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1

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

2

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

3

Power generating system and method utilizing hydropyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor transmission cycle is described which burns a slurry of coal and water with some of the air from the gas turbine compressor, cools and cleans the resulting low-Btu fuel gas, burns the clean fuel gas with the remaining air from the compressor, and extracts the available energy in the gas turbine. The cycle lends itself to combined-cycle cogeneration for the production of steam, absorption cooling, and electric power.

Tolman, R.

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Non-utility power generation continues to grow  

SciTech Connect

This article examines why the number of non-utility power plants is increasing. The topics include the impact of the changes to the Public Utility Holding Company Act, and bidding for capacity. It includes a look at Texaco's Puget Sound oil refinery and how its efficiency problems were solved using cogeneration including the need to improve energy balance and engineering of the plant. Grayling generating station (wood waste) and Kalaeloa cogeneration power plant (low sulfur fuel oil) are also discussed.

Smith, D.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric power generation business. Included is a comparison between heavy-duty industrial combustion turbines and their rapidly evolving competition, aeroderivative machines, with emphasis on the appropriate application of each. The prospects for future improvements in the cost and performance of combustion turbines are reviewed, and the likely impact of advanced combustion turbine power generation concepts is considered. Also summarized is the outlook for power generation fuels, including the longer term reemergence of coal and the potential for widespread use of coal gasification-based combustion turbine systems. The paper draws heavily from a technical, economic, and business analysis, Combustion Turbine Power Systems, recently completed by SFA Pacific. The analysis was sponsored by an international group of energy companies that includes utilities, independent power producers (IPPs), and power industry equipment vendors.

Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

9

Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging problems is known as islanding phenomenon. This situation occurs when a network is disconnected from utility grid and is energized by local DFPGs. It can possibly result in injury to utility personnel arriving to service isolated feeders, equipment damage, and system malfunction. In response to the concern, this dissertation aims to develop a robust anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of DFPGs. In the first part, digital signal processor (DSP) controlled power electronic converters for utility interconnection of DFPGs are developed. Current control in a direct-quadrature (dq) synchronous frame is proposed. The real and reactive power is controlled by regulating inverter currents. The proposed digital current control in a synchronous frame significantly enhances the performance of DFPGs. In the second part, the robust anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of a DFPG is developed. The power control algorithm is proposed based on analysis of a real and reactive power mismatch. It continuously perturbs (±5%) the reactive power supplied by the DFPG while monitoring the voltage and frequency. If islanding were to occur, a measurable frequency deviation would take place, upon which the real power of the DFPG is further reduced to 80%; a drop in voltage positively confirms islanding. This method is shown to be robust and reliable. In the third part, an improved anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of multiple DFPGs is presented. The cross correlation method is proposed and implemented in conjunction with the power control algorithm. It calculates the cross correlation index of a rate of change of the frequency deviation and (±5%) the reactive power. If this index increases above 50%, the chance of islanding is high. The algorithm initiates (±10%) the reactive power and continues to calculate the correlation index. If the index exceeds 80%, islanding is now confirmed. The proposed method is robust and capable of detecting islanding in the presence of several DFPGs independently operating. Analysis, simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed.

Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.  

SciTech Connect

We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Small power systems study technical summary report. Volume II. Inventory of small generating units in U. S. utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Data identifying small (less than or equal to 10 MW) power units in the United States are tabulated. The data are listed alphabetically by state and are reported sequentially for investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electrical cooperatives and other utility systems. For a given utility system, the generating units are divided into steam turbines, diesel generators and gas turbines. The number and size of generating units are listed. A summary tabulation of the number of generating units of each type and total generating capacity by state is presented.

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic...

20

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via Responsive ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent ... Manufacturers of equipment sold to utilities to maximize the efficiency power generation More ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Concentrating solar power technologies offer utility-scale power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) is a utility-scale renewable energy option for generating electricity that is receiving considerable attention in the southwestern ...

22

EIS-0037: Springfield City Utilities, James River Generating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Springfield City Utilities, James River Generating Station, Power Plants 3 and 4, Springfield, Greene County, Missouri EIS-0037: Springfield City Utilities, James River...

23

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Photovoltaic Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is an overview of photovoltaic power generation. The purpose of the report is to provide the reader with a general understanding of photovoltaic power generation and how PV technology can be practically applied. There is a brief discussion of early research and a description of how photovoltaic cells convert sunlight to electricity. The report covers concentrating collectors, flat-plate collectors, thin-film technology, and building-integrated systems. The discussion of photovoltaic cell types includes single-crystal, poly-crystalline, and thin-film materials. The report covers progress in improving cell efficiencies, reducing manufacturing cost, and finding economic applications of photovoltaic technology. Lists of major manufacturers and organizations are included, along with a discussion of market trends and projections. The conclusion is that photovoltaic power generation is still more costly than conventional systems in general. However, large variations in cost of conventional electrical power, and other factors, such as cost of distribution, create situations in which the use of PV power is economically sound. PV power is used in remote applications such as communications, homes and villages in developing countries, water pumping, camping, and boating. Gridconnected applications such as electric utility generating facilities and residential rooftop installations make up a smaller but more rapidly expanding segment of PV use. Furthermore, as technological advances narrow the cost gap, more applications are becoming economically feasible at an accelerating rate. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ...................................................................................v

Tom Penick; Gale Greenleaf Instructor; Thomas Penick; Bill Louk; Bill Louk

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at the 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic...

28

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

29

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

green-power program. A "significant portion" of the electricity sold by a utility as green power must be generated using qualifying renewables, including wind energy,...

30

Radioisotope Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioisotope Power Generation Long lived power sources are needed for equipment that is too remote or inaccessible for replacement. By choosing a radioactive element with a long...

31

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

32

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility...

34

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Jump to: navigation, search Several states require certain electric utilities to offer customers the option of buying electricity generated from renewable resources, commonly known as “green power.” Typically, utilities offer green power generated using renewable resources that the utilities own (or for which they contract), or they buy renewable energy credits (RECs) from a renewable energy provider certified by a state public utilities commission [1] Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 17) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active DEMEC - Green Power Program (Delaware) Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Delaware Municipal Utility Solar Water Heat

35

Utilizing the connected power electronic converter for improved condition monitoring of induction motors and claw-pole generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation proposes several simple, robust, and non-intrusive condition monitoring methods for induction motors fed by closed-loop inverters and claw-pole generators with built-in rectifiers. While (more)

Cheng, Siwei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Geothermal Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION A PRIMER ON LOW-TEMPERATURE, SMALL-SCALE APPLICATIONS by Kevin Rafferty Geo-Heat Center January 2000 REALITY CHECK Owners of low-temperature...

37

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 © Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic Combustor for Fuel Flexible Turbines W. R. Laster Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation Abstract Siemens has been working on a catalytic combustor for natural gas operation for several years using the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL TM ) design. The design has been shown to produce low NOx emissions on natural gas operation. By operating the catalyst section fuel rich, the design shows considerable promise for robust operation over a wide range of fuel compositions including syngas. Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy' s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three year

38

Solar thermoelectrics for small scale power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past two decades, there has been a surge in the research of new thermoelectric (TE) materials, driven party by the need for clean and sustainable power generation technology. Utilizing the Seebeck effect, the ...

Amatya, Reja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, C.A.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Combined cycle and waste heat recovery power systems based on a novel thermodynamic energy cycle utilizing low-temperature heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A new thermodynamic energy cycle has been developed, using a multicomponent working agent. Condensation is supplemented with absorption, following expansion in the turbine. Several combined power systems based on this cycle have been designed and cost-estimated. Efficiencies of these new systems are 1.35 to 1.5 times higher than the best Rankine Cycle system, at the same border conditions. Investment cost per unit of power output is about two-thirds of the cost of a comparable Rankine Cycle system. Results make cogeneration economically attractive at current energy prices. The first experimental installation is planned by Fayette Manufacturing Company and Detroit Diesel Allison Division of General Motors.

Kalina, A.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via ...  

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via Responsive Loads Technology Summary A new methodology for dynamically managing an electrical ...

44

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning January 14, 2014 2:00PM to 3:00PM EST Online Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV "ownership" are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their resource planning processes. Analysts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Solar Electric Power

45

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Program on Technology Innovation: Distributed Photovoltaic Power Applications for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging PV technology brings significant opportunities for many stakeholders including electric utilities, electric customers, energy-service providers and PV equipment vendors. The opportunities for utilities range from owning and deploying various PV generation resources and related products to incentivizing other owners to install PV systems and technology that provide benefits to the power system. This technical update describes PV power system concepts that utilities may want to consider as they pl...

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Generation, distribution and utilization of electrical energy  

SciTech Connect

An up-to-date account of electric power generation and distribution (including coverage of the use of computers in various components of the power system). Describes conventional and unconventional methods of electricity generation and its economics, distribution methods, substation location, electric drives, high frequency power for induction and heating, illumination engineering, and electric traction. Each chapter contains illustrative worked problems, exercises (some with answers), and a bibliography.

Wadhwa, C.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 Asheville, NC April 1996 Donald E. OsbornDavid E. Collier Sacramento Municipal Utility...

50

Generation of electrical power  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element.

Hursen, Thomas F. (Monroeville, PA); Kolenik, Steven A. (Leechburg, PA); Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

52

Kraftwerk Union KWU Siemens Power Generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Services Product KWU is a provider of components and services to the commercial nuclear utility industry. References Kraftwerk Union (KWU) - Siemens Power Generation.1...

53

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrokinetic power generation using liquid water microjetscalculations of power generation and conversion efficiency.for electrokinetic power generation. By creating a jet of

Duffin, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Eligibility Construction InstallerContractor MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric...

55

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Municipal Power Start Date 01/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan with Lights: $15 Dehumidifier: $25 Select Clothes Washer: $50 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Furnace Fan with ECM: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $250 CFLs: up to 85% of cost Efficiency Smart (tm) provides energy efficiency incentives to the American

56

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Sacramento power utility experience in solar  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the development of three solar power technologies for use in Sacramento, California is provided. A central receiver power plant, Solar One, is being converted to a molten salt design with thermal energy storage by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and six other utilities. SMUD is also investigating a solar dish/sterling engine system and technologies to reduce photovoltaic conversion costs.

Smeloff, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Utilities expand baseload power plant plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the plans being made by electric utilities to expand the number of baseload plants to accommodate increasing power demands. The results of a survey of utility's construction plans is presented. The topics include current construction, construction planning in the Southeast, current baseload technology, nuclear potential, and incorporation of environmental externalities impact in planning.

Smock, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell: a model of a central utility plant.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This central utilities plant model details the major elements of a central utilities plant for several classes of users. The model enables the analyst to select optional, cost effective, plant features that are appropriate to a fuel cell application. These features permit the future plant owner to exploit all of the energy produced by the fuel cell, thereby reducing the total cost of ownership. The model further affords the analyst an opportunity to identify avoided costs of the fuel cell-based power plant. This definition establishes the performance and capacity information, appropriate to the class of user, to support the capital cost model and the feasibility analysis. It is detailed only to the depth required to identify the major elements of a fuel cell-based system. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Utility Response to Railroad Market Power: Assessment of Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal transportation is one of the largest and potentially least competitive costs of power generation. This report reviews possible strategies and recourse available to utilities to counter railroad market power. The implosion of the major carriers into just two major companies in the east and the west heralds an era of duopoly pricing for which no single solution presents itself, past strategies may no longer apply, and the prospect of burgeoning power transactions may offer surprisingly little help to ...

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs (as of December 2012) Which utilities are having the greatest success with their green power programs? NREL has compiled extensive data on utility green power programs and produced the following "Top Ten" lists of program characteristics and results: total sales of renewable energy to program participants; total number of customer participants; customer participation rates; percentage of renewable energy in total retail sales; the lowest premium charged to support new renewables development; and utilities using at least two percent solar to supply their green pricing programs. Download Information Release: NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders Previous Top Ten Lists - December 2010, December 2009, December 2008, December 2007, December 2006, December 2005, December 2004, December 2003, December 2002, December 2001, June 2001, November 2000, April 2000

64

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studiescurrents to generate electrical power have employed twodetermine the electrical power that can be generated from

Duffin, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Electric Power Generation Expansion in Deregulated Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The generation expansion problem involves increasing electric power generation capacity in an existing power network. In competitive environment, power producers, distributors, and consumers all make (more)

KAYMAZ, PINAR

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

67

Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Working Group Combined Heat and Power C.A. Skip Cofield October 16, 2012 Agenda * Southern Company * Combined Heat and Power (CHP) * Southern Company CHP * Utility Partnerships 2 Southern Company Overview Operating Companies: * Alabama Power * Georgia Power * Gulf Power * Mississippi Power Subsidiaries: * Southern LINC * Southern Nuclear * Southern Power * Southern Telecom 3 Retail Generating Units Wholesale Generating Units * 4.4 million customers * 43,500+ MW * 26,000+ employees * 120,000 square miles of retail service territory * 27,000 mi. of transmission lines * 3,700 substations * $17.7B in operating revenue * $2.2B in net income * $39.2B in market cap * $59.3B in assets * $13.5B annual op. expense 4 Southern Company Overview

68

Green Power Network: Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option A number of states have adopted policies requiring or encouraging electricity suppliers to offer green power options to consumers. This section provides summaries of these policies and links to the full text of the legislation or public utility commission rules. Connecticut Iowa Maine Minnesota Montana New Jersey New Mexico Oregon Vermont Virginia Washington Connecticut June 2003—On June 26, Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland signed a bill (SB 733) amending the state's Electric Restructuring Act and granting authority to the Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to require electric distribution companies to offer green power options. The legislation enables the DPUC to determine the terms and conditions of renewable energy or energy efficiency options, including the contract terms and the minimum percentage of electricity to be derived from renewable energy sources. The green energy options will be developed and implemented by third-party companies selected through a competitive bidding process.

69

Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Combined Heat and Power in Biofuels Production and Use of Biofuels for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rise of the biofuels industry presents electric utilities with two types of opportunities: combined heat and power (CHP) applications in biofuel production facilities using topping and bottoming power generation cycles and the use of the biofuels as a fuel in electric power generation. This report reviews production processes for ethanol and biodiesel, including the prospects for CHP applications, and describes power generation opportunities for the use of biofuels in power production, especially in ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

71

Changes related to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG" Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG Jump to:...

72

Characterizing the Impacts of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk Power System Operations Planning: Utility Wind Interest Group - Xcel Energy-North Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a case study evaluation of the impact of wind generation on electricity grid operations in the Xcel Energy-North service area around Minneapolis, Minnesota. The project's methodology and results will be useful when evaluating the operating impacts of wind generation at other locations.

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Treatment of Solar Generation Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning John Sterling Solar Electric Power Association Joyce McLaren National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mike Taylor Solar Electric Power Association Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-60047 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

74

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio Power Siting Board Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation

75

Overview of M-C Power`s MCFC power generation system  

SciTech Connect

The IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell power generation system is a skid mounted power plant which efficiently generates electricity and useful thermal energy. The primary benefits are its high electric generation efficiency (50% or greater), modular capacities (500 kW to 3 MW per unit) and minimal environmental impacts (less than 1 ppM NO{sub x}). A cost effective, modular capacity fuel cell power plant provides the industry with an attractive alternative to large central station facilities, and its advantages have the potential to optimize the way electric power is generated and distributed to the users. Environmental issues are becoming the single most uncertain aspect of the power business. These issues may be manifested in air emissions permits or allowances for NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2}, energy taxes, CO{sub 2} limits, ``carbon taxes,`` etc. and may appear as siting permits for generation, transmission, or distribution facilities. Utilities are ``down-sizing`` with the goal of becoming the lowest cost supplier of electricity and are beginning to examine the concepts of ``energy service`` to improve their economic competitiveness. These issues are leading utilities to examine the benefits of distributed generation. Siting small capacity generation near the customer loads or at distribution substations can improve system efficiency and quality while reducing distribution system costs. The advantages that fuel cell power plants have over conventional technologies are critical to the success of these evolving opportunities in the power generation marketplace.

Benjamin, T.G.; Woods, R.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Interruptible Power Rates and Their Role in Utility Distributed Resources Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-site generators installed primarily for use during power outages represent a significant distributed resource (DR). These generators can be readily incorporated into power markets through existing "interruptible" rate structures where customers agree to reduce the electrical demand (on the utility) for specified periods. The extent to which utilities have adopted and/or encouraged interruptible rates is the subject of this report.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel Switching on a Dime -- Boiler Capabilities of Electric Utilities and Industrial Companies: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities play an unusual and important role in the natural gas market because so much of their ongoing gas demand is price sensitive. This report, which focuses on the pattern of this demand, tracks how switching between gas and alternative fuels by major users affects the overall market. Events over the past four years and new plant-specific data have changed our understanding of this phenomenon.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermal energy storage for power generation  

SciTech Connect

Studies strongly indicate that the United States will face widespread electrical power constraints in the 1990s, with most regions of the country experiencing capacity shortages by the year 2000. In many cases, the demand for increased power will occur during intermediate and peak demand periods. Much of this demand is expected to be met by oil- and natural gas-fired Brayton cycle turbines and combined-cycle plants. While natural gas is currently plentiful and reasonably priced, the availability of an economical long-term coal-fired option for peak and intermediate load power generation will give electric power utilities an option in case either the availability or cost of natural gas should deteriorate. 54 refs., 5 figs., 17 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Sathyanarayana, K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of renewable energy development in power generation in Finland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy resources have historically played an important role for heat/electricity generation in Finland. Although diffusion costs of renewable energy utilization are higher than fossil fuels and nuclear power plants

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

Farhar, B. C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, emerging trend towards electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of Nox, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials of low strategic value. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 *C. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

Singh, Prabhakar; Pederson, Larry R.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solar energy power generation system  

SciTech Connect

A solar energy power generation system is described which consists of: (a) means for collecting and concentrating solar energy; (b) heat storage means; (c) Stirling engine means for producing power; (d) first heat transfer means for receiving the concentrated solar energy and for transferring heat to the heat storage means; and (e) second heat transfer means for controllably transferring heat from the storage means to the Stirling engine means and including a discharge heat pipe means for transferring heat to the Stirling engine means and further including means for inserting and withdrawing the discharge heat pipe means into and out of the heat storage means.

Nilsson, J.E.; Cochran, C.D.

1986-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Central station advanced power conditioning: technology, utility interface, and performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept is proposed for central station SPV power conditioning. It avoids heavy dc bus and extensive ac distribution, and so offers technical, cost, and efficiency advantages. Cost and efficiency comparisons with a more conventional approach, akin to that being implemented for the SMUD installation, are presented. Although the capital gains are not great, the simplification of site preparation and installation is considerable. The design used to generate data for this paper if fully compatible with utility transmission system requirements.

Wood, P.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

Wills, R.H. [Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Recovering heat when generating power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intelligent use of heat-recovery stream generators (HRSGs) is vital for the efficient operation of cogeneration plants, which furnish both thermal energy (usually in the form of steam) and electric energy. HRSGs are similarly important in combined-cycle power plants, in which the thermal energy rejected from the primary electric-power-generation step is harnessed (as discussed below) to produce additional electrical energy. In these facilities, the HRSG is typically heated by gas-turbine exhaust. Natural gas is the fuel most widely used for gas turbines in the U.S., whereas fuel oil is the main fuel in other countries. Depending on the amount of steam to be produced, HRSGs for gas-turbine-exhaust applications may be unfired, supplementary-fired or furnace fired. The paper describes these three options; the pressure drop encountered in all three systems; the Cheng cycle; catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides and CO; and performance testing.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Public Power & Utility, Inc. (New York) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc. (New York) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Power & Utility, Inc. Place New York Utility Id 56259 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

87

Magma energy for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy contained in crustal magma bodies represents a large potential resource for the US and magma generated power could become a viable alternative in the future. Engineering feasibility of the magma energy concept is being investigated as part of the Department of Energy's Geothermal Program. This current project follows a seven-year Magma Energy Research Project where scientific feasibility of the concept was concluded.

Dunn, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Solar-powered aroma generator  

SciTech Connect

In combination with a switch-controlled electric light bulb having a threaded plug and a threaded socket disposed in a room which is also subject to natural ambient light, a switchless aroma generator is installed in the room which is automatically activated only when the electric light bulb is switched on. The activated generator functions to discharge an air current into the room which conveys an aromatic vapor to modify the atmosphere. The generator described in this patent consists of: A.) an air-permeable cartridge containing an aroma supply which is exuded into the atmosphere at a relatively rapid rate as an air current is forced through the cartridge; B.) a fan driven by a low-voltage, direct-current motor having predetermined power requirements, the fan being arranged to force an air current through the cartridge; C.) a housing incorporating the cartridge and the motordriven fan, the housing containing an apparatus for mounting it on a wall in the room; and D.) a solar cell assembly producing a direct-current output placed in close proximity to the bulb in the room and irradiated when the bulb is switched on. The assembly is connected to the motor to supply power, the electrical relationship of the assembly to the motor being such that the cell output is sufficient to power the motor only when the bulb is switched on to irradiate the assembly, and is insufficient when the bulb is switched off. The cell output then depends on ambient light in the room, and the operation of the generator is coordinated with that of the bulb despite the absence of a wired connection between and an aroma is generated only when the bulb is switched on.

Spector, D.

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

89

INTEGRATED CONTROL OF NEXT GENERATION POWER SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Control methodologies provide the necessary data acquisition, analysis and corrective actions needed to maintain the state of an electric power system within acceptable operating limits. These methods are primarily software-based algorithms that are nonfunctional unless properly integrated with system data and the appropriate control devices. Components of the control of power systems today include protective relays, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), distribution automation (DA), feeder automation, software agents, sensors, control devices and communications. Necessary corrective actions are still accomplished using large electromechanical devices such as vacuum, oil and gas-insulated breakers, capacitor banks, regulators, transformer tap changers, reclosers, generators, and more recently FACTS (flexible AC transmission system) devices. The recent evolution of multi-agent system (MAS) technologies has been reviewed and effort made to integrate MAS into next generation power systems. A MAS can be defined as â??â?¦a loosely-coupled network of problem solvers that work together to solve problems that are beyond their individual capabilitiesâ?¦â?. These problem solvers, often called agents, are autonomous and may be heterogeneous in nature. This project has shown that a MAS has significant advantages over a single, monolithic, centralized problem solver for next generation power systems. Various communication media are being used in the electric power system today, including copper, optical fiber and power line carrier (PLC) as well as wireless technologies. These technologies have enabled the deployment of substation automation (SA) at many facilities. Recently, carrier and wireless technologies have been developed and demonstrated on a pilot basis. Hence, efforts have been made by this project to penetrate these communication technologies as an infrastructure for next generation power systems. This project has thus pursued efforts to use specific MAS methods as well as pertinent communications protocols to imbed and assess such technologies in a real electric power distribution system, specifically the Circuit of the Future (CoF) developed by Southern California Edison (SCE). By modeling the behavior and communication for the components of a MAS, the operation and control of the power distribution circuit have been enhanced. The use of MAS to model and integrate a power distribution circuit offers a significantly different approach to the design of next generation power systems. For example, ways to control a power distribution circuit that includes a micro-grid while considering the impacts of thermal constraints, and integrating voltage control and renewable energy sources on the main power system have been pursued. Both computer simulations and laboratory testbeds have been used to demonstrate such technologies in electric power distribution systems. An economic assessment of MAS in electric power systems was also performed during this project. A report on the economic feasibility of MAS for electric power systems was prepared, and particularly discusses the feasibility of incorporating MAS in transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. Also, the commercial viability of deploying MAS in T&D systems has been assessed by developing an initial case study using utility input to estimate the benefits of deploying MAS. In summary, the MAS approach, which had previously been investigated with good success by APERC for naval shipboard applications, has now been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future developed by Southern California Edison. The results for next generation power systems include better ability to reconfigure circuits, improve protection and enhance reliability.

None

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to purchase green power from any licensed retail supplier. For information about the green power utilities and suppliers in Virginia, see the Department of Energy, Energy...

92

NREL Webinar: Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies, especially PV. In this free webinar, you will hear how utilities are incorporating solar generation into their...

93

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Industry Recruitment/Support Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Program Grant Program Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal gasification. The statute also supports the development of projects using renewable energy sources as well

94

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Legislation enacted in 2009 directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a program offering green power as an option to residential and small commercial customers in the state. The PUC issued rules in October 2010 and issued an RFP. The PUC selected a company, 3 Degrees, to manage the statewide green power program for Maine's transmission and distribution territories. The program includes community-based renewable

95

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Iowa Utilities Board All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not rate-regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), are required to offer green power options to their customers. These programs allow customers to make voluntary contributions to support the development of renewable energy sources in Iowa. Utilities must file their program plans and tariff schedules with the IUB; however, the filings for non-rate-regulated utilities are intended to be for informational purposes only. This policy

97

Reliability Assessment of Power Systems with Wind Power Generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind power generation, the most promising renewable energy, is increasingly attractive to power industry and the whole society and becomes more significant in the portfolio (more)

Wang, Shu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cummins Power Generation SECA Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) SECA Phase 1 SOFC development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) contract DE-FC26-01NT41244. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner research development leading to successful demonstration of the SECA Phase 1 objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant Phase 1 Milestones: (1) Demonstrated: (a) Operation meeting Phase 1 requirements on commercial natural gas. (b) LPG and Natural Gas CPOX fuel reformers. (c) SOFC systems on dry CPOX reformate. (c) Steam reformed Natural Gas operation. (d) Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC system without inert gas purge. (e) Utility of stack simulators as a tool for developing balance of plant systems. (2) Developed: (a) Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. (b) Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. (c) Demonstrated high efficiency SOFC output power conditioning. (d) Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods. The Phase 1 performance test was carried out at the Cummins Power Generation facility in Minneapolis, Minnesota starting on October 2, 2006. Performance testing was successfully completed on January 4, 2007 including the necessary steady-state, transient, efficiency, and peak power operation tests.

Charles Vesely

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Unalaska geothermal exploration project. Electrical power generation analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the most cost-effective power cycle for utilizing the Makushin Volcano geothermal resource to generate electricity for the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor. It is anticipated that the geothermal power plant would be intertied with a planned conventional power plant consisting of four 2.5 MW diesel-generators whose commercial operation is due to begin in 1987. Upon its completion in late 1988, the geothermal power plant would primarily fulfill base-load electrical power demand while the diesel-generators would provide peak-load electrical power and emergency power at times when the geothermal power plant would be partially or completely unavailable. This study compares the technical, environmental, and economic adequacy of five state-of-the-art geothermal power conversion processes. Options considered are single- and double-flash steam cycles, binary cycle, hybrid cycle, and total flow cycle.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

102

Conditions on Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of the Effects of Drought An Analysis of the Effects of Drought Conditions on Electric Power Generation in the Western United States April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1365 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

103

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

104

Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable technologies. This policy complements Colorado's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires municipal utilities serving more than 40,000 customers to use renewable energy and energy recycling to account for 10% of retail sales by 2020.

105

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are undergoing unprecedented structural changes as a result of the confluence of regulatory, competitive, and technological forces. This paper will introduce the role of distributed generation technologies in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRI) and member utility case studies involving the assessment of distributed generation in premium power service, standby power and industrial cogeneration applications. In addition, EPRI products and services which can help evaluate energy service options involving distributed generation will also be briefly reviewed.

Rastler, D. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Washington State Department of Commerce In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible renewables include wind, solar, geothermal, landfill gas, wave or tidal action, wastewater treatment gas, certain biomass resources, and "qualified hydropower" that is fish-friendly. Beginning January 1, 2002, each electric utility must inform its customers

109

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geothermal Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, 2010 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Citation U.S. Geothermal Inc.. 2010. Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement. Boise Idaho: (!) . Report No.: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Idaho_Public_Utilities_Commission_Approves_Neal_Hot_Springs_Power_Purchase_Agreement&oldid=682748"

110

Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update to "Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets" (EPRIsolutions report 1000772). That previous report dealt with fuel cells, stirling engine generators, and reciprocating engine generators; this current report focuses on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems fueled with natural gas or propane and sized for residential loads.

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project October 31, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced a new concentrating solar power (CSP) project led by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The project will integrate utility-scale CSP technology with SMUD's 500-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired Cosumnes Power Plant. Supported by a $10 million Energy Department investment, this project will help design, build and test cost-competitive CSP-fossil fuel power generating systems in the United

112

Solar two: Utility-scale power from the sun  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented on the Solar Two solar-powered electric generating plant located east of Barstow California.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number NA DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase...

114

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa Sandra Halvatzis and David Keyser National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-53187 November...

115

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Integrated Database, eGRID, clean energy, power generation, electricity generation, production, environment, electricity, utilities, utility, power plant, power...

117

Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID),...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Integrated Database, eGRID, clean energy, power generation, electricity generation, production, environment, electricity, utilities, utility, power plant, power...

118

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Number of Customers" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "RV CSU Power II LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1

119

Distributed Generation and Resilience in Power Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the allocation of distributed generation on the resilience of power grids. We find that an unconstrained allocation and growth of the distributed generation can drive a power grid beyond its design parameters. In order to overcome such a problem, we propose a topological algorithm derived from the field of Complex Networks to allocate distributed generation sources in an existing power grid.

Scala, Antonio; Chessa, Alessandro; Caldarelli, Guido; Damiano, Alfonso

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

LASER Welding Survey for Power Generation Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed technology for laser weld repair of steam generator tubes in light water reactors. This technology has promise for other specialized welding and heat treatment applications in the power generation industry.

1998-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

today announces the selection of North Carolina State University to lead a public-private manufacturing innovation institute for next generation power electronics....

122

Long Term Power Generation Planning Under Uncertainty.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Generation expansion planning concerns investment and operation decisions for different types of power plants over a multi-decade horizon under various uncertainties. The goal of this (more)

Jin, Shan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

124

Rotordynamics in alternative energy power generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyses and discusses the main alternative energy systems that work with rotordynamics machines to generate power. Hydropower systems, wave and ocean energy, geothermal, (more)

Cortes-Zambrano, Ivan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Distributed Wind Power Generation - National Renewable Energy ...  

Technology breakthrough in roof-top distributed wind power generation Multi-billion $ market opportunity in next 10 years recent venture capital investments

126

Safe Operation of Backup Power Generators (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important to know how to operate backup power generators safely. The tips in this publication can prevent problems with CO poisoning, electrocution, fire and other hazards.

Smith, David

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

Safe Operation of Backup Power Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important to know how to operate backup power generators safely. The tips in this publication can prevent problems with CO poisoning, electrocution, fire and other hazards.

Smith, David

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

128

Heat Transfer Enhancement in Thermoelectric Power Generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat transfer plays an important role in thermoelectric (TE) power generation because the higher the heat-transfer rate from the hot to the cold side of (more)

Hu, Shih-yung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

130

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) (Redirected from Burbank Water and Power) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery

131

UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UTILITIES UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone (720) 962-7154 Email drake@wapa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone (706) 213-3823 Email annc@sepa.doe.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone (918) 595-6671 Email gary.bridges@swpa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 OREGON BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN POC Greg Eisenach Telephone (360) 418-8063 Email gaeisenach@bpa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB - PA POC Larry Sullivan

132

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers. This is a 28 percent decrease from the peak following the storm.

133

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers.

134

Conditions on Electric Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and California (CAL). We pay special attention to interdependencies among hydropower and thermal power plant operations because hydropower plants may provide up to 40% of the WECC...

135

Planning Your First Wind Power Project: A Primer for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most U.S. utilities, wind power is a new technology they need to understand in order to evaluate its use in their systems. This primer addresses questions commonly asked by utilities and the issues to be considered in bringing a wind power plant on-line.

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider New Mexico Public Regulation Commission In addition to meeting the requirements of the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... renewables portfolio standard], New Mexico investor-owned utilities (IOUs) are required to offer a voluntary program for purchasing renewable energy to customers. The voluntary renewable tariff may also allow consumers to purchase renewable energy within certain energy blocks and by source of

137

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Turbine-generator set development for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this effort was to design, develop, and demonstrate an integrated turbine genset suitable for the power generation requirements of a hybrid automotive propulsion system. The result of this effort would have been prototype generator hardware including controllers for testing and evaluation by Allison Engine Company. The generator would have been coupled to a suitably sized and configured gas turbine engine, which would operate on a laboratory load bank. This effort could lead to extensive knowledge and design capability in the most efficient generator design for hybrid electric vehicle power generation and potentially to commercialization of these advanced technologies. Through the use of the high-speed turbines as a power source for the hybrid-electric vehicles, a significant reduction in nitrous oxides emissions would be achieved when compared to those of conventional gas powered vehicles.

Adams, D.J. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berenyi, S.G. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Utility interface requirements for a solar power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study specifies that the southern tier of the US (south of the 36th parallel) should be examined to see what problems might develop with the installation of a Satellite Power System (SPS) in the year 2000. One or more 5-GW SPS units could be installed in the utility systems of the southern states in the year 2000. The 345- and 500-kV transmission systems that will probably exist at that time could be readily extended to accommodate the SPS units. The operation of the units will present the utilities with new and difficult problems in system stability and frequency control. The problems will arise because a somewhat variable 5-GW output will be produced by a generator having no mechanical inertia. The unavoidable time lag in controlling the position of the energy beam at the receiving station may have a very critical effect on the stability of the utility systems. The maintenance problems associated with the energy-receiving device, a continuous structure covering more than 40 mi/sup 2/, must be given careful consideration. Repair of lightning damage while maintaining SPS operation may be the most critical requirement. Acquisition and preparation of the 90 mi/sup 2/ land required for the receiving antenna (rectenna) will create many new and difficult environmental problems.

Donalek, P.J.; Whysong, J.L.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute FACTSHEET: Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute January 15, 2014 - 9:20am Addthis The Obama Administration today announces the selection of North Carolina State University to lead a public-private manufacturing innovation institute for next generation power electronics. Supported by a $70 million Energy Department investment over five years as well as a matching $70 million in non-federal cost-share, the institute will bring together over 25 companies, universities and state and federal organizations to invent and manufacture wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductor-based power electronics that are cost-competitive and 10 times more powerful than current

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Power-grade butanol recovery and utilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an alternative to the traditional recovery systems, it was proposed in a previous publication that the n-butanol/acetone/ethanol fermentation products could be recovered as a power grade fuel blend and used directly as a fuel. This would affect a savings in process energy requirements because each chemical component would not have to be processed individually to technical grade purity. Further, some residual water could be tolerated in the fuel blend. To develop such a power grade fuel recovery scheme beyond the conceptual stage, the Energy Research and Resource Division of the Kansas Energy Office undertook a two-fold program to demonstrate and test a power grade butanol/acetone/ethanol fuel recovery system, and further to demonstrate the feasibility of using the fuel blend in a standard type engine. A development program was initiated to accomplish the following objectives: design and test an operational power grade butanol recovery plant that would operate at one liter per hour output; and test and assess the performance of power grade butanol in a spark ignition automotive engine. This project has demonstrated that recovery of a power grade butanol fuel blend is simple and can be accomplished at a considered energy advantage over ethanol. It was further demonstrated that such a power grade blend works well in a typical spark ignition engine.

Noon, R.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power, California (Utility Company) Power, California (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $62,650,755.

143

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

The generative powers of demolition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When examining the factory within the urban fabric, especially those cases that are abandoned and considered obsolete, it may be possible to see the first generative act as one of un-building. Considering demolition as an ...

Muskopf, Christopher Jon Dalton, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

146

NREL: News - NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

213 213 NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders Top 10 programs support more than 4.2 million MWh of voluntary green power June 5, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today released its assessment of leading utility green power programs. Under these voluntary programs, residential and commercial consumers can choose to help support additional electricity production from renewable resources - such as wind and solar - that diversify our nation's energy portfolio and protect our air and water. "Participating in utility green power programs allows consumers to support renewable energy above and beyond what utilities are procuring to comply with state renewable portfolio standards," NREL Analyst Jenny Heeter said. "These utilities are offering first-rate programs that give

147

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to provide an update of historical and current trends in geothermal power plant technology, extending the previous Next Generation Geothermal Power Plant (NGGPP) report originally developed by EPRI in 1996.BackgroundIn its 1996 study, EPRI evaluated a number of technologies with the potential to lower the cost of geothermal power production or to expand cost effective power production to lower temperature resources, thus opening ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning  

SciTech Connect

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M.; Cory, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

EA-345 New Brunswick Power Generation Corporation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-345 New Brunswick Power Generation Corporation EA-345 New Brunswick Power Generation Corporation Order...

151

EA-290-A Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-290-A Ontario Power Generation, Inc. EA-290-A Ontario Power Generation, Inc. Order authorizing Ontario...

152

EA-290 Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-290 Ontario Power Generation, Inc. EA-290 Ontario Power Generation, Inc. Order authorizing Ontario...

153

EA-290-B Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-290-B Ontario Power Generation, Inc. EA-290-B Ontario Power Generation, Inc. Order authorizing Ontario...

154

Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amount of wind power generation that can be accommodated.ramping of generation Power and Frequency Control as itfrequency to loss of generation Power and Frequency Control

Lacommare, Kristina S H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

MHK Technologies/Gyroscopic wave power generation system | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gyroscopic wave power generation system Gyroscopic wave power generation system < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Gyrodynamics Corporation Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description This gyroscopic wave power generation system is a pure rotational mechanical system that does not use conventional air turbines and is housed on a unique floating platform float In particular its outstanding feature is that it utilizes the gyroscopic spinning effect A motor is used to turn a 1 meter diameter steel disc flywheel inside the apparatus and when the rolling action of waves against the float tilts it at an angle the gyroscopic effect causes the disc to rotate longitudinally This energy turns a generator producing electricity

156

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW operates in the energy efficiency field- one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen and WOWClean provide more energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. WOWGen - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat WOWClean - Multi Pollutant emission control system. Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel and converts it to useful output. The remaining 65% is discharged into the environment as waste heat at temperatures ranging from 300F to 1,200F. This waste heat can be captured using the WOWGen technology and turned into electricity. This efficiency is up to twice the rate of competing technologies. Compelling economics and current environmental policy are stimulating industry interest. WOWGen power plants can generate between 1 - 25 MW of electricity. Project payback is between two to five years with IRR of 15% 30%. Nearly anywhere industrial waste heat is present, the WOW products can be applied. Beneficial applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas (pipeline compression stations, processing plants). Sources such as stack flue gases, steam, diesel exhaust, hot oil or combinations of sources can be used to generate power. WOWGen can also be used with stand alone power plants burning fossil fuels or using renewable energy sources such as solar and biomass.

Romero, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report NRELTP-670-43532 August 2008 Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs Lori A. Bird and Karlynn S. Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

158

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

159

Analysis of power generation processes using petcoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum coke or petcoke, a refinery byproduct, has generally been considered as an unusable byproduct because of its high sulfur content. However energy industries now view petcoke as a potential feedstock for power generation because it has higher carbon content than other hydrocarbons like coal, biomass and sewage residue. This gives petcoke a great edge over other feedstocks to generate power. Models for the two most common processes for power generation, namely combustion and gasification, were developed using Aspen Plus steady state chemical process simulator. Overall plant layouts for both processes were developed by calculating the heat and mass balance of the unit operations. After conducting wide sensitivity analysis, results indicate that one ton of petcoke feedstock can generate up to 4 MW of net available power. Both processes have rates of return greater than 30%, although gasification offers a slightly more attractive opportunity than combustion.

Jayakumar, Ramkumar

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a literature review of hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation is first given with an emphasis on system integration and evaluation. Hybrid systems are defined as those which use solar energy and fuel ...

Sheu, Elysia J. (Elysia Ja-Zeng)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Apparatus and method for thermal power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved thermal power plant and method of power generation which minimizes thermal stress and chemical impurity buildup in the vaporizing component, particularly beneficial under loss of normal feed fluid and startup conditions. The invention is particularly applicable to a liquid metal fast breeder reactor plant.

Cohen, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Redding, Arnold H. (Export, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Power Quality Impacts of Distributed Generation: Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of deregulation, distributed generation (DG) will play an increasing role in electric distribution systems. This report addresses the issue of integrating DG into the electric power system in a way that assures power quality in the grid and at end-use customer facilities.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

R.Perez, K.Zweibel, T.Hoff Solar Power Generation in the US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© R.Perez, K.Zweibel, T.Hoff Solar Power Generation in the US: Too expensive, or a bargain that solar electric power plants deliver to utilities' rate payers and society's tax payers. Benefits. Introduction "Economically viable" solar power generation remains a remote and elusive goal for the solar

Perez, Richard R.

165

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.

Petr Sulc; Konstantin Turitsyn; Scott Backhaus; Michael Chertkov

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

167

Definition: Thermoelectric power generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermoelectric power generation Thermoelectric power generation Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermoelectric power generation The conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. Thermoelectric generation relies on a fuel source (e.g. fossil, nuclear, biomass, geothermal, or solar) to heat a fluid to drive a turbine[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The thermoelectric effect is the direct conversion of temperature differences to electric voltage and vice-versa. A thermoelectric device creates voltage when there is a different temperature on each side. Conversely, when a voltage is applied to it, it creates a temperature difference. At the atomic scale, an applied temperature gradient causes charge carriers in the material to diffuse from the hot side to the cold

168

Cascading Closed Loop Cycle Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW Energies was issued Patent 6,857,268 B2 on Feb 22, 2005 titled CASCADING CLOSED LOOP CYCLE (CCLC) and Patent 7,096,665 B2 on August 29, 2006 titled CASCADING CLOSED LOOP CYCLE POWER GENERATION. These patented technologies are collectively marketed as WOWGen. The WOW Energies patents represent the production of efficient power from low, medium and high temperature heat generated from the combustion of fuels; heat from renewable energy sources such as solar and geothermal heat; or waste heat sources. Waste heat sources can be in the form of exhaust stack flue gases; waste heat from vented steam or steam discharged from steam turbines; hot water; hot oils or combined waste heat sources. A major advantage of the WOWGen power plant is the ability to produce power without the use, consumption or contamination of valuable water resources. Production of power from waste heat and renewable energy sources is the most viable path to energy independence from foreign oil and reduced emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. The WOWGen power plant inherently reduces emissions and Greenhouse Gases (GHG) by producing power from waste heat without consuming fuel, thus increasing the overall energy efficiency of any industrial plant or power generation facility. The presentation will focus on the technology and provide case studies of its application.

Romero, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

170

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

171

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HYDROELECTRIC POWER In the early 1880s the first central power-generating station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fostered the growth of power companies interested in potential profits. Earlier advances in dam materialsTHE DEVELOPMENT OF HYDROELECTRIC POWER In the early 1880s the first central power-generating station opened in New York City, and a plant in Appleton, Wisconsin, first utilized falling water

US Army Corps of Engineers

172

National need for utilizing nuclear energy for process heat generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors are potential sources for generating process heat, and their applications for such use economically competitive. They help satisfy national needs by helping conserve and extend oil and natural gas resources, thus reducing energy imports and easing future international energy concerns. Several reactor types can be utilized for generating nuclear process heat; those considered here are light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), gas-cooled reactors (GCRs), and liquid metal reactors (LMRs). LWRs and HWRs can generate process heat up to 280/sup 0/C, LMRs up to 540/sup 0/C, and GCRs up to 950/sup 0/C. Based on the studies considered here, the estimated process heat markets and the associated energy markets which would be supplied by the various reactor types are summarized.

Gambill, W.R.; Kasten, P.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Photovoltaic power conditioners: Development, evolution, and the next generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Market-place acceptance of utility-connected photovoltaic (PV) power generation systems and their accelerated installation into residential and commercial applications are heavily dependent upon the ability of their power conditioning subsystems (PCS) to meet high reliability, low cost, and high performance goals. Many PCS development efforts have taken place over the last 15 years, and those efforts have resulted in substantial PCS hardware improvements. These improvements, however, have generally fallen short of meeting many reliability, cost and performance goals. Continuously evolving semiconductor technology developments, coupled with expanded market opportunities for power processing, offer a significant promise of improving PCS reliability, cost and performance, as they are integrated into future PCS designs. This paper revisits past and present development efforts in PCS design, identifies the evolutionary improvements and describes the new opportunities for PCS designs. The new opportunities are arising from the increased availability and capability of semiconductor switching components, smart power devices, and power integrated circuits (PICS).

Bulawka, A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Krauthamer, S.; Das, R. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Bower, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Power Quality Impacts of Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution systems are designed for one-way power flow and can accommodate only a limited amount of distributed generation (DG) without alterations. This project focused on the economics associated with upgrading and designing distribution systems to support widespread integration of distributed resources, especially distributed generation. Costs were determined in the area of protection requirements and voltage regulation requirements, two of the main areas where changes are required to accommodate DG.

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

A Numerical Investigation of a Thermodielectric Power Generation System .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of a novel micro-thermodielectric power generation device (MTDPG) was investigated in order to determine if thermodielectric power generation can compete with current portable (more)

Sklar, Akiva A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

178

Changes related to "Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd" | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd" Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation,...

179

Pages that link to "Next Generation Power Systems Inc" | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Next Generation Power Systems Inc" Next Generation Power Systems Inc Jump to: navigation,...

180

Changes related to "Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd" Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Datang Jilin Power Generation Co...

182

Pages that link to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG" Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG Jump to:...

183

Changes related to "Next Generation Power Systems Inc" | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Next Generation Power Systems Inc" Next Generation Power Systems Inc Jump to: navigation,...

184

Pages that link to "Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd" Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd Jump to:...

185

Changes related to "Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd" Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd Jump to:...

186

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design, reliability/ availability, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples of some of the major factors which could impact the project developer and his economics, as well as discuss potential mitigation measures. Areas treated include wheeling, utility ownership interests, dispatchability, regulatory acceptance and other considerations which could significantly affect the plant definition and, as a result, its attendant business and financing structure. Finally, suggestions are also made for facilitating the process of integration with the electric utility.

Felak, R. P.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Globally Optimal Distributed Power Control for Nonconcave Utility Maximization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future wireless networks are expected to operate in dense environments where the system capacity is fundamentally limited by severe co-channel interference among neighboring links. Transmit-power control has been recently explored as an important interference-mitigation technique that aims to maximize a system efficiency metric, which is often measured by a system utility function. Optimal power control is known to be difficult to achieve, mainly because the optimization problem is in general highly non-convex. This problem had eluded researchers and remained open until our recent work [11], where a centralized optimal power control algorithm, referred to as MAPEL, is developed based on a monotonic optimization framework. However, there does not yet exist a distributed power control algorithm that achieves the global optimal solution for generic utility functions, although the distributed implementation is crucial for the wireless infrastructureless networks such as ad hoc and sensor networks. This paper fill...

Qian, Li Ping; Zhang,; Chiang, Mung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Plasma plume MHD power generator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described of generating power at a situs exposed to the solar wind which comprises creating at separate sources at the situs discrete plasma plumes extending in opposed directions, providing electrical communication between the plumes at their source and interposing a desired electrical load in the said electrical communication between the plumes.

Hammer, J.H.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method and apparatus for thermal power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for power generation from a recirculating superheat-reheat circuit with multiple expansion stages which alleviates complex control systems and minimizes thermal cycling of system components, particularly the reheater. The invention includes preheating cold reheat fluid from the first expansion stage prior to its entering the reheater with fluid from the evaporator or drum component.

Mangus, James D. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Water Use for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes how thermoelectric plants use water and the strengths, limitations, and costs of available technologies for increasing water use efficiency (gal/MWh). The report will be of value to power company strategic planners, environmental managers, and generation managers as well as regulators, water resource managers, and environmentalists.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Compressed Air Storage for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Report focuses on the use of underground storage of natural gas as a means of leveling the load between supply and demand. The book presents a view of the way compressed air storage can reduce costs when constructing new facilities for generating peak load electricity. The primary emphasis given concerns underground storage of air in underground porous media, the vehicle utilized on a large scale for over 25 years by the natural gas industry.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Impact of Wind Power Generation on Wholesale Electricity Price ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

price for power generation are examined to forecast LNG price for power genera- tion. Information on future power plant's construction and decommission plan...

194

Recent advances in RF power generation  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a review of the progress and methods used in RF generation for particle accelerators. The frequencies of interest are from a few megahertz to 100 GHz, and the powers are for super linear collider applications, but in this case the pulses are short, generally below 1 {mu}s. The very high-power, short-pulse generators are only lightly reviewed here, and for more details the reader should follow the specialized references. Different RF generators excel over various parts of the frequency spectrum. Below 100 MHz solid-state devices and gridded tubes prevail, while the region between 400 MHz and 3 GHz, the cyclotron-resonant devices predominate, and above 250 GHz, Free-Electron Lasers and ubitrons are the most powerful generators. The emphasis for this review is on microwave generation at frequencies below 20 GHz, so the cyclotron-resonant devices are only partially reviewed, while the progress on free-electron laser and ubitrons is not reviewed in this paper. 39 refs., 4 figs.

Tallerico, P.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

SciTech Connect

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Siemens Power Generation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Siemens Power Generation Place Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany Zip 91058 Product Erlangen-based subsidiary of Siemens AG that develops, manufactures, and installs power plants and related equipment such as turbines. Its fuel cell subsidiary is Siemens Westinghouse. Coordinates 49.59795°, 11.00258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.59795,"lon":11.00258,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

198

Photovoltaic Power Generation in the Stellar Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we have studied the problem of photovoltaic power generation near selected stars in the solar neighborhood. The nature of the optical radiation from a star will depend on its luminosity,HR classification and spectral characteristics. The solar celloperation in the habitable zones of the stars is similar to AM1.0 operation near earth.Thecurrent space solar cell technology can be adopted for power generation near G,K and Mtype stars. Silicon solar cells with good near IR response are particularly suitable in theenvironments of M type stars which are most abundant in the universe. . Photovoltaicpower generation near binary stars like Sirius and Alpha Centauri is also discussed.

Girish, T E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Photovoltaic Power Generation in the Stellar Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we have studied the problem of photovoltaic power generation near selected stars in the solar neighborhood. The nature of the optical radiation from a star will depend on its luminosity,HR classification and spectral characteristics. The solar celloperation in the habitable zones of the stars is similar to AM1.0 operation near earth.Thecurrent space solar cell technology can be adopted for power generation near G,K and Mtype stars. Silicon solar cells with good near IR response are particularly suitable in theenvironments of M type stars which are most abundant in the universe. . Photovoltaicpower generation near binary stars like Sirius and Alpha Centauri is also discussed.

T. E. Girish; S. Aranya

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

GE power generation technology challenges for advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The GE Utility ATS is a large gas turbine, derived from proven GEPG designs and integrated GEAE technology, that utilizes a new turbine cooling system and incorporates advanced materials. This system has the potential to achieve ATS objectives for a utility sized machine. Combined with use of advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC`s), the new cooling system will allow higher firing temperatures and improved cycle efficiency that represents a significant improvement over currently available machines. Developing advances in gas turbine efficiency and emissions is an ongoing process at GEPG. The third generation, ``F`` class, of utility gas turbines offers net combined cycle efficiencies in the 55% range, with NO{sub x} programs in place to reduce emissions to less than 10 ppM. The gas turbines have firing temperatures of 2350{degree}F, and pressure ratios of 15 to 1. The turbine components are cooled by air extracted from the cycle at various stages of the compressor. The heat recovery cycle is a three pressure steam system, with reheat. Throttle conditions are nominally 1400 psi and 1000{degree}F reheat. As part of GEPG`s ongoing advanced power generation system development program, it is expected that a gas fired advanced turbine system providing 300 MW power output greater than 58% net efficiency and < 10 ppM NO{sub x} will be defined. The new turbine cooling system developed with technology support from the ATS program will achieve system net efficiency levels in excess of 60%.

Cook, C.S.; Nourse, J.G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The second quarter of the project was dedicated to convert the conceptual designs for the wireless tool and power generator into mechanical and electrical drawings as well as software code to create the new system. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Basic mechanical design for the wireless communications system was created and the detailed drawings were started. (2) Basic design for the power generator system was created and the detailed machining drawings were started. The generator design was modified to provide a direct action between the wellbore fluid flow and the piezoelectric stack to generate energy. The new design eliminates the inefficiencies related to picking up outside the tubing wall the pressure fluctuations occurring inside the tubing walls. (3) The new piezoelectric acoustic generator design was created and ordered from the manufacturer. The system will be composed of 40 ceramic wafers electrically connected in parallel and compressed into a single generator assembly. (4) The acoustic two-way communications requirements were also defined and the software and hardware development were started. (5) The electrical hardware development required to transmit information to the surface and to receive commands from the surface was started.

Paul Tubel

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

202

Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Solid oxide fuel cell distributed power generation  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that oxidize fuel without combustion to convert directly the fuel`s chemical energy into electricity. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is distinguished from other fuel cell types by its all solid state structure and its high operating temperature (1,000 C). The Westinghouse tubular SOFC stack is process air cooled and has integrated thermally and hydraulically within its structure a natural gas reformer that requires no fuel combustion and no externally supplied water. In addition, since the SOFC stack delivers high temperature exhaust gas and can be operated at elevated pressure, it can supplant the combustor in a gas turbine generator set yielding a dry (no steam) combined cycle power system of unprecedented electrical generation efficiency (greater 70% ac/LHV). Most remarkably, analysis indicates that efficiencies of 60 percent can be achieved at power plant capacities as low as 250 kWe, and that the 70 percent efficiency level should be achievable at the two MW capacity level. This paper describes the individual SOFC, the stack, and the power generation system and its suitability for distributed generation.

Veyo, S.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

PQ TechWatch: What To Expect from Normal, Utility-Grade Electrical Power: Educating End Users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although perfect electrical powerpower that never stops or deviates from a true sine wavemay be an impossibility, consumers want to know what kind of power they can expect from electric power providers. It is up to utilities to educate their customers on what normal, utility-grade power looks like, how it is generated and distributed, and how to identify and deal with problems related to reliability and power quality. This education should also lead to a two-way ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

For Safer Emergencies, Give Your Power Generator Some ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For Safer Emergencies, Give Your Power Generator Some Space. For Immediate Release: October 6, 2009. ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electrokinetic Power Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although electrokinetic effects are not new, only recently have they been investigated for possible use in energy conversion devices. We have recently reported the electrokinetic generation of molecular hydrogen from rapidly flowing liquid water microjets [Duffin et al. JPCC 2007, 111, 12031]. Here, we describe the use of liquid water microjets for direct conversion of electrokinetic energy to electrical power. Previous studies of electrokinetic power production have reported low efficiencies ({approx}3%), limited by back conduction of ions at the surface and in the bulk liquid. Liquid microjets eliminate energy dissipation due to back conduction and, measuring only at the jet target, yield conversion efficiencies exceeding 10%.

Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New and New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment

209

ADVANCED CO2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.

A. Nehrozoglu

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

ADVANCED CO2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.

A. Nehrozoglu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test  

SciTech Connect

The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS powers the cryogenic controls and Oxygen deficiency hazard equipment(ODH) and has a minimum rating of 20 minutes while on its batteries(to cover the transfer time to/from the emergency generator). Jan 23,1991 at 1640 hrs this system was tested under the supervision of the Terry Ross, Marv Johnson, Dan Markley, Kelly Dixon, and John Urbin. The power feeder to the emergency power grid at DO was disconnected. The generator responded immediately and was supplying power to the emergency power grid in less than 10 seconds. During the 10 seconds that there was no power on the emergency grid the UPS switched on its inverter and provided uninterrupted power to the cryogenic control system and the ODH system. All of the motorized equipment shut off instrument air compressor, vacuum pumps 1 and 2, insulating vacuum blower, glycol cooling pumps, cooling tower fan, and Exhaust Fan 7(EF7). Upon reengagement of power to the grid from the emergency generator, all of the motorized loads started back up with the exception of vacuum pumps 1 and 2, and the UPS inverter turned off. Vacuum pumps 1 and 2 were delay started 20 seconds by the cryogenic control system as not to cause too large of a surge in power by all of the inductive loads starting at once. The DO building elevator which is also on emergency power was test run while the emergency generator was on line with all other emergency loads. The emergency generator current was 140 amps with all loads on line and running except the building elevator. This load of 140 amps is 27% of the generator's capacity. The cryogenic control and ODH system continued to function properly throughout the entire test due to the UPS responding correctly to each power situation. The cryogenic control system isolated both the Utility(UV) and insulating(IV) vacuum systems as to preserve their vacua while the pumps were off. Once the vacuum pumps were reestablished the IV and UV vacua were put back on line to their respective pumps by the cryogenic control system. The instrument air is backed up by a high pressure trailer, regulated down to instrument air pressure and switches automatically on line through a check valve. During the time that the instrument air compressor was off, instrument air never went below 80 psig (high pressure regulator setting).

Markley, D.; /Fermilab

1991-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test  

SciTech Connect

The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS powers the cryogenic controls and Oxygen deficiency hazard equipment(ODH) and has a minimum rating of 20 minutes while on its batteries(to cover the transfer time to/from the emergency generator). Jan 23,1991 at 1640 hrs this system was tested under the supervision of the Terry Ross, Marv Johnson, Dan Markley, Kelly Dixon, and John Urbin. The power feeder to the emergency power grid at DO was disconnected. The generator responded immediately and was supplying power to the emergency power grid in less than 10 seconds. During the 10 seconds that there was no power on the emergency grid the UPS switched on its inverter and provided uninterrupted power to the cryogenic control system and the ODH system. All of the motorized equipment shut off instrument air compressor, vacuum pumps 1 and 2, insulating vacuum blower, glycol cooling pumps, cooling tower fan, and Exhaust Fan 7(EF7). Upon reengagement of power to the grid from the emergency generator, all of the motorized loads started back up with the exception of vacuum pumps 1 and 2, and the UPS inverter turned off. Vacuum pumps 1 and 2 were delay started 20 seconds by the cryogenic control system as not to cause too large of a surge in power by all of the inductive loads starting at once. The DO building elevator which is also on emergency power was test run while the emergency generator was on line with all other emergency loads. The emergency generator current was 140 amps with all loads on line and running except the building elevator. This load of 140 amps is 27% of the generator's capacity. The cryogenic control and ODH system continued to function properly throughout the entire test due to the UPS responding correctly to each power situation. The cryogenic control system isolated both the Utility(UV) and insulating(IV) vacuum systems as to preserve their vacua while the pumps were off. Once the vacuum pumps were reestablished the IV and UV vacua were put back on line to their respective pumps by the cryogenic control system. The instrument air is backed up by a high pressure trailer, regulated down to instrument air pressure and switches automatically on line through a check valve. During the time that the instrument air compressor was off, instrument air never went below 80 psig (high pressure regulator setting).

Markley, D.; /Fermilab

1991-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

Power Switches Utilizing Superconducting Material for Accelerator Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power switches that utilize superconducting material find application in superconducting systems. They can be used for the protection of magnets as a replacement for warm DC breakers, as well as for the replacement of cold diodes. This paper presents a comparison of switches made of various superconducting materials having transport currents of up to 600 A and switching times of the order of milliseconds. The switches operate in the temperature range 4.2-77 K and utilize stainless steel clad YBCO tape and MgB2 tape with a nickel, copper, and iron matrix. Results from simulations and tests are reported.

March, S A; Yang, Y; 10.1109/TASC.2009.2017890

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Control system for wind-powered generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a system of wind-powered generators, a reliable yet inexpensive control system is desirable. Such a system would be completely automatic so it could be left unattended for long periods. It would respond to electrical representations of data such as bearing temperature, vibration, wind velocity, turbine velocity, torque, or any other pertinent data. It would respond by starting or stopping the turbine, controlling the loading, or sounding an alarm. A microprocessor-based controller capable of these functions is described.

Kroth, G.J.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Safety of next generation power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is organized under the following headings: Future needs of utilities regulators, government, and other energy users, PRA and reliability, LMR concepts, LWR design, Advanced reactor technology, What the industry can deliver: advanced LWRs, High temperature gas-cooled reactors, LMR whole-core experiments, Advanced LWR concepts, LWR technology, Forum: public perceptions, What the industry can deliver: LMRs and HTGRs, Criteria and licensing, LMR modeling, Light water reactor thermal-hydraulics, LMR technology, Working together to revitalize nuclear power, Appendix A, luncheon address, Appendix B, banquet address.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The outlook for nuclear power in the U.S. is currently very bright. The economics, operations and safety performance of U.S. nuclear power plants is excellent. In addition, both the safety and economic regulation of nuclear power are being changed to produce better economic parameters for future nuclear plant operations and the licenses for plant operations are being extended to 60 years. There is further a growing awareness of the value of clean, emissions-free nuclear power. These parameters combine to form a firm foundation for continued successful U.S. nuclear plant operations, and even the potential In order to realize a bright future for nuclear power, we must respond successfully to five challenges: Nuclear power must remain economically competitive, The public must remain confident in the safety of the plants and the fuel cycle. Nuclear wastes and spent fuel must be managed and the ultimate disposition pathways for nuclear wastes must be politically settled. The proliferation potential of the commercial nuclear fuel cycle must continue to be minimized, and We must assure a sustained manpower supply for the future and preserve the critical nuclear technology infrastructure. The Generation IV program is conceived to focus the efforts of the international nuclear community on responding to these challenges.

Lake, James Alan

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Water Management Power Plant Water Management The availability of clean and reliable sources of water is a critical issue across the United States and throughout the world. Under the Innovations for Existing Plants Program (IEP), the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has pursued an integrated water-energy R&D program that addresses water management issues relative to coal-based power generation. This initiative intended to clarify the link between energy and water, deepen the understanding of this link and its implications, and integrate current water-related R&D activities into a national water-energy R&D program. Please click on each research area for additional information. Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water Non-Traditional Sources of Process and Cooling Water

218

Private-sector power generation in Thailand: potential, impediments, and policy issues. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Royal Thai Government (RTG) is exploring ways of involving the private sector in electricity generation. The study: (1) assesses the sector's potential for non-utility power generation, including such options as industrial cogeneration, agricultural-waste-based energy systems, and large-scale systems using domestic fossil fuels; (2) reviews existing power-sector institutions in Thailand and analyzes the major issues and impediments associated with private-sector power generation; and (3) based on U.S. experience, describes possible approaches to establishing the price of non-utility electricity.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energys (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis: Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Prepared under Task No. HY61.3620 Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Overland Tidal Power Generation Using Modular Tidal Prism  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring sites with sufficient kinetic energy suitable for tidal power generation with sustained currents > 1 to 2 m/s are relatively rare. Yet sites with greater than 3 to 4 m of tidal range are relatively common around the U.S. coastline. Tidal potential does exist along the shoreline but is mostly distributed, and requires an approach which allows trapping and collection to also be conducted in a distributed manner. In this paper we examine the feasibility of generating sustainable tidal power using multiple nearshore tidal energy collection units and present the Modular Tidal Prism (MTP) basin concept. The proposed approach utilizes available tidal potential by conversion into tidal kinetic energy through cyclic expansion and drainage from shallow modular manufactured overland tidal prisms. A preliminary design and configuration of the modular tidal prism basin including inlet channel configuration and basin dimensions was developed. The unique design was shown to sustain momentum in the penstocks during flooding as well as ebbing tidal cycles. The unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was used to subject the proposed design to a number of sensitivity tests and to optimize the size, shape and configuration of MTP basin for peak power generation capacity. The results show that an artificial modular basin with a reasonable footprint (? 300 acres) has the potential to generate 10 to 20 kw average energy through the operation of a small turbine located near the basin outlet. The potential of generating a total of 500 kw to 1 MW of power through a 20 to 40 MTP basin tidal power farms distributed along the coastline of Puget Sound, Washington, is explored.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Power quality - Utilities begin to set up monitoring networks  

SciTech Connect

The time of day at which power-quality problems occur, and their coincidence with other events on the electrical system, are two of the earliest clues to the source of the problem. Today, utilities are beginning to answer customer complaints by installing networks of power-monitoring devices and showing the customer how to use the data they supply. A monitoring network often provides the additional benefit of enabling an engineer to anticipate power-quality problems before the begin to affect production. Advanced electronic packaging allows power-quality monitors to perform three functions that originally required several different instruments: Transient recording and analysis; Harmonics analysis; and, Power measurement-including demand, kilowatt-hours, VArs, power factor, etc. There is a wide range of power-quality monitors on the market with a confusing array of capabilities. The problem is complicated by the frequent introduction of new models, designed to meet specific applications at the lowest possible cost. This paper describes the important features to look for, which include: sampling rate, peak detection, channels, communications, environmental capability, analysis, protocols, and portability. 3 figs.

Reason, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy Payback Optimization of Thermoelectric Power Generator Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytic model for optimizing thermoelectric power generation system is developed and utilized for parametric studies. This model takes into account the external thermal resistances with hot and cold reservoirs. In addition, the spreading thermal resistance in the module substrates is considered to find the impact of designing small fraction of thermo elements per unit area. Previous studies are expanded by a full optimization of the electrical and thermal circuits. The optimum condition satisfies both electrical load resistance match with the internal resistance and the thermal resistance match with the heat source and the heat sink. Thermoelectric element aspect ratio and fill factor are found to be key parameters to optimize. The optimum leg length and the maximum output power are determined by a simple formula. The output power density per mass of the thermoelectric material has a peak when thermo elements cover a fractional area of ~1%. The role of the substrate heat spreading for thermoelectric power generation is equally significant as thermoelement. For a given heat source, the co-optimization of the heat sink and the thermoelectric module should be performed. Active cooling and the design of the heat sink are customized to find the energy payback for the power generation system. The model includes both the air cooled heat sinks and the water cooled micro channels. We find that one can reduce the mass of thermoelement to around 3~10 % of that in commercial modules for the same output power, as long as the module and elements are designed properly. Also one notes that higher heat flux sources have significantly larger energy payback and reduced cost per output power.

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Design of Thermal Power Generation Device for Vehicle Recharging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With thermal power generation as the basis, vehicle heat sources (such as engine and exhaust pipe) as the carrier, and AT89C52 as the control center, this paper has designed a thermal power generation device for vehicle recharging. This device consists ... Keywords: thermal power generation, power supply for recharging, vehicle devices, design

Hong Fang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

BATTERY STORAGE CONTROL FOR STEADYING RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BATTERY STORAGE CONTROL FOR STEADYING RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION By Shengyuan (Mike) Chen, Emilie-626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;Battery Storage Control for Steadying Renewable Power Generation by storing excess power to a battery during excess generation, and then releasing the energy when power

226

Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter: Agile Direct Grid Connect Medium Voltage 4.7-13.8 kV Power Converter for PV Applications Utilizing Wide Band Gap Devices  

SciTech Connect

Solar ADEPT Project: Satcon is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levelseliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers step up the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually stepped down to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the voltage is high and current is low. Satcons new power conversion devices will eliminate these heavy transformers and connect a utility-scale solar power system directly to the grid. Satcons modular devices are designed to ensure reliabilityif one device fails it can be bypassed and the system can continue to run.

None

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

227

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Neutron generator power supply modeling in EMMA  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has prime responsibility for neutron generator design and manufacturing, and is committed to developing predictive tools for modeling neutron generator performance. An important aspect of understanding component performance is explosively driven ferroelectric power supply modeling. EMMA (ElectroMechanical Modeling in ALEGRA) is a three dimensional compile time version of Sandia`s ALEGRA code. The code is built on top of the general ALEGRA framework for parallel shock-physics computations but also includes additional capability for modeling the electric potential field in dielectrics. The overall package includes shock propagation due to explosive detonation, depoling of ferroelectric ceramics, electric field calculation and coupling with a general lumped element circuit equation system. The AZTEC parallel iterative solver is used to solve for the electric potential. The DASPK differential algebraic equation package is used to solve the circuit equation system. Sample calculations are described.

Robinson, A.C.; Farnsworth, A.V.; Montgomery, S.T.; Peery, J.S; Merewether, K.O.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings SaskPower Geothermal and Self-Generated Renewable Power Loan Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower...

230

Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power...

231

AWMA 97th Annual Conference & Exhibition Mercury and Power Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program for Coal-Fired Power Plants AWMA 97 th Annual Conference & Exhibition Mercury and Power Generation Panel June 23, 2003 Indianapolis, IN Thomas J. Feeley, III...

232

Voltage Support in Distributed Generation by Power Electronics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? There is an increasing amount of power processed through power electronics in the areas of generation interface, energy storage and loads. This increment enables (more)

Strand, Bjrn Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

New optimization techniques for power system generation scheduling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Generation scheduling in restructured electric power systems is critical to maintain the stability and security of a power system and economical operation of the electricity (more)

Sun, Wei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Most recently, a number of factors have led to a continuing electric power industry trend of substituting coal-fired generation with natural gas-fired generation: ...

235

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily generation flexibility in the installed hydro capacity, the total annual energy produced, 2003] 6 #12;· Renewable (non-conventional hydro) energy generation. This includes wind, solar, conventional hydro power, and renewable energy capacities because these are already fully utilized. Nuclear

237

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

Pleva, E. F. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Mehrotra, V. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NIST Processes to Help Build Next-Generation Nuclear Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Processes to Help Build Next-Generation Nuclear Power Plants. From NIST Tech Beat: June 2, 2009. ...

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

242

Next-Generation Power Electronics: Reducing Energy Waste and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute President Obama Announces New Public-Private Manufacturing Innovation Institute Photovoltaic Cell Material Basics...

243

Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James;PWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell. Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James Bushnell and Steven Stoft

California at Berkeley. University of

244

Optimal Design of Integration of Intelligent, Adaptive Solar (PV) Power Generator with Grid for Domestic Energy Management System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a novel system based on integration of solar power generator with grid for optimal utilization of energy by minimizing the power drawn from grid. A prototype grid integrated PV system comprising of PV module (2*75Wp), battery bank ... Keywords: Solar power Generator (SPG), Domestic Energy Management, Bi-directional Inverter, Photovoltaic(PV), Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)

S. N. Singh; Pooja Singh; Swati Kumari; Swati

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Strategic Analysis of Biomass and Waste Fuels for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, waste fuels, and power technologies based on advanced combustion and gasification show promise for renewable baseload generation. Utilities can use the results of this study to evaluate the potential performance and cost of biomass and waste fuel-fired power plants in their systems and examine fuel use in integrated resource plans.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Geothermal Power Generation as Related to Resource Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past several years geothermal exploratory work has been conducted in northern Nevada. In conjunction with that effort a proposed 55-MW steam geothermal power plant was considered for initial installation in one of the fields being developed. The characteristics of the geothermal fields under consideration were not firm, with data indicating widely varying downhole temperatures. Thus, neither the resource nor the plant operating conditions could be set. To assist both the ultimate user of the resource, the utility, and the developer of the geothermal field, a series of parametric sensitivity studies were conducted for the initial evaluation of a field vis-a-vis the power plant. Using downhole temperature as the variable, the amount of brine, brine requirements/kWh, and pounds brine/pound of steam to the turbine were ascertained. This was done over a range of downhole temperatures of from 350F to 475F. The studies illustrate the total interdependence of the geothermal resource and its associated power plant. The selection of geothermal steam power plant design conditions must be related to the field in which the plant is located. The results of the work have proven to be valuable in two major respects: (1) to determine the production required of a particular geothermal field to meet electrical generation output and (2) as field characteristics become firm, operating conditions can be defined for the associated power plant.

Falcon, J. A.; Richards, R. G.; Keilman, L. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Concentrating Solar Power Generation to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

248

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

New power politics will determine generation's path  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US power industry's story in 2009 will be all about change, to borrow a now-familiar theme. Though the new administration's policy specifics had not been revealed as this report was prepared, it appears that flat load growth in 2009 will give the new Obama administration a unique opportunity to formulate new energy policy without risking that the lights will go out. New coal projects are now facing increasing difficulties. It looks as though the electricity supply industry will continue to muddle through. It may see an advancement in infrastructure investment, significant new generation or new technology development. It also faces the possibility that policies necessary to achieving those goals will not materialize, for political and economic reasons. 4 figs.

Maize, K.; Neville, A.; Peltier, R.

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Diagnostics on the COBRA pulsed power generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The COBRA pulsed power generator has a variable current pulse wave form and amplitude (95-180 ns rise time, up to 1 MA peak current). It was designed to study wire array Z pinches and X pinches, including plasma formation, pinch implosion dynamics, and pinch plasma parameters as a function of current rise time. These loads have been studied using an extensive set of diagnostics with spatial and/or temporal resolution. The set of electrical diagnostics on the COBRA generator includes Rogowski coils to monitor the total load current and the current through individual return current posts, and there is also an inductive voltage monitor. A set of extreme ultraviolet and x-ray detectors is used to study the load radiation. Wire array and X pinch plasma formation and dynamics are studied using two-frame, point projection X-pinch x-ray imaging as well as with multiframe laser probing. Flat potassium acid phtalate crystal (KAP), convex, extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph, and focusing spectrograph with spatial resolution with mica crystal, pinhole cameras, and a camera with a slit and a step filter set (slip step-wedge camera) can be used in each pulse to monitor the x-ray emission from the X pinch(es) and arrays in several spectral bands.

Shelkovenko, T. A.; Chalenski, D. A.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A. [Laboratory of Plasma Studies, Cornell University, Rhodes Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

IEEE Power Engineering Society, papers from the joint power generation conference, 1979  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains 33 IEEE papers presented at the 1979 Joint Power Generation Conference. These papers were presented at the following sessions: Current Limiting Devices; Shutdown Capability for Nuclear Generating Stations; Decentralized Generation; Generator Circuit Breakers for Generating Stations; Application of Solid State Logic Controls for Generating Plants; Power Plant Response; Recent Nuclear Development; Power System Relaying; New Generation Methods and Problems; Batteries. All 33 papers have been indexed previously.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Rayapati Power Generation Pvt Ltd RPGPL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rayapati Power Generation Pvt Ltd RPGPL Rayapati Power Generation Pvt Ltd RPGPL Jump to: navigation, search Name Rayapati Power Generation Pvt. Ltd. (RPGPL) Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 500 082 Sector Biomass Product Biomass plant developer and operater. References Rayapati Power Generation Pvt. Ltd. (RPGPL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rayapati Power Generation Pvt. Ltd. (RPGPL) is a company located in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India . References ↑ "[ Rayapati Power Generation Pvt. Ltd. (RPGPL)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rayapati_Power_Generation_Pvt_Ltd_RPGPL&oldid=350208" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

255

Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller propose to utilize solar power in wireless sensor networks, establishing a topology where ­ changing over show that both protocols provide significant energy savings when utilizing solar power. The paper shows

Voigt, Thiemo

256

Real power regulation for the utility power grid via responsive loads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for dynamically managing an electrical power system that determines measures of performance and control criteria for the electric power system, collects at least one automatic generation control (AGC) input parameter to at least one AGC module and at least one automatic load control (ALC) input parameter to at least one ALC module, calculates AGC control signals and loads as resources (LAR) control signals in response to said measures of performance and control criteria, propagates AGC control signals to power generating units in response to control logic in AGC modules, and propagates LAR control signals to at least one LAR in response to control logic in ALC modules.

McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN); Kirby, Brendan J. (Knoxville, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN), Van Dyke, James W. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Siting Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, Congress asked the U.S. Department of Energy to develop and scope out an initiative to fulfill the goal of having 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new parabolic trough, power tower, and dish engine solar capacity supplying the southwestern United States. In this paper, we present a review of the solar resource for Arizona, California, Nevada, and New Mexico. These four states have the greatest number of ''premium'' solar sites in the country and each has a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). We present information on the generation potential of the solar resources in these states. We also present regions within New Mexico that may be ideally suited for developing large-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants because of their proximity to load and their access to unconstrained transmission.

Mehos, M.; Owens, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ris-R-1205(EN) Conceptual survey of Generators and Power Electronics for Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents a survey on generator concepts and power electronic concepts for wind turbines. The report is aimed as a tool for decision-makers and development people with respect to wind turbine manufactures, utilities, and independent system operators as well as manufactures of generators and power electronics. The survey is focused on the electric development of wind turbines and it yields an overview on: State of the art on generators and power electronics. Future concepts and technologies within generators and power electronics. Market needs in the shape of requirements to the grid connection. This survey on generator and power electronic concepts was carried out in cooperation between Aalborg University and Ris National Laboratory, in the scope of the joint research programme Electric Design and Control. The report has been reviewed by:

L. H. Hansen; L. Helle; F. Blaabjerg; E. Ritchie; S. Munk; H. Bindner; P. Srensen; B. Bak-jensen; Anca Daniela; Hansen Peter; Hauge Madsen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ontario Power Generation Motion to Intervene & Comments in FE Docket No.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ontario Power Generation Motion to Intervene & Comments in FE Ontario Power Generation Motion to Intervene & Comments in FE Docket No. 99-1 Ontario Power Generation Motion to Intervene & Comments in FE Docket No. 99-1 Ontario Power Generation hereby moves to intervene in, and comments on, the DOE's proposed open access requirements for International Electric Transmission Facilities. Ontario Power Company Motion to Intervene & Comments in FE Docket No. 99-1 More Documents & Publications Motion to Intervene and Comments of Public Utility District No. 1 (Pend Oreille County, Washington) on PP 99-1 Notice of Intent to Amend Presidential Permit Motion to intervene and comments of the energy services group of Hydro-Quebec and H.Q. Energy Services (U.S.) Inc, on FE 99-1 Joint Motion to Intervene of Northern States Power Company (Minnesota) et

263

Utilization of coal mine ventilation exhaust as combustion air in gas-fired turbines for electric and/or mechanical power generation. Semi-annual topical report, June 1995--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane emitted during underground coal mining operations is a hazard that is dealt with by diluting the methane with fresh air and exhausting the contaminated air to the atmosphere. Unfortunately this waste stream may contain more than 60% of the methane resource from the coal, and in the atmosphere the methane acts as a greenhouse gas with an effect about 24.5 times greater than CO{sub 2}. Though the waste stream is too dilute for normal recovery processes, it can be used as combustion air for a turbine-generator, thereby reducing the turbine fuel requirements while reducing emissions. Preliminary analysis indicates that such a system, built using standard equipment, is economically and environmentally attractive, and has potential for worldwide application.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western UtilityEmerging Driver of New Renewable Generation in the WesternEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Office of Planning,

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Backup Power Options Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options In addition to electric generators powered by fuel, homeowners and business owners may consider alternative backup power options. Battery-stored backup power-Allows you to continue operating lights, refrigerators and other appliances, fans, and communications during a power outage. These systems can connect to renewable sources of energy, like solar panels and small-scale wind generators, to help the batteries stay charged during an emergency. You can also recharge many of these battery systems with diesel generators. The length of time you will be able to draw electricity from your batteries will depend on the size of your

266

Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

Lal, Amit (Madison, WI); Li, Hui (Madison, WI); Blanchard, James P. (Madison, WI); Henderson, Douglass L. (Madison, WI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Generation Scheduling in Microgrids under Uncertainties in Power Generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recently, the concept of Microgrids (MG) has been introduced in the distribution network. Microgrids are defined as small power systems that consist of various distributed (more)

Zein Alabedin, Ayman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm Facility Loranger Power Generation Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Loranger Power Generation Developer Loranger Power Generation Location Berlin NH Coordinates 44.501183°, -71.231588° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.501183,"lon":-71.231588,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

High-density thermoelectric power generation and nanoscale thermal metrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric power generation has been around for over 50 years but has seen very little large scale implementation due to the inherently low efficiencies and powers available from known materials. Recent material advances ...

Mayer, Peter (Peter Matthew), 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

High Frequency High Power RF Generation using a Relativistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FREQUENCY HIGH POWER RF GENERATION USING A RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAM C. Jing , S. Antipov, P. Schoessow, and A. Kanareykin, Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH-44139 J.G. Power, M....

271

Optimal site selection and sizing of distributed utility-scale wind power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As electric market product unbundling occurs, sellers in the wholesale market for electricity will find it to their advantage to be able to specify the quantity of electricity available and the time of availability. Since wind power plants are driven by the stochastic nature of the wind itself, this can present difficulties. To the extent that an accurate wind forecast is available, contract deviations, and therefore penalties, can be significantly reduced. Even though one might have the ability to accurately forecast the availability of wind power, it might not be available during enough of the peak period to provide sufficient value. However, if the wind power plant is developed over geographically disperse locations, the timing and availability of wind power from these multiple sources could provide a better match with the utility`s peak load than a single site. There are several wind plants in various stages of planning or development in the US. Although some of these are small-scale demonstration projects, significant wind capacity has been developed in Minnesota, with additional developments planned in Wyoming and Iowa. As these and other projects are planned and developed, there is a need to perform analysis of the value of geographically diverse sites on the efficiency of the overall wind plant. In this paper, the authors use hourly wind-speed data from six geographically diverse sites to provide some insight into the potential benefits of disperse wind plant development. They provide hourly wind power from each of these sites to an electric reliability simulation model. This model uses generating plant characteristics of the generators within the state of Minnesota to calculate various reliability indices. Since they lack data on wholesale power transactions, they do not include them in the analysis, and they reduce the hourly load data accordingly. The authors present and compare results of their methods and suggest some areas of future research.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating capacity, 1949-2040 (index, 1949 = 1.0) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Author

273

Combined desalination and power generation using solar energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Integrated desalination and power generation using solar energy is a prospective way to help solve the twin challenges of energy and fresh water shortage, while (more)

Zhao, Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Distributed Generation: Issues Concerning a Changing Power Grid Paradigm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Distributed generation is becoming increasingly prevalent on power grids around the world. Conventional designs and grid operations are not always sufficient for handling the implementation (more)

Therien, Scott G.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Integrative Power Supply Solution for Future Generation Vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Abstract: How to secure the power supply for future generation vehicles is an open question. This thesis uses Web-HIPRE as a tool of Decision (more)

Zhou, Qinsheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide...

277

The Feasibility of Thermoelectric Power Generation: Linking Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts The Feasibility of Thermoelectric Power Generation: Linking Materials, Systems, and Cost Speaker(s): Saniya LeBlanc Date:...

278

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Jersey" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

279

REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Considerations REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF CBS CORPORATION, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT...

280

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Illinois" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Datang Jilin Resourceful New Energy Power Generation Co Ltd formerly...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Datang Jilin Resourceful New Energy Power Generation Co Ltd formerly known as Roaring 40s and Datan Jump to: navigation,...

282

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

283

REQUEST BY ABB POWER GENERATION, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Considerations REQUEST BY ABB POWER GENERATION, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER...

284

Power conversion effectiveness and generation | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Page Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Power conversion effectiveness and generation Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from...

285

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Texas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

286

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Washington" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,...

287

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Montana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,199...

288

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Maine" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,...

289

Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office EETD Safety Program Development Contact Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic Systems Speaker(s): Jason Stauth...

290

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "South Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,199...

291

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Kansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999...

292

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "West Virginia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

293

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Louisiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1...

294

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New Hampshire" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,19...

295

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

296

Distributed Generation and Virtual Power Plants: Barriers and Solutions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present technological and regulatory power system needs to adapt to the increase in the share of distributed generation. This research focuses on the applicability (more)

Olejniczak, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;...

298

Pennsylvania's use of natural gas for power generation has grown ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Changes in relative fuel prices. Prices of coal and natural gas are key input costs at electric power ... Pennsylvania coal and natural gas generation additions were ...

299

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

300

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil fuelscoal, natural gas, and petroleumsupplied 70% of total electric power generation in 1950, with that share rising to 82% in 1970, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

302

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kauai...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

coming from renewable energy by 2023. vii List of Acronyms Btu British thermal unit CSP concentrating solar power DER distributed energy resource DG distributed generation DOE...

303

NANODEVICES FOR GENERATING POWER FROM MOLECULES AND ...  

A nanoconverter or nanosensor is disclosed capable of directly generating electricity through physisorption interactions with molecules that are ...

304

Analysis of hybrid power system incorporating squirrel cage induction generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents generic model of hybrid power system consisting in a combined solution one wind turbine with asynchronous generator and on hydro generator with synchronous machine. This technology was developed by to reduce the cost of supplying ... Keywords: asynchronous generator, homer, optimal design, renewable energy, variable speed generation, voltage and frequency controller, water flow

Sorin Ioan Deaconu; Marcel Topor; Gabriel Nicolae Popa; Diana Bistrian

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

100-MW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UTILIZING A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a 100 Mw(e) nuclear power plant is described. The plant utilized a sodium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor with stainless- steel clad. slightiy enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel. The reactor is provided with three main coolant circuits, and the steam cycle has three stages of regenerative heating. The plant control system allows automatic operation over the range of 20 to 100% load, or manual operation at all loads. The site, reactor, sodium systems, reactor auxiliaries, fuel handling, instrumentation, turbine-generator, buildings. and safety measures are described. Engineering drawings are included. (W.D.M.)

1958-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest New Crop (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop is a trifold brochure that strives to educate rural landowners and rural co-op utilities about the benefits of wind power development. It provides examples of rural utilities that have successful wind energy projects and supportive statements from industry members.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

WRI 50: Strategies for Cooling Electric Generating Facilities Utilizing Mine Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation and water consumption are inextricably linked. Because of this relationship DOE/NETL has funded a competitive research and development initiative to address this relationship. This report is part of that initiative and is in response to DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41719-0. Thermal electric power generation requires large volumes of water to cool spent steam at the end of the turbine cycle. The required volumes are such that new plant siting is increasingly dependent on the availability of cooling circuit water. Even in the eastern U.S., large rivers such as the Monongahela may no longer be able to support additional, large power stations due to subscription of flow to existing plants, industrial, municipal and navigational requirements. Earlier studies conducted by West Virginia University (WV 132, WV 173 phase I, WV 173 Phase II, WV 173 Phase III, and WV 173 Phase IV in review) have identified that a large potential water resource resides in flooded, abandoned coal mines in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin, and likely elsewhere in the region and nation. This study evaluates the technical and economic potential of the Pittsburgh Coal Basin water source to supply new power plants with cooling water. Two approaches for supplying new power plants were evaluated. Type A employs mine water in conventional, evaporative cooling towers. Type B utilizes earth-coupled cooling with flooded underground mines as the principal heat sink for the power plant reject heat load. Existing mine discharges in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin were evaluated for flow and water quality. Based on this analysis, eight sites were identified where mine water could supply cooling water to a power plant. Three of these sites were employed for pre-engineering design and cost analysis of a Type A water supply system, including mine water collection, treatment, and delivery. This method was also applied to a ''base case'' river-source power plant, for comparison. Mine-water system cost estimates were then compared to the base-case river source estimate. We found that the use of net-alkaline mine water would under current economic conditions be competitive with a river-source in a comparable-size water cooling system. On the other hand, utilization of net acidic water would be higher in operating cost than the river system by 12 percent. This does not account for any environmental benefits that would accrue due to the treatment of acid mine drainage, in many locations an existing public liability. We also found it likely that widespread adoption of mine-water utilization for power plant cooling will require resolution of potential liability and mine-water ownership issues. In summary, Type A mine-water utilization for power plant cooling is considered a strong option for meeting water needs of new plant in selected areas. Analysis of the thermal and water handling requirements for a 600 megawatt power plant indicated that Type B earth coupled cooling would not be feasible for a power plant of this size. It was determined that Type B cooling would be possible, under the right conditions, for power plants of 200 megawatts or less. Based on this finding the feasibility of a 200 megawatt facility was evaluated. A series of mines were identified where a Type B earth-coupled 200 megawatt power plant cooling system might be feasible. Two water handling scenarios were designed to distribute heated power-plant water throughout the mines. Costs were developed for two different pumping scenarios employing a once-through power-plant cooling circuit. Thermal and groundwater flow simulation models were used to simulate the effect of hot water injection into the mine under both pumping strategies and to calculate the return-water temperature over the design life of a plant. Based on these models, staged increases in required mine-water pumping rates are projected to be part of the design, due to gradual heating and loss of heat-sink efficiency of the rock sequence above the mines. Utilizing pumping strategy No.1 (two mines) capital costs were 25 percent lower a

Joseph J. Donovan; Brenden Duffy; Bruce R. Leavitt; James Stiles; Tamara Vandivort; Paul Ziemkiewicz

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

SunShot Initiative: Baseload Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Generation Concentrating Solar Power Generation In 2010, DOE issued the Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Generation funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The following projects were selected under this competitive solicitation: Abengoa: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant eSolar: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant Conceptual Design and Feasibility General Atomics: Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage HiTek: Low-Cost Heliostat Development Infinia: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power PPG: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector Rocketdyne: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs SENER: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants

309

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Uses and Applications of Climate Forecasts for Power Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uses and potential applications of climate forecasts for electric and gas utilities were assessed 1) to discern needs for improving climate forecasts and guiding future research, and 2) to assist utilities in making wise use of forecasts. In-...

Stanley A. Changnon; Joyce M. Changnon; David Changnon

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales" Sales" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Sales (Megawatthours)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",33463,".",33463 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",6883,".",6883 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1820,".",".",1820 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",9651,".",".",9651

312

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue" Revenue" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Revenue (thousand dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1735,".",1735 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",798,".",798 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",243,".",".",243 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",603,".",".",603

313

Coal-fueled diesels for modular power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interest in coal-fueled heat engines revived after the sharp increase in the prices of natural gas and petroleum in the 1970`s. Based on the success of micronized coal water slurry combustion tests in an engine in the 1980`s, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy. initiated several programs for the development of advanced coal-fueled diesel and gas turbine engines for use in cogeneration, small utilities, industrial applications and transportation. Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have been developing technology since 1985, under the sponsor of METC, to enable coal water slurry (CWS) to be utilized in large bore, medium-speed diesel engines. Modular power generation applications in the 10--100 MW size (each plant typically using from two to eight engines) are the target applications for the late 1990`s and beyond when, according to the US DOE and other projections, oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate much more rapidly compared to the price of coal. As part of this program over 7.50 hours of prototype engine operation has been achieved on coal water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder full scale engine with Integrated Emissions Control System in 1993. In this paper, the authors described the project cost of the CWS fuel used, the heat rate of the engine operating on CWS, the projected maintenance cost for various engine components, and the demonstrated low emissions characteristics of the coal diesel system.

Wilson, R.P. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rao, A.K. [Cooper-Bessemer Reciprocating, Grove City, PA (United States); Smith, W.C. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Power Generating Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A privately held Texas corporation, which provides a direct-fired, biomass-fueled cogeneration system that generates electricity and process heat while consuming on-site...

315

Sacramento Municipal Utility District 100 MW Photovoltaic Power Plant: Final environmental impact report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) proposes constructing a 100 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. The project, to be built in increments over the next 12 years, is the largest facility of its kind proposed by any utility in the country. The initial 1 MW photovoltaic field will consist of four 250 kW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. Photovoltaic cell modules will be mounted on flat-plate arrays attached to centrally located torque tubes which allow the arrays to rotate on their long axis to )openreverse arrowquotes)track)closereverse arrowquotes) the sun. This Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) addresses environmental aspects of the proposed project according to the guidelines for implementing the California Environmental Quality Act and the National Enviornmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

317

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Residential Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart provides energy efficiency incentives to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. Efficiency Smart assists residential, commercial , and...

318

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

319

Pipelines to Power Lines: Gas Transportation for Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation represents a major growth market for the natural gas industry; but the large, high pressure, highly variable loads required for individual power generators can be difficult to serve. This report, cosponsored by the Gas Research Institute and EPRI, is a design stage assessment of the engineering and costs of the pipelines needed to handle these types of loads.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fuel Cycle Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as well as for coal and natural gas grid-generation technologies, are provided as baseline cases Cycle Power Plants 14.9 33.1 Natural Gas Turbine, Combined Cycle Power Plants 18.3 46.0 Coal comparable to the total energy use associated with the natural gas and coal grid-generation technologies

Argonne National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A learning control of unused energy power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the development of new clean energy without dependence on fossil fuel has become urgent. This article proposes a learning control system for power generation using a low-temperature gap which has been designed to maintain the speed of ... Keywords: BP neural network, Evaporator, Learning control, Low thermal gap, Power generator, Turbine

Satomi Shikasho; Kun-Young Han; Ji-Sun Shin; Chui Chengyou; Hee-Hyol Lee

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The development work during this quarter was focused in the assembly of the downhole power generator hardware and its electronics module. The quarter was also spent in the development of the surface system electronics and software to extract the acoustic data transmitted from downhole to the surface from the noise generated by hydrocarbon flow in wells and to amplify very small acoustic signals to increase the distance between the downhole tool and the surface receiver. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Assembly of the downhole power generator mandrel for generation of electrical power due to flow in the wellbore. (2) Test the piezoelectric wafers to assure that they are performing properly prior to integrating them to the mechanical power generator mandrel. (3) Coat the power generator wafers to prevent water from shorting the power generator wafers. (4) Test of the power generator using a water tower and an electric pump to create a water flow loop. (5) Test the power harvesting electronics module. (6) Upgrade the signal condition and amplification from downhole into the surface system. (7) Upgrade the surface processing system capability to process data faster. (8) Create a new filtering technique to extract the signal from noise after the data from downhole is received at the surface system.

Paul Tubel

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Power and Voltage Smooth Control of Doubly Fed Induction Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is the leading in wind power technology currently. In this paper, decoupling control of DFIG is studied and a new energy storage device is used in the smooth control of DFIG system's power and voltage. This new method ... Keywords: Doubly fed induction generator, Energy storage device, Decoupling control

An-Ren Ma, Cai-Xia Wang, Zhi-Wen Zhou, Tao Wu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Market concentration and marketing power among electricity generators in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Policy initiatives designed to foster competition among electricity generators in Texas face a special challenge due to the relative isolation of that system. This isolation contributes to high levels of market concentration and market power that could hinder the development of a truly competitive market. This paper examines market concentration and market power in the ERCOT market for electricity generation by calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) under various assumptions to gauge the degree of market concentration among generators in ERCOT. In addition, some ongoing studies of market power in ERCOT are discussed. The distinction between market concentration and market power is highlighted.

Zarnikau, J.; Lam, A. [Planergy Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Self-Powered Signal Processing Using Vibration-Based Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low power design trends raise the possibility of using ambient energy to power future digital systems. A chip has been designed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a digital system from power generated by vibrations in its environment. A moving coil electromagnetic transducer was used as a power generator. Calculations show that power on the order of 400 W can be generated. The test chip integrates an ultra-low power controller to regulate the generator voltage using delay feedback techniques, and a low power subband filter DSP load circuit. Tests verify 500 kHz self-powered operation of the subband filter, a level of performance suitable for sensor applications. The entire system, including the DSP load, consumes 18 W of power. The chip is implemented in a standard 0.8 m CMOS process. A single generator excitation produced 23 ms of valid DSP operation at a 500 kHz clock frequency, corresponding to 11 700 cycles.

Rajeevan Amirtharajah; Anantha P. Chandrakasan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation of conventional electric power generating industry quality assurance and reliability practices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The techniques and practices utilized in an allied industry (electric power generation) that might serve as a baseline for formulating Quality Assurance and Reliability (QA and R) procedures for photovoltaic solar energy systems were studied. The study results provide direct near-term input for establishing validation methods as part of the SERI performance criteria and test standards development task.

Anderson, R.T.; Lauffenburger, H.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hydrogen generation utilizing integrated CO2 removal with steam reforming  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam reformer may comprise fluid inlet and outlet connections and have a substantially cylindrical geometry divided into reforming segments and reforming compartments extending longitudinally within the reformer, each being in fluid communication. With the fluid inlets and outlets. Further, methods for generating hydrogen may comprise steam reformation and material adsorption in one operation followed by regeneration of adsorbers in another operation. Cathode off-gas from a fuel cell may be used to regenerate and sweep the adsorbers, and the operations may cycle among a plurality of adsorption enhanced reformers to provide a continuous flow of hydrogen.

Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Chellappa, Anand S

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Siemens Westinghouse Power Generation SWPG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Siemens Westinghouse Power Generation SWPG Siemens Westinghouse Power Generation SWPG Jump to: navigation, search Name Siemens Westinghouse Power Generation (SWPG) Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip PA 15235-5 Product Siemens Westinghouse Power Generation is the fuel cell subsidiary of Siemens Power Generation. It develops and manufactures stationary solide oxide fuel cells. Coordinates 40.438335°, -79.997459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.438335,"lon":-79.997459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

329

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Emergency Power Generation in Healthcare Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of a hospital or other healthcare facility's emergency power supply system can literally mean the difference between life and death, especially for patients connected to life support systems and other critical medical devices.

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

331

1996 international joint power generation conference: Proceedings. Volume 2; PWR-Volume 30  

SciTech Connect

This is volume 2 of the proceedings of the 1996 International Joint Power Generation Conference held in Houston, Texas. The topics of the paper include emerging technologies for heat exchangers, maintenance and repair of feedwater and service water heat exchangers, steam surface condensers, understanding performance test codes, reliability, availability and maintainability of units and components, economics and reliability, Kalina cycle technologies, systems development under DOE`s combustion 2000 program, improvements in turbine materials and operating environment, combined cycle steam turbine application, case histories of turbine improvements, advanced generator mechanical design improvements and upgrades, steam turbine performance improvements, improvements in turbine materials and operating environment, combustion turbines for power generation, optimization of boiler performance using CEMS, international power plant design and restructuring issues, recent improvements in utility operations, turbine generator assessment technology, environmental compliance for industrial operations, industrial energy systems and services, industrial steam generation options.

Kielasa, L. [ed.] [Detroit Edison Co., MI (United States); Weed, G.E. [ed.] [Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities.

Information Center

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volume 1: Electric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Reti attive di distribuzione: le applicazioni Virtual Power Plant e Virtual Utility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Il presente lavoro si occupa di nuove applicazioni per la gestione e lottimizzazione di risorse distribuite, cos dette Virtual Power Plant (VPP) o Virtual Utility (more)

Baroncelli, Paolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

336

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Risk Assessment: Volume 2: Application to Diablo Canyon Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to steam generator tubing can impair its ability to adequately perform the required safety functions in terms of structural stability and leakage. This report describes the Diablo Canyon Power Plant application of a method for calculating risk for severe accidents involving steam generator tube failure. The method helps utilities determine risks associated with application of alternate repair criteria and/or operation with degraded tubing.

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Bicarbonate Buffer and Proton Transfer) isolation and selection of electricity- generating bacteria (3­5), (ii) selection and modification studies (11­21) to maintain a suitable pH for electricity- generating bacteria and/or to increase

Tullos, Desiree

339

Delimiting Thunderstorm Watch Periods by Real-Time Lightning Location for a Power Utility Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During times of thunderstorm activity, the power utility serving metropolitan New York enters a potentially costly thunderstorm watch mode of operation which is designed to prevent a major power outage caused by lightning. To evaluate the ...

Vincent P. Idone; Richard E. Orville

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Utility Integrated Resource Planning: An Emerging Driver of NewRenewable Generation in the Western United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, markets for renewable generation--especially wind power--have grown substantially in recent years. This growth is typically attributed to technology improvements and resulting cost reductions, the availability of federal tax incentives, and aggressive state policy efforts. But another less widely recognized driver of new renewable generation is poised to play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Common in the late-1980s to mid-1990s, but relegated to lesser importance as many states took steps to restructure their electricity markets in the late-1990s, IRP has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions such as the western United States, where retail competition has failed to take root. As practiced in the United States, IRP is a formal process by which utilities analyze the costs, benefits, and risks of all resources available to them--both supply- and demand-side--with the ultimate goal of identifying a portfolio of resources that meets their future needs at lowest cost and/or risk. Though the content of any specific utility IRP is unique, all are built on a common basic framework: (1) development of peak demand and load forecasts; (2) assessment of how these forecasts compare to existing and committed generation resources; (3) identification and characterization of various resource portfolios as candidates to fill a projected resource deficiency; (4) analysis of these different ''candidate'' resource portfolios under base-case and alternative future scenarios; and finally, (5) selection of a preferred portfolio, and creation of a near-term action plan to begin to move towards that portfolio. Renewable resources were once rarely considered seriously in utility IRP. In the western United States, however, the most recent resource plans call for a significant amount of new wind power capacity. These planned additions appear to be motivated by the improved economics of wind power, an emerging understanding that wind integration costs are manageable, and a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities. Equally important, utility IRPs are increasingly recognizing the inherent risks in fossil-based generation portfolios--especially natural gas price risk and the financial risk of future carbon regulation--and the benefits of renewable energy in mitigating those risks. This article, which is based on a longer report from Berkeley Lab,i examines how twelve investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in the western United States--Avista, Idaho Power, NorthWestern Energy (NWE), Portland General Electric (PGE), Puget Sound Energy (PSE), PacifiCorp, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Nevada Power, Sierra Pacific, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)--treat renewable energy in their most recent resource plans (as of July 2005). In aggregate, these twelve utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. In reviewing these plans, our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable generation in the United States, and (2) to suggest possible improvements to the methods used to evaluate renewable generation as a resource option. As such, we begin by summarizing the amount and types of new renewable generation planned as a result of these twelve IRPs. We then offer observations about the IRP process, and how it might be improved to more objectively evaluate renewable resources.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Protection and Control for Grid Connected Photovoltaic Power Generation System Based on Instantaneous Power Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable protection and reasonable control run an important role in grid connected PV power generation system. The detection and calculation of real and reactive power are the bases of many inverter resident passive and active islanding detection method ... Keywords: Distributed generation, photovoltaic system, grid connected, protection and control, power theory

Fei Wang; Chengcheng Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Next Generation Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designed by PNNL and currently being deployed in the AEP gridSMART Demonstration Project, and » developed that will position PNNL as the leader in modeling and planning power grid data communication networks. External users scenarios and testing of communication requirements with smart grid investments. November 2012 PNNL-SA-90012

343

Protective, Modular Wave Power Generation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of small wave energy conversion modules that can be built into large, scalable arrays, in the same vein as solar panels, has been developed. This innovation lends itself to an organic business and development model, and enables the use of large-run manufacturing technology to reduce system costs. The first prototype module has been built to full-scale, and tested in a laboratory wave channel. The device has been shown to generate electricity and dissipate wave energy. Improvements need to be made to the electrical generator and a demonstration of an array of modules should be made in natural conditions.

Vvedensky, Jane M.; Park, Robert Y.

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Design & optimization of automotive power electronics utilizing FITMOS MOSFET technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power electronics are essential to many automotive applications, and their importance continues to grow as more vehicle functions incorporate electronic controls. MOSFETs are key elements in automotive power electronic ...

Li, Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M. Misakian, TL Nelson and WE Feero. Regarding Electric Energy Savings, Power Factors, and Carbon Footprints: A Primer. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Technologies for CO{sub 2}-capture from advanced power-generation systems  

SciTech Connect

The US power-generation industry generated about 1.5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} in 1990, with over 95% of that CO{sub 2} being generated by coal-fired utility boilers. Extensive use of coal for power generation is expected to continue for many years to come. Therefore, should capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} be necessary, coal-fired power plants are likely to be primary targets for CO{sub 2} capture. This paper discusses opportunities and techniques for the capture of CO{sub 2} from the advanced power-generation systems that appear to be the leading candidates for widespread commercialization in the next two decades: integrated coal gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) and fuel cells. Retrofitting of conventional power plants for burning coal with O{sub 2} to facilitate CO{sub 2} capture was also investigated. A brief discussion of the impact of the CO{sub 2}-capture technology on the cost of power generation is also presented. Research and development needs of the CO{sub 2}-capture technologies are also identified. The results indicate that CO{sub 2} recovery from IGCC and fuel-cell plants is less complicated, less energy-intensive, and less costly than its recovery from conventional coal-fired power stations.

Wolsky, A.M.; Daniels, E.J.; Jody, B.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications  

SciTech Connect

The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Powering Curiosity: Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Powering Curiosity: Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Powering Curiosity: Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators Powering Curiosity: Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators January 29, 2008 - 7:06pm Addthis Mars Science Laboratory, aka Curiosity, is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term program of robotic exploration of the Red Planet. It's powered by the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG). Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech. Mars Science Laboratory, aka Curiosity, is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term program of robotic exploration of the Red Planet. It's powered by the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG). Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech. What are the key facts? Over the last four decades, the United States has launched 26

349

MHK Technologies/Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Generation Buoy Power Generation Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Columbia Power Technologies Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Direct drive point absorber In 2005 Oregon State University entered into an exclusive license agreement with Columbia Power Technologies to jointly develop a direct drive wave energy conversion device Designed to be anchored 2 5 miles off the Oregon coast in 130 feet of water it uses the rise and fall of ocean waves to generate electricity Mooring Configuration Anchored

350

The Homopolar Generator as a Pulsed Industrial Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological breakthroughs in recent years have allowed the homopolar generator to be developed to a point where it can now be considered a highly reliable industrial pulsed power supply. These power supplies are capable of producing repetitive high current, low voltage electrical pulses. The homopolar generator is allowing numerous industrial joining and forming processes to be extended to larger work pieces and higher power output capabilities than were previously possible. The basic electrical and mechanical nature of the homopolar generator is described, and a brief discussion of the recent technological advances that have led to its development as a pulsed power supply is given. The homopolar generator is then discussed as a pulsed power supply for numerous industrial applications such as large metal cross section pulsed resistance welding, pulsed billet heating for subsequent hot working processes, pulsed heating for localized forging processes, and magnetic metal forming. Each of these application areas is discussed in detail including, technical advantages of the pulsed homopolar generator power, supply, as well as economic advantages of the system based on time and energy savings as compared with conventional power and heat sources. Each application discussion includes analytical and empirical data on the performance of an actual homopolar generator used for tests on that particular application. Information on current availability of various size homopolar generators is also presented.

Weldon, J. M.; Weldon, W. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Integrated high speed intelligent utility tie unit for disbursed/renewable generation facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After experiencing the price hikes and rotating blackouts in California, the disbursed or distributed generation (DG) is considered as one of the most attractive alternatives for future utility industry. In addition to the conventional DG that uses fossil-fuel ...

Worakarn Wongsaichua / Wei-Jen Lee; Soontorn Oraintara

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Wind-powered generator. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Completion of a wind energy conversion system for a private home is reported. The system included three blades constructed of an aluminum center with marine plywood sandwiched between the aluminum center and the fiberglass outer covering. The wind turbine drives a 1800 rpm generator by a chain drive mechanism. Battery storage is included. (LEW)

Whitesides, R E

353

Generating power with drained coal mine methane  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

NONE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Cascade Failures from Distributed Generation in Power Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power grids are nowadays experiencing a transformation due to the introduction of Distributed Generation based on Renewable Sources. At difference with classical Distributed Generation, where local power sources mitigate anomalous user consumption peaks, Renewable Sources introduce in the grid intrinsically erratic power inputs. By introducing a simple schematic (but realistic) model for power grids with stochastic distributed generation, we study the effects of erratic sources on the robustness of several IEEE power grid test networks with up to 2000 buses. We find that increasing the penetration of erratic sources causes the grid to fail with a sharp transition. We compare such results with the case of failures caused by the natural increasing power demand.

Scala, Antonio; Scoglio, Caterina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Power production, generating capacity data for 1972--1977  

SciTech Connect

Statistics on trends in electric power production, generating capacity, and consumption of fossil fuels over the past six-year period are reported. Included are monthly production by fuel, fuel consumption and stocks for the past six years, installed capacity, and net generation by type of prime mover and class of ownership. Most data are by State for the past year. A narrative section discusses the highlights and trends supported by the tables. This document continues the annual series on power production and generating capacity previously published by the Federal Power Commission. This publication was discontinued with this issue. 8 tables.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Plasma plume MHD power generator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly-conducting plasma plumes are ejected across the interplanetary magnetic field from a situs that is moving relative to the solar wind, such as a spacecraft or an astral body, such as the moon, having no magnetosphere that excludes the solar wind. Discrete plasma plumes are generated by plasma guns at the situs extending in opposite directions to one another and at an angle, preferably orthogonal, to the magnetic field direction of the solar wind plasma. The opposed plumes are separately electrically connected to their source by a low impedance connection. The relative movement between the plasma plumes and the solar wind plasma creates a voltage drop across the plumes which is tapped by placing the desired electrical load between the electrical connections of the plumes to their sources. A portion of the energy produced may be used in generating the plasma plumes for sustained operation.

Hammer, James H. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Property:Distributed Generation System Power Application | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application Application Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "Distributed Generation System Power Application" Showing 21 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Based Load + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Based Load + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Based Load + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Based Load +, Backup + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Based Load +, Backup + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Based Load + Distributed Generation Study/Floyd Bennett + Based Load + Distributed Generation Study/Harbec Plastics + Based Load + Distributed Generation Study/Hudson Valley Community College + Based Load +

358

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the burning of natural gas for on-site power generation andnatural gas absorption chiller GenL i , m , t , h , u Generated power by distributed generation

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Low-Power Maximum Power Point Tracker with Digital Control for Thermophotovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, optimization, and evaluation of the power electronics circuitry for a low-power portable thermophotovotaic (TPV) generator system. TPV system is based on a silicon micro-reactor design and ...

Pilawa, Robert

360

Self-powered wireless sensor system using MEMS piezoelectric micro power generator (PMPG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thin-film lead zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr,Ti)03, MEMS Piezoelectric Micro Power Generator (PMPG) has been integrated with a commercial wireless sensor node (Telos), to demonstrate a self-powered RF temperature sensor ...

Xia, YuXin, M.B.A. Sloan School of Management.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ePOWER Seminar AC solar cells: A new breed of PV power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ePOWER Seminar AC solar cells: A new breed of PV power generation Professor Faisal Khan Assistant will provide a guideline for solar cell designers to fabricate various discrete components in a power converter-junction solar cells. Prof. Khan is the founder of the Power Engineering and Automation Research Lab (PEARL

Ellis, Randy

362

Pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion for power generation  

SciTech Connect

Second-generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (PCFBC) is the culmination of years of effort in the development of a new generation of power plants which can operate on lower-quality fuels with substantially improved efficiencies, meet environmental requirements, and provide a lower cost of electricity. Air Products was selected in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Round V program to build, own, and operate the first commercial power plant using second-generation PCFBC technology, to be located at an Air Products chemicals manufacturing facility in Calvert City, Kentucky. This paper describes the second-generation PCFBC concept and its critical technology components.

Weimer, R.F.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Wireless Product Applications for Utilities: Technical Services for Power Utilities in Wireless Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless technology applications are abundant, with products and services ranging from two-way paging to Personal Communications Services (PCS) to low cost satellite data transmission. With this in mind, utilities are encouraged to develop relationships and business arrangements with telecommunication companies--relationships that can benefit both industries. These arrangements promise to streamline utility operations and, in selected cases, create new businesses and provide sources of revenue for utilit...

1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Energy-based analysis of utility scale hybrid power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The promise of large-scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for supplying electrical power is tempered by the sources' transient behavior and the (more)

Agyenim-Boateng, Kwame

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing...

366

WWTP Power Generation Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Generation Station Biomass Facility Power Generation Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name WWTP Power Generation Station Biomass Facility Facility WWTP Power Generation Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Alameda County, California Coordinates 37.6016892°, -121.7195459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6016892,"lon":-121.7195459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

367

Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant Facility Springerville Generating Station Solar System Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Tucson Electric Power Location Springerville, Arizona Coordinates 34.1333799°, -109.2859196° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1333799,"lon":-109.2859196,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

Optimization Online - Robust mid-term power generation management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 23, 2011 ... Robust mid-term power generation management. Vincent Guigues(vguigues *** at*** puc-rio.br) Ren Aid(rene.aid ***at*** edf.fr) Papa Momar...

369

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council NYC-Westchester This dataset comes...

370

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool South This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

371

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Utah" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

372

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Northeast This dataset comes from...

373

ORC Scroll Turbine and its Applications for Micro Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts ORC Scroll Turbine and its Applications for Micro Power Generation Speaker(s): Malick Kane Date: October 17, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg....

374

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Iowa" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

375

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the...

376

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "Ohio" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2...

377

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Through 2010 (Megawatthours)" "New York" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,19...

378

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Long Island This dataset comes from...

379

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY HYBRID POWER GENERATION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE CH 630 252 2779 TO AGCP-HQ P.0203 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY HYBRID POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE...

380

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Upstate New York This dataset comes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microsoft Word - Power Generation in Pipeline Report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

correctness. LA-UR-05-6354 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Title: Power Generation in Pipeline: Report Author(s): Dipen N. Sinha Submitted to: Gas...

382

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool North This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

383

Integration of decentralized generators with the electric power grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report develops a new methodology for studying the economic interaction of customer-owned electrical generators with the central electric power grid. The purpose of the report is to study the reciprocal effects of the ...

Finger, Susan

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Doing better with less energy [fuel-efficient power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe how many fuel-efficient coal-fired power generation technologies can be adopted at reduced net cost, but argue that, unless barriers to innovation are removed, their adoption will be far from automatic

J. Sathbye; J. Sinton; T. Heller

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A thermally efficient micro-reactor for thermophotovoltaic power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon fuels exhibit very high energy densities, and micro-generators converting the stored chemical energy into electrical power are interesting alternatives to batteries in certain applications. The increasing demands ...

Nielsen, Ole Mattis, 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Power Generation from Solid Fuels in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Gorte vohs@seas.upenn.edu, 215-898-6318 Abstract In this study we demonstrate the generation of electricity at high power densities, >300 mWcm 2 at 973 K, from a solid...

388

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficien

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) - Power Generation and Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Technical Assessment Guide (TAG)Power Generation and Storage Technology Options helps energy company decision makers optimize capital investments in power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The 2009 TAG has been significantly enhanced. The following topics are among those that are new or enhanced: several options on CO2 capture controls and costs for existing retrofits and for new Pulverized Coal and Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle plants; several options on hybrid and dry cooling f...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

Selection of Alloys for Power Generation Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 16   Soft magnetic materials used for transformers...thickness Material mm in. Continuous duty (a) Distribution 0.27 0.011 M-3, M-4 0.30 0.012 M-5 0.35 0.014 M-6 Power 0.30 0.012 M-5 0.35 0.014 M-6 Voltage regulator 0.30 0.012 M-5 0.35 0.014 M-15 0.63 0.025 M-22 Welding transformer 0.30 0.012 M-5 0.35 0.014 M-6 0.63 0.025 M-43, M-36, M-27 Application...

392

Novel Power Cycle for Combined-Cycle Systems and Utility Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The description of a new power cycle, based on the use of a multicomponent working fluid, was published earlier. A thermodynamic analysis of this cycle has demonstrated its superiority over the currently used Rankine Cycle, and a distribution of losses in the subsystems of this cycle has been established. A new, improved variant of the cycle, which provides 10% efficiency improvement over the initial variant, has been developed. The new variant employs a cooling of the working fluid between turbine stages and a recuperation of the released heat for supplementation of the boiler heat supply. Analysis shows that with this new, improved cycle efficiencies of up to 52% for a combined-cycle system employing standard turbines, and of up to 55% when modern high-temperature gas turbines are employed, can be achieved. The same cycle can be utilized to retrofit existing direct-fired power plants, providing an efficiency of up to 42%. The possible implications off such a cycle implementation are briefly discussed. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is now conducting a study of this cycle.

Kalina, A. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry  

SciTech Connect

Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

Klara, J.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Weinstein, R.E. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Wherley, M.R. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.  

SciTech Connect

Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating potential PV impacts.

Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA; Smith, Jeff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN; Dugan, Roger [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Utility-Scale Power Router: Dynamic Control of Grid Assets Using Direct AC Converter Cells  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Georgia Tech is developing a cost-effective, utility-scale power router that uses an enhanced transformer to more efficiently direct power on the grid. Existing power routing technologies are too expensive for widespread use, but the ability to route grid power to match real-time demand and power outages would significantly reduce energy costs for utilities, municipalities, and consumers. Georgia Tech is adding a power converter to an existing grid transformer to better control power flows at about 1/10th the cost of existing power routing solutions. Transformers convert the high-voltage electricity that is transmitted through the grid into the low-voltage electricity that is used by homes and businesses. The added converter uses fewer steps to convert some types of power and eliminates unnecessary power storage, among other improvements. The enhanced transformer is more efficient, and it would still work even if the converter fails, ensuring grid reliability.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

HOM Power Generation and Propagation in the PEP II Rings  

SciTech Connect

Most of the HOM power that propagates in the PEP-II rings is generated in the RF cavities but its content in terms of TE and TM components has not been accurately determined. For purpose of estimating power deposition at the cavity HOM loads, and also of shielding beamline components such as bellows from TE power penetration, this HOM power content and its distribution profile around the rings are needed. We calculate the TE and TM contributions of the RF cavity to the circulating HOM power and their transmission properties at another cavity downstream. By taking into account the generation in, and scattering by the cavities, as well as the attenuation along the vacuum chamber, a realistic estimate of the HOM power propagating out of a RF station is obtained. The formulation can include the HOM contributions of other beamline components such as collimators.

Lin, Xintian; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effects of voltage control in utility interactive dispersed storage and generation systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When a small generator is connected to the distribution system, the voltage at the point of interconnection is determined largely by the system and not the generator. This report examines the effect on the generator, on the load voltage and on the distribution system of a number of different voltage control strategies in the generator. Synchronous generators with three kinds of exciter control are considered, as well as induction generators and dc/ac inverters, with and without capacitor compensation. The effect of varying input power during operation (which may be experienced by generators based on renewable resources) is explored, as well as the effect of connecting and disconnecting the generator at ten percent of its rated power.

Kirkham, H.; Das, R.

1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Generator of pumping pulses for powerful semiconductor lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generator of electric and optic pulses are built using powerful MOS transistors and an ILPI-103 semiconductor laser generates pumping pulses with an amplitude of 15 A and optic pulses with a duration of 9 to 30 nsec at a repetition rate of up to 90 kHz. The output signal is TTL. The device is designed for open optic communication lines.

An, V.I.; Kolesnikov, Yu.Yu. [Voronezh Scientific Research Institute of Communications, Voronezh (Russian Federation)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hybrid distributed generation for power distribution systems planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents planning models for hybrid distributed generation systems, as well as the results corresponding to a distribution systems planning problem obtained using a new computational tool based on a Geographic Information System, GIS. This ... Keywords: distributed generation (DG), geographical information systems (GIS), hybrid power systems, optimal planning

I. J. Ramrez-Rosado; P. J. Zorzano-Santamara; L. A. Fernndez-Jimnez; E. Garca-Garrido; P. Lara-Santilln; E. Zorzano-Alba; M. Mendoza-Villena

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

On Low-Frequency Electric Power Generation With PZT Ceramics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piezoelectric materials have long been used as sensors and actuators, however their use as electrical generators is less established. A piezoelectric power generator has great potential for some remote applications such as in vivo sensors, embedded MEMS devices, and distributed networking. Such materials are capable of converting mechanical energy into electrical energy, but developing piezoelectric generators is challenging because of their poor source characteristics (high voltage, low current, high impedance) and relatively low power output. In the past these challenges have limited the development and application of piezoelectric generators, but the recent advent of extremely low power electrical and mechanical devices (e.g., MEMS) make such generators attractive. This paper presents a theoretical analysis of piezoelectric power generation that is verified with simulation and experimental results. Several important considerations in designing such generators are explored, including parameter identification, load matching, form factors, efficiency, longevity, energy conversion and energy storage. Finally, an application of this analysis is presented where electrical energy is generated inside a prototype Total Knee Replacement (TKR) implant.

Stephen R. Platt; et al.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Experimental power reactor dc generator energy storage study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study covers the use of dc generators for meeting the Experimental Power Reactor Ohmic Heating Energy Storage Requirements. The dc generators satisfy these requirements which are the same as defined in WFPS-TME-038 which covered the use of ac generators and homopolar generators. The costs of the latter two systems have been revised to eliminate first-of-a-kind factors. The cost figures for dc generators indicate a need to develop larger machines in order to take advantage of the economy-of-scale that the large ac machines have. Each of the systems has its own favorable salient features on which to base a system selection.

Heck, F.M.; Smeltzer, G.S.; Myers, E.H.; Kilgore, L.

1978-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Impact of Dispersed Generation on Electric Power Quality at the Central and South West Services Wind Farm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic and environmental concerns have propelled the utility industry toward renewable and clean energy sources as alternatives to coal- and gas-fired power stations. This report presents the results of an evaluation to determine the power quality characteristics of a wind turbine generator at an Oklahoma wind farm which is connected to a 69-kV subtransmission system.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

From Investor-owned Utility to Independent Power Producer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation supply, three (Duke Energy N o r t h A m e r i cCompany PG&E Exelon Duke Energy ConEd Edison InternationalDominion Resources Inc Duke Energy Public Serv Enterprise

Ishii, Jun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Flux compression generators as plasma compression power sources  

SciTech Connect

A survey is made of applications where explosive-driven magnetic flux compression generators have been or can be used to directly power devices that produce dense plasmas. Representative examples are discussed that are specific to the theta pinch, the plasma gun, the dense plasma focus and the Z pinch. These examples are used to illustrate the high energy and power capabilities of explosive generators. An application employing a rocket-borne, generator-powered plasma gun emphasizes the size and weight potential of flux compression power supplies. Recent results from a local effort to drive a dense plasma focus are provided. Imploding liners ae discussed in the context of both the theta and Z pinches.

Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Feasibility of Utility-Provided Uninterruptible DC Power for Telecommunication Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing uninterruptible power to the telecommunication industry is a natural fit for the expertise of the electric utility industry and represents a significant opportunity for revenue growth. This report analyzes the power requirements for different sectors of the telecommunication industry and examines existing and emerging technologies for providing uninterruptible power.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

REQUEST BY ABB POWER GENERATION, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ABB POWER GENERATION, INC., FOR AN ABB POWER GENERATION, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT NO. DE-AC21-95MC30245; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-95-035[ORO-604] ABB Power Generation, Inc., (ABB) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC21-95MC30245. The scope of the work calls for the completion of the conceptual preliminary design of a selected utility advanced turbine system (ATS), to identify technical barrier issues, and to conduct test programs of prospective conceptual designs that address these issues. The work is sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy. The dollar amount of the contract is $4,807,507 with ABB cost sharing 25%, or

407

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. 52076.pdf More Documents & Publications Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High-Penetration PV Potential Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution System of the U.S. Virgin Islands Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

408

Power Quality and Harmonic Impacts of Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PQ TechWatch report series builds on EPRI's broad expertise and power quality testing and evaluation work to provide a vital flow of data, including important information on emerging trends powering ebusinesses and developments in next-generation power quality mitigation and energy storage technologies.This PQ TechWatch aims to present an overview of power quality impacts resulting from operation of DG technologies on the grid. An emphasis on harmonic effects is included here. Concerns in this area a...

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Optimization of Piezoelectric Electrical Generators Powered by Random Vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares the performances of a vibrationpowered electrical generators using PZT piezoelectric ceramic associated to two different power conditioning circuits. A new approach of the piezoelectric power conversion based on a nonlinear voltage processing is presented and implemented with a particular power conditioning circuit topology. Theoretical predictions and experimental results show that the nonlinear processing technique may increase the power harvested by a factor up to 4 compared to the Standard optimization technique. Properties of this new technique are analyzed in particular in the case of broadband, random vibrations, and compared to those of the Standard interface.

Lefeuvre, E; Richard, C; Petit, L; Guyomar, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

From Investor-owned Utility to Independent Power Producer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L G & E Energy Corporation Xcel Energy IPP Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y YAmerican Electric Power Co Ine Xcel Energy IPP Y Y Y N Y Y NPower Co Ine UtiliCorp United Xcel Energy American Electric

Ishii, Jun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

Power Quality Impacts of Distributed Generation: Survey of Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of deregulation, distributed generation (DG) will play an increasing role in electric distribution systems. Various new types of DG technologies, such as microturbines and fuel cells, now are being developed in addition to the more traditional solar and wind power. A common belief among developers is that DG will improve the local power quality. This potential for better quality is cited as one of the attributes that add value to the installation of distributed generators. In some cases, ...

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Growth of fuel cell applications for specialty vehicles, portable power, auxiliary power, backup power, and stationary power are expected to generate a range of new jobs in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth of fuel cell applications for specialty vehicles, portable power, auxiliary power, backup engineers · Power plant operators · Power plant maintenance staff · Bus, truck and other fleet drivers power, and stationary power are expected to generate a range of new jobs in the near term

417

Reducing Power Production Costs by Utilizing Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke. It is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance, and is generally less reactive than coal. Therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the comb...

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

420

Jiangsu Dongsheng Biomass Power Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dongsheng Biomass Power Generation Co Ltd Dongsheng Biomass Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Jiangsu Dongsheng Biomass Power Generation Co Ltd Place Dongtai, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 224212 Sector Biomass Product A biomass project developer in China. Coordinates 32.845699°, 120.301224° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.845699,"lon":120.301224,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

422

Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic Systems Next-Generation Distributed Power Management for Photovoltaic Systems Speaker(s): Jason Stauth Date: July 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Steven Lanzisera In recent years, the balance of systems (BOS) side of photovoltaic (PV) energy has become a major focus in the effort to drive solar energy towards grid parity. The power management architecture has expanded to include a range of distributed solutions, including microinverters and 'micro' DC-DC converters to solve problems with mismatch (shading), expand networking and control, and solve critical BOS issues such as fire safety. This talk will introduce traditional and distributed approaches for PV systems, and will propose a next-generation architecture based on a new

423

Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd Place Jiaonan, Shandong Province, China Sector Wind energy Product Shandong, Jiaonan-based wind turbine supplier. Coordinates 35.875°, 119.977203° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.875,"lon":119.977203,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG Environmentally Protective Power Generation EPPG Jump to: navigation, search Name Environmentally Protective Power Generation (EPPG) Place Tucson, Arizona Sector Wind energy Product Seeking financing for a Tower system, about which little has been disclosed, which would have wind and other backup. Coordinates 32.221553°, -110.969754° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.221553,"lon":-110.969754,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

425

Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California October 15, 2012 - 4:40pm Addthis A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County’s Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs. Click here to see a panoramic view of the entire solar array. | Photo courtesy of Santa Cruz Westside Electric, DBA Sandbar. A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs.

426

New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power New San Antonio Airport Terminal Generating Clean Power January 27, 2011 - 2:03pm Addthis The new photovoltaic system at the San Antonio International Airport. The new photovoltaic system at the San Antonio International Airport. Todd G. Allen Project Officer, Golden Field Office What are the key facts? The City of San Antonio's EECBG proram staff awarded a block grant for a solar photovoltaic (PV) system at the airport, designed and built the project, and complied with all local and federal regulations... all in seven months. In early 2010, the City of San Antonio's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program staff quickly realized a golden opportunity lay right at their fingertips. The opening of the new San

427

Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California Solar Power Generates Big Savings in Salinas, California October 15, 2012 - 4:40pm Addthis A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County’s Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs. Click here to see a panoramic view of the entire solar array. | Photo courtesy of Santa Cruz Westside Electric, DBA Sandbar. A portion of the new 141 kilowatt solar photovoltaic energy system at Monterey County's Laurel Yard Complex in Salinas, California. The system is expected to save the county thousands of dollars a year in energy costs.

428

Steam Generator Replacement and Power Up-rating on Tihange 2 Nuclear Plant Safety Study Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Tihange2 900 MWe 3-L PWR NPP, operated by the Belgian utility Electrabel, was first commissioned in 1982 with a design core power of 2775 MWth. Following an initial core power up-rating by 4,5% in 1995, Electrabel has since replaced the Steam Generators which has allowed a further core power increase by roughly 5% (total 10%) in 2001. For both of each projects, licensing and implementation studies were successfully performed by Tractebel Energy Engineering and Framatome ANP. The demanding new operating conditions required a complete review of the plant design basis for which advanced methods were applied and licensed through a continuous process of discussions with the client and the Belgian Safety Authorities AVN. The licensing process required flexibility in the methods application in order to meet the specific requirements of the S.A., which was achieved within the time schedule and without jeopardising the technical objectives of the utility. (authors)

Malaval, Andre; Marin-Lafleche, Pascale; Forgeot d'Arc, Myriam; Collin, Celine [Framatome ANP (France)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

430

Most Viewed Documents - Power Generation and Distribution | OSTI, US Dept  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Most Viewed Documents - Power Generation and Distribution Most Viewed Documents - Power Generation and Distribution Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; et al. (1994) ASPEN Plus Simulation of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1993--December 1993 Benemann, J.R.; Oswald, W.J. (1994) Load flow analysis: Base cases, data, diagrams, and results Portante, E.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; et al. (1997) Multilevel converters -- A new breed of power converters Lai, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.]; Peng, F.Z. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United

431

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

432

Electric Utility Rate Design Study: embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis for Iowa Southern Utilities Company  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a method for determining average embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis and describes the application of the method to Iowa Southern Utilities. These costs are not allocated to customer classes. Since average embedded costs are composed of the running (or variable) costs and the capital costs, the analysis examines each of these separately. Running costs on a time-of-day basis are determined through the use of a generation dispatch model that reports the loadings by generating unit and the running costs of meeting the load. These costs are reported on an hour-by-hour basis. The dispatch model takes into account the operating characteristics of each unit and the major engineering constraints on a system; e.g., must-run units, minimum up and down time, startup cost. After reviewing several suggested capital-cost allocation procedures, a method is developed that allocates capital costs on a time-of-day basis by using a recontracting-for-capacity procedure that allows capacity to vary by hour for each month. The method results in allocations to customers who benefit from its use. An important and distinguishing feature of this method is that it allows calculation of the costs before rating periods are chosen.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Utility-scale combined-cycle power systems with Kalina bottoming cycles  

SciTech Connect

A new power-generation technology, often referred to as the Kalina cycle, is being developed as a direct replacement for the Rankine steam cycle. It can be applied to any thermal heat source, low or high temperature. Among several Kalina cycle variations, there is one that is particularly well suited as a bottoming cycle for utility combined-cycle applications. It is the subject of this paper. Using an ammonia/water mixture as the working fluid and a condensing system based on absorption-refrigeration principles, the Kalina bottoming cycle outperforms a triple-pressure steam cycle by 16%. Additionally, this version of the Kalina cycle is characterized by an intercooling feature between turbine stages, diametrically opposite to normal reheating practice in steam plants. Energy and mass balances are presented for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina bottoming cycle. Kalina cycle performance is compared to a triple-pressure steam plant. Energy and mass balances are presented as well for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina direct-fired cycle designed for utility purposes.

Kalina, A.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Microsoft PowerPoint - AECC Hydroelectric Generation 2010.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Electric Cooperative Corporation Cooperative Corporation AECC H d l i AECC Hydroelectric Generation Facilities Generation Facilities Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation Cooperative Corporation * Generation and Transmission Cooperative headquartered in Little Rock * Wholesale power provider for 16 distribution cooperatives * Serves about 62% of Arkansas with over 400,000 consumers O b 2 600 MW f i 12 * Owns about 2,600 MW of generation at 12 different facilities. Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation Cooperative Corporation 2009 G i b S f A CC 2009 Generation by Energy Source for AECC Owned and Co-Owned Plants * Natural Gas and Oil 4.0% * Wyoming Coal 88.8% * Water 7.2% Water 7.2% Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation Cooperative Corporation E i ti H d l t i Existing Hydroelectric Generating Resources

435

Program on Technology Innovation: Power Generation and Water Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure summarizes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report 1015371, Program on Technology Innovation: An Energy/Water Sustainability Program for the Electric Power Industry. It presents a research planbased on business, economic, and technical considerationsthat would create and test new technology and science to overcome present and future constraints on thermoelectric and hydroelectric generation resulting from limited fresh water availability. The 10 year plan has an overall budget o...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

Program on Technology Innovation: Nuclear Power Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States and other countries are currently planning to expand their nuclear power electrical generation base in order to provide energy security and price stability while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Since the existing fleet of nuclear plants was built during or before the 1970s, new plants will incorporate more advanced designs. This report documents the current status and potential for advanced nuclear power technology development and/or commercialization over the next 5 to 15 years.

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A Power Energy Generation Systems Ltd APWR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Systems Ltd APWR Generation Systems Ltd APWR Jump to: navigation, search Name A-Power Energy Generation Systems Ltd (APWR) Place Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China Zip 110021 Product Chinese-based provider of power generation systems, acting as the holding company of Liaoning Gaoke Energy. Coordinates 41.788509°, 123.40612° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.788509,"lon":123.40612,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

Hart, Mark M. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications. 2 figs.

Hart, M.M.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

System for generating power with top pressure of blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating power with the top pressure of a plurality of blast furnaces by leading a gas from the top of the furnaces into turbines, corresponding in number to the furnaces, to convert the pressure of the gas into rotational energy and generate power by a generator coupled to the turbines. The turbines connected to the furnaces by main gas channels individually are aligned with their rotor shafts connected together into a single shaft which is connected to the generator. Preferably each pair of the adjacent turbines are arranged with their intake ends positioned in the center of the arrangement so that the gas flows toward the exhaust ends at both sides, or with their intake ends positioned at both sides to cause the gas to flow toward the exhaust ends in the center. The single shaft connecting the pair of turbines together has no intermediate bearing between these turbines.

Kihara, H.; Mizota, T.; Ohmachi, M.; Takao, K.; Toki, K.; Tomita, Y.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communication, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of material resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

Hart, M.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

New low cost IGCC designs for competitive power generation  

SciTech Connect

Design studies of coal based 450 MW new IGCC power plants reveal their ability to compete in today's power generation market. Single train unit designs coupled with significant improvements in IGCC net output and efficiency have brought down the installed costs to the range of 850--1,000 $/kW and net thermal efficiency up to 43--47%. These improvements are shown to result from IGCC design configurations integrating new generation gas turbine combined cycles with High Pressure Texaco Gasification Technology and Elevated Pressure Air Separation Units.

Brdar, D.R.; Depuy, R.A.; Gulko, G.; Jandrisevits, M.; Paolino, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model  

SciTech Connect

This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fixed and variable speed induction generators for real power loss minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of induction generators in the wind power industry is standard practice. An induction generator draws reactive power from the network depending on its real power output, such that the greater the real power exported to the network, the ... Keywords: doubly- fed induction generator, induction generator, line loss, reactive power

S. Durairaj; D. Flynn; B. Fox

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Pages that link to "Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd" Ningxia Yinyi Wind Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to:...

450

Pages that link to "Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd" | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd" Datang Jilin Power Generation Co Ltd Jump to: navigation,...

451

MHK Technologies/Submergible Power Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Submergible Power Generator Submergible Power Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Submergible Power Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current to Current Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The design of the SPG leverages water flows in varying scenarios to generate electricity While the focus of the C2C deployments is ocean currents the SPG works in a bi directional manner Therefore the SPG can be deployed to generate electricity from tidal differential tidal streams In areas where currents and tidal differential streams converge the SPG with remote control and telemetry systems will track the water velocity In this manner the SPG can be maneuver in three dimensions to optimize water flow Each tube of the catamaran is approximately 150 feet in length The inner tube contains the electronic components and the outer tube is the rotating impeller system comprising a generator with a four blade turbine which measures approximately 100 feet in diameter The total area covered by each SPG is about the size of a football field

452

Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

453

EVALUATION OF PV GENERATION CAPICITY CREDIT FORECAST ON DAY-AHEAD UTILITY MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF PV GENERATION CAPICITY CREDIT FORECAST ON DAY-AHEAD UTILITY MARKETS Richard Perez of the NDFD-based solar radiation forecasts for several climatically distinct locations, the evaluation is now continued by testing the forecasts' end-use operational accuracy, focusing on their ability to accurately

Perez, Richard R.

454

Commercialization of coal diesel engines for non-utility and export power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic motivation behind this project is to develop coal-burning heat engine technology primarily for 10-100 MW modular stationary power applications in the late 1990`s and beyond, when oil and gas prices may return to the $5--7/MMBtu range. The fuel is a low-cost, coal-based liquid with the consistency of black paint, composed of 12-micron mean size premium 2% ash coal dust mixed 50/50 with water. The Clean Coal Diesel Plant of the future is targeted for the 10-100 MW non-utility generation (NUG) and small utility markets, including independent power producers (IPP) and cogeneration. A family of plant designs will be offered using the Cooper-Bessemer 3.8, 5.0, and 6.3 MW Model LS engines as building blocks. In addition, larger plants will be configured with an engine in the 10-25 MW class (Cooper will license the technology to other large bore stationary engine manufacturers). The reciprocating engine offers a remarkable degree of flexibility in selecting plant capacity. This flexibility exists because the engines are modular in every sense (fuel cell stacks have similar modularity). Scale-up is accomplished simply by adding cylinders (e.g., 20 vs 16) or by adding engines (4 vs 3). There is no scale-up of the basic cylinder size. Thus, there is essentially no technical development needed to scale-up the Cooper-Bessemer Clean Coal Diesel Technology all the way from 2 MW (one 6-cylinder engine) to 50 MW (eight 20-cylinder engines), other than engineering adaptation of the turbocharger to match the engine.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E.; Mayville, R.A.; Itse, D.; Kimberley, J.; Parkinson, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Supporting Renewable Generation Through Green Power Certification: The Green-e Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2485 2485 Supporting Renewable Generation Through Green Power Certification: The Green-e Program Ryan Wiser Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 1998 The work described in this study was funded by the Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Utility Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. -i- TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Green Power: A New Market Opportunity? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Why Certify? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Green-e Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

456

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Subtask 1.24 - Optimization of Cooling Water Resources for Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed an interactive, Web-based decision support system (DSS{copyright} 2007 EERC Foundation) to provide power generation utilities with an assessment tool to address water supply issues when planning new or modifying existing generation facilities. The Web-based DSS integrates water and wastewater treatment technology and water law information with a geographic information system-based interactive map that links to state and federal water quality and quantity databases for North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Iowa.

Daniel Stepan; Richard Shockey; Bethany Kurz; Wesley Peck

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF CBS CORPORATION, FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GRANT NO. GRANT NO. DE-FG21-94MC32071; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-98-005 [ORO-736] Westinghouse Power Generation, a former division of CBS Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "the Grantee"), has requested an advance waiver of worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Department of Energy (DOE) Grant No. DE-FG21-94MC32071. The goal of the grant was to perform system analysis, selection and optimization to develop the next generation of gas-fired advanced turbine systems (ATS's) for green field and repowered electricity generation applications. The goal of the ATS program is to develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems for base- load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. This work

460

Electrochemical engines for power generation and load-leveling at sites for underground coal conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The integration of fuel generation by underground processing of coal with commercial consumption of the fuel at the mine site offers highly efficient utilization of energy. Commercial versions of Li/I/sub 2/ electrochemical engines to be used in one way of integration are postulated, described and evaluated on the basis of laboratory and theoretical studies. These engines are shown to be valuable for electric power generation and storage in connection with underground coal conversion (UCC) in arid land such as Northwestern New Mexico. Such engines, combined with UCC, could convert roughly 26 percent of the energy as pyrolysis hydrocarbons. The engines also provide load leveling so that peak power generators would be unnecessary.

Elliott, G.R.B.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utility power generation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Coordination of reactive power scheduling in a multi-area power system operated by independent utilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the problem of reactive power scheduling in a power system with several areas controlled by independent transmission system operators (TSOs). To design (more)

Phulpin, Yannick

462

Offering Premium Power to Select Customer Segments: Using Distributed Resources for Distribution Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric sector restructuring will likely lead to increased opportunities for distributed resources (DR) technologies and solutions. In particular, distribution utilities may be able to use DR to provide innovative services that can help increase customer value and open new sources of revenue. Using DR to offer premium power services to customers with special sensitivity to power quality disturbances is one such opportunity.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage iterations. We demonstrate our method in simulations with various wind scenarios and prices for energy. INTRODUCTION Today, wind power is the most important renewable energy source. For the years to come, many

464

Advances in steam turbine technology for power generation  

SciTech Connect

This book contains articles presented at the 1990 International Joint Power Generation Conference. It is organized under the following headings: Solid particle erosion in steam turbines, Steam turbine failure analysis, Steam turbine upgrades, steam turbine blading development, Boiler feed pumps and auxiliary steam turbine drives.

Bellanca, C.P. (Dayton Power and Light Company (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the design and operation of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cells based on yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The functional requirements of the various cell components are presented; and the materials and fabrication processes used for different cell components are described. Finally, the recent progress made toward commercialization of these cells for clean and efficient power generation is discussed.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the design and operation of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cells based on yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The functional requirements of the various cell components are presented; and the materials and fabrication processes used for different cell components are described. Finally, the recent progress made toward commercialization of these cells for clean and efficient power generation is discussed.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467