novel Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  4. Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

  5. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT41047. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a computational workbench for simulating the performance of Vision 21 Power Plant Systems. Within the last quarter, good progress has been made on the development of our IGCC workbench. Preliminary CFD simulations for single stage and two stage ''generic'' gasifiers using firing conditions based on the Vision 21 reference configuration have been performed. Work is continuing on implementing an advanced slagging model into the CFD based gasifier model. An investigation into published gasification kinetics has highlighted a wide variance in predicted performance due to the choice of kinetic parameters. A plan has been outlined for developing the reactor models required to simulate the heat transfer and gas clean up equipment downstream of the gasifier. Three models that utilize the CCA software protocol have been integrated into a version of the IGCC workbench. Tests of a CCA implementation of our CFD code into the workbench demonstrated that the CCA CFD module can execute on a geographically remote PC (linked via the Internet) in a manner that is transparent to the user. Software tools to create ''walk-through'' visualizations of the flow field within a gasifier have been demonstrated.

  6. License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

  7. Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

  8. Wireless power transmission utilizing a phased array of Tesla coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Joseph C. (Joseph Charles), 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses the theory and design of coupled resonant systems and how they can be linked in a phased array for the wireless transmission of electrical power. A detailed derivation of their operational theory is ...

  9. Use of expert systems in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of technologies, particularly expert systems, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, there are a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) in which expert systems can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of overall plant and corporate operations. This document presents a number of potential applications of expert systems in the nuclear power field. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products regulations and increasing use of low-grade coal, the number of coal-fired power plants with flue gasCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R

  12. UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi1 of prototypical behaviors. Its performance is tested with respect to an artificial case study and then applied on transients originated by different faults in the pressurizer of a nuclear power reactor. Key Words: Fault

  13. Wind Power Plant Prediction by Using Neural Networks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Gao, W.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a method of short-term wind power prediction for a wind power plant by training neural networks based on historical data of wind speed and wind direction. The model proposed is shown to achieve a high accuracy with respect to the measured data.

  14. Visual Sensitivity of River Recreation to Power Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    the sensitivity of river-related recreational activities to visual intrusion by large coal-fired power plants activities. Each potential activity is assigned to one of three classes of importance and sensitivity The State of Minnesota anticipates the construction of a considerable number of large new coal-fired power

  15. Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    , Germany 2 Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg, Germany Abstract. The exploitation of solar power for energy supply is of in- creasing importance. While technical development mainly takes, wind, and biomass energy. Among such tech- nologies, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants

  16. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulating solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant output givenfor simulating the power output of a solar photovoltaic (PV)

  17. Some aspects of nuclear power plant safety under war conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stritar, A.; Mavko, B.; Susnik, J.; Sarler, B. (Jozef Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer of 1991, the Krsko nuclear power plant in Slovenia found itself in an area of military operations. This was probably the first commercial nuclear power plant to have been threatened by an attack by fighter jets. A number of never-before-asked questions had to be answered by the operating staff and supporting organizations. Some aspects of nuclear power plant safety under war conditions are described, such as the selection of the best plant operating state before the attack and the determination of plant system vulnerability and dose releases from the potentially damaged spent fuel in the spent-fuel pit. The best operating mode to which the plant should be brought before the attack is cold shutdown, and radiological consequences to the environment after the spent fuel is damaged and the water in the pit is lost are not very high. The problem of nuclear power plant safety under war conditions should be addressed in more detail in the future.

  18. The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regulations for coal plants New concerns about nuclear power after Fukushima · Recent studies also show emissions · Most CCS cost studies have focused on coal-based power plants; relatively few on NGCC with CCS1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power

  19. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric...

  20. Multi-area power system state estimation utilizing boundary measurements and phasor measurement units ( PMUs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Matthew A

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    investigates the benefits that stem from utilizing a multi-area state estimator instead of a serial state estimator. These benefits are largely in the form of increased accuracy and decreased processing time. First, the theory behind power system state...

  1. Radial fryers. [Used tire power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gawlicki, S.M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience has shown that tires have their limits as a primary power generation fuel. As a supplemental fuel, however, they may prove to be cost effective. This article discusses the use of tires as a alternate fuel source.

  2. Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

  3. Winter study of power plant effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrinos, A.A.N.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of DOE's Meteorological Effects of Thermal Energy Releases (METER) program a field study was undertaken at the Bowen Electric Generating Plant (Plant Bowen) in December 1979. The study was a joint endeavor of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the main objective of determining the effects of the plant's smokestack effluents on aerosol characteristics and precipitation chemistry. Other objectives included studies of cooling tower temperature and humidity (T/h) plumes and drift drop concentrations. Conducted over a period of three weeks, the study involved an instrumented aircraft, pilot balloons, a tethered balloon system, a dense network of wetfall chemistry collectors and numerous ground- and tower-based meteorological instruments. Rainfall samples collected during the precipitation event of December 13, 1979, revealed some evidence of plume washout. The tethered balloon flights rarely detected the faint presence of the T/h plumes while the airborne measurements program concentrated on the study of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate conversion. A series of plume observations confirmed the suitability of the plant's windset for plume direction determinations.

  4. New geothermal power plants in Azores and Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahara, M.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two geothermal power plants were recently completed. One is 3 MW unit in Azores and another is 15 MW unit in Kenya. Both plants have very simple construction. For Azores, a packaged portable turbine generator is adopted to save the cost and installation term. 15 MW Olkaria plant which is adopted single flash cycle has produced first electricity by the geothermal energy in Africa. This turbine generator has been installed on a steel foundation. Special site conditions have been taken into consideration and both plants are successfully running with certification of the suitable design concept.

  5. UTILIZING SAP'S SYBASE UNWIRED PLATFORM AND MOBILE BUSINESS OBJECTS TO CREATE A MOBILE PLANT MAINTENANCE APPLICATION.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ElAarag, Hala

    .......................................................... 12 #12;1 ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to use System Analysis and Program DevelopmentUTILIZING SAP'S SYBASE UNWIRED PLATFORM AND MOBILE BUSINESS OBJECTS TO CREATE A MOBILE PLANT by System Analysis and Program Development and the server access they so graciously provided to both myself

  6. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station.

  7. Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, R.; Hawk, J.; Schwant, R.; Saha, D.; Totemeier, T.; Goodstine, S.; McNally, M.; Allen, D. B.; Purgert, Robert

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ultrasupercritical (USC) Steam Turbine Materials Development Program is sponsored and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office, through grants to Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO), a non-profit organization contracted to manage and direct the project. The program is co-funded by the General Electric Company, Alstom Power, Siemens Power Generation (formerly Siemens Westinghouse), and the Electric Power Research Institute, each organization having subcontracted with EIO and contributing teams of personnel to perform the requisite research. The program is focused on identifying, evaluating, and qualifying advanced alloys for utilization in coal-fired power plants that need to withstand steam turbine operating conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). For these conditions, components exposed to the highest temperatures and stresses will need to be constructed from nickel-based alloys with higher elevated temperature strength than the highchromium ferritic steels currently used in todayâ??s high-temperature steam turbines. In addition to the strength requirements, these alloys must also be weldable and resistant to environmental effects such as steam oxidation and solid particle erosion. In the present project, candidate materials with the required creep strength at desired temperatures have been identified. Coatings that can resist oxidation and solid particle erosion have also been identified. The ability to perform dissimilar welds between nickel base alloys and ferritic steels have been demonstrated, and the properties of the welds have been evaluated. Results of this three-year study that was completed in 2009 are described in this final report. Additional work is being planned and will commence in 2009. The specific objectives of the future studies will include conducting more detailed evaluations of the weld-ability, mechanical properties and repair-ability of the selected candidate alloys for rotors, casings and valves, and to perform scale-up studies to establish a design basis for commercial scale components. A supplemental program funded by the Ohio Coal Development Office will undertake supporting tasks such as testing and trials using existing atmospheric, vacuum and developmental pressure furnaces to define specific metal casting techniques needed for producing commercial scale components.

  8. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed generation (residential rooftop) plant in Ota City, Japan, and the Copper Mountain 48MW p utility

  9. Potential for a cycling steam power plant with TES to supply district heating in Washington DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobson, M.J.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Office of the District of Columbia is planning the conversion of a 1500 TPD incinerator for district heating and the generation of electric power for sale to the local utility, PEPCO. This paper records a preliminary evaluation of whether hot water storage would be appropriate at the heat source plant to maximize power sales and improve the reliability of the district heat service. Hot water storage is being employed successfully at Herning, Denmark, in conjunction with a cogeneration plant heat source, and this concept is adapted to Washington D.C. area needs for heating and cooling service. Heat storage allows a 7% increase in power sales based on a simplified approach to daily load profiles and PEPCO's proposed avoided cost rates. Pressurized storage is uneconomic due to the high cost of containment, but atmospheric storage at 200F shows a simple payback of 5 years.

  10. 1284 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 26, NO. 2, APRIL 2011 Improving SVM-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducatelle, Frederick

    classification. I. INTRODUCTION DISTRIBUTON losses in power utilities originating from electricity theft-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using the Fuzzy Inference System Jawad Nagi, Keem Siah Yap, Sieh of fraud and electricity theft in power distribution utilities. Pre- vious work was carried out by using

  11. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes Electric Power Supply Chain Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    than a third arises from generating electricity. With the accumulating evidence of global warming, any affect the equilibrium electric power supply chain network production outputs, the transactions betweenModeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain

  12. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

  13. Pauzhetskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian,Parle Biscuits Pvt

  14. Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation,Power RentalAreas- CovePresciencePrescott

  15. System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals.

  16. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  17. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  18. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  19. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  20. Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Financing Capture Ready Coal-Fired Power Plants in China by Issuing Capture Options Xi Liang, Jia supercritical pulverized coal power plant in China, using a cash flow model with Monte-Carlo simulations Defense Council) O&M (Operating & Maintenance) PC Power Plant (Pulverized Coal Fired Power Plant) ROA

  1. Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naser, J. A. [Electric Power Research Inst., 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

  2. Lihir Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design Jump to:PhotonicsLihir

  3. Otake Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Ostwind

  4. Pailas Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York:Ozark,Pacific

  5. Pamukoren Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, NewPalisades Park, NewPalomar VenturesGas

  6. Ngatamariki Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,NextEra EnergyNgatamariki

  7. Niigata Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy Resources Jump to:Nigeria: Energy Resources (RedirectedNiigata

  8. Ogiri Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice of State Lands and InvestmentsJumpOgiri

  9. Okeanskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOffice of State LandsOhio:Okeanskaya Geothermal

  10. Onuma Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resources Jump to:County,Onuma

  11. Maibarara Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP)Texas:MSML JumpMahopac,Maibarara

  12. Mataloko Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy Resources JumpMastic, New York: Energy ResourcesMataloko

  13. Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy Resources JumpMastic, New York:Matney-FranzMatsukawa

  14. Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°,Meeteetse,Illinois: EnergyMenasha,Mendeleevskaya

  15. Mohave Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysisMogadore, Ohio: Energy ResourcesMohave

  16. Momotombo Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysisMogadore,MolexMomotombo Geothermal

  17. Mori Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill, California: Energy ResourcesMori Geothermal

  18. Nagqu Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean Energy ThermalEnergy,NacelNagqu Geothermal

  19. Ndunga Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergy InformationNatura BioNavarroEnhanced

  20. Simulation and Optimization on Power Plant Operation Using SEGA's EOP Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    The operation of a cogeneration power plant is complicated. The Energy Optimization Program (EOP, software made by SEGA, Inc.) was designed to simulate and optimize the operation of TAMU power plant. All major plant components were represented...

  1. Simulation and Optimization on Power Plant Operation Using Sega's EOP Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of a cogeneration power plant is complicated. The Energy Optimization Program (EOP, software made by SEGA, Inc.) was designed to simulate and optimize the operation of TAMU power plant. All major plant components were represented...

  2. Simulation and Optimization on Power Plant Operation Using Sega's EOP Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of a cogeneration power plant is complicated. The Energy Optimization Program (EOP, software made by SEGA, Inc.) was designed to simulate and optimize the operation of TAMU power plant. All major plant components were represented...

  3. Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 at least half of its energy obtained from energy efficiency and renewable resources by the year 2000. Solar energy, distributed generation resource. Investments made in solar power today are expected to provide

  4. Five-megawatt geothermal-power pilot-plant project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the Raft River Geothermal-Power Pilot-Plant Project (Geothermal Plant), located near Malta, Idaho; the review took place between July 20 and July 27, 1979. The Geothermal Plant is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) overall effort to help commercialize the operation of electric power plants using geothermal energy sources. Numerous reasons were found to commend management for its achievements on the project. Some of these are highlighted, including: (a) a well-qualified and professional management team; (b) effective cost control, performance, and project scheduling; and (c) an effective and efficient quality-assurance program. Problem areas delineated, along with recommendations for solution, include: (1) project planning; (2) facility design; (3) facility construction costs; (4) geothermal resource; (5) drilling program; (6) two facility construction safety hazards; and (7) health and safety program. Appendices include comments from the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications, the Controller, and the Acting Deputy Director, Procurement and Contracts Management.

  5. Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPower Plant

  6. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

  7. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2005.

  8. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April 1 to June 30, 2005.

  9. Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of January 1 to March 31, 2006.

  10. Boiler Materials For Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2006.

  11. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coleman; R. Viswanathan; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

  12. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

  13. Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2005.

  14. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

  15. Public Power & Utility, Inc. (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook icon TwitterZip JumpProwind GmbHPublic Power &

  16. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  17. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  18. Simulator-analyzer for binary-cycle geothermal power plants: Volume 1, Executive summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenlee, T.L.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The object was to develop a generic dynamic simulator/analyzer for binary-cycle geothermal power plants for use on today's personal computers. The simulator/analyzer, as developed, can be used for (1) engineering analyses of static/dynamic performance and design trade-offs; (2) operator training and operating procedure evaluation; and (3) binary cycle technology demonstration. The simulator/analyzer consists of a set of ordinary non-linear differential equations that are programmed in a simulation language format and solved on an IBM-PC-AT. The equations are driven in an interactive mode by inputs from the PC keyboard and responses of plant temperatures, pressures, flows, etc., can be observed on a real-time color display that replicates a control room interface. Simulation predictions have been validated by comparisons with actual transient and steady state data taken from the Heber Binary Project, a 46.6 MWe binary-cycle demonstration power plant in operation in southern California. The simulation is accurate to within the uncertainty of the plant's process sensors. During this plant's later phases of construction, startup and operation, the simulator/analyzer is being used to: develop tuning constants for the Honeywell TDC-2000 control system, confirm failure/safety analyses study results, and support analyses of major operating events. It represents an adaptable tool for utilities and others involved in developing geothermal power generation facilities.

  19. Energy conversion/power plant cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, K.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation by Kenneth Nichols, Barber-Nichols, Inc., is about cost-cutting in the energy conversion phase and power plant phase of geothermal energy production. Mr. Nichols discusses several ways in which improvements could be made, including: use of more efficient compressors and other equipment as they become available, anticipating reservoir resource decline and planning for it, running smaller binary systems independent of human operators, and designing plants so that they are relatively maintenance-free.

  20. Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

  1. Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashadi, Sarah O.

    Adding post-combustion capture technology to existing coal-fired power plants is being considered as a near-term option for mitigating CO[subscript 2] emissions. To supply the thermal energy needed for CO[subscript 2] ...

  2. Agent-Based Modleing of Power Plants Placement to Evaluate the Clean Energy Standard Goal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a political push for utilities to supply a specified share of their electricity sales from clean energy resources under the clean energy standard (CES). The goal is to achieve 80% clean energy by 2035. However, there are uncertainties about the ability of the utility industry to ramp up quickly even with the incentives that will be provided. Water availability from the streams is one of the major factors. The contiguous United States is divided into eighteen water regions, and multiple states share water from a single water region. Consequently, water usage decisions made in one state (located upstream of a water region that crosses multiple states) will greatly impact what is available downstream in another state. In this paper, an agent-based modeling approach is proposed to evaluate the clean energy standard goal for water-dependent energy resources. Specifically, using a water region rather than a state boundary as a bounding envelope for the modeling and starting at the headwaters, virtual power plants are placed based on the conditions that there is: (i) suitable land to site a particular power plant, (ii) enough water that meet regulatory guidelines within 20 miles of the suitable land, and (iii) a 20-mile buffer zone from an existing or a virtual power plant. The results obtained are discussed in the context of the proposed clean energy standard goal for states that overlap with one water region.

  3. Comparison of two U.S. power-plant carbon dioxide emissions data sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherine V. Ackerman; Eric T. Sundquist [U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions are needed to address a variety of climate-change mitigation concerns over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. We compared two data sets that report power-plant CO{sub 2} emissions in the conterminous U.S. for 2004, the most recent year reported in both data sets. The data sets were obtained from the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Environmental Protection Agency's eGRID database. Conterminous U.S. total emissions computed from the data sets differed by 3.5% for total plant emissions (electricity plus useful thermal output) and 2.3% for electricity generation only. These differences are well within previous estimates of uncertainty in annual U.S. fossil-fuel emissions. However, the corresponding average absolute differences between estimates of emissions from individual power plants were much larger, 16.9% and 25.3%, respectively. By statistical analysis, we identified several potential sources of differences between EIA and eGRID estimates for individual plants. Estimates that are based partly or entirely on monitoring of stack gases (reported by eGRID only) differed significantly from estimates based on fuel consumption (as reported by EIA). Differences in accounting methods appear to explain differences in estimates for emissions from electricity generation from combined heat and power plants, and for total and electricity generation emissions from plants that burn nonconventional fuels (e.g., biomass). Our analysis suggests the need for care in utilizing emissions data from individual power plants, and the need for transparency in documenting the accounting and monitoring methods used to estimate emissions. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Fire models for assessment of nuclear power plant fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolette, V.F.; Nowlen, S.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in available fire models for the assessment of nuclear power plants fires. The advantages and disadvantages of three basic types of fire models (zone, field, and control volume) and Sandia's experience with these models will be discussed. It is shown that the type of fire model selected to solve a particular problem should be based on the information that is required. Areas of concern which relate to all nuclear power plant fire models are identified. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Aging of concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Pland, C.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Arndt, E.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), had the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant structures for continued service. The program consists of three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued service determinations. Major accomplishments under the SAG Program during the first two years of its planned five-year duration have included: development of a Structural Materials Information Center and formulation of a Structural Aging Assessment Methodology for Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants. 9 refs.

  6. Neural networks and their application to nuclear power plant diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reifman, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Analysis Div.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a survey of artificial neural network-based computer systems that have been proposed over the last decade for the detection and identification of component faults in thermal-hydraulic systems of nuclear power plants. The capabilities and advantages of applying neural networks as decision support systems for nuclear power plant operators and their inherent characteristics are discussed along with their limitations and drawbacks. The types of neural network structures used and their applications are described and the issues of process diagnosis and neural network-based diagnostic systems are identified. A total of thirty-four publications are reviewed.

  7. Nuclear power plant fire protection: philosophy and analysis. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D. L.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report combines a fire severity analysis technique with a fault tree methodology for assessing the importance to nuclear power plant safety of certain combinations of components and systems. Characteristics unique to fire, such as propagation induced by the failure of barriers, have been incorporated into the methodology. By applying the resulting fire analysis technique to actual conditions found in a representative nuclear power plant, it is found that some safety and nonsafety areas are both highly vulnerable to fire spread and impotant to overall safety, while other areas prove to be of marginal importance. Suggestions are made for further experimental and analytical work to supplement the fire analysis method.

  8. Cibuni Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPower InternationalChuichu, Arizona:Churchill,Cibuni

  9. Sinem Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG Solar GmbHKentucky: EnergySinem Geothermal Power

  10. Gumuskoy Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open Energy InformationGettopGuilford,GulfstreamGumuskoyPower

  11. Darajat Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data and Resources11-DNADalyDanishDarajat Geothermal Power

  12. Dieng Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan:Dewey-Humboldt,DickensonDieng Geothermal Power

  13. Coal Power Plant Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCityFundCo-benefits EvaluationCoalCoal

  14. Ulumbu Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypeforUSDOIinUlubelu Unit 1 JumpPower

  15. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  16. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  17. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  18. Clean Power Plan: Reducing Carbon Pollution From Existing Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremer,K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 18-20 40 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 2,000 Baseline (lb/MWh) 2030 Goal (lb/MWh) lb /M W h 111(d) - Comparison of Region 6 State Baselines and 2030 Targets Arkansas New Mexico Louisiana Oklahoma Texas 47% 42% 43% 42% 44% ESL-KT-14..., by 2030, this rule would help reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector by approximately 30% from 2005 levels. • Also by 2030, reduce by over 25% pollutants that contribute to the soot and smog that make people sick. • These reductions will lead...

  19. Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressured Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron; Davis, John

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI) and Thar Energy LLC (Thar) applied technology engineering and economic analysis to evaluate two advanced oxy-combustion power cycles, the Cryogenic Pressurized Oxy-combustion Cycle (CPOC), and the Supercritical Oxy-combustion Cycle. This assessment evaluated the performance and economic cost of the two proposed cycles with carbon capture, and included a technology gap analysis of the proposed technologies to determine the technology readiness level of the cycle and the cycle components. The results of the engineering and economic analysis and the technology gap analysis were used to identify the next steps along the technology development roadmap for the selected cycle. The project objectives, as outlined in the FOA, were 90% CO{sub 2} removal at no more than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE) as compared to a Supercritical Pulverized Coal Plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The supercritical oxy-combustion power cycle with 99% carbon capture achieves a COE of $121/MWe. This revised COE represents a 21% reduction in cost as compared to supercritical steam with 90% carbon capture ($137/MWe). However, this represents a 49% increase in the COE over supercritical steam without carbon capture ($80.95/MWe), exceeding the 35% target. The supercritical oxy-combustion cycle with 99% carbon capture achieved a 37.9% HHV plant efficiency (39.3% LHV plant efficiency), when coupling a supercritical oxy-combustion thermal loop to an indirect supercritical CO{sub 2} (sCO{sub 2}) power block. In this configuration, the power block achieved 48% thermal efficiency for turbine inlet conditions of 650°C and 290 atm. Power block efficiencies near 60% are feasible with higher turbine inlet temperatures, however a design tradeoff to limit firing temperature to 650°C was made in order to use austenitic stainless steels for the high temperature pressure vessels and piping and to minimize the need for advanced turbomachinery features such as blade cooling. The overall technical readiness of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is TRL 2, Technology Concept, due to the maturity level of the supercritical oxy-combustor for solid fuels, and several critical supporting components, as identified in the Technical Gap Analysis. The supercritical oxycombustor for solid fuels operating at pressures near 100 atm is a unique component of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle. In addition to the low TRL supercritical oxy-combustor, secondary systems were identified that would require adaptation for use with the supercritical oxycombustion cycle. These secondary systems include the high pressure pulverized coal feed, high temperature cyclone, removal of post-combustion particulates from the high pressure cyclone underflow stream, and micro-channel heat exchangers tolerant of particulate loading. Bench scale testing was utilized to measure coal combustion properties at elevated pressures in a CO{sub 2} environment. This testing included coal slurry preparation, visualization of coal injection into a high pressure fluid, and modification of existing test equipment to facilitate the combustion properties testing. Additional bench scale testing evaluated the effectiveness of a rotary atomizer for injecting a coal-water slurry into a fluid with similar densities, as opposed to the typical application where the high density fluid is injected into a low density fluid. The swirl type supercritical oxy-combustor was developed from initial concept to an advanced design stage through numerical simulation using FLUENT and Chemkin to model the flow through the combustor and provide initial assessment of the coal combustion reactions in the flow path. This effort enabled the initial combustor mechanical layout, initial pressure vessel design, and the conceptual layout of a pilot scale test loop. A pilot scale demonstration of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is proposed as the next step in the technology development. This demonstration would advance the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle and the supercritical

  20. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  1. Analysis of interrelationships between photovoltaic power and battery storage for electric utility load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, B.H.; Rahman, S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of photovoltaic power generation on the electric utility's load shape under supply-side peak load management conditions is explored. Results show that some utilities employing battery storage for peak load shaving might benefit from use of photovoltaic (PV) power, the extent of its usefulness being dependent on the specific load shapes as well as the photovoltaic array orientations. Typical utility load shapes both in the eastern and in the western parts of the U.S. are examined for this purpose. While photovoltaic power generation seems to present a bigger impact on the load of the western utility, both utilities will experience considerable savings on the size of the battery system required to shave the peak loads and also in the night-time base capacity required to charge the battery. Results show that when the cost of 2-axis tracking PV systems drop to $2/Wp, the southwestern utility will experience net cost savings when the PV-battery hybrid system is employed for load management. On the other hand, because of lesser availability of solar energy, the southeastern utility shows adverse economics for such a system.

  2. Intelligent Component Monitoring for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefteri Tsoukalas

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability and economy are two major concerns for a nuclear power generation system. Next generation nuclear power reactors are being developed to be more reliable and economic. An effective and efficient surveillance system can generously contribute toward this goal. Recent progress in computer systems and computational tools has made it necessary and possible to upgrade current surveillance/monitoring strategy for better performance. For example, intelligent computing techniques can be applied to develop algorithm that help people better understand the information collected from sensors and thus reduce human error to a new low level. Incidents incurred from human error in nuclear industry are not rare and have been proven costly. The goal of this project is to develop and test an intelligent prognostics methodology for predicting aging effects impacting long-term performance of nuclear components and systems. The approach is particularly suitable for predicting the performance of nuclear reactor systems which have low failure probabilities (e.g., less than 10-6 year-). Such components and systems are often perceived as peripheral to the reactor and are left somewhat unattended. That is, even when inspected, if they are not perceived to be causing some immediate problem, they may not be paid due attention. Attention to such systems normally involves long term monitoring and possibly reasoning with multiple features and evidence, requirements that are not best suited for humans.

  3. Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were evaluated. The first type consisted of geographical areas where specific conditions can generate demand vulnerabilities. These conditions include high projected future water consumption by thermoelectric power plants, high projected future water consumption by all users, high rates of water withdrawal per square mile (mi{sup 2}), high projected population increases, and areas projected to be in a water crisis or conflict by 2025. The second type of demand indicator was plant specific. These indicators were developed for each plant and include annual water consumption and withdrawal rates and intensities, net annual power generation, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The supply indictors, which are also area based, include areas with low precipitation, high temperatures, low streamflow, and drought. The indicator data, which were in various formats (e.g., maps, tables, raw numbers) were converted to a GIS format and stored, along with the individual plant data from the CPPDB, in a single GIS database. The GIS database allowed the indicator data and plant data to be analyzed and visualized in any combination. To determine the extent to which a plant would be considered 'vulnerable' to a given demand or supply concern (i.e., that the plant's operations could be affected by water shortages represented by a potential demand or supply indicator), criteria were developed to categorize vulnerability according to one of three types: major, moderate, or not vulnerable. Plants with at least two major demand indicator values and/or at least four moderate demand indicator values were considered vulnerable to demand concerns. By using this approach, 144 plants were identified as being subject to demand concerns only. Plants with at least one major supply indicator value and/or at least two moderate supply indicator values were considered vulnerable to supply concerns. By using this approach, 64 plants were identified as being subject to supply concerns only. In addition, 139 plants were identified as subject to both demand and supply concerns. Therefore, a total of 347 plants were considere

  4. Decentralised optimisation of cogeneration in virtual power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard; Erge, Thomas; Wittwer, Christof [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within several projects we investigated grid structures and management strategies for active grids with high penetration of renewable energy resources and distributed generation (RES and DG). Those ''smart grids'' should be designed and managed by model based methods, which are elaborated within these projects. Cogeneration plants (CHP) can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by locally producing heat and electricity. The integration of thermal storage devices is suitable to get more flexibility for the cogeneration operation. If several power plants are bound to centrally managed clusters, it is called ''virtual power plant''. To operate smart grids optimally, new optimisation and model reduction techniques are necessary to get rid with the complexity. There is a great potential for the optimised management of CHPs, which is not yet used. Due to the fact that electrical and thermal demands do not occur simultaneously, a thermally driven CHP cannot supply electrical peak loads when needed. With the usage of thermal storage systems it is possible to decouple electric and thermal production. We developed an optimisation method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP) for the management of local heat supply systems with CHPs, heating boilers and thermal storages. The algorithm allows the production of thermal and electric energy with a maximal benefit. In addition to fuel and maintenance costs it is assumed that the produced electricity of the CHP is sold at dynamic prices. This developed optimisation algorithm was used for an existing local heat system with 5 CHP units of the same type. An analysis of the potential showed that about 10% increase in benefit is possible compared to a typical thermally driven CHP system under current German boundary conditions. The quality of the optimisation result depends on an accurate prognosis of the thermal load which is realised with an empiric formula fitted with measured data by a multiple regression method. The key functionality of a virtual power plant is to increase the value of the produced power by clustering different plants. The first step of the optimisation concerns the local operation of the individual power generator, the second step is to calculate the contribution to the virtual power plant. With small extensions the suggested MILP algorithm can be used for an overall EEX (European Energy Exchange) optimised management of clustered CHP systems in form of the virtual power plant. This algorithm has been used to control cogeneration plants within a distribution grid. (author)

  5. Some Factors Affecting the Utilization of Phosphoric Acid in Soils by Plants in Pot Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    briefly as follows: Total phosphoric acid, Pz05: The soil was ignited with magnesium nitrate, the mixture was dissolved in hydrochloric acid, filtered, and phos- phoric acid was then determined by the volumetric method of the Associa- tion of Official...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, Director College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 647 APRIL, 1944 SOME FACTORS AFFECTING THE UTILIZATION OF PHOSPHORIC ACID IN SOILS BY PLANTS IN POT EXPERIMENTS G. S. FRAPS and J. F. FUDGE...

  6. Guideline for the seismic technical evaluation of replacement items for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S.P.; Cushing, R.W. (EQE International, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Johnson, H.W. (Programmatic Solutions, Smithtown, NY (United States)); Abeles, J.M. (System 1, Inc., Potomac, MD (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic qualification for equipment originally installed in nuclear power plants was typically performed by the original equipment suppliers or manufactures (OES/OEM). Many of the OES/OEM no longer maintain quality assurance programs with adequate controls for supplying nuclear equipment. Utilities themselves must provide reasonable assurance in the continued seismic adequacy of such replacement items. This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques which can be used to provide reasonable assurance that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. It also provides a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items (STERI) is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items. Guidance on supplier program requirements necessary to maintain continued seismic adequacy and on documentation of maintaining required seismic adequacy is also included.

  7. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  8. Safeguard Requirements for Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston and Alexander Glaser

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to fissile materials can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production and diversion of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state openly produces fissile material in violation of international agreements. The degree of risk in each of these categories is assessed, taking into account both state and non-state actors, and it is found that safeguards are required for fusion energy to be highly attractive from a non-proliferation standpoint. Specific safeguard requirements and R&D needs are outlined for each category of risk, and the technical capability of the ITER experiment, under construction, to contribute to this R&D is noted. A preliminary analysis indicates a potential legal pathway for fusion power systems to be brought under the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. "Vertical" proliferation risks associated with tritium and with the knowledge that can be gained from inertial fusion energy R&D are outlined.

  9. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  10. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  11. Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    REVIEW Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels J. A. Francis*1 , H. K. D. H require therefore, an accounting of residual stresses, which often are introduced during welding. To do in the estimation of welding residual stresses in austenitic stainless steels. The progress has been less convincing

  12. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methodology to compare supply and demand-side resources. The screening curve approach supplements with load curve approach supplements with load shape information the data contained in a supply curve of conservedLBL-27286 Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan

  13. Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    -Wide Optimization Meeting · Plan preventive maintenance shutdowns ­ Minimize payment for skilled labor ­ Save onlineOptimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal Electricity Tariffs Pedro M. Castro maintenance team doing shutdowns · Shutdown period mandatory after [ , ] h online · Challenging (hard

  14. Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Gas Engine Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    to carry out preventive maintenance at regular intervals19 . The maintenance schedule affects many short1 Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Gas Engine Power Plant using Generalized Disjunctive with parallel units. Gas engines are shutdown according to a regular maintenance plan that limits the number

  15. Corrosion Investigations at Masned Combined Heat and Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrosion Investigations at Masnedø Combined Heat and Power Plant Part VII Melanie Montgomery Ole Hede Larsen Elsam ­ Fynsværket Fælleskemikerne December 2002. #12;CORROSION INVESTIGATIONS.................................................................................................... 6 3.1. Measured corrosion attack on the fireside

  16. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  17. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  18. A Stochastic Game Formulation of Energy-Efficient Power Control: Equilibrium Utilities and Practical Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mériaux, François; Lasaulce, Samson; Kieffer, Michel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency non-selective time-selective multiple access channels in which transmitters can freely choose their power control policy are considered. The individual objective of the transmitters is to maximize their averaged energy-efficiency. For this purpose, a transmitter has to choose a power control policy that is, a sequence of power levels adapted to the channel variations. This problem can be formulated as a stochastic game with discounting for which there exists a theorem characterizing all the equilibrium utilities (equilibrium utility region). As in its general formulation, this theorem relies on global channel state information (CSI), it is shown that some points of the utility region can be reached with individual CSI. Interestingly, time-sharing based solutions, which are usually considered for centralized policies, appear to be part of the equilibrium solutions. This analysis is illustrated by numerical results providing further insights to the problem under investigation.

  19. ASSESSING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SAFETY AND RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKES USING A SYSTEM-OF-SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by Monte Carlo simulation the probability that the nuclear power plant enters in an unsafe stateASSESSING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SAFETY AND RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKES USING A SYSTEM in which the plant is embedded. As a test system, we consider the impacts produced on a nuclear power plant

  20. A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

  1. Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical Fault Currents of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. The size of wind power plants (WPPs) keeps getting bigger and bigger. The number of wind plants in the U.S. has increased very rapidly in the past 10 years. It is projected that in the U.S., the total wind power generation will reach 330 GW by 2030. As the importance of WPPs increases, planning engi-neers must perform impact studies used to evaluate short-circuit current (SCC) contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This information is needed to size the circuit breakers, to establish the proper sys-tem protection, and to choose the transient suppressor in the circuits within the WPP. This task can be challenging to protec-tion engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. Three different soft-ware packages are utilized to develop this paper. Time domain simulations and steady-state calculations are used to perform the analysis.

  2. Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ervin, Elizabeth K.

    Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc. Reactor Type a nuclear power plant. Plant was Entergy, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) type. Built in the 80's, it has of the veteran plant workers. The presentation gave the nuclear plant engineering basics and built

  3. U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20% of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of greenhouse gas regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

  4. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

  5. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, M. W. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop: 012-H2, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

  6. Fusion Engineering and Design 38 (1997) 2757 Physics basis for a reversed shear tokamak power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fusion power plant. Analysis of plasma equilibrium and ideal MHD stability, bootstrap current and current the recirculating power fraction. The final plasma configuration for the ARIES-RS power plant obtains i of 4 reserved. Keywords: Reversed shear; Tokamak power plant; Plasma configuration 1. Introduction The reversed

  7. Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustakerov, Ivan

    Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design Daniela Borissova1 and Ivan. Designing of reliable and cost-effective industrial wind power plant is a prerequisite for the effective use of wind power as an alternative resource. The design of a wind power plant includes the determination

  8. Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants Cédric JOIN Gérard ROBERT for hydroelectric run-of-the river power plants. To modulate power generation, a level trajectory is planned for cascaded power plants. Numerous dynamic simulations show that with a simple and robust control algorithm

  9. Overall Power Core Configuration and System Integration for ARIES-ACT1 Fusion Power Plant , M.S. Tillack1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Overall Power Core Configuration and System Integration for ARIES-ACT1 Fusion Power Plant X.R. Wang Consulting, Fliederweg 3, D 76351 Linkenheim-Hochstetten, GERMANY, smalang@web.de ARIES-ACT1 power plant has been designed and configured to allow for rapid removal of the full power core sectors followed

  10. Turbine Drive Gas Generator for Zero Emission Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Stephen E.; Anderson, Roger E.

    2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vision 21 Program seeks technology development that can reduce energy costs, reduce or eliminate atmospheric pollutants from power plants, provide choices of alternative fuels, and increase the efficiency of generating systems. Clean Energy Systems is developing a gas generator to replace the traditional boiler in steam driven power systems. The gas generator offers the prospects of lower electrical costs, pollution free plant operations, choices of alternative fuels, and eventual net plant efficiencies in excess of 60% with sequestration of carbon dioxide. The technology underlying the gas generator has been developed in the aerospace industry over the past 30 years and is mature in aerospace applications, but it is as yet unused in the power industry. This project modifies and repackages aerospace gas generator technology for power generation applications. The purposes of this project are: (1) design a 10 MW gas generator and ancillary hardware, (2) fabricate the gas generator and supporting equipment, (3) test the gas generator using methane as fuel, (4) submit a final report describing the project and test results. The principal test objectives are: (1) define start-up, shut down and post shutdown control sequences for safe, efficient operation; (2) demonstrate the production of turbine drive gas comprising steam and carbon dioxide in the temperature range 1500 F to 3000 F, at a nominal pressure of 1500 psia; (3) measure and verify the constituents of the drive gas; and (4) examine the critical hardware components for indications of life limitations. The 21 month program is in its 13th month. Design work is completed and fabrication is in process. The gas generator igniter is a torch igniter with sparkplug, which is currently under-going hot fire testing. Fabrication of the injector and body of the gas generator is expected to be completed by year-end, and testing of the full gas generator will begin in early 2002. Several months of testing are anticipated. When demonstrated, this gas generator will be the prototype for use in demonstration power plants planned to be built in Antioch, California and in southern California during 2002. In these plants the gas generator will demonstrate durability and its operational RAM characteristics. In 2003, it is expected that the gas generator will be employed in new operating plants primarily in clean air non-attainment areas, and in possible locations to provide large quantities of high quality carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery or coal bed methane recovery. Coupled with an emission free coal gasification system, the CES gas generator would enable the operation of high efficiency, non-polluting coal-fueled power plants.

  11. ANALYSIS OF A HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR POWERED HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS HYDROGEN PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; A. M. Gandrik

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322°C and 750°C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

  13. Increased efficiency of topping cycle PCFB power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Horazak, D. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) power plants offer the power industry significantly increased efficiencies with reduced costs of electricity and lower emissions. When topping combustion is incorporated in the plant, these advantages are enhanced. In the plant, coal is fed to a pressurized carbonizer that produces a low-Btu fuel gas and char. After passing through a cyclone and ceramic barrier filter to remove gas-entrained particulates and a packed bed of emathelite pellets to remove alkali vapors. the fuel gas is burned in a topping combustor to produce the energy required to drive a gas turbine. The gas turbine drives a generator combustor, and a fluidized bed heat exchanger (FBHE). The carbonizer char is burned in the PCFB and the exhaust gas passes through its own cyclone, ceramic barrier filter, and alkali getter and supports combustion of the fuel gas in the topping combustor. Steam generated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) downstream of the gas turbine and in the FBHE associated with the PCFB drives the steam turbine generator that furnishes the balance of electric power delivered by the plant.

  14. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  15. Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

  16. Impacts of TMDLs on coal-fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Water Act (CWA) includes as one of its goals restoration and maintenance of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters. The CWA established various programs to accomplish that goal. Among the programs is a requirement for states to establish water quality standards that will allow protection of the designated uses assigned to each water body. Once those standards are set, state agencies must sample the water bodies to determine if water quality requirements are being met. For those water bodies that are not achieving the desired water quality, the state agencies are expected to develop total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) that outline the maximum amount of each pollutant that can be discharged to the water body and still maintain acceptable water quality. The total load is then allocated to the existing point and nonpoint sources, with some allocation held in reserve as a margin of safety. Many states have already developed and implemented TMDLs for individual water bodies or regional areas. New and revised TMDLs are anticipated, however, as federal and state regulators continue their examination of water quality across the United States and the need for new or revised standards. This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements its overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. One of the program missions of the DOE's NETL is to develop innovative environmental control technologies that will enable full use of the Nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. Some of the parameters for which TMDLs are being developed are components in discharges from coal-fired power plants. If a state establishes a new or revised TMDL for one of these pollutants in a water body where a power plant is located, the next renewal of the power plant's National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is likely to include more restrictive limits. Power generators may need to modify existing operational and wastewater treatment technologies or employ new ones as TMDLs are revised or new ones are established. The extent to which coal-fired power plants may be impacted by revised and new TMDL development has not been well established. NETL asked Argonne to evaluate how current and potential future TMDLs might influence coal-fired power plant operations and discharges. This information can be used to inform future technology research funded by NETL. The scope of investigation was limited to several eastern U.S. river basins rather than providing a detailed national perspective.

  17. LOCAL IMPACTS OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; MILIAN, L.; LIPFERT, F.; SUBRAMANIAM, S.; BLAKE, R.

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury is a neurotoxin that accumulates in the food chain and is therefore a health concern. The primary human exposure pathway is through fish consumption. Coal-fired power plants emit mercury and there is uncertainty over whether this creates localized hot spots of mercury leading to substantially higher levels of mercury in water bodies and therefore higher exposure. To obtain direct evidence of local deposition patterns, soil and vegetations samples from around three U.S. coal-fired power plants were collected and analyzed for evidence of hot spots and for correlation with model predictions of deposition. At all three sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. It was estimated that less than 2% of the total mercury emissions from these plants deposited within 15 km of these plants. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the literature review findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to hot spots, near the plants. The major objective of the sampling studies was to determine if there was evidence for hot spots of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. From a public health perspective, such a hot spot must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must increase mercury concentrations to a level in which health effects are a concern in a water body large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study suggest that neither of these conditions has been met.

  18. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

  19. Potential sites for joint venture biomass fueled power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army is investigating wood-fired boilers. One application is for wood fuels to fire fixed power plant installations where the technology is well proven. Approximately 170 Army bases were evaluated for their heating and electrical needs versus fuel availability from on-base forests. Approximately 20 bases met the minimum demand and resource criteria. Potential joint venture partner classes were identified as new Contractor Owned/Contractor Operated (COCO) entrepreneurs; existing utilities and industries in the vicinity of the bases; and existing Government Owned/Contractor Operated (GOCO) entrepreneurs.

  20. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.