Sample records for utility power generation

  1. Power generating system and method utilizing hydropyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolman, R.

    1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor transmission cycle is described which burns a slurry of coal and water with some of the air from the gas turbine compressor, cools and cleans the resulting low-Btu fuel gas, burns the clean fuel gas with the remaining air from the compressor, and extracts the available energy in the gas turbine. The cycle lends itself to combined-cycle cogeneration for the production of steam, absorption cooling, and electric power.

  2. INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

  3. Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging problems is known...

  4. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to the Rooftop Practical...

  5. What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

  6. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper...

  7. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

    2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

  8. features Utility Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    #12;#12;#12;#12;features function utility Training Pool Utility Generator Per-frame function content utility classes utility classes utility Tree Decision Generator Module Utility Clustering Adaptive Content Classification Loop features content VO selection & Utility Selector content features Real

  9. Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

  10. Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

  11. Development of thermoelectric power generation system utilizing heat of combustible solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajikawa, T.; Ito, M.; Katsube, I. [Shonan Institute of Technology, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, 251 (Japan); Shibuya, E. [NKK Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 230 (Japan)

    1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents the development of thermoelectric power generation system utilizing heat of municipal solid waste. The systematic classification and design guideline are proposed in consideration of the characteristics of solid waste processing system. The conceptual design of thermoelectric power generation system is carried out for a typical middle scale incinerator system (200 ton/day) by the local model. Totally the recovered electricity is 926.5 kWe by 445 units (569,600 couples). In order to achieve detailed design, one dimensional steady state model taking account of temperature dependency of the heat transfer performance and thermoelectric properties is developed. Moreover, small scale on-site experiment on 60 W class module installed in the real incinerator is carried out to extract various levels of technological problems. In parallel with the system development, high temperature thermoelectric elements such as Mn-Si and so on are developed aiming the optimization of ternary compound and high performance due to controlled fine-grain boundary effect. The manganese silicide made by shrinking-rate controlled sintering method performs 5 ({mu}W/cm K{cflx 2}) in power factor at 800 K. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

  13. Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

  14. Wind power generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schachle, Ch.; Schachle, E. C.; Schachle, J. R.; Schachle, P. J.

    1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Normally feathered propeller blades of a wind power generating system unfeather in response to the actuation of a power cylinder that responds to actuating signals. Once operational, the propellers generate power over a large range of wind velocities. A maximum power generation design point signals a feather response of the propellers so that once the design point is reached no increase in power results, but the system still generates power. At wind speeds below this maximum point, propeller speed and power output optimize to preset values. The propellers drive a positive displacement pump that in turn drives a positive displacement motor of the swash plate type. The displacement of the motor varies depending on the load on the system, with increasing displacement resulting in increasing propeller speeds, and the converse. In the event of dangerous but not clandestine problems developing in the system, a control circuit dumps hydraulic pressure from the unfeathering cylinder resulting in a predetermined, lower operating pressure produced by the pump. In the event that a problem of potentially cladestine consequence arises, the propeller unfeathering cylinder immediately unloads. Upon startup, a bypass around the motor is blocked, applying a pressure across the motor. The motor drives the generator until the generator reaches a predetermined speed whereupon the generator is placed in circuit with a utility grid and permitted to motor up to synchronous speed.

  15. Power Sales to Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

  16. Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute requires a certificate of necessity from the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission for the construction, purchase, or lease of an electricity generation facility by a public utility.

  17. Peak power ratio generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  18. Concentrated Solar Power Generation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Zhilei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Solar power generation is the most promising technology to transfer energy consumption reliance from fossil fuel to renewable sources. Concentrated solar power generation is a… (more)

  19. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not rate-regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), are required to offer green power options to their customers. These programs allow...

  20. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

  1. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legislation enacted in 2009 directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a program offering green power as an option to residential and small commercial customers in the state....

  2. Utility Variable Generation Integration Group Fall Technical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technical Workshop Utility Variable Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop October 15, 2014 9:00AM CDT to October 17, 2014 3:00PM CDT The Utility Variable Generation...

  3. Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -SeparationUnit........................................................................18 3.4.3SyngasGeneration..........................................................................18 3.4.4Fischer-Tropsch(FT)Synthesis.....................................................20 viii CHAPTER Page 3.4.5Product...Description TherearethreestagesinvolvedintheconversionofnaturalgasintoGTLfuels-Syngas generation,Fischer-Tropsch(FT)synthesis,andProductupgrade.Adetailedresultofthe processmodelinginAspenPlusisincludedinAppendixB,whiletheactualprocessmap isshowninFigureA1inAppendixAandFigure3.1below. 17...

  4. Power Control and Transmission Scheduling for Network Utility Maximization in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vinod

    Power Control and Transmission Scheduling for Network Utility Maximization in Wireless Networks Min power control and transmis- sion scheduling problem in wireless networks with average power constraints. Index Terms--Network utility maximization, power control, transmission scheduling, column generation I

  5. Work Force Planning for Public Power Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Work Force Planning for Public Power Utilities: Ensuring Resources to Meet Projected Utilities Need to Do More to Prepare for Their Future Work Force Needs.............................................................................20 #12;ii Work Force Planning for Public Power Utilities #12;1 Work Force Planning for Public Power

  6. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  7. Solar thermoelectrics for small scale power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amatya, Reja

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past two decades, there has been a surge in the research of new thermoelectric (TE) materials, driven party by the need for clean and sustainable power generation technology. Utilizing the Seebeck effect, the ...

  8. Oscillating fluid power generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  9. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  10. Report on discussions with utility engineers about superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report relates to a series of discussions with electric utility engineers concerning the integration of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generators into the present electric power system. The current and future interest of the utilities in the purchase and use of HTS generators is assessed. Various performance and economic factors are also considered as part of this inspection of the utility prospects for HTS generators. Integration of HTS generators into the electric utility sector is one goal of the Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). The SPI, a major part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems, features vertical teaming of a major industrial power apparatus manufacturers, a producer of HTS wire, and an end-user with assistance and technical support for the national laboratories. The SPI effort on HTS generators is headed by a General Electric Corporation internal team comprised of the Corporate Research Laboratories, Power Generation Engineering, and Power Systems Group. Intermagnetics General corporation, which assisted in the development of the superconducting coils, is the HTS wire and tape manufacturer. Additional technical support is provided by the national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge, and the New York State Institute on Superconductivity. The end-user is represented by Niagara-Mohawk and the Electric Power Research Institute.

  11. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  12. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  13. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible...

  14. Mandatory Utility Green Power Option

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to meeting the requirements of the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... renewables portfolio standard], New Mexico investor-owned utilities...

  15. Automotive Power Generation and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caliskan, Vahe

    This paper describes some new developments in the application of power electronics to automotive power generation and control. A new load-matching technique is introduced that uses a simple switched-mode rectifier to achieve ...

  16. Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as...

  17. Utilizing the Traction Drive Power Electronics System to Provide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilizing the Traction Drive Power Electronics System to Provide Plug-in Capability for PHEVs Utilizing the Traction Drive Power Electronics System to Provide Plug-in Capability...

  18. Mesofluidic magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fucetola, Jay J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the previous research into magnetohydrodynamics has involved large-scale systems. This thesis explores the miniaturization and use of devices to convert the power dissipated within an expanding gas flow into ...

  19. RF power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, R G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the main types of r.f. power amplifiers which are, or may be, used for particle accelerators. It covers solid-state devices, tetrodes, inductive output tubes, klystrons, magnetrons, and gyrotrons with power outputs greater than 10 kW c.w. or 100 kW pulsed at frequencies from 50 MHz to 30 GHz. Factors affecting the satisfactory operation of amplifiers include cooling, matching and protection circuits are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the state of the art for the different technologies.

  20. From Investor-owned Utility to Independent Power Producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Jun

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Connecticut Light & Power Co Entergy Gulf States Ine HolyokeCompany Northeast Utilities Entergy Corporation Northeast

  1. A planning scheme for penetrating embedded generation in power distribution grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetrating Embedded Generation, or Distributed Generation (DG), in power distribution grids presents great benefits and substantial positive social impacts to utilities, system operators and electricity consumers. Existing ...

  2. Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhar, B. C.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

  3. Overview of M-C Power`s MCFC power generation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, T.G.; Woods, R.R.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell power generation system is a skid mounted power plant which efficiently generates electricity and useful thermal energy. The primary benefits are its high electric generation efficiency (50% or greater), modular capacities (500 kW to 3 MW per unit) and minimal environmental impacts (less than 1 ppM NO{sub x}). A cost effective, modular capacity fuel cell power plant provides the industry with an attractive alternative to large central station facilities, and its advantages have the potential to optimize the way electric power is generated and distributed to the users. Environmental issues are becoming the single most uncertain aspect of the power business. These issues may be manifested in air emissions permits or allowances for NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2}, energy taxes, CO{sub 2} limits, ``carbon taxes,`` etc. and may appear as siting permits for generation, transmission, or distribution facilities. Utilities are ``down-sizing`` with the goal of becoming the lowest cost supplier of electricity and are beginning to examine the concepts of ``energy service`` to improve their economic competitiveness. These issues are leading utilities to examine the benefits of distributed generation. Siting small capacity generation near the customer loads or at distribution substations can improve system efficiency and quality while reducing distribution system costs. The advantages that fuel cell power plants have over conventional technologies are critical to the success of these evolving opportunities in the power generation marketplace.

  4. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  5. Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency Hybrid Vehicles Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency...

  6. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    POWER GENERATION PLANT GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls,...

  7. Second generation PFB for advanced power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Van Hook, J.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is being conducted under a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) contract to develop a new type of coal-fueled plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant-called an advanced or second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (APFBC) plant-offers the promise of 45-percent efficiency (HHV), with emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. This paper summarizes the pilot plant R&D work being conducted to develop this new type of plant. Although pilot plant testing is still underway, preliminary estimates indicate the commercial plant Will perform better than originally envisioned. Efficiencies greater than 46 percent are now being predicted.

  8. ENERGY PAYBACK OPTIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC POWER GENERATOR SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the thermoelectric module should be performed. Active cooling and the design of the heat sink are customized to findENERGY PAYBACK OPTIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC POWER GENERATOR SYSTEMS Kazuaki Yazawa Dept model for optimizing thermoelectric power generation system is developed and utilized for parametric

  9. Solid state pulsed power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Fengfeng; Saddoughi, Seyed Gholamali; Herbon, John Thomas

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A power generator includes one or more full bridge inverter modules coupled to a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) through an inductive resonant branch. Each module includes a plurality of switches that are switched in a fashion causing the one or more full bridge inverter modules to drive the semiconductor opening switch SOS through the resonant circuit to generate pulses to a load connected in parallel with the SOS.

  10. Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Idaho Public Utilities...

  11. The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.H. [Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

  12. Greg Rutherford Executive Director Global Power & Utilities Investment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Director Global Power & Utilities Investment Banking Morgan Stanley Bankability of Electricity Transmission, Storage and Distribution Infrastructure Investment Opening...

  13. Jon C. Arnold Managing Director, Worldwide Power and Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Jon C. Arnold Managing Director, Worldwide Power and Utilities Microsoft Corporation Jon Arnold is the Managing Director, Worldwide Power and Utilities for Microsoft. As Microsoft's senior executive for Power and Utilities his primary responsibility is to establish and drive Microsoft's industry strategy, which extends

  14. Reliability Evaluation of Electric Power Generation Systems with Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samadi, Saeed

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional power generators are fueled by natural gas, steam, or water flow. These generators can respond to fluctuating load by varying the fuel input that is done by a valve control. Renewable power generators such as wind or solar, however...

  15. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2007" "January through December 2007"...

  16. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2004" "January through December 2004"...

  17. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2005" "January through December 2005"...

  18. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2003" "January through December 2003"...

  19. Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating " Worksheet" "Monthly Nuclear Utility Generation by State and Reactor, 2008" "January through December 2008"...

  20. INTEGRATED CONTROL OF NEXT GENERATION POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Control methodologies provide the necessary data acquisition, analysis and corrective actions needed to maintain the state of an electric power system within acceptable operating limits. These methods are primarily software-based algorithms that are nonfunctional unless properly integrated with system data and the appropriate control devices. Components of the control of power systems today include protective relays, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), distribution automation (DA), feeder automation, software agents, sensors, control devices and communications. Necessary corrective actions are still accomplished using large electromechanical devices such as vacuum, oil and gas-insulated breakers, capacitor banks, regulators, transformer tap changers, reclosers, generators, and more recently FACTS (flexible AC transmission system) devices. The recent evolution of multi-agent system (MAS) technologies has been reviewed and effort made to integrate MAS into next generation power systems. A MAS can be defined as ��a loosely-coupled network of problem solvers that work together to solve problems that are beyond their individual capabilities��. These problem solvers, often called agents, are autonomous and may be heterogeneous in nature. This project has shown that a MAS has significant advantages over a single, monolithic, centralized problem solver for next generation power systems. Various communication media are being used in the electric power system today, including copper, optical fiber and power line carrier (PLC) as well as wireless technologies. These technologies have enabled the deployment of substation automation (SA) at many facilities. Recently, carrier and wireless technologies have been developed and demonstrated on a pilot basis. Hence, efforts have been made by this project to penetrate these communication technologies as an infrastructure for next generation power systems. This project has thus pursued efforts to use specific MAS methods as well as pertinent communications protocols to imbed and assess such technologies in a real electric power distribution system, specifically the Circuit of the Future (CoF) developed by Southern California Edison (SCE). By modeling the behavior and communication for the components of a MAS, the operation and control of the power distribution circuit have been enhanced. The use of MAS to model and integrate a power distribution circuit offers a significantly different approach to the design of next generation power systems. For example, ways to control a power distribution circuit that includes a micro-grid while considering the impacts of thermal constraints, and integrating voltage control and renewable energy sources on the main power system have been pursued. Both computer simulations and laboratory testbeds have been used to demonstrate such technologies in electric power distribution systems. An economic assessment of MAS in electric power systems was also performed during this project. A report on the economic feasibility of MAS for electric power systems was prepared, and particularly discusses the feasibility of incorporating MAS in transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. Also, the commercial viability of deploying MAS in T&D systems has been assessed by developing an initial case study using utility input to estimate the benefits of deploying MAS. In summary, the MAS approach, which had previously been investigated with good success by APERC for naval shipboard applications, has now been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future developed by Southern California Edison. The results for next generation power systems include better ability to reconfigure circuits, improve protection and enhance reliability.

  1. ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

  2. FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to jumpstart the next generation of smaller, faster, cheaper and more efficient power electronics for personal devices, electric vehicles, renewable power interconnection,...

  3. Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal...

  4. Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

  5. Cummins Power Generation SECA Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Vesely

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) SECA Phase 1 SOFC development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) contract DE-FC26-01NT41244. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner research development leading to successful demonstration of the SECA Phase 1 objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant Phase 1 Milestones: (1) Demonstrated: (a) Operation meeting Phase 1 requirements on commercial natural gas. (b) LPG and Natural Gas CPOX fuel reformers. (c) SOFC systems on dry CPOX reformate. (c) Steam reformed Natural Gas operation. (d) Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC system without inert gas purge. (e) Utility of stack simulators as a tool for developing balance of plant systems. (2) Developed: (a) Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. (b) Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. (c) Demonstrated high efficiency SOFC output power conditioning. (d) Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods. The Phase 1 performance test was carried out at the Cummins Power Generation facility in Minneapolis, Minnesota starting on October 2, 2006. Performance testing was successfully completed on January 4, 2007 including the necessary steady-state, transient, efficiency, and peak power operation tests.

  6. Power Generation Subprogram status report, 1988-1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of individual contracts are described for projects within GRI's Power Generation Subprogram. The funding rationale, goals and objectives, accomplishments, and strategy are described for projects in cogeneration and power systems, prime mover and component development, and natural gas vehicles research. These project areas cut across the residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors.

  7. Use of Slip Ring Induction Generator for Wind Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K Y Patil; D S Chavan

    Wind energy is now firmly established as a mature technology for electricity generation. There are different types of generators that can be used for wind energy generation, among which Slip ring Induction generator proves to be more advantageous. To analyse application of Slip ring Induction generator for wind power generation, an experimental model is developed and results are studied. As power generation from natural sources is the need today and variable speed wind energy is ample in amount in India, it is necessary to study more beneficial options for wind energy generating techniques. From this need a model is developed by using Slip ring Induction generator which is a type of Asynchronous generator.

  8. Remarks Concerning the Public Utility Commission of Texas Study on Bulk Power Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweatman, R. T.

    REMARKS CONCERNING THE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS STUDY ON BULK POWER TRANSMISSION R. T. SWEATMAN Executive Director Electric Reliability Council of Texas The citizens of Texas need reliable electric service. Our economy, our way... amounts of transmission capacity must alwavs be available in the event generation is lost in one area, so that the other utility's power can be transmitted to the utility in need. A pipeline system can suffer equipment outages easily, without loss...

  9. Power Utility Maximization in Constrained Exponential Lvy Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutz, Marcel

    Power Utility Maximization in Constrained Exponential Lévy Models Marcel Nutz ETH Zurich. Abstract We study power utility maximization for exponential Lévy models with portfolio constraints, where utility is obtained from consumption and/or terminal wealth. For convex constraints, an explicit solution

  10. Analysis of power generation processes using petcoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayakumar, Ramkumar

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    higher carbon content than other hydrocarbons like coal, biomass and sewage residue. This gives petcoke a great edge over other feedstocks to generate power. Models for the two most common processes for power generation, namely combustion and gasification...

  11. The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    system requirements for high volume power generation with thermoelectrics such desirable thermoelectric properties, low material toxicity, interface compatibility, cost...

  12. Power generation using solar power plant.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Parth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Pursuing the commitment of California State to generate at least 20 percent of total generated energy from the renewable source by the year 2010 rather… (more)

  13. Power Utility Maximization for Multiple-Supply Systems by a Load-Matching Switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    such as solar panels and wind generators, be- cause it directly affects the utility of the available power source must be discarded in this case. As a result, these MPS systems must either use larger solar panels a day. Its power sources consist of a solar panel and a rechargeable battery. The only time solar power

  14. Opening New Frontiers in Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    FUEL CELLS Opening New Frontiers in Power Generation U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y in the power generation industry. Fuel cells have the potential to truly revolutionize power generation. Fuel by subjecting it to steam and high temperatures. In order to use coal, biomass, or a range of hydrocarbon wastes

  15. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  16. Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

  17. Utility system integration and optimization models for nuclear power management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deaton, Paul Ferris

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power management model suitable for nuclear utility systems optimization has been developed for use in multi-reactor fuel management planning over periods of up to ten years. The overall utility planning model ...

  18. Impact of Power Generation Uncertainty on Power System Static Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    in load and generation are modeled as random variables and the output of the power flow computationImpact of Power Generation Uncertainty on Power System Static Performance Yu Christine Chen, Xichen--The rapid growth in renewable energy resources such as wind and solar generation introduces significant

  19. New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Reuse ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Introduction As population growth and associated factors...

  20. Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers combined heat and power (CHP) and its uses, configurations, considerations, and more.

  1. An integrated optimal design method for utility power distribution systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehr, Ralph E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This dissertation presents a comprehensive and integrated design methodology to optimize both the electrical and the economic performance of a utility power distribution system. The… (more)

  2. Appendix S-50 - Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) - Public Utilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) - Public Utilities Commission Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Instructions:...

  3. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

  4. Unconventional energy - for a public-power utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leber, R.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a few of the hundreds of projects annually featured in the Public Power Innovation list published in the American Public Power Association's (APPA) Public Power magazine. These innovative approaches include feasibility studies, developments or demonstrations in the use of alternative fuels such as low-Btu corncob gas in a diesel generating set, the burning of corn waste in suitably modified steam boilers, anaerobic digestion of solid waste to produce methane, increasing the energy content of gas so produced from 350 Btu/cu ft to approximately 1000 Btu/cu ft by the Binax system, gasified peat for diesel power plants, the use of waste heat from diesel plants in a Rankine-cycle bottoming system, and the use of coal-derived liquid fuel in diesel engines. Other approaches include the phosphoric acid fuel cell, solar heating and cooling systems, photoelectric cell arrays, wind power, small low-head hydroelectric plants, and cogeneration systems. Other public electric utilities are providing free energy audits to their customers, and offering water-to-air heat pumps.

  5. Power Generation and Power Use Decisions in an Industrial Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.; Niess, R. C.

    of power generation and power use economics, most people want to under stand power generation. The primary questions usually relate to increasing the amount of power available, starting with a high pressure steam turbine or a gas turbine. They are "How... pressure Tsink OF temperature corresponding to outlet pressure Qsource = steam flow in Btu per hour Wideal Ideal power produced in Btu per hour 460 Conversion to absolute tempera ture "R From here, knowing the efficiency of the turbine...

  6. Performance of solar electric generating systems on the utility grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roland, J.R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first year of performance of the Solar Electric Generating System I (SEGS I), which has been operating on the Southern California Edison (SCE) grid since December 1984 is discussed. The solar field, comprised of 71,680 m/sup 2/ of Luz parabolic trough line-focus solar collectors, supplies thermal energy at approx. 585/sup 0/F to the thermal storage tank. This energy is then used to generate saturated steam at 550 psia and 477/sup 0/F which passes through an independent natural gas-fired superheater and is brought to 780/sup 0/F superheat. The solar collector assembly (SCA) is the primary building block of this modular system. A single SCA consists of a row of eight parabolic trough collectors, a single drive motor, and a local microprocessor control unit. The basic components of the parabolic trough collector are a mirrored glass reflector, a unique and highly efficient heat collection element, and a tracking/positioning system. The heat collector element contains a stainless steel absorber tube coated with black chrome selective surface and is contained within an evacuated cylindrical glass envelope. The plant has reached the design capacity of 14.7 MW and, on a continuous basis, provides approx. 13.8 MW of net power during the utility's on-peak periods (nominally 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. during the summer weekdays and 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. during the winter weekdays).

  7. Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks Na Li, Lijun Chen different appliances including PHEVs and batteries and propose a demand response approach based on utility. The utility company can thus use dynamic pricing to coordinate demand responses to the benefit of the overall

  8. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Next Generation Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Next Generation Network Simulations for Power System Applications MANAGEMENT The Next Generation Network Simulator is a framework for the partitioning, distribution, and run Grid Initiative (FPGI) will deliver next-generation concepts and tools for grid operation and planning

  9. Regional vs. Utility Planning Power Committee Webinar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Webinar 7 January Capacity Reserve Margin Expected Build-Out Schedule -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50

  10. Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies This report examines backup power and prime power...

  11. Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen? Business Overview WOW operates in the energy efficiency field - one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen? and WOWClean? provide more... energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. ? WOWGen? - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat ? WOWClean? - Multi Pollutant emission control system Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel...

  12. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  13. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bel,; Lon E. (Altadena, CA); Crane, Douglas Todd (Pasadena, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  14. Rotordynamics in alternative energy power generation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes-Zambrano, Ivan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis analyses and discusses the main alternative energy systems that work with rotordynamics machines to generate power. Hydropower systems, wave and ocean energy, geothermal,… (more)

  15. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

  16. EIS-0362: Colorado Springs Utilities' Next Generation CFB Coal Generating Unit, CO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve Colorado Springs Utilities design, construction, and operation of their Next- Generation Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Coal Generating Unit demonstration plant near Fountain, El Paso County, Colorado.

  17. Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

  18. Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 at least half of its energy obtained from energy efficiency and renewable resources by the year 2000. Solar energy, distributed generation resource. Investments made in solar power today are expected to provide

  19. Project Profile: The Sacramento Municipal Utility District Consumnes Power Plant Solar Augmentation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), under the Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Development (HIBRED) program, is demonstrating a hybrid CSP solar energy system that takes advantage of an existing electrical generator for its power block and transmission interconnection.

  20. IEEE POWER ENGINEERING SOCIETY ENERGY DEVELOPMENT AND POWER GENERATION COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    --Price Cap Regulation: Stimulating Efficiency in Electricity Distribution in Latin America. (Luiz Barroso Sponsored by: International Practices for Energy Development and Power Generation Chairs: Luiz Barroso, PSR

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Power Towers for Utilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

  2. Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Developing integrated TE system...

  3. Non-Utility Generation and Transmission Access in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panjavan, S.; Adib, P.

    system is a key factor in promoting competition in power generation. With changes in the Federal law, wholesale customers and NUGs are working with state legislators and regulators to open up the transmission system for opportunities in the wholesale...

  4. Utilizing the Traction Drive Power Electronics System to Provide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mobile power generation can be powered by the battery for short periods of time or by the ICE for long durations * For HEVs using single inverter and motor - Add two additional...

  5. Transaction Based Power Flow Analysis For Transmission Utilization Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transactions as well as the effect of reactive power on transmission losses and active power flows. Two the electric power industry moves into an era of supply competition and consumer choice, the power system electricity market at the ex ante phase; (ii) MW generations are decided by bilateral contracts and other

  6. Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable...

  7. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  8. Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felak, R. P.

    UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

  9. Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

  10. The generative powers of demolition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muskopf, Christopher Jon Dalton, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When examining the factory within the urban fabric, especially those cases that are abandoned and considered obsolete, it may be possible to see the first generative act as one of un-building. Considering demolition as an ...

  11. Photonic microwave generation with high-power photodiodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortier, Tara M; Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig; Taylor, Jennifer A; Fu, Yang; Campbell, Joe; Diddams, Scott A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize and characterize high-power, high-linearity modified uni-traveling carrier (MUTC) photodiodes for low-phase-noise photonic microwave generation based on optical frequency division. When illuminated with picosecond pulses from a repetition-rate-multiplied gigahertz Ti:sapphire modelocked laser, the photodiodes can achieve 10 GHz signal power of +14 dBm. Using these diodes, a 10 GHz microwave tone is generated with less than 500 attoseconds absolute integrated timing jitter (1 Hz-10 MHz) and a phase noise floor of -177 dBc/Hz. We also characterize the electrical response, amplitude-to-phase conversion, saturation and residual noise of the MUTC photodiodes.

  12. Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: utility-scale power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-activeNationalhydrogen componentsutility-scale power Sandia

  14. Compiling Utility Requirements For New Nuclear Power Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrakka, Eero [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, 27160 Olkiluoto (Finland)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted in November 2000 to the Finnish Government an application for a Decision-in-Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland. The actual investment decision can be made first after a positive decision has been made by the Government and the Parliament. Parallel to the licensing process, technical preparedness has been upheld so that the procurement process can be commenced without delay, when needed. This includes the definition of requirements for the plant and preliminary preparation of bid inquiry specifications. The core of the technical requirements corresponds to the specifications presented in the European Utility Requirement (EUR) document, compiled by major European electricity producers. Quite naturally, an amount of modifications to the EUR document are needed that take into account the country- and site-specific conditions as well as the experiences gained in the operation of the existing NPP units. Along with the EUR-related requirements concerning the nuclear island and power generation plant, requirements are specified for scope of supply as well as for a variety of issues related to project implementation. (author)

  15. Biocomplexity Analysis of Alternative Biomass Routes for Power Generation: Environmental, Economic, and Technical Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    ) as a replacement for coal in power generation. We utilize an environmental biocomplexity approach and examineBiocomplexity Analysis of Alternative Biomass Routes for Power Generation: Environmental, Economic generation. Economics, emissions and energy consumption during the on farm stage of all processes between

  16. Cascading Closed Loop Cycle Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    marketed as WOWGen®. The WOW Energies patents represent the production of efficient power from low, medium and high temperature heat generated from the combustion of fuels; heat from renewable energy sources such as solar and geothermal heat; or waste heat...

  17. Hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheu, Elysia J. (Elysia Ja-Zeng)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, a literature review of hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation is first given with an emphasis on system integration and evaluation. Hybrid systems are defined as those which use solar energy and fuel ...

  18. Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric power generating facilities with a combined capacity greater than 25 MW, as well as associated transmission lines, may not be constructed or begin operation prior to the issuance of a...

  19. Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Sulc; Konstantin Turitsyn; Scott Backhaus; Michael Chertkov

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.

  20. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  1. Wind Power (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISPWind Industry Soars to New1Wind Power

  2. Analysis of interrelationships between photovoltaic power and battery storage for electric utility load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, B.H.; Rahman, S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of photovoltaic power generation on the electric utility's load shape under supply-side peak load management conditions is explored. Results show that some utilities employing battery storage for peak load shaving might benefit from use of photovoltaic (PV) power, the extent of its usefulness being dependent on the specific load shapes as well as the photovoltaic array orientations. Typical utility load shapes both in the eastern and in the western parts of the U.S. are examined for this purpose. While photovoltaic power generation seems to present a bigger impact on the load of the western utility, both utilities will experience considerable savings on the size of the battery system required to shave the peak loads and also in the night-time base capacity required to charge the battery. Results show that when the cost of 2-axis tracking PV systems drop to $2/Wp, the southwestern utility will experience net cost savings when the PV-battery hybrid system is employed for load management. On the other hand, because of lesser availability of solar energy, the southeastern utility shows adverse economics for such a system.

  3. 1170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 2, MAY 2013 Independent Distributed Generation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Generation Planning to Profit Both Utility and DG Investors H. A. Hejazi, Ali R. Araghi, Behrooz Vahidi, S. H-scale electric generation facilities to participate in distributed generation (DG) with few requirements on power Terms--Distributed generation, investment incentives, op- timal location, price allocation, size

  4. Optical fiber networks boost utilities` power to thrive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, M.; Boxer, M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent legislative and regulatory initiatives have propelled the electric power industry onto the information superhighway. Utility companies are not only becoming large users of the information superhighway, but they also are building the physical network to carry the traffic. Some utilities are implementing fiber-optic projects that match or even exceed the size, scope and capabilities of networks installed by telecommunications firms and cable-television companies. Current optical-fiber deployments range from hundreds or thousands of route miles planned or installed by large utilities-such as Entergy and The Southern Company-to networks of just a few route miles envisioned by many smaller municipalities.

  5. Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

  6. High Reliability, High TemperatureThermoelectric Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reliability, High TemperatureThermoelectric Power Generation Materials and Technologies High Reliability, High TemperatureThermoelectric Power Generation Materials and Technologies...

  7. REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    position in the power generation field. It is the second largest commercial supplier of power generation gas turbines in the United States and the fourth single largest supplier...

  8. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as applied to waste heat recovery, renewable thermal energy...

  9. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

  10. Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

  11. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board...

  12. Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Presents progress in government- and...

  13. Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Identifying Energy Waste through Dense Power Sensing and Utilization Monitoring Maria Kazandjieva the efficiency of such a computing system requires detailed data of both en- ergy consumption and energy waste to differentiate energy used well from energy waste. This is an important difference from pre- vious work [8, 14

  14. Power generation considerations in a solar biomodal receiver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rochow, R.F. [NovaTech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Miles, B.J. [Babcock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS), or solar bimodal stage provides both propulsive thrust for efficient orbital transfer(s) and electrical power generation for the spacecraft. The combined propulsive and power systems allow the solar bimodal system to effectively compete for a variety of missions. Once on station, thermionic converters are used to supply continuous electrical power to the satellite, even during periods when the spacecraft is in the Earth`s shadow. The key to continuous power supply is thermal energy storage. The ISUS propulsion system also benefits through the use of thermal storage. By utilizing a graphite receiver, large amounts of sensible heat can be stored for later power generation. Waste heat is radiated to space through the use of heat pipes. Clearly, the graphite mass must be minimized without sacrificing electrical power capability. Voltage and current characteristics are carefully designed to operate within acceptable ranges. The detailed design of the receiver/absorber/converter (RAC) power system must meet these requirements with as little impact to the remainder of the bimodal system as possible. This paper addresses the key design considerations of a solar bimodal receiver as a power plant. Factors including the thermal storage and heat transfer from the graphite receiver to the thermionic converters, the support structures, electrical insulation and converter string design will be discussed.

  15. Utilization of Estonian oil shale at power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ots, A. [Tallin Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Department

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Estonian oil shale belongs to the carbonate class and is characterized as a solid fuel with very high mineral matter content (60--70% in dry mass), moderate moisture content (9--12%) and low heating value (LHV 8--10 MJ/kg). Estonian oil shale deposits lie in layers interlacing mineral stratas. The main constituent in mineral stratas is limestone. Organic matter is joined with sandy-clay minerals in shale layers. Estonian oil shale at power plants with total capacity of 3060 MW{sub e} is utilized in pulverized form. Oil shale utilization as fuel, with high calcium oxide and alkali metal content, at power plants is connected with intensive fouling, high temperature corrosion and wear of steam boiler`s heat transfer surfaces. Utilization of Estonian oil shale is also associated with ash residue use in national economy and as absorbent for flue gas desulfurization system.

  16. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  17. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, J.H.

    1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

  18. Photovoltaic Power Generation in the Stellar Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Girish; S. Aranya

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have studied the problem of photovoltaic power generation near selected stars in the solar neighborhood. The nature of the optical radiation from a star will depend on its luminosity,HR classification and spectral characteristics. The solar celloperation in the habitable zones of the stars is similar to AM1.0 operation near earth.Thecurrent space solar cell technology can be adopted for power generation near G,K and Mtype stars. Silicon solar cells with good near IR response are particularly suitable in theenvironments of M type stars which are most abundant in the universe. . Photovoltaicpower generation near binary stars like Sirius and Alpha Centauri is also discussed.

  19. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  20. Isotope powered stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Battelle, Paific Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Company, 2952 George Washington Way, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling ENgine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to data: (a) a development model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  1. NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes.

  2. Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter: Agile Direct Grid Connect Medium Voltage 4.7-13.8 kV Power Converter for PV Applications Utilizing Wide Band Gap Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ADEPT Project: Satcon is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levels—eliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers “step up” the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually “stepped down” to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the voltage is high and current is low. Satcon’s new power conversion devices will eliminate these heavy transformers and connect a utility-scale solar power system directly to the grid. Satcon’s modular devices are designed to ensure reliability—if one device fails it can be bypassed and the system can continue to run.

  3. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

  4. Financing future power generation in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Italian law, independent power generation fueled by renewable and so-called ``assimilated'' sources must be given incentives. To implement this provision, a resolution known as ``CIP 6'' and a decree setting forth the procedure to sell such electricity to ENEL were issued. CIP 6 has recently been revoked and new incentives have been announced. In the meantime, CIP 6 continues to apply to various projects which have been approved but not yet constructed.

  5. The Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, James Alan

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outlook for nuclear power in the U.S. is currently very bright. The economics, operations and safety performance of U.S. nuclear power plants is excellent. In addition, both the safety and economic regulation of nuclear power are being changed to produce better economic parameters for future nuclear plant operations and the licenses for plant operations are being extended to 60 years. There is further a growing awareness of the value of clean, emissions-free nuclear power. These parameters combine to form a firm foundation for continued successful U.S. nuclear plant operations, and even the potential In order to realize a bright future for nuclear power, we must respond successfully to five challenges: • Nuclear power must remain economically competitive, • The public must remain confident in the safety of the plants and the fuel cycle. • Nuclear wastes and spent fuel must be managed and the ultimate disposition pathways for nuclear wastes must be politically settled. • The proliferation potential of the commercial nuclear fuel cycle must continue to be minimized, and • We must assure a sustained manpower supply for the future and preserve the critical nuclear technology infrastructure. The Generation IV program is conceived to focus the efforts of the international nuclear community on responding to these challenges.

  6. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  7. Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip: 84111Jumpand Power Jump to:

  8. Load-shedding probabilities with hybrid renewable power generation and energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu , Huan

    Load-shedding probabilities with hybrid renewable power generation and energy storage Huan Xu, Ufuk to the intermittency in the power output. These difficulties can be alleviated by effectively utilizing energy storage turbines, supplemented with energy storage. We use a simple storage model alongside a combination

  9. Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

  10. Datang Jilin Resourceful New Energy Power Generation Co Ltd formerly...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resourceful New Energy Power Generation Co Ltd formerly known as Roaring 40s and Datan Jump to: navigation, search Name: Datang Jilin Resourceful New Energy Power Generation Co Ltd...

  11. Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

  12. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as applied to waste heat recovery, renewable thermal energy sources, and energy harvesting

  13. Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

  14. Electromagnetic Generators for Portable Power Applications Matthew Kurt Senesky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    or turbines paired with electrical generators. Producing such a system to run efficiently on the milli to power tools to electric vehicle drives to wind power generation -- that would benefit from highElectromagnetic Generators for Portable Power Applications by Matthew Kurt Senesky B.A. (Dartmouth

  15. Commitment of Electric Power Generators under Stochastic Market Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Mainak

    Commitment of Electric Power Generators under Stochastic Market Prices Jorge Valenzuela 1 November 2001 1 Corresponding author. #12;1 Commitment of Electric Power Generators under Stochastic Market Prices Abstract A formulation for the commitment of electric power generators under a deregulated

  16. Distributed Power Generation: Requirements and Recommendations for an ICT Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

    . Some of these are sustainable (wind and hydroelectric power plants, solar cells), some are controllable), distrib- uted generation, energy management systems (EMS) , IEC standards 1 Power Generation possible to generate energy efficiently in large-scale power plants, a complex infrastructure is needed

  17. Utility Variable Generation Integration Group Fall O&M User Group...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    O&M User Group Meeting Utility Variable Generation Integration Group Fall O&M User Group Meeting October 1, 2014 7:00AM CDT to October 2, 2014 3:00PM CDT The Utility Variable...

  18. FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    . The Class F fly ashes are normally generated due to combustion of anthracite or bituminous coal. The Class CFLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION - AN OVERVIEW* By Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E. Director, Center GENERATION AND UTILIZATION - AN OVERVIEW By Tarun R. Naik, and Shiw S. Singh ABSTRACT This chapter describes

  19. Seventh Power Plan: Generating Resources Advisory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for all regional utilities Avoided cost benchmarks to evaluate new Avoided cost benchmarks to evaluate

  20. Real power regulation for the utility power grid via responsive loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J [Knoxville, TN; Kirby, Brendan J [Knoxville, TN; Kisner, Roger A

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for dynamically managing an electrical power system that determines measures of performance and control criteria for the electric power system, collects at least one automatic generation control (AGC) input parameter to at least one AGC module and at least one automatic load control (ALC) input parameter to at least one ALC module, calculates AGC control signals and loads as resources (LAR) control signals in response to said measures of performance and control criteria, propagates AGC control signals to power generating units in response to control logic in AGC modules, and propagates LAR control signals to at least one LAR in response to control logic in ALC modules.

  1. Investigation And Evaluation Of The Systemwide Economic Benefits Of Combined Heat And Power Generation In The New York State Energy Market.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquero, Ricardo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is the production of electricity and the simultaneous utilization of the heat produced by the generator prime mover. The energy… (more)

  2. Siting Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M.; Owens, B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, Congress asked the U.S. Department of Energy to develop and scope out an initiative to fulfill the goal of having 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new parabolic trough, power tower, and dish engine solar capacity supplying the southwestern United States. In this paper, we present a review of the solar resource for Arizona, California, Nevada, and New Mexico. These four states have the greatest number of ''premium'' solar sites in the country and each has a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). We present information on the generation potential of the solar resources in these states. We also present regions within New Mexico that may be ideally suited for developing large-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants because of their proximity to load and their access to unconstrained transmission.

  3. Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, R.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

  4. PERFORMANCE OF DISTRIBUTED UTILITY-BASED POWER CONTROL FOR WIRELESS AD HOC NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    PERFORMANCE OF DISTRIBUTED UTILITY-BASED POWER CONTROL FOR WIRELESS AD HOC NETWORKS Jianwei Huang network. The users exchange prices that reflect their loss in utility due to interference. The prices are then used to determine optimal (utility maximizing) power levels for each user. We present simulation

  5. The Optimal Power Tracking Control Strategy of Grid-Connected Excited Synchronous Wind Power Generator.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Wen-kai

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In this thesis, the wind power system is a coaxial coupling structure between servo motor and excited synchronous wind power generator. By using the excited… (more)

  6. Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    devoted to wide bandgap power electronics. It will create, showcase, and deploy new power electronic capabilities, products, and processes that can impact commercial...

  7. Supervisory Public Utilities Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent of this position serves as a Supervisory Public Utilities Specialist in the Long Term Power Planning Group that is part of Power Servicess Generation Asset Management, Power &...

  8. Improvement of low speed induction generator performances and reducing the power of excitation and voltage control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budisan, N. [Politechnica Univ. of Timisoara (Romania); Hentea, T.; Mahil, S. [Purdue Univ. Calumet, Hammond, IN (United States); Madescu, G. [Romanian Academy, Timisoara (Romania)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the results of our investigations concerning the utilization of induction generators at very low speed. It is shown that, by proper design, it is possible to obtain high efficiency and high power factor values. The optimized induction generators require lower reactive power resulting in lower size and price of the excitation control system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  9. 11.11.2004 08:48:00 GMT China aims to employ nuclear fusion technology in power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Search 11.11.2004 08:48:00 GMT China aims to employ nuclear fusion technology in power generation to employ nuclear fusion technologies in power generation by 2050. China will adopt a three-step strategy with thermonuclear reactors; the second step aims to raise the utilization rate of nuclear fuels from the current 1

  10. Coal pulverizing systems for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sligar, J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulverized coal-fired boiler for power generation is a mature technology which requires the production of fine coal for combustion. The product material particle size is smaller than 250 microns and about 70 percent smaller than 75 microns. It is no coincidence that most of the new coal technologies for combustion or gasification require a product with a similar particle size distribution for complete reaction. This particle size distribution provides coal particles which can react with oxygen in the air at local velocities and resident times in the boiler furnace to result in almost complete combustion or gasification with 1 or 2 percent carbon loss in the resulting ash. Size reduction, while being one of the most common unit operations on material is also one of the least understood, requiring a high energy input. When pulverizing coal of the particle size required there is an added complication that the product may spontaneously ignite, particularly if the process passes through a stage when an explosive or at least highly combustible mixture of fine coal and air is present. The pulverized coal system covers that portion of the power station from coal bunkers to feeders, pulverizers and delivery system to the boiler burner or gasifier injection point. The transport medium has traditionally been air and in some cases inert gases. The system has usually been lean phase with air to coal ratios in excess of 1:4:1. More recently, a few systems have been dense phase with air to coal ratios of 1:30 up to 1:100. This has the distinct advantage of reduced transport pipe diameter. The key element in the system, the coal pulverizer, will be considered first.

  11. UTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011 #12;Inland Overview Largest co-op in Washington 39,000 meters 13 counties 7500 miles of line #12;Customers Per Mile of Line - Power Don't need a lot of additional power 3 MW by 2016; 8 by 2020 Formed group of 20 smaller utilities

  12. Generator powered electrically heated diesel particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A control circuit for a vehicle powertrain includes a switch that selectivity interrupts current flow between a first terminal and a second terminal. A first power source provides power to the first terminal and a second power source provides power to the second terminal and to a heater of a heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The switch is opened during a DPF regeneration cycle to prevent the first power source from being loaded by the heater while the heater is energized.

  13. Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

  14. WRI 50: Strategies for Cooling Electric Generating Facilities Utilizing Mine Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph J. Donovan; Brenden Duffy; Bruce R. Leavitt; James Stiles; Tamara Vandivort; Paul Ziemkiewicz

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power generation and water consumption are inextricably linked. Because of this relationship DOE/NETL has funded a competitive research and development initiative to address this relationship. This report is part of that initiative and is in response to DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41719-0. Thermal electric power generation requires large volumes of water to cool spent steam at the end of the turbine cycle. The required volumes are such that new plant siting is increasingly dependent on the availability of cooling circuit water. Even in the eastern U.S., large rivers such as the Monongahela may no longer be able to support additional, large power stations due to subscription of flow to existing plants, industrial, municipal and navigational requirements. Earlier studies conducted by West Virginia University (WV 132, WV 173 phase I, WV 173 Phase II, WV 173 Phase III, and WV 173 Phase IV in review) have identified that a large potential water resource resides in flooded, abandoned coal mines in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin, and likely elsewhere in the region and nation. This study evaluates the technical and economic potential of the Pittsburgh Coal Basin water source to supply new power plants with cooling water. Two approaches for supplying new power plants were evaluated. Type A employs mine water in conventional, evaporative cooling towers. Type B utilizes earth-coupled cooling with flooded underground mines as the principal heat sink for the power plant reject heat load. Existing mine discharges in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin were evaluated for flow and water quality. Based on this analysis, eight sites were identified where mine water could supply cooling water to a power plant. Three of these sites were employed for pre-engineering design and cost analysis of a Type A water supply system, including mine water collection, treatment, and delivery. This method was also applied to a ''base case'' river-source power plant, for comparison. Mine-water system cost estimates were then compared to the base-case river source estimate. We found that the use of net-alkaline mine water would under current economic conditions be competitive with a river-source in a comparable-size water cooling system. On the other hand, utilization of net acidic water would be higher in operating cost than the river system by 12 percent. This does not account for any environmental benefits that would accrue due to the treatment of acid mine drainage, in many locations an existing public liability. We also found it likely that widespread adoption of mine-water utilization for power plant cooling will require resolution of potential liability and mine-water ownership issues. In summary, Type A mine-water utilization for power plant cooling is considered a strong option for meeting water needs of new plant in selected areas. Analysis of the thermal and water handling requirements for a 600 megawatt power plant indicated that Type B earth coupled cooling would not be feasible for a power plant of this size. It was determined that Type B cooling would be possible, under the right conditions, for power plants of 200 megawatts or less. Based on this finding the feasibility of a 200 megawatt facility was evaluated. A series of mines were identified where a Type B earth-coupled 200 megawatt power plant cooling system might be feasible. Two water handling scenarios were designed to distribute heated power-plant water throughout the mines. Costs were developed for two different pumping scenarios employing a once-through power-plant cooling circuit. Thermal and groundwater flow simulation models were used to simulate the effect of hot water injection into the mine under both pumping strategies and to calculate the return-water temperature over the design life of a plant. Based on these models, staged increases in required mine-water pumping rates are projected to be part of the design, due to gradual heating and loss of heat-sink efficiency of the rock sequence above the mines. Utilizing pumping strategy No.1 (two mines) capital costs were 25 percent lower a

  15. Reducing power production costs by utilizing petroleum coke. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath, K.C.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

  16. REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

  17. High-density thermoelectric power generation and nanoscale thermal metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Peter (Peter Matthew), 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric power generation has been around for over 50 years but has seen very little large scale implementation due to the inherently low efficiencies and powers available from known materials. Recent material advances ...

  18. OPTIMAL DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION UNDER NETWORK LOAD CONSTRAINTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Jason

    -producers. Decentralized Power Generation (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat (the approach used in the traditional electric power paradigm), DPG systems employ numerous, but small¨EL BLOEMHOF, JOOST BOSMAN§, DAAN CROMMELIN¶, JASON FRANK , AND GUANGYUAN YANG Abstract. In electrical power

  19. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice · Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants · Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs · Supply costs can reflect capital

  20. Centralized and Decentralized Generated Power Systems -A Comparison Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach@howard.edu, 202-806-5350 Power Systems Engineering Research Center The Power Systems Engineering Research Center

  1. power generAtion College of Rural and Community Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    to Power Generation: Maintenance.......4 PGEN F104--Gas and Steam Turbines; Co-Generation and Combined with embedded communication content............(2 ­ 3) * ENGL F212 does not fulfill the second half

  2. Distributed Generation and Virtual Power Plants: Barriers and Solutions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olejniczak, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The present technological and regulatory power system needs to adapt to the increase in the share of distributed generation. This research focuses on the applicability… (more)

  3. Combined desalination and power generation using solar energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Y

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Integrated desalination and power generation using solar energy is a prospective way to help solve the twin challenges of energy and fresh water shortage, while… (more)

  4. Novel NDE techniques in the power generation industry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Christopher M. S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The thesis presented here comprises the work undertaken for research into novel NDE techniques in the power generation industry. This has been undertaken as part… (more)

  5. Analysis of solar power generation on California turkey ranches.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Rick

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The objective of this thesis is to conduct a net present value analysis of installing a solar power generation system on company owned turkey grow… (more)

  6. Ames Lab 101: Next Generation Power Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Alan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory scientist Alan Russell discusses the need to develop new power lines that are stronger and more conductive as a way to address the problem of the nation's aging and inadequate power grid.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Next Generation Power Lines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Russell, Alan

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory scientist Alan Russell discusses the need to develop new power lines that are stronger and more conductive as a way to address the problem of the nation's aging and inadequate power grid.

  8. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes Electric Power Supply Chain Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    , natural gas, uranium, and oil), or approximately 40 quadrillion BTU (see Edison Electric Institute (2000Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain at the electric power industry with taxes applied according to the type of fuel used by the power generators

  9. The Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A. Carreras M. Kirchner I. Dobson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    distributed generation if not done carefully. 1. Introduction With the increased utilization of local, oftenThe Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A@engr.wisc.edu Abstract In this paper we investigate the impact of the introduction of distributed generation

  10. Reti attive di distribuzione: le applicazioni Virtual Power Plant e Virtual Utility.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baroncelli, Paolo

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Il presente lavoro si occupa di nuove applicazioni per la gestione e l’ottimizzazione di risorse distribuite, così dette Virtual Power Plant (VPP) o Virtual Utility… (more)

  11. Interconnection of on-site photovoltaic generation to the electric utility. [Conference paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichler, C.H.; Kilar, L.A.; Stiller, P.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical interconnection with the local electric utility of small, privately owned, on-site photovoltaic generating systems will be necessary. Legal guidelines exist through PURPA, administered by FERC, to establish interconnection, but economic viability will be the deciding factor in constructing photovoltaic generating systems. Although nationally recognized technical standards do not yet exist for interconnecting photovoltaic generation with an electric utility, most utilities have considered the need for developing cogeneration standards, and a few have developed such standards independently. Additional costs incurred by utilities in providing service interconnections to customers with cogeneration will be passed along to those customers, either as a direct assessment or as part of the applicable rate schedule. An economic-analysis methodology has been developed to allow comparing various possible photovoltaic-generating-system configurations under different utility rate structures and varying economic climates on a consistent basis.

  12. Energy and Capacity Valuation of Photovoltaic Power Generation in New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    Perez & Thomas E. Hoff, Clean Power Research for the Solar Alliance and the N r Energy Industry between peak demand and solar resource availability both downstate and upstate, the generation energy: What is the Value of PV? System Owners Utility Constituents Equipment cost Incentives benefit cost

  13. Generating expansion model incorporating compact DC power flow equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nderitu, D.G.; Sparrow, F.T.; Yu, Z. [Purdue Inst. for Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a compact method of incorporating the spatial dimension into the generation expansion problem. Compact DC power flow equations are used to provide real-power flow coordination equations. Using these equations the marginal contribution of a generator to th total system loss is formulated as a function of that generator`s output. Incorporating these flow equations directly into the MIP formulation of the generator expansion problem results in a model that captures a generator`s true net marginal cost, one that includes both the cost of generation and the cost of transport. This method contrasts with other methods that iterate between a generator expansion model and an optimal power flow model. The proposed model is very compact and has very good convergence performance. A case study with data from Kenya is used to provide a practical application to the model.

  14. Fault Current Issues for Market Driven Power Systems with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fault Current Issues for Market Driven Power Systems with Distributed Generation Natthaphob of installing distributed generation (DG) to electric power systems. The proliferation of new generators creates Terms--Distributed / dispersed generation, power distri- bution, power system protection, fault

  15. SUSTAINABLE GENERATION AND UTILIZATION OF ENERGY THE CASE OF ICELAND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valfells, Ágúst

    . It is more difficult to estimate the amount of energy that may be obtained from geothermal sources/annum of hydro- and geothermal energy may be used for generation of electricity in a sustainable manner nations with untapped renewable energy sources. 2. Energy Resources 2. Les sources de l'Ã?nergie We begin

  16. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001Long-Term Storage of Cesium1940sofof10

  17. Power Generation Asset Management Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be done to determine optimal sensor deployment to address these criteria. TC8 Incorporate turbine layouts, make efforts and operational status within wind power plants to have more...

  18. Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of traditional emergency generator applications, these technologies are integrated in building energy systems to provide some portion of a facility’s electricity and thermal energy needs including space heating and air conditioning. In the event of a power.... These CHP systems provide electricity and utilize waste heat from the generation process in existing building thermal applications such as space heating, domestic water heating. Thermal energy can also be used in an absorption refrigeration cycle...

  19. Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

  20. DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Tubel

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development work during this quarter was focused in the assembly of the downhole power generator hardware and its electronics module. The quarter was also spent in the development of the surface system electronics and software to extract the acoustic data transmitted from downhole to the surface from the noise generated by hydrocarbon flow in wells and to amplify very small acoustic signals to increase the distance between the downhole tool and the surface receiver. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Assembly of the downhole power generator mandrel for generation of electrical power due to flow in the wellbore. (2) Test the piezoelectric wafers to assure that they are performing properly prior to integrating them to the mechanical power generator mandrel. (3) Coat the power generator wafers to prevent water from shorting the power generator wafers. (4) Test of the power generator using a water tower and an electric pump to create a water flow loop. (5) Test the power harvesting electronics module. (6) Upgrade the signal condition and amplification from downhole into the surface system. (7) Upgrade the surface processing system capability to process data faster. (8) Create a new filtering technique to extract the signal from noise after the data from downhole is received at the surface system.

  1. Concentrated Solar Power Generation Systems: The SAIC Dish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Concentrated Solar Power Generation Systems: The SAIC Dish Center for Energy Research at UNLV #12;Concentrating Solar Dishes Work has been underway at UNLV's Center for Energy Research since 2001 in the use of concentrating solar dishes for electrical power generation. One of these solar dishes was marketed by Science

  2. BATTERY STORAGE CONTROL FOR STEADYING RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pro- duction to come from renewable resources. In the 2011 State of the Union Address, President ObamaBATTERY STORAGE CONTROL FOR STEADYING RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION By Shengyuan (Mike) Chen, Emilie-626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;Battery Storage Control for Steadying Renewable Power Generation

  3. Stochastic Co-optimization for Hydro-Electric Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Stochastic Co-optimization for Hydro-Electric Power Generation Shi-Jie Deng, Senior Member, IEEE the optimal scheduling problem faced by a hydro-electric power producer that simultaneously participates in multiple markets. Specifically, the hydro-generator participates in both the electricity spot market

  4. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  5. Hydrogen generation utilizing integrated CO2 removal with steam reforming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Chellappa, Anand S

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam reformer may comprise fluid inlet and outlet connections and have a substantially cylindrical geometry divided into reforming segments and reforming compartments extending longitudinally within the reformer, each being in fluid communication. With the fluid inlets and outlets. Further, methods for generating hydrogen may comprise steam reformation and material adsorption in one operation followed by regeneration of adsorbers in another operation. Cathode off-gas from a fuel cell may be used to regenerate and sweep the adsorbers, and the operations may cycle among a plurality of adsorption enhanced reformers to provide a continuous flow of hydrogen.

  6. WARP: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States)] [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)] [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kilowatts each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) Windframe, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user-friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/kWh, depending on the wind resource.

  7. A Mathematical Solution to Power Optimal Pipeline Design by Utilizing Soft Edge Flip-Flops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    A Mathematical Solution to Power Optimal Pipeline Design by Utilizing Soft Edge Flip-Flops Mohammad a novel technique to minimize the total power consumption of a synchronous linear pipeline circuit by exploiting extra slacks available in some stages of the pipeline. The key idea is to utilize soft-edge flip

  8. Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voigt, Thiemo

    Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller propose to utilize solar power in wireless sensor networks, establishing a topology where ­ changing over propose and evaluate two protocols that perform solar- aware routing. The presented simulation results

  9. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  10. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy analyzed uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  11. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up, and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy the authors analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  12. Designing of Hybrid Power Generation System using Wind energy- Photovoltaic Solar energy- Solar energy with Nanoantenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All the natural wastage energies are used for production of Electricity. Thus, the Electrical Power or Electricity is available with a minimum cost and pollution free to anywhere in the world at all times. This process reveals a unique step in electricity generation and availability from natural resources without hampering the ecological balance. This paper describes a new and evolving Electrical Power Generation System by integrating simultaneously photovoltaic Solar Energy, solar Energy with Nano-antenna, Wind Energy and non conventional energy sources. We can have an uninterrupted power supply irrespective of the natural condition without any sort of environmental pollution. Moreover this process yields the least production cost for electricity generation. Utilization of lightning energy for generation of electricity reveals a new step. The set-up consists of combination of photo-voltaic solar-cell array & Nano-anteena array, a mast mounted wind generator, lead-acid storage batteries, an inverter unit to convert DC power to AC power, electrical lighting loads and electrical heating loads, several fuse and junction boxes and associated wiring, and test instruments for measuring voltages, currents, power factors, and harmonic contamination data throughout the system. This hybrid solar-wind power generating system will extensively use in the Industries and also in external use like home appliance.

  13. Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B capital investment costs of renewable energy technologies. Specifically, wind power represents the most and small power systems. However, the variability due to the stochastic nature of the wind resource

  14. Scenario Generation for Price Forecasting in Restructured Wholesale Power Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Scenario Generation for Price Forecasting in Restructured Wholesale Power Markets Qun Zhou--In current restructured wholesale power markets, the short length of time series for prices makes are fitted between D&O and wholesale power prices in order to obtain price scenarios for a specified time

  15. Energy Storage System Sizing for Smoothing Power Generation , P. Bydlowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy Storage System Sizing for Smoothing Power Generation of Direct J. Aubry1 , P. Bydlowski 1 E-mail: judicael.aubry Abstract This paper examines the sizing energy storage system (ESS) for energy converter. Keywords: Energy Storage System (ESS), power smoothing, Direct Wave Energy Converter, Supercapacitor, Power

  16. Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

  17. Optimal distributed power generation under network load constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    wind turbines and heat pumps). This gives rise to the question how many units of each type (solar panel, mainly because of the development of novel components for decentral power generation (solar panels, small (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat power (CHP) connected

  18. Synchrophasor Applications for Wind Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.; Allen, A.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Wan, Y. H.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. power industry is undertaking several initiatives that will improve the operations of the electric power grid. One of those is the implementation of wide-area measurements using phasor measurement units to dynamically monitor the operations and status of the network and provide advanced situational awareness and stability assessment. The overviews of synchrophasors and stability analyses in this report are intended to present the potential future applications of synchrophasors for power system operations under high penetrations of wind and other renewable energy sources.

  19. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  20. HEITSCH, R OMISCH --HYDRO-STORAGE SUBPROBLEMS IN POWER GENERATION 1 Hydro-Storage Subproblems in Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    HEITSCH, R ¨OMISCH -- HYDRO-STORAGE SUBPROBLEMS IN POWER GENERATION 1 Hydro-Storage Subproblems that owns a hydro-thermal generation sys- tem and trades on the power market often lead to complex stochas- tic optimization problems. We present a new approach to solving stochastic hydro-storage subproblems

  1. PLATO Power--a robust, low environmental impact power generation system for the Antarctic plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    PLATO Power--a robust, low environmental impact power generation system for the Antarctic plateau the power generation and management system of PLATO. Two redundant arrays of solar panels and a multiply astronomical facilities on the Antarctic plateau, offering minimum environmental impact and requiring minimal

  2. Public Power & Utility, Inc. (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to:USGSMeanReservoirTempUtility, Inc. (Pennsylvania) Jump to:

  3. Combined fuel and air staged power generation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabovitser, Iosif K; Pratapas, John M; Boulanov, Dmitri

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for generation of electric power employing fuel and air staging in which a first stage gas turbine and a second stage partial oxidation gas turbine power operated in parallel. A first portion of fuel and oxidant are provided to the first stage gas turbine which generates a first portion of electric power and a hot oxidant. A second portion of fuel and oxidant are provided to the second stage partial oxidation gas turbine which generates a second portion of electric power and a hot syngas. The hot oxidant and the hot syngas are provided to a bottoming cycle employing a fuel-fired boiler by which a third portion of electric power is generated.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY GENERATION AND UTILIZATION Luis D. Berrizbeitia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    such as solar power, wind power, and geothermal power. Geothermal energy is a source of electricity generation, with a current capacity of 3,093 megawatts (MW). The largest geothermal development in the world is located at the Geysers north of San Francisco, in Sonoma County, California

  5. Protective, Modular Wave Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vvedensky, Jane M.; Park, Robert Y.

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of small wave energy conversion modules that can be built into large, scalable arrays, in the same vein as solar panels, has been developed. This innovation lends itself to an organic business and development model, and enables the use of large-run manufacturing technology to reduce system costs. The first prototype module has been built to full-scale, and tested in a laboratory wave channel. The device has been shown to generate electricity and dissipate wave energy. Improvements need to be made to the electrical generator and a demonstration of an array of modules should be made in natural conditions.

  6. Self-powered wireless sensor system using MEMS piezoelectric micro power generator (PMPG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, YuXin, M.B.A. Sloan School of Management.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin-film lead zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr,Ti)03, MEMS Piezoelectric Micro Power Generator (PMPG) has been integrated with a commercial wireless sensor node (Telos), to demonstrate a self-powered RF temperature sensor ...

  7. Low-Power Maximum Power Point Tracker with Digital Control for Thermophotovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa, Robert

    This paper describes the design, optimization, and evaluation of the power electronics circuitry for a low-power portable thermophotovotaic (TPV) generator system. TPV system is based on a silicon micro-reactor design and ...

  8. Generating power with drained coal mine methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

  9. Safe Operation of Backup Power Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    three-prong plug equipped with a grounding pin. ? Never plug the generator into a wall outlet in a house or other circuit. This practice, known as ?back feeding,? is extremely dangerous because it energizes the failed electrical wiring supply- ing...

  10. Pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, R.F.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second-generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (PCFBC) is the culmination of years of effort in the development of a new generation of power plants which can operate on lower-quality fuels with substantially improved efficiencies, meet environmental requirements, and provide a lower cost of electricity. Air Products was selected in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Round V program to build, own, and operate the first commercial power plant using second-generation PCFBC technology, to be located at an Air Products chemicals manufacturing facility in Calvert City, Kentucky. This paper describes the second-generation PCFBC concept and its critical technology components.

  11. Plasma plume MHD power generator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

  12. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficien

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: renewable energy power generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-active perovskiteremoving the highlypower generation Hoboken

  14. Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

  15. atomic power generation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a squeezed atom laser is to use Queensland, University of 420 A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation CERN Preprints Summary: This paper reports on our...

  16. advanced power generation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATK Aerospace, ITT Exelis and the University of Texas 324 A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation CERN Preprints Summary: This paper reports on our...

  17. Power Generation From Waste Heat Using Organic Rankine Cycle Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many efforts are currently being pursued to develop and implement new energy technologies aimed at meeting our national energy goals The use of organic Rankine cycle engines to generate power from waste heat provides a near term means to greatly...

  18. Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botros, Barbara Brenda

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

  19. Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    during a power outage. These systems can connect to renewable sources of energy, like solar panels and small-scale wind generators, to help the batteries stay charged during an...

  20. Integration of decentralized generators with the electric power grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finger, Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops a new methodology for studying the economic interaction of customer-owned electrical generators with the central electric power grid. The purpose of the report is to study the reciprocal effects of the ...

  1. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY HYBRID POWER GENERATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BY HYBRID POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-04G014351 ENTITLED "HIGH PERFORMANCE FLEXIBLE REVERSIBLE...

  2. SECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN CHILE, POWER EXCHANGE MODEL. THE SOLUTION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    SECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN CHILE, POWER EXCHANGE MODEL. THE SOLUTION? David Watts Paulo Atienza to participate. Chile was the pioneer introducing this kind of reforms, through the application of a centralized

  3. A thermally efficient micro-reactor for thermophotovoltaic power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Ole Mattis, 1977-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbon fuels exhibit very high energy densities, and micro-generators converting the stored chemical energy into electrical power are interesting alternatives to batteries in certain applications. The increasing demands ...

  4. REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NO. DE-AC21-95MC30247; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-98-006 ORO-737 Westinghouse Power Generation, a former division of CBS Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "the Contractor"),...

  5. REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NO. DE-FC21-95MC32267; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-96-002 ORO-620 Westinghouse Power Generation, a former division of CBS Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "the...

  6. Multilevel Converter Topologies for Utility Scale Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essakiappan, Somasundaram

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and phase angle of the inverter cells is proposed. This improves differential power processing amongst cells while keeping the voltage and current ratings of the devices low. A battery energy storage system for the multilevel PV converter has also been...

  7. Wireless power transmission utilizing a phased array of Tesla coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Joseph C. (Joseph Charles), 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses the theory and design of coupled resonant systems and how they can be linked in a phased array for the wireless transmission of electrical power. A detailed derivation of their operational theory is ...

  8. Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that could be of use. For example, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deployed water pumps to a flooded Con Edison power substation in New York to help clear out the water - a...

  9. Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA; Smith, Jeff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN; Dugan, Roger [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating potential PV impacts.

  10. Power Generating Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River EnergyCube Pvt Ltd PCPL Jump

  11. Public Power & Utility, Inc. (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to:USGSMeanReservoirTemp

  12. Piezoelectric and Semiconducting Coupled Power Generating Process of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    of the electric generator relies on the unique coupling of piezoelectric and semiconducting dual properties of ZnPiezoelectric and Semiconducting Coupled Power Generating Process of a Single ZnO Belt/Wire. A Technology for Harvesting Electricity from the Environment Jinhui Song, Jun Zhou, and Zhong Lin Wang* School

  13. High-frequency transformer isolated power conditioning system for fuel cells to utility interface.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathore, Akshay Kumar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis presents interfacing of fuel cells to a single-phase utility line using a high-frequency transformer isolated power converter. This research contributes towards selecting a… (more)

  14. Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singhal, S.C.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

  15. Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singhal, S.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

  16. Hypermodular Self-Assembling Space Solar Power -- Design Option for Mid-Term GEO Utility-Scale Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitgab, Martin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a design for scaleable space solar power systems based on free-flying reflectors and module self-assembly. Lower system cost of utility-scale space solar power is achieved by design independence of yet-to-be-built in-space assembly or transportation infrastructure. Using current and expected near-term technology, this study describe a design for mid-term utility-scale power plants in geosynchronous orbits. High-level economic considerations in the context of current and expected future launch costs are given as well.

  17. Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

  18. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

  19. Appendix S-50 - Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) - Public Utilities

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperimentsInformationAnuvuCommission | Open Energy

  20. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) and member...

  1. Evaluating Wind Power Generating Capacity Adequacy Using MCMC Time Series Model.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almutairi, Abdulaziz

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In recent decades, there has been a dramatic increase in utilizing renewable energy resources by many power utilities around the world. The tendency toward using… (more)

  2. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  3. Lamp for generating high power ultraviolet radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gary L. (Elkridge, MD); Potter, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus is a gas filled ultraviolet generating lamp for use as a liquid purifier. The lamp is powred by high voltage AC, but has no metallic electrodes within or in contact with the gas enclosure which is constructed as two concentric quartz cylinders sealed together at their ends with the gas fill between the cylinders. Cooling liquid is pumped through the volume inside the inner quartz cylinder where an electrically conductive pipe spaced from the inner cylinder is used to supply the cooling liquid and act as the high voltage electrode. The gas enclosure is enclosed within but spaced from a metal housing which is connected to operate as the ground electrode of the circuit and through which the treated fluid flows. Thus, the electrical circuit is from the central pipe, and through the cooling liquid, the gas enclosure, the treated liquid on the outside of the outer quartz cylinder, and to the housing. The high voltage electrode is electrically isolated from the source of cooling liquid by a length of insulated hose which also supplies the cooling liquid.

  4. EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE), Curtin University of Technology, WA Abstract: Variable speed wind turbine generators provide the opportunity to capture more power than fixed speed turbines. However the variable speed machine output can

  5. ePOWER Seminar AC solar cells: A new breed of PV power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    ePOWER Seminar AC solar cells: A new breed of PV power generation Professor Faisal Khan Assistant dc output which needs to be processed and inverted for ac applications. Using a modern manufacturing facility, PV panels could be mass produced without any apparent issues. Unfortunately, power converters

  6. 1284 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 26, NO. 2, APRIL 2011 Improving SVM-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducatelle, Frederick

    classification. I. INTRODUCTION DISTRIBUTON losses in power utilities originating from electricity theft-Based Nontechnical Loss Detection in Power Utility Using the Fuzzy Inference System Jawad Nagi, Keem Siah Yap, Sieh of fraud and electricity theft in power distribution utilities. Pre- vious work was carried out by using

  7. Method and apparatus for automobile actuated power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenblum, J.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of cylindrical rollers are embedded in a roadway over which wheeled vehicles move such that the vehicle wheels rotate the contacted rollers. A shaft transverse to the roadway supports the rollers and turns with them to transfer power from vehicle contact to an electrical generating apparatus. Power accumulating apparatus, such as a water or hydraulic fluid reservoir, may intervene between the shaft and the generator to smooth the power flow when vehicle travel is intermittent. Alternate apparatus may directly link the shaft to an electrical generator which may, in turn, charge batteries or pump water upwardly to accumulate power for response to later demand. The rollers may be housed in a metal or concrete trough and cross one or more lanes of traffic to a median power collector such as a spider and bevel gear arrangement that is capable of receiving rotating motion from four right angle directions at once. In its simplest form, power is taken from auto wheels to turn the rollers and their shaft or shafts, and shaft rotation is communicated directly to an electrical generator to supply demand.

  8. MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage iterations. We demonstrate our method in simulations with various wind scenarios and prices for energy. INTRODUCTION Today, wind power is the most important renewable energy source. For the years to come, many

  9. Environmental impact of fossil fuel combustion in power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    All the recent developments in the combustion systems employed for power generation have been based on environmental considerations. Combustion modifications have been developed and utilised in order to control NO{sub x} emissions and improvements continue to be made as the legislative requirements tighten. Chemical processes and fuel switching are used to control SO{sub x} emissions. After nitrogen, carbon dioxide is the major gas emitted from the combustion process and its potential potency as a greenhouse gas is well documented. Increased efficiency cycles, mainly based on natural gas as the prime fuel, can minimise the amount of CO{sub x} produced per unit of power generated. As the economics of natural gas utilisation become less favourable a return to clean coal technology based power generation processes may be required.

  10. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  11. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus(R) with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH{sub 3} mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., k{sub NH3}< 4×10{sup -3} m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}). The effect of the CO{sub 2} mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., k{sub CO2}<4×10{{sup -6} m/s).

  12. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, M.M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communication, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of material resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  13. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, M.M.

    1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications. 2 figs.

  14. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Mark M. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  15. PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

  16. Power Maximization of a Closed-orbit Kite Generator System Mariam Ahmed*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The third option is to use power kites as renewable energy generators such as the "Kite Wind Generator

  17. New geothermal heat extraction process to deliver clean power generation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pete McGrail

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for capturing significantly more heat from low-temperature geothermal resources holds promise for generating virtually pollution-free electrical energy. Scientists at the Department of Energys Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will determine if their innovative approach can safely and economically extract and convert heat from vast untapped geothermal resources. The goal is to enable power generation from low-temperature geothermal resources at an economical cost. In addition to being a clean energy source without any greenhouse gas emissions, geothermal is also a steady and dependable source of power.

  18. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  19. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group) and Robertare the integration costs associated with wind power. The

  20. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  1. Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications. LBNL-Tax on Microgrid Combined Heat and Power Adoption. JournalGeneration with Combined Heat and Power Applications Afzal

  2. High power terahertz generation using 1550?nm plasmonic photomixers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Christopher W. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Preu, Sascha [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University Darmstadt, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1550?nm plasmonic photomixer operating under pumping duty cycles below 10%, which offers significantly higher terahertz radiation power levels compared to previously demonstrated photomixers. The record-high terahertz radiation powers are enabled by enhancing the device quantum efficiency through use of plasmonic contact electrodes, and by mitigating thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels through use of a low duty cycle optical pump. The repetition rate of the optical pump can be specifically selected at a given pump duty cycle to control the spectral linewidth of the generated terahertz radiation. At an average optical pump power of 150 mW with a pump modulation frequency of 1 MHz and pump duty cycle of 2%, we demonstrate up to 0.8 mW radiation power at 1 THz, within each continuous wave radiation cycle.

  3. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. A central objective of a LANL/Industry collaborative effort supported by the Hydrogen Program is to integrate PEM fuel cell and novel stack designs at LANL with stack technology of H-Power Corporation (H-Power) in order to develop a manufacturable, low-cost/high-performance hydrogen/air fuel cell stack for stationary generation of electric power. A LANL/H-Power CRADA includes Tasks ranging from exchange, testing and optimization of membrane-electrode assemblies of large areas, development and demonstration of manufacturable flow field, backing and bipolar plate components, and testing of stacks at the 3-5 cell level and, finally, at the 4-5 kW level. The stack should demonstrate the basic features of manufacturability, overall low cost and high energy conversion efficiency. Plans for future work are to continue the CRADA work along the time line defined in a two-year program, to continue the LANL activities of developing and testing stainless steel hardware for longer term stability including testing in a stack, and to further enhance air cathode performance to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies as required for stationary power application.

  4. IBEX - a pulsed power accelerator that generates no prepulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Corley, J.P.; Mazarakis, M.G.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense relativistic electron beams are produced in vacuum diodes driven by pulsed power accelerators. For pulse widths approx. 100 nsec, pulse forming lines (PPL) are used to generate the accelerating voltage pulse. This pulse is produced by sequential switching of stored energy through two or more stages. Capacitance and/or inductive coupling usually results in the generation of a low level prepulse voltage some time during the switching sequence. This prepulse is known to have a substantial effect on the performance of the vacuum diode during the main accelerating pulse. Most accelerators use various schemes for reducing this prepulse to acceptable levels. The Isolated Blumlein PPL concept was developed at Sandia to allow for the generation of the main accelerating pulse without generating a prepulse voltage. This concept was implemented into the IBEX accelerator that generates a 4 MV, 100 kA, 20 nsec output pulse. Design and performance data are presented.

  5. C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors Generation and Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    14 C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors ­ Generation and Characterization of Gaseous, Liquid and process water from nuclear reactors ­ A method for quantitative determination of organic and inorganic and Solid Waste �sa Magnusson Division of Nuclear Physics Department of Physics 2007 Akademisk avhandling

  6. Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Bicarbonate Buffer and Proton Transfer applications, especially for wastewater treatment. Introduction Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has drawn of electrodes (6­9), (iii) selection and treatment of membranes (10­12), and (iv) optimization of the MFC design

  7. ULTRA-THIN QUARTZ COMBUSTORS FOR TPV POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    ULTRA-THIN QUARTZ COMBUSTORS FOR TPV POWER GENERATION Yong Fan, Yuji Suzuki, and Nobuhide Kasagi in planar quartz combustors with channel height of 0.7/1.0/1.5 mm have been investigated for micro on the wall temperature. Keywords: Quenching distance, Micro combustor, Wall/flame temperature, PLIF 1

  8. DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Tubel

    2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The first quarter of the Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications was characterized by the evaluation and determination of the specifications required for the development of the system for permanent applications in wellbores to the optimization of hydrocarbon production. The system will monitor and transmit in real time pressure and temperature information from downhole using the production tubing as the medium for the transmission of the acoustic waves carrying digital information. The most common casing and tubing sizes were determined by interfacing with the major oil companies to obtain information related to their wells. The conceptual design was created for both the wireless gauge section of the tool as well as the power generation module. All hardware for the wireless gauge will be placed in an atmospheric pressure chamber located on the outside of a production tubing with 11.4 centimeter (4-1/2 inch) diameter. This mounting technique will reduce cost as well as the diameter and length of the tool and increase the reliability of the system. The power generator will use piezoelectric wafers to generate electricity based on the flow of hydrocarbons through an area in the wellbore where the tool will be deployed. The goal of the project is to create 1 Watt of power continuously.

  9. Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems -A Comparison Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy System #12;Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems" Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Robert Saint National Rural Electric Cooperative Association PSERC Publication 12-08 June 2012 #12;For

  10. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Impacts of Future Electric Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Impacts of Future Electric Power Generation Mark D. Cohen Physical fish consumption, and significant portions of the general population are believed to be consuming toxicologically significant levels of mercury (e.g., National Research Council, 2000). Historical discharges ­ e

  12. Personalized Power Saving Profiles Generation Analyzing Smart Device Usage Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Personalized Power Saving Profiles Generation Analyzing Smart Device Usage Patterns Soumya Kanti interactions of smart devices. This paper describes a client-server architecture that proposes personalized and they are sent back to the smart devices. These profiles are highly personalized since they are developed

  13. UMCP-BG and E collaboration in nuclear power engineering in the framework of DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, Lothar PhD

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program has been established to support the education of students in Nuclear Engineering Programs to maintain a knowledgeable workforce in the United States in order to keep nuclear power as a viable component in a mix of energy sources for the country. The involvement of the utility industry ensures that this grant program satisfies the needs and requirements of local nuclear energy producers and at the same time establishes a strong linkage between education and day-to-day nuclear power generation. As of 1997, seventeen pairs of university-utility partners existed. UMCP was never a member of that group of universities, but applied for the first time with a proposal to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in January 1999 [1]. This proposal was generously granted by BG&E [2,3] in the form of a gift in the amount of $25,000 from BG&E's Corporate Contribution Program. Upon the arrival of a newly appointed Director of Administration in the Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, the BG&E check was deposited into the University's Maryland Foundation Fund. The receipt of the letter and the check enabled UMCP to apply for DOE's matching funds in the same amount by a proposal.

  14. Nonlinear power flow control applications to conventional generator swing equations subject to variable generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Wilson, David Gerald

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the swing equations for renewable generators are formulated as a natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. A two-step process referred to as Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) is used to analyze and design feedback controllers for the renewable generator system. This formulation extends previous results on the analytical verification of the Potential Energy Boundary Surface (PEBS) method to nonlinear control analysis and design and justifies the decomposition of the system into conservative and non-conservative systems to enable a two-step, serial analysis and design procedure. In particular, this approach extends the work done by developing a formulation which applies to a larger set of Hamiltonian Systems that has Nearly Hamiltonian Systems as a subset. The results of this research include the determination of the required performance of a proposed Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS)/storage device to enable the maximum power output of a wind turbine while meeting the power system constraints on frequency and phase. The FACTS/storage device is required to operate as both a generator and load (energy storage) on the power system in this design. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is applied to the power flow equations to determine the stability boundaries (limit cycles) of the renewable generator system and enable design of feedback controllers that meet stability requirements while maximizing the power generation and flow to the load. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of renewable generators systems are determined based on the concepts of Hamiltonian systems, power flow, exergy (the maximum work that can be extracted from an energy flow) rate, and entropy rate.

  15. Remote-site power generation opportunities for Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working with the Federal Energy Technology Center in Morgantown, West Virginia, to assess options for small, low-cost, environmental acceptable power generation for application in remote areas of Alaska. The goal of this activity was to reduce the use of fuel in Alaskan villages by developing small, low-cost power generation applications. Because of the abundance of high-quality coal throughout Alaska, emphasis was placed on clean coal applications, but other energy sources, including geothermal, wind, hydro, and coalbed methane, were also considered. The use of indigenous energy sources would provide cheaper cleaner power, reduce the need for PCE (Power Cost Equalization program) subsidies, increase self-sufficiency, and retain hard currency in the state while at the same time creating jobs in the region. The introduction of economical, small power generation systems into Alaska by US equipment suppliers and technology developers aided by the EERC would create the opportunities for these companies to learn how to engineer, package, transport, finance, and operate small systems in remote locations. All of this experience would put the US developers and equipment supply companies in an excellent position to export similar types of small power systems to rural areas or developing countries. Thus activities in this task that relate to determining the generic suitability of these technologies for other countries can increase US competitiveness and help US companies sell these technologies in foreign countries, increasing the number of US jobs. The bulk of this report is contained in the two appendices: Small alternative power workshop, topical report and Global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  16. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power system modeling, wind energy I. I NTRODUCTION Generating electricity from wind technology has several advantages

  17. falls into this category if the PV DC conductors penetrate the house. Although batteries are not power generators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    falls into this category if the PV DC conductors penetrate the house. Although batteries-grid, battery-based PV systems or grid-tied (utility-interactive) PV systems with battery backup. In situations are not power generators, they can source energy, so a battery disconnect might also fall into this category

  18. Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

  19. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  20. Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

  1. Electricity-producing heating apparatus utilizing a turbine generator in a semi-closed brayton cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Labinov, Solomon D.; Christian, Jeffrey E.

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides apparatus and methods for producing both heat and electrical energy by burning fuels in a stove or boiler using a novel arrangement of a surface heat exchanger and microturbine-powered generator and novel surface heat exchanger. The equipment is particularly suited for use in rural and relatively undeveloped areas, especially in cold regions and highlands.

  2. The effects of energy storage properties and forecast accuracy on mitigating variability in wind power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaworsky, Christina A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation from wind power is increasing worldwide. Wind power can offset traditional fossil fuel generators which is beneficial to the environment. However, wind generation is unpredictable. Wind speeds have ...

  3. Coal gasification for power generation. 2nd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report gives an overview of the opportunities for coal gasification in the power generation industry. It provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; A description of gasification technology including processes and systems; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; An analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; A discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; An evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; A discussion of IGCC project development options; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; Profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and A description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

  4. A Power Energy Generation Systems Ltd APWR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan, Sw China)|EnergyApproach-|Power

  5. Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

  6. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  7. Nanodevices for generating power from molecules and batteryless sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Yinmin; Wang, Xianying; Hamza, Alex V.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are dipole containing organic species in a molecule interaction zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or randomly-aligned on a substrate. Epoxy or other nonconductive polymers are used to seal portions of the nanowires or nanotubes to create molecule noninteraction zones. By correlating certain molecule species to voltages generated, a nanosensor may quickly identify which species is detected. Nanoconverters in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries. In some cases breath, from human or other life forms, contain sufficient molecules to power a nanoconverter. A membrane permeable to certain molecules around the molecule interaction zone increases specific molecule nanosensor selectivity response.

  8. Advance Three Phase Power Factor Correction Schemes for Utility Interface of Power Electronic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albader, Mesaad

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    systems, battery chargers and data centers etc. Also, high voltage DC (HVDC) systems employ rectifiers to convert ac input to DC output. HVDC is one example of the application of AC/DC conversion, in power system also, grid tie of two different power...

  9. National-Scale Wind Resource Assessment for Power Generation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the current standards for conducting a national-scale wind resource assessment for power generation, along with the risk/benefit considerations to be considered when beginning a wind resource assessment. The presentation describes changes in turbine technology and viable wind deployment due to more modern turbine technology and taller towers and shows how the Philippines national wind resource assessment evolved over time to reflect changes that arise from updated technologies and taller towers.

  10. Thermoelectric materials 1998 -- The next generation materials for small-scale refrigeration and power generation applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tritt, T.M. (ed.) (Clemson Univ., SC (United States)); Kanatzidis, M.G. (ed.) (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Mahan, G.D. (ed.) (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Lyon, H.B. Jr. (ed.) (Marlow Industries, Dallas, TX (United States))

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric materials are used in a wide variety of applications related to small-scale solid-state refrigeration or power generation. Over the past 30 years, alloys based on the Bi-Te compounds (refrigeration) [(Bi[sub 1[minus]x]Sb[sub x])[sub 2] (Te[sub 1[minus]x]Se[sub x])[sub 3

  11. Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.01–0.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ?4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

  12. POST-CONSTRUCTION WILDLIFE MONITORING AT THE ATLANTIC CITY UTILITIES AUTHORITY-JERSEY ATLANTIC WIND POWER FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    WIND POWER FACILITY PROJECT STATUS REPORT IV Submitted to: New Jersey Board of Public Utilities New Authority (ACUA) wind power facility. The period covered by this report is 1 January to 31 August 2009

  13. Power Generation Loading Optimization using a Multi-Objective Constraint-Handling Method via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaodong

    results of the power generation loading optimization based on a coal-fired power plant demonstrates algorithm in solving significant industrial problems. I. INTRODUCTION Most power generation plants have.e., heat rate/NOx vs. load, for a given plant condition. There are two objectives for the power generation

  14. Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrey, David A.

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

  15. Abstract--The socially optimal power market clearing problem with diverse, complex-utility-structure participants at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caramanis, Michael

    capabilities in today's cyber-enabled smart power grid, and the promise of distributed generation, demand generation volatility, have peaked interest in distribution network power markets [1,8]. In [1], we commercial and residential loads. Both feeders have distributed PV generation with power electronics

  16. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

  17. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

  18. Method and apparatus for generating radiation utilizing DC to AC conversion with a conductive front

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Mori, Warren B. (Hermosa Beach, CA); Lai, Chih-Hsiang (So. Pasadena, CA); Katsouleas, Thomas C. (Malibu, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for generating radiation of high power, variable duration and broad tunability over several orders of magnitude from a laser-ionized gas-filled capacitor array. The method and apparatus convert a DC electric field pattern into a coherent electromagnetic wave train when a relativistic ionization front passes between the capacitor plates. The frequency and duration of the radiation is controlled by the gas pressure and capacitor spacing.

  19. Method and apparatus for generating radiation utilizing DC to AC conversion with a conductive front

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawson, J.M.; Mori, W.B.; Lai, C.H.; Katsouleas, T.C.

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus ar disclosed for generating radiation of high power, variable duration and broad tunability over several orders of magnitude from a laser-ionized gas-filled capacitor array. The method and apparatus convert a DC electric field pattern into a coherent electromagnetic wave train when a relativistic ionization front passes between the capacitor plates. The frequency and duration of the radiation is controlled by the gas pressure and capacitor spacing. 4 figs.

  20. Efficient Power Converters for PV Arrays : Scalable Submodule Power Conversion for Utility-Scale Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar ADEPT Project: SolarBridge is developing a new power conversion technique to improve the energy output of PV power plants. This new technique is specifically aimed at large plants where many solar panels are connected together. SolarBridge is correcting for the inefficiencies that occur when two solar panels that encounter different amounts of sun are connected together. In most conventional PV system, the weakest panel limits the energy production of the entire system. That’s because all of the energy collected by the PV system feeds into a single collection point where a central inverter then converts it into useable energy for the grid. SolarBridge has found a more efficient and cost-effective way to convert solar energy, correcting these power differences before they reach the grid.

  1. Update on use of mine pool water for power generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, nearly 90 percent of the country's electricity was generated at power plants using steam-based systems (EIA 2005). Electricity generation at steam electric plants requires a cooling system to condense the steam. With the exception of a few plants using air-cooled condensers, most U.S. steam electric power plants use water for cooling. Water usage occurs through once-through cooling or as make-up water in a closed-cycle system (generally involving one or more cooling towers). According to a U.S. Geological Survey report, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 136 billion gallons per day of fresh water in 2000 (USGS 2005). This is almost the identical volume withdrawn for irrigation purposes. In addition to fresh water withdrawals, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 60 billion gallons per day of saline water. Many parts of the United States are facing fresh water shortages. Even areas that traditionally have had adequate water supplies are reaching capacity limits. New or expanded steam electric power plants frequently need to turn to non-traditional alternate sources of water for cooling. This report examines one type of alternate water source-groundwater collected in underground pools associated with coal mines (referred to as mine pool water in this report). In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to evaluate the feasibility of using mine pool water in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. That report (Veil et al. 2003) identified six small power plants in northeastern Pennsylvania (the Anthracite region) that had been using mine pool water for over a decade. It also reported on a pilot study underway at Exelon's Limerick Generating Station in southeastern Pennsylvania that involved release of water from a mine located about 70 miles upstream from the plant. The water flowed down the Schuylkill River and augmented the natural flow so that the Limerick plant could withdraw a larger volume of river water. The report also included a description of several other proposed facilities that were planning to use mine pool water. In early 2006, NETL directed Argonne to revisit the sites that had previously been using mine pool water and update the information offered in the previous report. This report describes the status of mine pool water use as of summer 2006. Information was collected by telephone interviews, electronic mail, literature review, and site visits.

  2. Coal as an option for power generation in US territories of the Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, I. Y.

    1981-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of general considerations relating to the use of coal in US territories and trust territories of the Pacific suggests that coal is a viable option for power generation. Future coal supplies, principally from Australia and the west coast of America, promise to be more than adequate, but large bulk carriers will probably not be able to land coal directly because of inadequate port facilities. Hence, smaller than Panamax-class vessels (60,000 dwt) or some arrangement utilizing self-loading barges or lighters would have to be used. Except for Guam, with peak power requirements on the order of 175 MW/sub e/, most territories have current, albeit inadequate, installations of 1 to 25 MW/sub e/ Turnkey, conventional-coal-fired, electrical-power generating systems are available in that size range. US environmental laws are now applicable to Guam and American Samoa; the trust territories are exempt. However, the small power requirements of many small islands will qualify for exemption from the New Source Performance Standards called for in the Clean Air Act. The principal problems with coal use in the territories, apart from the shallow draft of most harbors, are the limited amount of land available and the high capital costs associated with conversion. Ocean dumping of ash and sludge can be permitted under existing Environmental Protection Agency regulations, and barge-mounted power installations are not out of the question. The feasibility of converting from oil-fired to coal-fired electrical-power generating systems must be determined with site-specific information.

  3. Power Electronics for Distributed Energy Systems and Transmission and Distribution Applications: Assessing the Technical Needs for Utility Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, L.M.

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Power electronics can provide utilities the ability to more effectively deliver power to their customers while providing increased reliability to the bulk power system. In general, power electronics is the process of using semiconductor switching devices to control and convert electrical power flow from one form to another to meet a specific need. These conversion techniques have revolutionized modern life by streamlining manufacturing processes, increasing product efficiencies, and increasing the quality of life by enhancing many modern conveniences such as computers, and they can help to improve the delivery of reliable power from utilities. This report summarizes the technical challenges associated with utilizing power electronics devices across the entire spectrum from applications to manufacturing and materials development, and it provides recommendations for research and development (R&D) needs for power electronics systems in which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) could make a substantial impact toward improving the reliability of the bulk power system.

  4. Photovoltaic solar system connected to the electric power grid operating as active power generator and reactive power compensator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albuquerque, Fabio L.; Moraes, Adelio J.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C.; Sanhueza, Sergio M.R.; Vaz, Alexandre R. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Uberlandia-MG, CEP 38400-902 (Brazil)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the case of photovoltaic (PV) systems acting as distributed generation (DG) systems, the DC energy that is produced is fed to the grid through the power-conditioning unit (inverter). The majority of contemporary inverters used in DG systems are current source inverters (CSI) operating at unity power factor. If, however, we assume that voltage source inverters (VSI) can replace CSIs, we can generate reactive power proportionally to the remaining unused capacity at any given time. According to the theory of instantaneous power, the inverter reactive power can be regulated by changing the amplitude of its output voltage. In addition, the inverter active power can be adjusted by modifying the phase angle of its output voltage. Based on such theory, both the active power supply and the reactive power compensation (RPC) can be carried out simultaneously. When the insolation is weak or the PV modules are inoperative at night, the RPC feature of a PV system can still be used to improve the inverter utilisation factor. Some MATLAB simulation results are included here to show the feasibility of the method. (author)

  5. Protection from ground faults in the stator winding of generators at power plants in the Siberian networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vainshtein, R. A., E-mail: vra@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Lapin, V. I. [ODU Sibiri (Integrated Dispatcher Control for Siberia), branch of JSC 'SO EES' (Russian Federation); Naumov, A. M.; Doronin, A. V. [JSC NPP 'EKRA' (Russian Federation); Yudin, S. M. [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experience of many years of experience in developing and utilization of ground fault protection in the stator winding of generators in the Siberian networks is generalized. The main method of protection is to apply a direct current or an alternating current with a frequency of 25 Hz to the primary circuits of the stator. A direct current is applied to turbo generators operating in a unit with a transformer without a resistive coupling to the external grid or to other generators. Applying a 25 Hz control current is appropriate for power generation systems with compensation of a capacitive short circuit current to ground. This method forms the basis for protection of generators operating on busbars, hydroelectric generators with a neutral grounded through an arc-suppression reactor, including in consolidated units with generators operating in parallel on a single low-voltage transformer winding.

  6. Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

  7. Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

  8. Method and apparatus for automated, modular, biomass power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Lilley, Arthur (Finleyville, PA); Browne, Kingsbury III (Golden, CO); Walt, Robb Ray (Aurora, CO); Duncan, Dustin (Littleton, CO); Walker, Michael (Longmont, CO); Steele, John (Aurora, CO); Fields, Michael (Arvada, CO); Smith, Trevor (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for generating a low tar, renewable fuel gas from biomass and using it in other energy conversion devices, many of which were designed for use with gaseous and liquid fossil fuels. An automated, downdraft gasifier incorporates extensive air injection into the char bed to maintain the conditions that promote the destruction of residual tars. The resulting fuel gas and entrained char and ash are cooled in a special heat exchanger, and then continuously cleaned in a filter prior to usage in standalone as well as networked power systems.

  9. Method and apparatus for automated, modular, biomass power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P; Lilley, Arthur; Browne, III, Kingsbury; Walt, Robb Ray; Duncan, Dustin; Walker, Michael; Steele, John; Fields, Michael; Smith, Trevor

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for generating a low tar, renewable fuel gas from biomass and using it in other energy conversion devices, many of which were designed for use with gaseous and liquid fossil fuels. An automated, downdraft gasifier incorporates extensive air injection into the char bed to maintain the conditions that promote the destruction of residual tars. The resulting fuel gas and entrained char and ash are cooled in a special heat exchanger, and then continuously cleaned in a filter prior to usage in standalone as well as networked power systems.

  10. Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Next Generation Power Electronics National Manufacturing Innovation Institute will focus on wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors - the same materials used in LED light fixtures and many flat screen TVs. The Institute will use $70 million provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office to support and manage its programs over the next five years. This Institute is one of three new innovation hubs announced by President Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address and part of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).

  11. Gravitational wave generation in power-law inflationary models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo M. Sá; Alfredo B. Henriques

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in power-law inflationary models. The energy spectrum of the gravitational waves is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. We show that, by looking at the interval of frequencies between 10^(-5) and 10^5 Hz and also at the GHz range, important information can be obtained, both about the inflationary period itself and about the thermalization regime between the end of inflation and the beginning of the radiation-dominated era. We thus deem the development of gravitational wave detectors, covering the MHz/GHz range of frequencies, to be an important task for the future.

  12. Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment ofEnergy,PotomacGenerators Power outages

  13. Alternatives for management of wastes generated by the formerly utilized sites remedial action program and supplement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Vocke, R.W.; Alexander, J.K.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternatives for disposal or stabilization of the wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) are identified and compared, with emphasis on the long-term aspects. These wastes consist of soil material and rubble containing trace amounts of radionuclides. A detailed pathway analysis for the dose to the maximally exposed individual is carried out using an adaptation of the natural analogue method. Comparisons of the different alternatives, based on the results of the pathway analysis and qualitative cost considerations, indicate that, if the hazard is such that the wastes must be removed and disposed of rather than stabilized in place, disposal by immediate dispersal is preferable to containment, and containment followed by slow planned dispersal is preferable to containment without dispersal. The Supplement presents refinements of work that was reported at the 1982 International Decommissioning Symposium. The new material consists of revisions of the estimates of the predicted potential dose to the maximally exposed individual and a more detailed comparative assessment of the radiological impacts of alternatives for management of wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

  14. Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

  15. Adapting a GIS-Based Multicriteria Decision Analysis Approach for Evaluating New Power Generating Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Blevins, Brandon R [ORNL; Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Neish, Bradley S [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing need to site new power generating plants that use cleaner energy sources due to increased regulations on air and water pollution and a sociopolitical desire to develop more clean energy sources. To assist utility and energy companies as well as policy-makers in evaluating potential areas for siting new plants in the contiguous United States, a geographic information system (GIS)-based multicriteria decision analysis approach is presented in this paper. The presented approach has led to the development of the Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion (OR-SAGE) tool. The tool takes inputs such as population growth, water availability, environmental indicators, and tectonic and geological hazards to provide an in-depth analysis for siting options. To the utility and energy companies, the tool can quickly and effectively provide feedback on land suitability based on technology specific inputs. However, the tool does not replace the required detailed evaluation of candidate sites. To the policy-makers, the tool provides the ability to analyze the impacts of future energy technology while balancing competing resource use.

  16. Public Service Commission Authorization to Utilize an Alternative Method of Cost Recovery for Certain Base Load Generation (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Senate Bill 2793 authorizes the Public Service Commission (PSC) to utilize an alternative cost recovery for certain base load generation. The PSC is authorized to include in an electric...

  17. High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas Success story about using waste water...

  18. Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field Fluids Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field Fluids Co-produced and low-temperature...

  19. Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

  20. EA-1857: Wind Turbine Power Generation Complex at Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA would evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed wind turbine power generation complex at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho.

  1. Geothermal, an alternate energy source for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinosa, H.A.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic development of nations depends on an escalating use of energy sources. With each passing year the dependence increases, reaching a point where the world will require, in the next six years, a volume of energetics equal to that consumed during the last hundred years. Statistics show that in 1982 about 70% of the world's energy requirements were supplied by oil, natural gas and coal. The remaining 30% came from other sources such as nuclear energy, hydroelectricity, and geothermal. In Mexico the situation is more extreme. For the same year (1982) 85% of the total energy consumed was supplied through the use of hydrocarbons, and only 15% through power generated by the other sources of electricity. Of the 15%, 65% used hydrocarbons somewhere in the power generation system. Geothermal is an energy source that can help solve the problem, particularly in Mexico, because the geological and structural characteristics of Mexico make it one of the countries in the world with a tremendous geothermal potential. The potential of geothermal energy for supplying part of Mexico's needs is discussed.

  2. Utility-based Time and Power Allocation on an Energy Harvesting Downlink: The Optimal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uysal-Biyikoglu, Elif

    problem where the transmitter is aware of the energy arrival statistics of a frame before the frame starts harvest energy through solar cells, vibration absorption devices, thermoelectric generators, wind power on optimizing data transmission with an energy harvesting transmitter. A single-user communication system op

  3. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  4. Stirling Engines for Low-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Stirling Engines for Low-Temperature Solar-Thermal- Electric Power Generation Artin Der Minassians-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation by Artin Der Minassians Karshenasi (Amirkabir University-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation Copyright c 2007 by Artin Der Minassians #12;1 Abstract Stirling

  5. A stochastic framework for uncertainty analysis in electric power transmission systems with wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an electric transmission network with wind power generation and their impact on its reliability. A stochastic disconnections leading to massive network blackout. 1. Introduction Systems of electric power generation, supply of generating units, the transfer of electric power over networks of transmission lines and, finally

  6. The ultra-thin solar cells that could generate power through windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    The ultra-thin solar cells that could generate power through windows By Claire Bates Last updated, generating enough electricity to power the GPS or air conditioning. Solar cells, which convert solar energy into tinted windows Page 1 of 3The ultra-thin solar cells that could generate power through windows | Mail

  7. A comparison of reversible chemical reactions for solar thermochemical power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    453 A comparison of reversible chemical reactions for solar thermochemical power generation O. M storage of the reaction products. A number of reactions have been proposed for solar thermochemical power to be a good choice for first generation solar thermochemical power generation. Revue Phys. Appl. 15 (1980) 453

  8. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis. The feasibility analysis anticipated only positive results from the combustion of corn cobs with coal in the WMU power plant boiler, and therefore recommended that the project proceed. The study proceeded with a review of the existing WMU Power Plant configuration; cob fuel analyses; an application for an Air Quality Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct the co-combustion test burns; identification of and a site visit to a similar facility in Iowa; an evaluation of cob grinding machines; and agreements with a corn grower, a cob harvester, and the City of Willmar to procure, harvest, and store cobs. The WMU power plant staff constructed a temporary cob feed system whereby the cobs could be injected into the #3 Boiler firebox, at rates up to 40% of the boiler total heat input. Test burns were conducted, during which air emissions were monitored and fuel and ash samples analyzed. The results of the test burns indicated that the monitored flue gas quality improved slightly during the test burns. The WMU was able to determine that modifications to the #3 Boiler fuel feed system to accept com cobs on a permanent basis would be technically feasible and would enable the WMU to generate electricity from renewable fuels on a dispatchable basis.

  9. R.Perez, K.Zweibel, T.Hoff Solar Power Generation in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    energy skeptics because the cost of unsubsidized solar power appears to be much higher than that solar electric power plants deliver to utilities' rate payers and society's tax payers. Benefits that are relevant to utilities and their rate payers include traditional, measures of energy and capacity. Benefits

  10. Solar's combined-cycle system utilizes novel steam-generator concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As escalating fuel costs force equipment users to seek more efficient prime movers, the combined-cycle system will become increasingly attractive because it retains the advantages of simple-cycle gas turbines - low installation costs, high availability, low maintenance, and low emission levels - while adding 40% power output from the steam-based system operated on the turbine exhaust. Solar Turbines International has sought to develop an automated, remote-control combined-cycle system that can be easily retrofitted to existing simple-cycle power stations. The key component giving the system its advantages over the hazardous, complex steam-drum-type boiler systems is a once-through dual-pressure steam-generator device that eliminates the need for drums and elaborate control mechanisms. Forty identical parallel tube circuits suspended from a single frame are connected to common inlet and discharge manifolds; the individual circuits are made of dual high- and low-pressure bundles, with each bundle having economizer, vaporizer, and superheating sections. The 40 circuits comprise one complete steam-generator module core matrix. By injecting the superheated low-pressure steam into the latter stages of the steam turbine, the dual-pressure feature improves the heat recovery by more than 12% over conventional devices. The only water treatment that the corrosion-resistant tube material requires is the removal of dissolved solids.

  11. Fatal Flaw Analysis of Utility-Scale Wind Turbine Generators at the West Haymarket Joint Public Agency. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatal flaw analysis of utility-scale wind turbines at the West Haymarket Joint Public Agency brownfields site in Lincoln, Nebraska, funded by EPA.

  12. Permit compliance monitoring for the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macak, J.J. III [Mostardi-Platt Associates, Inc., Elmhurst, IL (United States); Platt, T.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Waukegan, IL (United States); Miller, S.B. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 authorized EPA to develop regulations requiring facilities to monitor the adequacy of emission control equipment and plant operations. Furthermore, under the CAAA, EPA is required to issue regulations to require owners and operators of large industrial facilities to enhance air pollution monitoring and certify compliance with air pollution regulations. The fossil-fueled power generation industry has been targeted with the promulgation of the Acid Rain Program regulations of 40 CFR 72, and the Continuous Emissions Monitoring requirements of 40 CFR 75. The Part 75 regulations, with a few exceptions, establish requirements for monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide emissions, volumetric flow, and opacity data from affected units under the Acid Rain Program. Depending upon the type of unit and location, other applicable emission limitations may apply for particulate emissions (both total and PM-10), carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and sulfuric acid mist.

  13. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

  14. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a part of an investigation of the ability of the U.S. power system to accommodate large scale additions of wind generation. The objectives of this report are to describe principles by which large multi-area power systems are controlled and to anticipate how the introduction of large amounts of wind power production might require control protocols to be changed. The operation of a power system is described in terms of primary and secondary control actions. Primary control is fast, autonomous, and provides the first-line corrective action in disturbances; secondary control takes place on a follow-up time scale and manages the deployment of resources to ensure reliable and economic operation. This report anticipates that the present fundamental primary and secondary control protocols will be satisfactory as wind power provides an increasing fraction of the total production, provided that appropriate attention is paid to the timing of primary control response, to short term wind forecasting, and to management of reserves for control action.

  15. Combined heat & Power (CHP), Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codes andDepartment of EnergyPowerStatesiUtility

  16. Central power generation versus distributed generation e An air quality assessment in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Keywords: Distributed generation Central generation Air quality modeling Reactivity a b s t r a c by the widespread installation of many stationary power generators close to the point of electricity use within from which electricity must be transmitted to end users. However, increasing electricity demand

  17. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Allan J

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

  18. Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation and Distribution:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report Tom McDermott (2010) 34 Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. Electrotek Concepts. (1995) 29 Recovery of Water from...

  19. A control system for improved battery utilization in a PV-powered peak-shaving system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomino, E [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiles, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) power systems offer the prospect of allowing a utility company to meet part of the daily peak system load using a renewable resource. Unfortunately, some utilities have peak system- load periods that do not match the peak production hours of a PV system. Adding a battery energy storage system to a grid-connected PV power system will allow dispatching the stored solar energy to the grid at the desired times. Batteries, however, pose system limitations in terms of energy efficiency, maintenance, and cycle life. A new control system has been developed, based on available PV equipment and a data acquisition system, that seeks to minimize the limitations imposed by the battery system while maximizing the use of PV energy. Maintenance requirements for the flooded batteries are reduced, cycle life is maximized, and the battery is operated over an efficient range of states of charge. This paper presents design details and initial performance results on one of the first installed control systems of this type.

  20. Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

  1. Grid-Connected Marine Current Generation System Power Smoothing Control Using Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Grid-Connected Marine Current Generation System Power Smoothing Control Using Supercapacitors to reduce the fluctuation of generator power. In the second step, Supercapacitor (SC) Energy Storage System fluctuation, swell effect, power smoothing control, supercapacitor. I. [NTRODUCTION [n the recent years

  2. The development of a solar thermal water purification, heating, and power generation system: A case study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    The development of a solar thermal water purification, heating, and power generation system: A case, none of the existing concentrated solar power systems (trough, dish, and tower) that have been the potential of an invention directed to a water purification system that also recovers power from generated

  3. Dynamics of an Economics Model for Generation Coupled to the OPA Power Transmission Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    Dynamics of an Economics Model for Generation Coupled to the OPA Power Transmission Model B. A a dynamic model of the power transmission system (OPA) and a simple economic model of power generation development. Despite the simplicity of this economic model, complex dynamics both in the economics (prices

  4. Sustainable solar thermal power generation (STPG) technologies in Indian context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.S. [Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, New Delhi (India). Solar Energy Centre

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    India is a fast developing country. Some of the factors like population growth, industrialization, liberalization in economic policies, green revolution and awareness toward the environment, are increasing the electricity demand rapidly. As per the 14th Power Survey Report, an energy deficit of (+) 9% and peak demand deficit of (+) 18% have been estimated. Keeping in view the liberalization in economic policies, this deficit may be higher by the year 2000 AD. An estimation indicates that India is blessed with solar energy to the tune of 5 x 10{sup 15} kWh/yr. Being clean and inexhaustible source of energy, it can be used for large-scale power generation in the country. Keeping in view the present state-of-art technologies for STPG in MW range, best possible efforts are required to be made by all the concerned, to develop sustainable STPG technology of the future, specially for tropical regions. Standardization of vital equipment is an important aspect. There are a few required criteria like simple and robust technology, its transfer and adaptation in tropical climate conditions; high plant load factor without fossil-fired backup; availability of plant during evening peak and night hours; least use of fragile components, and capacity optimization for MW plants as per solar irradiance and environmental factors. In this paper, efforts have been made to compare the different STPG technologies. On the basis, of literature surveyed and studies carried out by the author, it may be stated that Central Receiver System technologies using molten salt and volumetric air receiver, along with molten salt and ceramic thermal storage respectively seems to be suitable and comparable in Indian context. Performance of SOLAR-TWO and PHOEBUS plants may be decisive.

  5. Program on Technology Innovation: Power Generation and Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management has pro- vided information and decision-support tools designed to help member utilities meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's rules and policies on total...

  6. Advanced liquid fuel production from biomass for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grassi, G.; Palmarocchi, M.; Joeler, J. [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie, Pisa (Italy)] [and others

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the European Union, important political decisions recently adopted and concerning the evolution of the Common Agriculture Policy, the GATT trade liberalisation Agreement and new measures actually under discussion (CARBON TAX, Financial support for rural development...) will have significant impact, in a no distant future, on the bioenergy activity. Also the considerable energy import ({approximately} 55% of the consumption) is of increasing concerns. The biomass potential in the E.U. is large, but the availability of commercial technologies for processing and utilising this renewable energy resource is very modest. Thus, a strong effort for the development of new and efficient technologies (like the one implemented by ENEL/CRT) is essential, as well as the build-up of an efficient industry for the commercialisation of reliable, low-cost biomass conversion/utilisation systems. The recently founded {open_quotes}European Bioenergy Industry Association{close_quotes} will make an effort for the promotion of this specific new industrial sector. In this framework, a new research effort (in Germany/Italy) for up-grading the bio-crude-oil by high energetic electrons. This process, if demonstrated feasible, could be of great interest for the production of new liquid fuels of sufficient quality to be utilised in most types of modern power generator.

  7. IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS National Laboratory(a) ABSTRACT The U.S. electric power infrastructure is a strategic national asset with the emerging plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology to meet the majority of the daily energy needs

  8. An air-breathing, portable thermoelectric power generator based on a microfabricated silicon combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marton, Christopher Henry

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global consumer demand for portable electronic devices is increasing. The emphasis on reducing size and weight has put increased pressure on the power density of available power storage and generation options, which ...

  9. Long-term contracts for new investments in power generation capacity : pain or gain?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakhrani, Vivek A. (Vivek Ashok)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, a debate has ensued regarding the role of long-term power purchase agreements for securing investments in power generation capacity in organized wholesale markets. This thesis illuminates the issues ...

  10. Advances in steam turbine technology for the power generation industry. PWR-Volume 26

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, W.G. [ed.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a collection of the papers on advances in steam turbine technology for the power generation industry presented at the 1994 International Joint Power Generation Conference. The topics include advances in steam turbine design, application of computational fluid dynamics to turbine aerodynamic design, life extension of fossil and nuclear powered steam turbine generators, solid particle erosion control technologies, and artificial intelligence, monitoring and diagnostics.

  11. SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS Hans. For the conventional power park, the power production of the wind turbines presents a fluctuating 'negative load PRODUCTION OF WIND TURBINES For the forecast of the power production of wind turbines two approaches may

  12. A Set-Theoretic Framework to Assess the Impact of Variable Generation on the Power Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    penetration of renewable resources of electricity, such as wind and solar, into existing power systems. Since renewable resources vary in rated power output and point of grid interconnection, they affect power systems1 A Set-Theoretic Framework to Assess the Impact of Variable Generation on the Power Flow Xichen

  13. Analyzing Effects of Turbulence on Power Generation Using Wind Plant Monitoring Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affects the power generation of a single wind turbine within an array of turbines. Using monitoring data from a wind power plant, we selected two sets of wind and power data for turbines on the edge of the wind plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine directly faces incoming winds) and (ii) an in-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine is under the wake of other turbines). For each set of data, two surrogate models were then developed to represent the turbine power generation (i) as a function of the wind speed; and (ii) as a function of the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Support vector regression was adopted for the development of the surrogate models. Three types of uncertainties in the turbine power generation were also investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the published/reported power curve, (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) under the same wind conditions, the turbine generates different power between the in-wake and out-of-wake scenarios, (ii) a turbine generally produces more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario, (iii) the power generation is sensitive to turbulence intensity even when the wind speed is greater than the turbine rated speed, and (iv) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

  14. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the core. Still there are problems of containment since many of the proposed vessel materials such as W or Mo have high neutron cross sections making the design of a critical system difficult. There is also the possibility for a GCR to remain in a subcritical state, and by the use of a shockwave mechanism, increase the pressure and temperature inside the core to achieve criticality. This type of GCR is referred to as a shockwave-driven pulsed gas core reactor. These two basic designs were evaluated as advance concepts for space power and propulsion.

  15. Next Generation Short-Term Forecasting of Wind Power Overview of the ANEMOS Project.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of difficulties to the power system operation. This is due to the fluctuating nature of wind generation to the management of wind generation. Accurate and reliable forecasting systems of the wind production are widely

  16. Production and maintenance planning for electricity generators: modeling and application to Indian power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragoti-Ã?ela, Eranda

    Production and maintenance planning for electricity generators: modeling and application to Indian power systems Debabrata Chattopadhyay Department of Management, University of Canterbury, Private Bag describes the development of an optimization model to perform the fuel supply, electricity generation

  17. Increasing power generation for scaling up single-chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential as a tech- nology for sustainable bioenergy production due to their ability to generate., 2004) can also affect power generation. Through optimization of MFC architecture and solution chemis

  18. Combined Heat and Power: Connecting the Gap Between Markets and Utility Interconnection and Tariff Practices (Part 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, S.; Elswick, B.; Elliott, R. N.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , integrated system (Elliott and Spurr 1999). CHP is not a technology, but an approach to applying technologies. CHP is more energy efficient than separate generation of electricity and thermal energy. Heat that is normally wasted in conventional power... installations are considered DER—only large central generation CHP that focuses on wholesale power generation is not included. Because this report focuses on smaller CHP, we can consider the barriers for these installations to be largely the same...

  19. Fuel-cell based power generating system having power conditioning apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Sudip K. (Chicago, IL); Pradhan, Sanjaya K. (Des Plaines, IL)

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A power conditioner includes power converters for supplying power to a load, a set of selection switches corresponding to the power converters for selectively connecting the fuel-cell stack to the power converters, and another set of selection switches corresponding to the power converters for selectively connecting the battery to the power converters. The power conveners output combined power that substantially optimally meets a present demand of the load.

  20. 24 DTU International Energy Report 2013 Stochastic power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that their power output can be curtailed if necessary. Renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, wave and tidal are not dispatchable. Indeed, wind farms and solar power plants can be scheduled and controlled only to the extent of energy storage, which can compen- sate for the limited predictability of wind and solar power. Changing

  1. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of large amounts of wind power production might requirewill be satisfactory as wind power provides an increasing64   7.2   Wind Power in Relation to System

  2. Integrated High Speed Intelligent Utility Tie Unit for Disbursed/Renewable Generation Facilities Worakarn Wongsaichua, Wei-Jen Lee Soontorn Oraintara Chiman Kwan Frank Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oraintara, Soontorn

    Integrated High Speed Intelligent Utility Tie Unit for Disbursed/Renewable Generation Facilities is to rejuvenate the idea of integrated resource planning and promote the distributed generation via traditional or renewable generation facilities for the deregulated utility systems. Fuel cell and photovoltaic are the most

  3. Advanced power generation systems for the 21st Century: Market survey and recommendations for a design philosophy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andriulli, J.B.; Gates, A.E.; Haynes, H.D.; Klett, L.B.; Matthews, S.N.; Nawrocki, E.A.; Otaduy, P.J.; Scudiere, M.B.; Theiss, T.J.; Thomas, J.F.; Tolbert, L.M.; Yauss, M.L.; Voltz, C.A.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of a study designed to enhance the performance of future military generator sets (gen-sets) in the medium power range. The study includes a market survey of the state of the art in several key component areas and recommendations comprising a design philosophy for future military gen-sets. The market survey revealed that the commercial market is in a state of flux, but it is currently or will soon be capable of providing the technologies recommended here in a cost-effective manner. The recommendations, if implemented, should result in future power generation systems that are much more functional than today's gen-sets. The number of differing units necessary (both family sizes and frequency modes) to cover the medium power range would be decreased significantly, while the weight and volume of each unit would decrease, improving the transportability of the power source. Improved fuel economy and overall performance would result from more effective utilization of the prime mover in the generator. The units would allow for more flexibility and control, improved reliability, and more effective power management in the field.

  4. Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

  5. A Hierarchical Control Algorithm for Managing Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Homes Equipped with PV Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    use their PV-based generation and controllable storage devices for peak shaving on their power demand controller should possess the ability of forecasting future PV-based power generation and load power consumption profiles for better performance. In this paper we present novel PV power generation and load power

  6. Plume opacity investigation at a stoker-fired power generating station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, G.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A public utility contacted the Conoco Coal Research Division through Consolidation Coal Company and requested technical assistance in determining the cause of a high plume opacity at one of their stoker-fired power generating stations. The sporadic occurrence of a high opacity plume (>20%) had been reported for several years. Although the utility was burning low sulfur coal, sulfuric acid mist had been suspected as the cause of the plume opacity; therefore, anhydrous ammonia had been injected into the flue gas at the ESP inlet plenums to control the plume opacity with some degree of success. However, for the last two years, the high plume opacity has occurred more frequently. The possible causes of the high plume opacity investigated were: 1) organic species emissions, 2) particulate mass loading, 3) particle size distribution, and 4) sulfuric acid emissions. The investigation included detailed sampling inside the boiler, stack, and plume areas. It was determined that the major cause of the high plume opacity was submicron particle growth at the stack exit due to sulfuric acid/water condensation. The larger particles more efficiently scattered light which resulted in the visible plume at the stack exit. The organic emissions and particulate mass loading in the stack flue gas had minimal effect on the high plume opacity. The fly ash size distribution would also have had minimal effect if the sulfuric acid had not been present.

  7. Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic projection of 25% market penetration by 2020, involving a mixture of sedans and sport utility vehicles. The calculations were done using the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model, a model developed over the past 12 years to evaluate a wide variety of critical electricity sector issues. Seven scenarios were run for each region for 2020 and 2030, for a total of 182 scenarios. In addition to a base scenario of no PHEVs, the authors modeled scenarios assuming that vehicles were either plugged in starting at 5:00 p.m. (evening) or at 10:00 p.m.(night) and left until fully charged. Three charging rates were examined: 120V/15A (1.4 kW), 120V/20A (2 kW), and 220V/30A (6 kW). Most regions will need to build additional capacity or utilize demand response to meet the added demand from PHEVs in the evening charging scenarios, especially by 2030 when PHEVs have a larger share of the installed vehicle base and make a larger demand on the system. The added demands of evening charging, especially at high power levels, can impact the overall demand peaks and reduce the reserve margins for a region's system. Night recharging has little potential to influence peak loads, but will still influence the amount and type of generation.

  8. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Undrill. 1975. "Automatic Generation Control", IEEE Tutorialfraction of generation providing response grid. The adjustment of generation, minute-by- minute, in

  9. Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

  10. Space-based solar power generation using a distributed network of satellites and methods for efficient space power transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLinko, Ryan M.

    Space-based solar power (SSP) generation is being touted as a solution to our ever-increasing energy consumption and dependence on fossil fuels. Satellites in Earth's orbit can capture solar energy through photovoltaic ...

  11. Integration and operation of post-combustion capture system on coal-fired power generation: load following and peak power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brasington, Robert David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-fired power plants with post combustion capture and sequestration (CCS) systems have a variety of challenges to integrate the steam generation, air quality control, cooling water systems and steam turbine with the ...

  12. Next-Generation Power Electronics: Reducing Energy Waste and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power electronics. This technology uses electronic components such as inverters and transformers to convert the electricity from your wall outlet into the right voltage and current...

  13. Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    feasibility of the use of an existing low-temperature geothermal resource for combined heat and power; and Maintain and enhance existing geothermal district heating operation....

  14. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    materials (CLSM), reported by ACI Committee 229 Rajendran, N. (1997) 15 > Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. Electrotek Concepts. (1995) 15 > WABASH RIVER COAL...

  15. Membranes for H2 generation from nuclear powered thermochemical cycles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Ambrosini, Andrea; Garino, Terry J.; Gelbard, Fred; Leung, Kevin; Navrotsky, Alexandra (University of California, Davis, CA); Iyer, Ratnasabapathy G. (University of California, Davis, CA); Axness, Marlene

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to produce hydrogen without the unwanted greenhouse gas byproducts, high-temperature thermochemical cycles driven by heat from solar energy or next-generation nuclear power plants are being explored. The process being developed is the thermochemical production of Hydrogen. The Sulfur-Iodide (SI) cycle was deemed to be one of the most promising cycles to explore. The first step of the SI cycle involves the decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} into O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O at temperatures around 850 C. In-situ removal of O{sub 2} from this reaction pushes the equilibrium towards dissociation, thus increasing the overall efficiency of the decomposition reaction. A membrane is required for this oxygen separation step that is capable of withstanding the high temperatures and corrosive conditions inherent in this process. Mixed ionic-electronic perovskites and perovskite-related structures are potential materials for oxygen separation membranes owing to their robustness, ability to form dense ceramics, capacity to stabilize oxygen nonstoichiometry, and mixed ionic/electronic conductivity. Two oxide families with promising results were studied: the double-substituted perovskite A{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}B{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (A=La, Y; B=Cr-Ni), in particular the family La{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCM), and doped La{sub 2}Ni{sub 1-x}M{sub x}O{sub 4} (M = Cu, Zn). Materials and membranes were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray and neutron diffraction, SEM, thermal analyses, calorimetry and conductivity. Furthermore, we were able to leverage our program with a DOE/NE sponsored H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition reactor study (at Sandia), in which our membranes were tested in the actual H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition step.

  16. Reactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    -loadability Reactive power margin Wind turbine a b s t r a c t This paper proposes static and dynamic VAR planningReactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage February 2013 Available online Keywords: Composite load Distributed generation D-STATCOM Q

  17. MULTI-WATT ELECTRIC POWER FROM A MICROFABRICATED PERMANENT-MAGNET GENERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MULTI-WATT ELECTRIC POWER FROM A MICROFABRICATED PERMANENT-MAGNET GENERATOR S. Das1 , D. P. Arnold2 presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of permanent-magnet (PM) generators for use, coupled to a transformer and rectifier, delivers 1.1 W of DC electrical power to a resistive load

  18. Analysis of geothermal electric-power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, Lemhi County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struhsacker, D.W. (ed.)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big Creek Hot Springs was evaluated as a source of electrical power for the Blackbird Cobalt Mine, approximately 13 miles south of the hot spring. An evaluaton of the geothermal potential of Big Creek Hot Springs, a suggested exploration program and budget, an engineering feasibility study of power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, an economic analysis of the modeled power generating system, and an appraisal of the institutional factors influencing development at Big Creek Hot Springs are included.

  19. Assessment of Metal Media Filters for Advanced Coal-Based Power Generation Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.

    2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. This paper reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion conditions.

  20. Water value in power generation: Experts distinguish water use and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter 2013 tx H2O 11 ] Story by Danielle Kalisek In Grimes County, the sun sets over Gibbons Creek Reservoir, the cooling water supply for an adjacent power plant. Photo by Leslie Lee. WATER VALUE IN POWER GENERATION Experts distinguish... water use and consumption Having enough water available for municipal and agricultural needs is o#23;en discussed; however, having the water needed to generate electric power and the electricity needed to treat and transport water is a struggle all...

  1. Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power to control voltage of distribution networks with DG using reactive power compensation approach. In this paper profile within the specified limits, it is essential to regulate the reactive power of the compensators

  2. Assessment of architectural options for surface power generation and energy storage on human Mars missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    of the Martian day). Given the significant policy and sustainability advantages of solar power compared-film photovoltaic arrays and energy storage technologies that is anticipated over the coming decades, solar powerAssessment of architectural options for surface power generation and energy storage on human Mars

  3. FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER and Corn Stover Collection for Heat and Power Generation Mitchell A. Myhre Advisor: Associate Professor heat and electric power. To perform this analysis, yield and production potentials were explored

  4. MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF LIFETIME CONSUMPTION of a combined cycle power plant under consideration of the real cost of lifetime usage is accomplished behavior of a combined cycle power plant. In order to model both the continuous/discrete dynamics

  5. Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

  6. Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

  7. Message passing for integrating and assessing renewable generation in a redundant power grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zdeborova, Lenka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified model of a redundant power grid is used to study integration of fluctuating renewable generation. The grid consists of large number of generator and consumer nodes. The net power consumption is determined by the difference between the gross consumption and the level of renewable generation. The gross consumption is drawn from a narrow distribution representing the predictability of aggregated loads, and we consider two different distributions representing wind and solar resources. Each generator is connected to D consumers, and redundancy is built in by connecting R {le} D of these consumers to other generators. The lines are switchable so that at any instance each consumer is connected to a single generator. We explore the capacity of the renewable generation by determining the level of 'firm' generation capacity that can be displaced for different levels of redundancy R. We also develop message-passing control algorithm for finding switch sellings where no generator is overloaded.

  8. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  9. Motion-to-Energy (M2E™) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  10. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fan blades Karr, O.F.; Brooks, J.B.; Seay, E. (1993) 19 > Status of superconducting power transformer development Johnson, R.C.; McConnell, B.W.; Mehta, S.P. and others...

  11. Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems (PWPS), and the United StatesDepartment of Energy will demonstrate that electric power can begenerated from the geothermal heat co-produced when extractingoil and gas from...

  12. Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation and Distribution:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    W ; Trainor-Guitton, W (2013) 18 Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John (2011) 18 Wind power...

  13. Enhanced Efficiency of Wind-Diesel Power Generation in Tribal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    a 30% reduction in the use of fuel at the power plant, and at least a 30% reduction in heating fuel used by the tribal residences installed with electric thermal storage devices....

  14. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  15. Motion-to-Energy (M2Eâ?¢) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  16. Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    field operated by Continental Resources, Inc. in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be...

  17. Generation Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Power

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many local governments are using green power in their facilities and providing assistance to local businesses and residents to do the same. Green power is a subset of renewable energy that is produced with no GHG emissions, typically from solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, biomass, or low-impact small hydroelectric sources, includes three types of products: utility products (i.e., green power purchased from the utility through the electricity grid), renewable energy certificates (RECs), and on-site generation. Opportunities to purchase these products are increasing significantly, with annual green power market growth rates

  18. Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States 1013776 #12;#12;ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com www.epri.com Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA: 2008. 1013776. #12;#12;v PRODUCT

  19. Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus by re-dispatching generator outputs, using a normal vector found at a voltage collapse boundary or a low voltage boundary (LVB). This method uses the normal vector as an indicator to change the generation

  20. The potential impacts of climate-change policy on freshwater use in thermoelectric power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    The potential impacts of climate-change policy on freshwater use in thermoelectric power generation to generate electricity. We analyze what these changes could entail for electricity generation in the United carbon prices (4$50/tonne CO2), however, retrofitting coal plants to capture CO2 increases freshwater

  1. Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drost, M.K.

    1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  2. Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drost, Monte K. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

  3. Generation of Alfven waves by high power pulse at the electron plasma frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    Generation of Alfve´n waves by high power pulse at the electron plasma frequency B. Van CompernolleG, Helium) capable of supporting Alfve´n waves has been studied. The interaction leads to the generation locations. Citation: Van Compernolle, B., W. Gekelman, P. Pribyl, and T. A. Carter (2005), Generation

  4. Economic Assessment and Impacts Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles on Electric Utilities And Regional U.S. Power Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Elliott, Douglas B.; Warwick, William M.

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 2 provides an economic assessment of the impacts of PHEV adoption on vehicle owners and on electric utilities. The paper finds favorable impacts on LCC to vehicle owners, and average costs of power for both types of utilities.

  5. Economic Assessment And Impacts Assessment Of Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles On Electric Utilities And Regional U.S. Power Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Elliott, Douglas B.; Warwick, William M.

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 2 provides an economic assessment of the impacts of PHEV adoption on vehicle owners and on electric utilities. The paper finds favorable impacts on LCC to vehicle owners, and average costs of power for both types of utilities.

  6. Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

  7. Gigawatt peak power generation in a relativistic klystron amplifier driven by 1 kW seed-power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y. [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China) [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xie, H. Q. [College of Science, Southwestern University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)] [College of Science, Southwestern University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. J.; Ma, Q. S. [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier driven by kW-level RF power is proposed and studied experimentally. In the device, the RF lossy material is introduced to suppress higher mode excitation. An output power of 1.95 GW with a gain of 62.8 dB is obtained in the simulation. Under conditions of an input RF power of 1.38 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.9 GW, frequency of 2.86 GHz, and duration of 105 ns is generated in the experiment, and the corresponding gain is 61.4 dB.

  8. Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L. A.; Cory, K. S.; Swezey, B. G.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines utility experiences when offering the fixed-price benefits of renewable energy in green pricing programs, including the methods utilized and the impact on program participation. It focuses primarily on utility green pricing programs in states that have not undergone electric industry restructuring.

  9. Design and analysis of modern three-phase AC/AC power converters for AC drives and utility interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Sangshin

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    output current/voltage waveforms and fast dynamic response in high power areas. A new topology and control scheme for a six-step current source inverter is proposed. The proposed topology utilizes a small voltage source inverter, to turn off main...

  10. $18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations.

  11. Rayapati Power Generation Pvt Ltd RPGPL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRaus Power Ltd Jump to:Kiran ProjectsRayapati Power

  12. Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

  13. Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

  14. Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressured Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron; Davis, John

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI) and Thar Energy LLC (Thar) applied technology engineering and economic analysis to evaluate two advanced oxy-combustion power cycles, the Cryogenic Pressurized Oxy-combustion Cycle (CPOC), and the Supercritical Oxy-combustion Cycle. This assessment evaluated the performance and economic cost of the two proposed cycles with carbon capture, and included a technology gap analysis of the proposed technologies to determine the technology readiness level of the cycle and the cycle components. The results of the engineering and economic analysis and the technology gap analysis were used to identify the next steps along the technology development roadmap for the selected cycle. The project objectives, as outlined in the FOA, were 90% CO{sub 2} removal at no more than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE) as compared to a Supercritical Pulverized Coal Plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The supercritical oxy-combustion power cycle with 99% carbon capture achieves a COE of $121/MWe. This revised COE represents a 21% reduction in cost as compared to supercritical steam with 90% carbon capture ($137/MWe). However, this represents a 49% increase in the COE over supercritical steam without carbon capture ($80.95/MWe), exceeding the 35% target. The supercritical oxy-combustion cycle with 99% carbon capture achieved a 37.9% HHV plant efficiency (39.3% LHV plant efficiency), when coupling a supercritical oxy-combustion thermal loop to an indirect supercritical CO{sub 2} (sCO{sub 2}) power block. In this configuration, the power block achieved 48% thermal efficiency for turbine inlet conditions of 650°C and 290 atm. Power block efficiencies near 60% are feasible with higher turbine inlet temperatures, however a design tradeoff to limit firing temperature to 650°C was made in order to use austenitic stainless steels for the high temperature pressure vessels and piping and to minimize the need for advanced turbomachinery features such as blade cooling. The overall technical readiness of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is TRL 2, Technology Concept, due to the maturity level of the supercritical oxy-combustor for solid fuels, and several critical supporting components, as identified in the Technical Gap Analysis. The supercritical oxycombustor for solid fuels operating at pressures near 100 atm is a unique component of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle. In addition to the low TRL supercritical oxy-combustor, secondary systems were identified that would require adaptation for use with the supercritical oxycombustion cycle. These secondary systems include the high pressure pulverized coal feed, high temperature cyclone, removal of post-combustion particulates from the high pressure cyclone underflow stream, and micro-channel heat exchangers tolerant of particulate loading. Bench scale testing was utilized to measure coal combustion properties at elevated pressures in a CO{sub 2} environment. This testing included coal slurry preparation, visualization of coal injection into a high pressure fluid, and modification of existing test equipment to facilitate the combustion properties testing. Additional bench scale testing evaluated the effectiveness of a rotary atomizer for injecting a coal-water slurry into a fluid with similar densities, as opposed to the typical application where the high density fluid is injected into a low density fluid. The swirl type supercritical oxy-combustor was developed from initial concept to an advanced design stage through numerical simulation using FLUENT and Chemkin to model the flow through the combustor and provide initial assessment of the coal combustion reactions in the flow path. This effort enabled the initial combustor mechanical layout, initial pressure vessel design, and the conceptual layout of a pilot scale test loop. A pilot scale demonstration of the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle is proposed as the next step in the technology development. This demonstration would advance the supercritical oxy-combustion cycle and the supercritical

  15. EVALUATION OF PV GENERATION CAPICITY CREDIT FORECAST ON DAY-AHEAD UTILITY MARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    City, and Sacramento Municipal Utility District, in California 1. BACKGROUND The effective capacity comfortable if capacity could be ascertained operationally by knowing in advance what the output of solar of the NDFD-based solar radiation forecasts for several climatically distinct locations, the evaluation is now

  16. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  17. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  18. Geothermal Power Generation as Related to Resource Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, J. A.; Richards, R. G.; Keilman, L. R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requirements/kWh, and pounds brine/pound of steam to the turbine were ascertained. This was done over a range of downhole temperatures of from 350F to 475F. The studies illustrate the total interdependence of the geothermal resource and its associated power...

  19. A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan, Sw China) | Openbeneath Butte,Energy

  20. Electric Power Generation from Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThisEcoGridCounty,Portal,105.Electric FuelGas

  1. Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems, Part 2: Modeling, Development, and Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Control Functions for Single-Phase Utility-Connected Inverter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Kramer, W.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating renewable energy and distributed generations into the Smart Grid architecture requires power electronic (PE) for energy conversion. The key to reaching successful Smart Grid implementation is to develop interoperable, intelligent, and advanced PE technology that improves and accelerates the use of distributed energy resource systems. This report describes the simulation, design, and testing of a single-phase DC-to-AC inverter developed to operate in both islanded and utility-connected mode. It provides results on both the simulations and the experiments conducted, demonstrating the ability of the inverter to provide advanced control functions such as power flow and VAR/voltage regulation. This report also analyzes two different techniques used for digital signal processor (DSP) code generation. Initially, the DSP code was written in C programming language using Texas Instrument's Code Composer Studio. In a later stage of the research, the Simulink DSP toolbox was used to self-generate code for the DSP. The successful tests using Simulink self-generated DSP codes show promise for fast prototyping of PE controls.

  2. Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind turbine is discussed in this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    operating a variable-speed wind turbine with pitch control to maximize power while minimizing the loads prediction, power ramp rate, data mining, wind turbine operation strategy, generator torque, blade pitch1 Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind

  3. Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

  4. Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technologiesinchart.ppt More Documents & Publications Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 7 8 System) - Reedsport PB150...

  5. American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Smart™ provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

  6. American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Smart ™ provides energy efficiency incentives to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. Efficiency Smart assists residential, commercial , and...

  7. The CAIR vacatur raises uncertainty in the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Weiss; John Kinsman [Duke Energy Indiana (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On 11 July 2008, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia issued a unanimous decision vacating the entire Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the associated federal implementation plan. The upset of this program to reduce power plant sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in the eastern United States was a great surprise, creating operational and planning turmoil in the industry. 4 refs.

  8. Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New EnergyAnatoliaSciraShenhuaWindPowerSoham

  9. Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumSunwaysDatang Chifeng Saihanba Wind Power Co Ltd

  10. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

  11. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

  12. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the selected thermochemical process and to define the selected reactor and process to the point that capital costs, operating costs and the resultant cost of hydrogen can be estimated. During original contract negotiation, it was necessary to reduce work scope to meet funding limits. As a result, the reactor interface and process will not be iterated to the point that only hydrogen is produced. Rather, hydrogen and electricity will be co-generated and the hydrogen cost will be stated as a function of the electricity sales price.

  13. Reliability Improvement Programs in Steam Distribution and Power Generation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petto, S.

    RELIABILITY IIIPROVEfWlT PROGRAMS IN STEAM DISTRIBUTION AND POVER GENERATION SYSTEItS Steve Petto Tech/Serv Corporation Blue Bell, PA Abstract This paper will present alternatives to costly corrective maintenance of the steam trap... In the reliability and efficiency of the system. Recent studies have shownt hat more than 40% of all In stalled steam traps and 20% of certain types of valves need some form of corrective action. The majority of all high backpressure problems In condensate return...

  14. Advanced natural gas-fired turbine system utilizing thermochemical recuperation and/or partial oxidation for electricity generation, greenfield and repowering applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance, economics and technical feasibility of heavy duty combustion turbine power systems incorporating two advanced power generation schemes have been estimated to assess the potential merits of these advanced technologies. The advanced technologies considered were: Thermochemical Recuperation (TCR), and Partial Oxidation (PO). The performance and economics of these advanced cycles are compared to conventional combustion turbine Simple-Cycles and Combined-Cycles. The objectives of the Westinghouse evaluation were to: (1) simulate TCR and PO power plant cycles, (2) evaluate TCR and PO cycle options and assess their performance potential and cost potential compared to conventional technologies, (3) identify the required modifications to the combustion turbine and the conventional power cycle components to utilize the TCR and PO technologies, (4) assess the technical feasibility of the TCR and PO cycles, (5) identify what development activities are required to bring the TCR and PO technologies to commercial readiness. Both advanced technologies involve the preprocessing of the turbine fuel to generate a low-thermal-value fuel gas, and neither technology requires advances in basic turbine technologies (e.g., combustion, airfoil materials, airfoil cooling). In TCR, the turbine fuel is reformed to a hydrogen-rich fuel gas by catalytic contact with steam, or with flue gas (steam and carbon dioxide), and the turbine exhaust gas provides the indirect energy required to conduct the endothermic reforming reactions. This reforming process improves the recuperative energy recovery of the cycle, and the delivery of the low-thermal-value fuel gas to the combustors potentially reduces the NO{sub x} emission and increases the combustor stability.

  15. Applying epoch-era analysis for homeowner selection of distributed generation power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piña, Alexander L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current shift from centralized energy generation to a more distributed model has opened a number of choices for homeowners to provide their own power. While there are a number of systems to purchase, there are no tools ...

  16. Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be...

  17. Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Söderholm, Patrik

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

  18. Strategic investment in power generation under uncertainty : Electric Reliability Council of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiyangwa, Diana Kudakwashe

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to develop a strategy for investment in power generation technologies in the future given the uncertainties in climate policy and fuel prices. First, such studies are commonly conducted using ...

  19. Gas production response to price signals: Implications for electric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, M.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas production response to price signals is outlined. The following topics are discussed: Structural changes in the U.S. gas exploration and production industry, industry outlook, industry response to price signals, and implications for electric power generators.

  20. Efficiency, Cost and Weight Trade-off in TE Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Generation System for Vehicle Exhaust Applications It contains a detailed co-optimization of the thermoelectric module with the heat sink and a study of the tradeoff between...

  1. ROBUST CONTROL ANALYSIS USING REAL-TIME IMPLEMENTATION OF A HYBRID FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is performed for a hybrid Fuel Cell/Supercapacitor generation system with power management, realized through converters interfacing the Fuel Cell (FC) and the Supercapacitor (SC) with the system electrical load

  2. Transient stability enhancement of electric power generating systems by 120-degree phase rotation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cresap, Richard L. (Portland, OR); Taylor, Carson W. (Portland, OR); Kreipe, Michael J. (Portland, OR)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for enhancing the transient stability of an intertied three-phase electric power generating system. A set of power exporting generators (10) is connected to a set of power importing generators (20). When a transient cannot be controlled by conventional stability controls, and imminent loss of synchronism is detected (such as when the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets exceeds a predetermined value, such as 150 degrees), the intertie is disconnected by circuit breakers. Then a switch (30) having a 120-degree phase rotation, or a circuit breaker having a 120-degree phase rotation is placed in the intertie. The intertie is then reconnected. This results in a 120-degree reduction in the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets, making the system more stable and allowing more time for the conventional controls to stabilize the transient.

  3. EA-290 Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing American Electric Power80AC NOBLE89-B

  4. EA-290-A Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing American Electric Power80AC NOBLE89-B-A

  5. EA-290-B Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing American Electric Power80AC NOBLE89-B-A-B

  6. Powering Curiosity: Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6DepartmentOutages Update:Fleet

  7. Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment ofPowered VehicleDepartment offor2forinHigh

  8. Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy CoFirst SecondTianjing Shenzhou Wind Power Co

  9. Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d FNEPA/309 Reviewers | DepartmentSiteMaryland |2POWER ELECTRONICS

  10. Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    of virtual impedance parameters and (ii) higher accuracy in reactive power flow calculation. The improved With larger portion of growing electricity demand which is being fed through distributed generation (DG, in order to decouple real and reactive power, to increase the stability margin and also to improve

  11. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Assessment of Other Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and wind power, covered in more detail in specific papers. The paper begins with an overview of generating adoption of the Plan. Wind plant construction is driven by extension of the federal production tax credit of wind power development in the Northwest. A preliminary estimate prepared for the Northwest Wind

  12. A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption Anna Nagurney and Dmytro Matsypura Department of Finance and Operations Management Isenberg School, Berlin, Germany, pp. 3-27. Abstract: A supply chain network perspective for electric power production

  13. Solving the Unit Commitment Problem in Power Generation by Primal and Dual Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    - storage hydro plants a large-scale mixed integer optimization model for unit commitment is developed optimal scheduling of on/o decisions and output levels for generating units in a power system over on the shares of nuclear, conventional thermal, hydro and pumped-storage hydro power in the underlying

  14. The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagerty, John Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

  15. Heat Transfer and Thermophotovoltaic Power Generation in Oil-fired Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.; Hammonds, J.S.; Horne, E.; Kamath, B.; Carpenter, J.; Woods, D.R.

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study is the production of electric power in an oil-fired, residential heatingsystem using thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion devices. This work uses experimental, computational, and analytical methods to investigate thermal mechanisms that drive electric power production in the TPV systems. An objective of this work is to produce results that will lead to the development of systems that generate enough electricity such that the boiler is self-powering. An important design constraint employed in this investigation is the use of conventional, yellow-flame oil burners, integrated with a typical boiler. The power production target for the systems developed here is 100 W - the power requirement for a boiler that uses low-power auxiliary components. The important heattransfer coupling mechanisms that drive power production in the systems studied are discussed. The results of this work may lead to the development of systems that export power to the home electric system.

  16. Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Separation and Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Hunt, Jennifer; Patel, Dilip; Steen, William A.; Richardson, Carl F.; Marina, Olga A.

    2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    uelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) has developed a novel system concept for separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources using an electrochemical membrane (ECM). The salient feature of the ECM is its capability to produce electric power while capturing CO2 from flue gas, such as from an existing pulverized coal (PC) plant. Laboratory scale testing of the ECM has verified the feasibility of the technology for CO2 separation from simulated flue gases of PC plants as well as combined cycle power plants and other industrial facilities. Recently, FCE was awarded a contract (DE-FE0007634) from the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the use of ECM to efficiently and cost effectively separate CO2 from the emissions of existing coal fired power plants. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from flue gas of an existing PC plant with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE) produced by the plant. The specific objectives and related activities planned for the project include: 1) conduct bench scale tests of a planar membrane assembly consisting of ten or more cells of about 0.8 m2 area each, 2) develop the detailed design for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to an existing PC plant, and 3) evaluate the effects of impurities (pollutants such as SO2, NOx, Hg) present in the coal plant flue gas by conducting laboratory scale performance tests of the membrane. The results of this project are anticipated to demonstrate that the ECM is an advanced technology, fabricated from inexpensive materials, based on proven operational track records, modular, scalable to large sizes, and a viable candidate for >90% carbon capture from existing PC plants. In this paper, the fundamentals of ECM technology including: material of construction, principal mechanisms of operation, carbon capture test results and the benefits of applications to PC plants will be presented.

  17. Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A mono-container fuel cell generator contains a layer of interior insulation, a layer of exterior insulation and a single housing between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation in the interior of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650 C, where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling. 7 figs.

  18. Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mono-container fuel cell generator (10) contains a layer of interior insulation (14), a layer of exterior insulation (16) and a single housing (20) between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation (14) in the interior (12) of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650.degree. C., where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing (20) below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling.

  19. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

  20. High gliding fluid power generation system with fluid component separation and multiple condensers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahmoud, Ahmad M; Lee, Jaeseon; Radcliff, Thomas D

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An example power generation system includes a vapor generator, a turbine, a separator and a pump. In the separator, the multiple components of the working fluid are separated from each other and sent to separate condensers. Each of the separate condensers is configured for condensing a single component of the working fluid. Once each of the components condense back into a liquid form they are recombined and exhausted to a pump that in turn drives the working fluid back to the vapor generator.

  1. Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

  2. Review of Historical and Modern Utilization of Wind Power Publications Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    words are used, such as windmill and wind turbines. The word windmill indicates that wind power of Alexandria, who in the third or second century BC described a simple horizontal-axis wind turbine seriously used wind power from a vertical-axis machine. From Asia the use of wind power spread to Europe

  3. Short term generation scheduling in photovoltaic-utility grid with battery storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marwali, M.K.C.; Ma, H.; Shahidehpour, S.M. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering] [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Abdul-Rahman, K.H. [Siemens Energy and Automation, Brooklyn Park, MN (United States)] [Siemens Energy and Automation, Brooklyn Park, MN (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an efficient approach to short term resource scheduling for an integrated thermal and photovoltaic-battery generation. The proposed model incorporated battery storage for peak load shaving. Several constraints including battery capacity, minimum up/down time and ramp rates for thermal units, as well as natural photovoltaic (PV) capacity are considered in the proposed model. A case study composed of 26 thermal units and a PV-battery plant is presented to test the efficiency of the method.

  4. DISTRIBUTED GENERATION POWER UNITS AT MARGINAL OIL WELL SITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Carl

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The CEC approved funding on April 9, 2003 for $1,000,000.00 instead of the $1,500,000.00 COPE requested for the project. A kickoff meeting with the California Energy Commission (CEC) was held on Monday, April 14, 2003, in their Sacramento, CA offices. Mark Carl, IOGCC project manager for the DOE grant, attended this meeting, along with Bob Fickes with COPE, Edan Prabhu, Mike Merlo and CEC officials. The change in funding by the CEC required a modification in the scope of work and an amended form DOE F 4600.1. The modifications were completed and the IOGCC received approval to commence work on the project on May 9, 2003. On May 29, 2003, Virginia Weyland with DOE/NETL, Mark Carl with IOGCC, and Bob Fickes with COPE, Edan Prabhu and Mike Merlo, consultants with COPE, participated in a teleconference kick-off meeting. During May, 2003, COPE canvassed its membership for potential locations for the four test sites. They received a very good response and have identified at least two potential sites for each of the four test sites. COPE has been obtaining gas samples from the various potential lease sites for analyses to verify the chemical properties analyses which the oil and gas producers provided during the initial contact period. The St. James project located at 814 W. 23 rd Street in Los Angeles, California, was selected as the first test site for the project. A Project Advisory Committee (PAC) was established in May, 2003. The following representatives from each of the following areas of expertise comprise the PAC membership. Acquisition of permits for the initial test site has required drawn out negotiations with CEC which has hindered progress on the technical aspects of the project. The technical aspects will begin aggressively beginning in October, 2003. The Southern California Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) donated three Capstone micro-turbines to the project. These micro-turbines will be utilized at the St. James Project site located in Los Angeles, California. This site will fulfill the requirements of the medium BTU test site. It is anticipated that start-up of operations will begin during late December, 2003 or early January, 2004.

  5. Rule Based Energy Management and Reporting System (EMRS) Applied to a Large Utility Power Station Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bamber, D.; Childress, R.; Robinson, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deregulation of electricity and rising fuel costs are causing renewed interest in Energy Management Systems (EMS) to service both the utility and private sectors. This paper details a case study of the successful integration of a new class of rule...

  6. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't Happen toLeveragingLindseyLong-TermLosof Energy

  7. The Use of Biomass for Power Generation in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, biomass has been man's principal source of energy, mainly used in the form of wood for cooking and heating. With the industrial revolution and the introduction of motorized transportation and electricity, fossil fuels became the dominant source of energy. Today, biomass is the largest domestic source of renewable energy providing over 3% of total U.S. energy consumption, and surpassing hydropower. Yet, recent increases in the price and volatility of fossil fuel supplies and the financial impacts from a number of financially distressed investments in natural gas combined cycle power plants have led to a renewed interest in electricity generation from biomass. The biomass-fueled generation market is a dynamic one that is forecast to show significant growth over the next two decades as environmental drivers are increasingly supported by commercial ones. The most significant change is likely to come from increases in energy prices, as decreasing supply and growing demand increase the costs of fossil fuel-generated electricity and improve the competitive position of biomass as a power source. The report provides an overview of the renewed U.S. market interest in biomass-fueled power generation and gives a concise look at what's driving interest in biomass-fueled generation, the challenges faced in implementing biomass-fueled generation projects, and the current and future state of biomass-fueled generation. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of biomass-fueled generation including its history, the current market environment, and its future prospects; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in biomass-fueled generation; an analysis of the challenges that are hindering the implementation of biomass-fueled generation projects; a description of the various feedstocks that can be used for biomass-fueled generation; an evaluation of the biomass supply chain; a description of biomass-fueled generation technologies; and, a review of the economic drivers of biomass-fueled generation project success.

  8. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

  9. The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puga, J. Nicolas

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

  10. Co-generation of electricity and heat from combustion of wood powder utilizing thermophotovoltaic conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broman, L. [Solar Energy Research Center, University College of Falun/Borlaenge, P.O. Box 10044, S-781 10 Borlaenge, Sweden, Phone +46 2437 3747, fax 3750, e-mail lbratt.hfb.se (Sweden); Marks, J. [Department of Operational Efficiency, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences S-776 98 Garpenberg, Sweden, Phone +46 2252 6068, fax 2162 (Sweden)

    1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a thermophotovoltaic converter that uses combustion of wood powder as energy source has started with development of the combustion source. During the last few months, we have constructed and tested a feeding mechanism and a combustion chamber that seem very promising. We manage to keep a 10 kW flame steadily burning for several minutes at the time, generating a temperature exceeding 1400 K. The plans for continued development of this and other components of the converter are discussed in the paper. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Title: Clinical Operations During Utility Outages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , medical gases, natural gas, sewer stoppage or telephone and computer systems. B. Emergency Generator Power generator power outlets, identified in red, should utilize emergency generator power outlets to maintain includes electrical power failure, water, heating or air conditioning, but may include fire alarm systems

  12. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Ramana G. [The University of Alabama] [The University of Alabama

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222ºC) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 °C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the go/no-go goals stipulated by the DOE for this project. Energy densities of all salt mixtures were higher than that of the current solar salt. The salt mixtures costs have been estimated and TES system costs for a 2 tank, direct approach have been estimated for each of these materials. All estimated costs are significantly below the baseline system that used solar salt. These lower melt point salts offer significantly higher energy density per volume than solar salt – and therefore attractively smaller inventory and equipment costs. Moreover, a new TES system geometry has been recommended A variety of approaches were evaluated to use the low melting point molten salt. Two novel changes are recommended that 1) use the salt as a HTF through the solar trough field, and 2) use the salt to not only create steam but also to preheat the condensed feedwater for Rankine cycle. The two changes enable the powerblock to operate at 500°C, rather than the current 400°C obtainable using oil as the HTF. Secondly, the use of salt to preheat the feedwater eliminates the need to extract steam from the low pressure turbine for that purpose. Together, these changes result in a dramatic 63% reduction required for 6 hour salt inventory, a 72% reduction in storage volume, and a 24% reduction in steam flow rate in the power block. Round trip efficiency for the Case 5 - 2 tank “direct” system is estimated at >97%, with only small losses from time under storage and heat exchange, and meeting RFP goals. This attractive efficiency is available because the major heat loss experienced in a 2 tank “indirect” system - losses by transferring the thermal energy from oil HTF to the salt storage material and back to oil to run the steam generator at night - is not present for the 2 tank direct system. The higher heat capacity values for both LMP and HMP systems enable larger storage capacities for concentrating solar power.

  13. On the impact of CO{sub 2} emission-trading on power generation emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappin, E.J.L.; Dijkema, G.P.J. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Europe one of the main policy instruments to meet the Kyoto reduction targets is CO{sub 2} emission-trading (CET), which was implemented as of January 2005. In this system, companies active in specific sectors must be in the possession of CO{sub 2} emission rights to an amount equal to their CO{sub 2} emission. In Europe, electricity generation accounts for one-third of CO{sub 2} emissions. Since the power generation sector has been liberalized, reregulated and privatized in the last decade, around Europe autonomous companies determine the sectors' CO{sub 2} emission. Short-term they adjust their operation, long-term they decide on (dis) investment in power generation facilities and technology selection. An agent-based model is presented to elucidate the effect of CET on the decisions of power companies in an oligopolistic market. Simulations over an extensive scenario-space show that there CET does have an impact. A long-term portfolio shift towards less-CO{sub 2} intensive power generation is observed. However, the effect of CET is relatively small and materializes late. The absolute emissions from power generation rise under most scenarios. This corresponds to the dominant character of current capacity expansion planned in the Netherlands (50%) and in Germany (68%), where companies have announced many new coal based power plants. Coal is the most CO{sub 2} intensive option available and it seems surprising that even after the introduction of CET these capacity expansion plans indicate a preference for coal. Apparently in power generation the economic effect of CO{sub 2} emission-trading is not sufficient to outweigh the economic incentives to choose for coal.

  14. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

  15. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

  16. Development of a lithium hydride powered hydrogen generator for use in long life, low power PEM fuel cell power supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strawser, Daniel DeWitt

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies a hybrid PEM fuel cell system for use in low power, long life sensor networks. PEM fuel cells offer high efficiency and environmental friendliness but have not been widely adopted due to cost, reliability, ...

  17. Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electricity supply system is undergoing major regulatory and technological change with significant implications for the way in which the sector will operate (including its patterns of carbon emissions) and for the policies required to ensure socially and environmentally desirable outcomes. One such change stems from the rapid emergence of viable small-scale (i.e., smaller than 500 kW) generators that are potentially competitive with grid delivered electricity, especially in combined heat and power configurations. Such distributed energy resources (DER) may be grouped together with loads in microgrids. These clusters could operate semi-autonomously from the established power system, or macrogrid, matching power quality and reliability more closely to local end-use requirements. In order to establish a capability for analyzing the effect that microgrids may have on typical commercial customers, such as office buildings, restaurants, shopping malls, and grocery stores, an economic mod el of DER adoption is being developed at Berkeley Lab. This model endeavors to indicate the optimal quantity and type of small on-site generation technologies that customers could employ given their electricity requirements. For various regulatory schemes and general economic conditions, this analysis produces a simple operating schedule for any installed generators. Early results suggest that many commercial customers can benefit economically from on-site generation, even without considering potential combined heat and power and reliability benefits, even though they are unlikely to disconnect from the established power system.

  18. Computational Research Challenges and Opportunities for the Optimization of Fossil Energy Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging fossil energy power generation systems must operate with unprecedented efficiency and near-zero emissions, while optimizing profitably amid cost fluctuations for raw materials, finished products, and energy. To help address these challenges, the fossil energy industry will have to rely increasingly on the use advanced computational tools for modeling and simulating complex process systems. In this paper, we present the computational research challenges and opportunities for the optimization of fossil energy power generation systems across the plant lifecycle from process synthesis and design to plant operations. We also look beyond the plant gates to discuss research challenges and opportunities for enterprise-wide optimization, including planning, scheduling, and supply chain technologies.

  19. Utilizing Load Response for Wind and Solar Integration and Power System Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responsive load is still the most underutilized reliability resource in North America. This paper examines the characteristics of concern to the power system, the renewables, and to the loads.

  20. High power single-crystal fiber CW 946 nm laser and blue generation based on Rubidium-doped PPKTP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for high power, continuous wave and polarized laser at 946 nm (fig1.c). We demonstrate a polarized laser. Laurell, "High-power, continous-wave, second harmonic generation at 532 nm in periodically poled KTiOPO4(b)(a) (c) High power single-crystal fiber CW 946 nm laser and blue generation based on Rubidium