Sample records for utility conference demand

  1. BBEE Public Utility Conference Call

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BBEE Public Utility Conference Call May 19, 2011 - Summary Summer Goodwin, BPA, welcomed public utility representative participants, asked them to introduce themselves, and...

  2. Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Demand Side Management #12;Current Programs/Tariffs ­ Load Control Programs Cool Keeper, Utah (currentlyDemand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission January 6, 2005 Mike Koszalka Director 33 MW, building to 90 MW) Irrigation load control, Idaho (35 MW summer, 2004) Lighting load control

  3. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  4. Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Optimal Demand Response Based on Utility Maximization in Power Networks Na Li, Lijun Chen different appliances including PHEVs and batteries and propose a demand response approach based on utility. The utility company can thus use dynamic pricing to coordinate demand responses to the benefit of the overall

  5. AWWA, WEF Utility Management Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AWWA, WEF Utility Management Conference AWWA, WEF Utility Management Conference February 17, 2015 1:00PM CST to February 20, 2015 10:00PM CST Austin, TX The American Water Works...

  6. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

  7. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. US electric utility demand-side management, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

  10. Photovoltaics for demand-side management utility markets: A utility/customer partnership approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power and Light Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems located at customer sites can be used to meet utility needs for demand-side management (DSM) applications. PV-DSM can also represent a high-value intermediate market for PV in the utility sector. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been the higher value DSM application for US utilities. This analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and peak demand pricing characteristics. This paper presents the results for PV-DSM systems located within the service territories of five case study utilities.

  11. Using Utility Load Data to Estimate Demand for Space Cooling and Potential for Shiftable Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ong, S.; Booten, C.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simple method to estimate hourly cooling demand from historical utility load data. It compares total hourly demand to demand on cool days and compares these estimates of total cooling demand to previous regional and national estimates. Load profiles generated from this method may be used to estimate the potential for aggregated demand response or load shifting via cold storage.

  12. Demand Control Utilizing Energy Management Systems - Report of Field Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, B. D.; Heller, R. P.; Perry, L. W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Management systems and particularly demand controllers are becoming more popular as commercial and light industrial operations attempt to reduce their electrical usage and demand. Numerous techniques are used to control energy use and demand...

  13. Sixth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conference was held on coal preparation, utilization and environmental control. Topics included: combustion of fuel slurries; combustor performance; desulfurization chemically and by biodegradation; coal cleaning; pollution control of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides; particulate control; and flue gas desulfurization. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS).

  14. ranking of utilities by demand charge? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource History ViewZAPZinccellranking of utilities

  15. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Yourstone, N.E. (Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group's functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities' views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  16. The demand-side management program development process: A utility perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yourstone, N.E. [Yourstone (Evelin), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an aspect of DSM that has received little attention, namely, how utilities develop DSM programs. The selection of utilities to study purposely was biased in favor of those with reputations for being experienced DSM program developers so as to optimize the chances to obtain detailed information. The DSM planning process is affected by organizational factors and external influences: (1) the location of the demand-side planning department within the utility; (2) the demand-side planning group`s functional responsibilities; (3) upper management participation in the DSM program development process; and (4) the organizational relationship between (or, separation of) supply-side and demand-side planning. Organizational factors reflect utilities` views of DSM programs and thus can affect the adoption of a technology- or customer-oriented approach. Despite repeated claims of the uniqueness of the demand- side planning process and its resistance to standardization, two general approaches to program development were discerned, namely technology- or customer-orientation. Although utilities consider customer related and technological factors in their DSM program development process, utilities can be differentiated by their emphasis on one or the other approach. 25 refs.

  17. Integrated Demand Controlled Ventilation for Single Duct VAV System with Conference Rooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Y.; Liu, M.; Cho, Y.; Xu, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTEGRATED DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION FOR SINGLE DUCT VAV SYSTEM WITH CONFERENCE ROOMS Yuebin Yu Mingsheng Liu YoungHum Cho Ke Xu Graduate Student Professor of Architectural Engineering, PhD, PE Graduate.... The total OA intake of IDCV is obtained with the occupancy time ratio considered. The real time distribution of the occupancy and un-occupancy doesn’t much influence the overall calculation. With the amount of OA intake and the local BIN data...

  18. Influence of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems on Air Conditioning Demand in an Utility Pilot Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during the summer of 2000. Data analysis on the pre and post cooling and heating consumption was used to determine impacts on energy use and peak demand for the utility. The average cooling energy savings from the RBS retrofit was 3.6 kWh/day, or about 9...

  19. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Systems National Conference on Building

  20. Utilities and energy efficiency: new opportunities and risks. Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the eight papers (with discussions) presented at the conference. All abstracts will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

  1. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  2. Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 at least half of its energy obtained from energy efficiency and renewable resources by the year 2000. Solar energy, distributed generation resource. Investments made in solar power today are expected to provide

  3. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings”, Lawrencesystems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Test in Large Facilities13 National Conference on Building

  4. Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

  5. Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

    in programs that influence electric demand in ways that produce desired changes in the pattern and magnitude of a utility's electric load profile. These programs, commonly termed "de mand side management" (DSH) , have a customer orien tation... such a rescheduling. The residential customer class appears least suited to load-shaping efforts. Al though characterized by a relatively low load-profile (high peak-to-average ratio) and consistent electricity consumption pat terns, the timing...

  6. The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence...

  7. The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence...

  8. Utilizing the infrastructure to assist autonomous vehicles in a mobility on demand context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebsamen, B.

    In this paper we describe an autonomous vehicle that aims at providing shared transportation services in a mobility on demand context. As the service is limited to a known urban environment, prior knowledge of the environment ...

  9. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth1 | Open Energy Information

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  10. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth10 | Open Energy Information

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  11. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth11 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth12 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth5 | Open Energy Information

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  16. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth9 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Decision-making in demand-side management collaboratives: The influence of non-utility parties on electric-utility policies and programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, M.; Schexnayder, S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the late 1980s, a number of electric utilities and interested non-utility parties (NUPs)-such as environmental groups, large industrial customers, and state government agencies-have tried a new approach to reaching agreement on program design and policy issues related to utility use of Demand-Side Management (DSM) resources. Through this new arrangement, known as the DSM collaborative process, parties who have often been adversaries attempt to resolve their differences through compromise and consensus rather than by using traditional litigation. This paper-which is based on studies of over a dozen collaboratives nationwide-discusses the organizational structure of collaboratives, the ways in which NUPs have been involved in the decision-making process, and how the amount of influence exerted by the NUPs is related to collaborative accomplishments. Most of the collaboratives studied had two organizational levels: a {open_quotes}working group{close_quotes} that provided policy direction and guidance for the collaborative and {open_quotes}subgroups{close_quotes} that performed the detailed tasks necessary to flesh out individual DSM programs. Most collaboratives also had a coordinator who was charged with scheduling meetings, exchanging information, and performing other important organizational functions, and it was common for the utility to fund consultants to provide expert assistance for the NUPs. In general, the utilities reserved the final decision-making prerogative for themselves, in line with their ultimate responsibility to shareholders, customers, and regulators. Still, there was substantial variation among the collaboratives in terms of how actively consensus was sought and how seriously the inputs of the NUPs were taken. In general, the collaboratives that resulted in the largest effects on utility DSM usage were those in which the utilities were most willing to allow their decisions to be shaped by the NUPs.

  20. Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L BAutomated Demand Response National Conference on BuildingAutomated Demand Response National Conference on Building

  1. Utility Demand Side Management- DSM Lessons: Experience is the Toughest Teacher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, S. M.

    Most utilities first became actively involved with energy conservation in the early 1980s with the federally mandated Residential Conservation Service (RCS) program. Legislation mandating a similar effort directed toward commercial and apartment...

  2. Evaluation of Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc.`s competitive bidding program for demand-side resources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, J.S.; Stucky, L.; Seratt, P.; Darden-Butler, D. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process evaluation reports on the implementation of Orange and Rockland Utilities demand-side bidding program in New York State during 1991 and 1992. The program is implemented by two energy service companies in Orange and rockland`s New York State service territory. The process evaluation methodology included interviews with utility staff (3), energy service company staff (2), and participating (6) and nonparticipating (7) utility customers. The two energy service companies had enrolled 14 customers in the program by summer 1992. One company had achieved 90% of their 2.75 MW bid and the other had achieved less than 90% of their 6.9 MW bid. Critical factors in success were determination of a reasonable bid amount for the market and marketing to the appropriate customers. Customers most interested in the program included those with limited access to capital and medium-sized firms with poor cash flows, particularly schools and hospitals. The findings also show that due to the incentive structure and associated need for substantial customer contributions, lighting measures dominate all installations. Customers, however, were interested in the potential savings and six of the nonparticipants chose to either install measures on their own or enroll in the utility`s rebate program.

  3. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod3 | Open Energy Information

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  4. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod3FAdj | Open Energy

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  5. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod4 | Open Energy Information

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  6. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod5 | Open Energy Information

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  7. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod5FAdj | Open Energy

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  8. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod6 | Open Energy Information

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  9. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandChargePeriod6FAdj | Open Energy

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  10. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRatchetPercentage | Open Energy

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  11. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandReactivePowerCharge | Open Energy

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerCharge Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  12. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandWindow | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerCharge Jump to: navigation, search This is

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerCharge Jump to: navigation, search This

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation Rate Jump to:Information

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation Rate Jump

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation Rate JumpInformation 1

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation Rate JumpInformation

  18. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FixedDemandChargeMonth2 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation Rate

  19. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FixedDemandChargeMonth3 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation RateInformation

  20. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FixedDemandChargeMonth4 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformation

  1. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FixedDemandChargeMonth5 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformationInformation

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformation DemandReactivePowerChargeInformationInformationInformation

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformationInformation FixedDemandChargeMonth8 Jump to: navigation, search

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformationInformation FixedDemandChargeMonth8 Jump to: navigation,

  5. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/FlatDemandMonth2 | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformationInformation FixedDemandChargeMonth8 Jump

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkinsInformationInformation FixedDemandChargeMonth8

  7. Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads in response to a utility signal, represent a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Issue Demand-response (DR) programs, in which facilities reduce their electric loads (Figure 1). The testing covered four Lighting the Way to Demand ResponseLighting the Way to Demand Response California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Technical Brief PIER

  8. Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data abundant at Planetary Conference March 15, 2013 Laser instrument aboard Curiosity rover provides well over 40,000 shots so far LOS ALAMOS, N. M., March 15, 2013-Members of the...

  9. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 – 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

  10. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Building Systems and DR Strategies 16 Demand ResponseDemand Response Systems. ” Proceedings, 16 th National Conference on Building

  11. Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Demand Response in New and Existing Commercial BuildingsDemand Response Strategies and National Conference on BuildingDemand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building

  12. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

  13. Demand Response: Load Management Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs...

  14. Estimating the Energy, Demand and Cost Savings from a Geothermal Heat Pump ESPC Project at Fort Polk, LA Through Utility Bill Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are a method of financing energy conservation projects using the energy cost savings generated by the conservation measures themselves. Ideally, reduced energy costs are visible as reduced utility bills, but in fact this is not always the case. On large military bases, for example, a single electric meter typically covers hundreds of individual buildings. Savings from an ESPC involving only a small number of these buildings will have little effect on the overall utility bill. In fact, changes in mission, occupancy, and energy prices could cause substantial increases in utility bills. For this reason, other, more practical, methods have been developed to measure and verify savings in ESPC projects. Nevertheless, increasing utility bills--when ESPCs are expected to be reducing them--are problematic and can lead some observers to question whether savings are actually being achieved. In this paper, the authors use utility bill analysis to determine energy, demand, and cost savings from an ESPC project that installed geothermal heat pumps in the family housing areas of the military base at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The savings estimates for the first year after the retrofits were found to be in substantial agreement with previous estimates that were based on submetered data. However, the utility bills also show that electrical use tended to increase as time went on. Since other data show that the energy use in family housing has remained about the same over the period, the authors conclude that the savings from the ESPC have persisted, and increases in electrical use must be due to loads unassociated with family housing. This shows that under certain circumstances, and with the proper analysis, utility bills can be used to estimate savings from ESPC projects. However, these circumstances are rare and over time the comparison may be invalidated by increases in energy use in areas unaffected by the ESPC.

  15. TWELFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE, UTILIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION MAY 1316, 2013 DAVID L. Lawrence Convention Center Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Page1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    TWELFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE, UTILIZATION AND SEQUESTRATION MAY 1316 approaches of CCS. The main concern for a geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is sustained of CO2 Sequestration in Deep Saline Reservoir, Citronelle Dome, USA S.Alireza Haghighat1 , Shahab D

  16. Tenth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: combustion 2000 session; advanced research and technology development session; commercial/industrial combustion systems session; alternative fuels utilization session; environmental control poster session; and advanced combustion technology poster session. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Ninth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers are grouped under the following sessions: compliance technology; high-efficiency preparation; characterization; advanced technologies; alternative fuels; coal utilization; industrial/commercial combustor development; combustion; superclean emission systems; carbon dioxide recovery and reuse; air toxics and fine particulates; air toxics sampling and analysis workshop; and combined poster session. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response & Energy Efficiency International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ESL-IC-09-11-05 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 2 ?Less than 5... for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 5 What is Demand Response? ?The temporary reduction of electricity demanded from the grid by an end-user in response to capacity shortages, system reliability events, or high wholesale...

  19. Report of the first United States conference on utility experience with neutron noise analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, D.N.; Horne, G.P.; Mayo, C.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An informal meeting was held in Washington, D.C. on April 3 and 4, 1984, to discuss the current state of the art and experiences with neutron noise analysis in US pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The meeting was attended by 33 persons representing 11 utilities and 3 PWR reactor vendors as well as consultants, universities, and research laboratories. Presentations at the meeting covered several applications of neutron noise for diagnosing such things as vibrations induced by baffle jetting, detection of mechanical degradation of thermal shield supports, and electrical degradation of nuclear instrumentation channels. Twenty-one responses were obtained from a questionnaire circulated to all participants requesting their viewpoints and experiences regarding neutron noise analysis. The meeting participants concluded that a working group on neutron noise analysis should be formed to (1) establish a baseline library of neutron noise data, (2) provide a forum for communicating experiences with neutron noise surveillance, and (3) develop good practices and quality assurance procedures for neutron noise measurement and interpretation.

  20. Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO 2005 Conference Paper September 1, 2005 LBNL # 58179 ADVANCED CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES AND STRATEGIES LINKING DEMAND RESPONSE AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY Sila Kiliccote Mary Ann Piette Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley..., and nationwide status is outlined. The role of energy management and control systems for DR is described. Building systems such as HVAC and lighting that utilize control technologies and strategies for energy efficiency are mapped on to DR and demand...

  1. Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA, and published in the Conference Proceedings SBEAM Functionality Commercial Lighting Equipment Marketshare Commercial Electricity DemandUSA, and published in the Conference Proceedings SBEAM Functionality Commercial Lighting Equipment Marketshare Commercial Electricity Demand

  2. Demand Response: Load Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CenterPoint Load Management Programs CATEE Conference October, 2012 Agenda Outline I. General Demand Response Definition II. General Demand Response Program Rules III. CenterPoint Commercial Program IV. CenterPoint Residential Programs... V. Residential Discussion Points Demand Response Definition of load management per energy efficiency rule 25.181: ? Load control activities that result in a reduction in peak demand, or a shifting of energy usage from a peak to an off...

  3. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home, Proceedings of theConference on Smart Homes and Health Telematics, September,Smart Meter Motion sensors Figure 1: Schematic of the Demand Response Electrical Appliance Manager in a Home.

  4. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand response: ? Distribution utility ? ISO ? Aggregator (demand response less obstructive and inconvenient for the customer (particularly if DR resources are aggregated by a load aggregator).

  5. Text and slides of presentation originally presented to the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board regarding the province's Demand Side Management program,19 April 2010.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    that affordable and available oil is becoming harder to obtain (Figure 2). Figure 2: World oil demand and prices); even offshore Newfoundland and Labrador (which meets about 26% of Atlantic Canada's crude oil demand As fuel oil prices rise, one can expect to see additional demand being put on the electrical system

  6. Invester-Owned Utilities' 2012-13 Results, 2014 Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berny, B.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference December 16-18, 2013 San Antonio, Texas ESL-KT-13-12-14 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 So…What Have You Done? Utility Efficiency... Resources, Achievements, & Challenges Texas’ Investor-owned Utilities’ 2012 results and 2014 programs CATEE 2013 San Antonio, TX Billy Berny, AEP Texas Manager Energy Efficiency/Demand Response Programs ESL-KT-13-12-14 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy...

  7. Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattles, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response and Electric Grid Reliability Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT CATEE Conference, Galveston October 10, 2012 2 North American Bulk Power Grids CATEE Conference October 10, 2012 ? The ERCOT... adequacy ? ?Achieving more DR participation would . . . displace some generation investments, but would achieve the same level of reliability... ? ?Achieving this ideal requires widespread demand response and market structures that enable loads...

  8. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak, and natural Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility

  9. National Action Plan on Demand Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the National Assessment of Demand Response study, the National Action Plan for Demand Response, and demand response as related to the energy outlook.

  10. Overview of Demand Side Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the utility PJM's demand side response (DSR) capabilities, including emergency and economic responses.

  11. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

  12. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

  13. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility Planning Area Energy Policy Report. The forecast includes three full scenarios: a high energy demand case, a low

  14. Energy-Efficiency-Related Conference Papers and Workshop Summarys

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Conference Papers Conference Papers Page Last Modified: September 2007 The Growth in Electricity Demand in U.S....

  15. IEEE International Conference on Dielectric Liquids (ICDL-2008), Poitiers, June 30-July 4, 2008 Drop-on-demand Extraction from a Water Meniscus by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Drop-on-demand Extraction from a Water Meniscus by a High Field Pulse P. Atten, A. Ouiguini, J. Raisin of a small drop electrically neutral. The experimental results of water drops extraction in oil are presented, France Abstract- As a part of a study of electrocoalescence of water droplets in oil, the controlled

  16. Demand Side Management in Rangan Banerjee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    Demand Side Management in Industry Rangan Banerjee Talk at Baroda in Birla Corporate Seminar August 31,2007 #12;Demand Side Management Indian utilities ­ energy shortage and peak power shortage. Supply for Options ­ Demand Side Management (DSM) & Load Management #12;DSM Concept Demand Side Management (DSM) - co

  17. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas demands are forecast for the four natural gas utility2013 Forecast, these trends lead to declining natural gasthe 2006-2016 Forecast. Commercial natural gas demand is

  18. assessing workforce demand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: LBNL-5319E Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries in this report was coordinated by the Demand...

  19. Analytical Frameworks to Incorporate Demand Response in Long-term Resource Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchwell, Andrew

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Intohttp://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUC/energy/Demand+Response/Cost-Utilization of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response as

  20. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implement demand response programs involving buildingbased demand response (DR) technologies in real buildings.BUILDING AUDITS Introduction Customers’ attitudes to prospective utility demand response

  1. Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    building control strategies and techniques for demand response,”demand response systems,” in Proceedings of 16th National Conference on BuildingBuilding Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    International Conference onFly Ash Disposal and Utilization,onJanuary 20-22, 1998, New Delhi, India. COAL ASH and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;COAL ASH GENERATIONANDUTILIZATION: A REVIEW and utilization of coal ash in many parts of the world. The utilization potential for coal ash generated from

  3. Travel Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Garrow, Dr. Laurie [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

  4. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Honeywell's Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) project demonstrates utility-scale performance of a hardwaresoftware platform for automated demand response (ADR). This project...

  5. POWER-GEN '91 conference papers: Volume 7 (Non-utility power generation) and Volume 8 (New power plants - Gas and liquid fuels/combustion turbines). [Independent Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is book 4 of papers presented at the Fourth International Power Generation Exhibition and Conference on December 4-6, 1991. The book contains Volume 7, Non-Utility Power Generation and Volume 8, New Power Plants - Gas and Liquid Fuels/Combustion Turbines. The topics of the papers include PUHCA changes and transmission access, financing and economics of independent power projects, case histories, combustion turbine based technologies, coal gasification, and combined cycle.

  6. Conference Proceedings International Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Conference Proceedings 10th International Conference on Hand-Arm Vibration 7-11 June 2004 Flamingo related to HAVS. The published proceedings from these conferences have become blueprints for assessing, the entertainment capital of the world: The 10th International Hand-Arm Vibration Conference will be the second time

  7. Electrical Demand Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the reservoir. Util i ties have iiting for a number of years. d a rebate for reducing their When the utility needs to shed is sent to turn off one or mnre mer's electric water heater or equipment. wges have enticed more and more same strategies... an increased need for demand 1 imiting. As building zone size is reduced, total instal led tonnage increases due to inversfty. Each compressor is cycled by a space thermostat. There is no control system to limit the number of compressors running at any...

  8. BBEE Public Utility Conference Call

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust AugustInstruments3/2008ConstructionUseBBEE

  9. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  10. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3047E Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers G described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers. California Energy

  11. Electric Utility Demand-Side Evaluation Methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treadway, N.

    of many publ ic projects because it provides a framework for public agency appraisal of noncommercial activities. Its application allows a summary of the benefits and costs of an activity from the perspective of society and the taxpayer or... of the rate impact at one point in tim.e. Rates do not change for ':the nonparticipant, or? for anyone ~lse unti 1. ?autil.ity' requests and receives a rate change. In Texas;.? r?atesar.e? based on the average embedded costs of a? one year historic time...

  12. Final Report on DOE Project entitled Dynamic Optimized Advanced Scheduling of Bandwidth Demands for Large-Scale Science Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramamurthy, Byravamurthy [University of Nebraska-Lincoln

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, developed scheduling frameworks for dynamic bandwidth demands for large-scale science applications. In particular, we developed scheduling algorithms for dynamic bandwidth demands in this project. Apart from theoretical approaches such as Integer Linear Programming, Tabu Search and Genetic Algorithm heuristics, we have utilized practical data from ESnet OSCARS project (from our DOE lab partners) to conduct realistic simulations of our approaches. We have disseminated our work through conference paper presentations and journal papers and a book chapter. In this project we addressed the problem of scheduling of lightpaths over optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks. We published several conference papers and journal papers on this topic. We also addressed the problems of joint allocation of computing, storage and networking resources in Grid/Cloud networks and proposed energy-efficient mechanisms for operatin optical WDM networks.

  13. ERCOT's Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ERCOT’s Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot CATEE 12-17-13 ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Disclaimer The information contained in this report has been obtained from... services along with other information about our business is available online at constellation.com. ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Demand Response in ERCOT CATEE 121313 - Tim Carter...

  14. Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luna, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Initiatives at CPS Energy Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-53 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 CPSE’s DR Program • DR... than the military bases and Toyota combined. • Schools & Universities contributed 6 MW’s of Demand Response in 2013. 2013 DR Participants Trinity University - $5,654 Fort Sam ISD - $18,860 Judson ISD - $45,540 Alamo Colleges - $98,222 UTSA - $168...

  15. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  16. CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION Call for Proposals Date of Issue: July 29, 2013 The Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) at Washington University in St. Louis was established in January of Clean Coal Utilization. The format may be a conference or workshop, or a seminar given by a leading

  17. Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

    Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost...

  18. Industrial Demand-Side Management in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaussaud, D.

    of programs result in lower consumption and/or lower peak demand, and ultimately reduce the need to build new capacity. Hence demand-side management can be used as a resource option to be considered alongside more traditional supply-side resources in a...INDUSTRIAL DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT IN TEXAS Danielle Jaussaud Economic Analysis Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The industrial sector in Texas is highly energy intensive and represents a large share...

  19. aggregate electricity demand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: LBNL-6417E Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part I: Load Availability Profiles Resources 4 12;12;12;CHAPTER 3:...

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Presentationand Publicationat the CBIP International Conference onFly Ash Disposal & Utilization,New Delhi, India, January 1998 foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option because it not only causes huge

  1. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CA Control Areas CO 2 Carbon Dioxide CHP Combined Heat and Power CPP Critical Peak Pricing DG Distributed Generation DOE Department of Energy DR Demand Response DRCC Demand...

  2. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

  3. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response:both the avoided energy costs (and demand charges) as wellCoordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response,

  4. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  5. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits of Demand Side Management (DSM) are insufficient toefficiency, demand side management (DSM) cost effectivenessResearch Center Demand Side Management Demand Side Resources

  6. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF DRAFT FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procurement process at the California Public Utilities Commission. This forecast was produced with the Energy Commission demand forecast models. Both the staff draft energy consumption and peak forecasts are slightly and commercial sectors. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather

  7. Optimal Power Flow Based Demand Response Offer Price Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    Optimal Power Flow Based Demand Response Offer Price Optimization Zhen Qiu 1 Introduction-time energy balance. Demand response programs are offered by the utility companies to reduce the load response cost in exchange for load reduction. A considerable amount of papers have discussed the demand

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and water pumping sectors. Mark Ciminelli forecasted energy for transportation, communication and utilities. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ted Dang prepared the historic energy consumption data at the California Public Utilities Commission. This forecast was produced with the Energy Commission demand forecast

  9. Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration, MayEleventh Annual Carbon Capture, Utilization & Sequestrationplants with and without carbon capture. Presentation at 2009

  10. Conference Papers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upcoming Conferences CONFERENCE REPORTS Evolution and Control of Complexity: Key Experiments Using Sources of Hard X-rays---A Report of a Workshop held October 11-13, 2010, ANL-13...

  11. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2003deeralgrain.pdf...

  12. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  13. annual battery conference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sequence - Needs Simon, Dan 2 22nd Annual Transportation Research Conference Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: 22nd Annual Transportation...

  14. Utility Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utility Partnerships 7/10/12. Provides an overview of LEAP's (Charlottesville, VA) partnership with local utilities.

  15. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DECC aggregator managed portfolio automated demand responseaggregator designs their own programs, and offers demand responseaggregator is responsible for designing and implementing their own demand response

  16. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings,Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings",demand response and energy efficiency functions into the design of buildings,

  17. Demand Response in Quebec's CI Buildings: Potentioal and Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daoud, A.; Leduc, M. A.; Baribeault, J.; Lavigne, K.; Chenard, S.; Poulin, A.; Martel, S.; Bendaoud, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 October 10th 2013 ? ICEBO2013 Demand response in Quebec?s CI buildings: potential and strategies Team: Ahmed Daoud, Ph.D, project manager Marie-Andr?e Leduc, MSc., ing, task manager Jean Baribeault, ing, researcher Karine Lavigne, MSc...-10-20 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Montreal, Quebec, October 8-11, 2013 4 Demand response in CI buildings ESL-IC-13-10-20 Proceedings of the 13th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations...

  18. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  19. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

  20. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IEfficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006,Application to Demand Response Energy Pricing” SenSys 2003,

  1. Energy Demand Staff Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Energy Demand in China Lynn Price Staff Scientist February 2, 2010 #12;Founded in 1988 Focused,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 2007 USChina #12;Overview:Overview: Key Energy Demand DriversKey Energy Demand Drivers · 290 million new urban residents 1990-2007 · 375 million new urban residents 2007

  2. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

  3. Demand Response In California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

  4. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission's preliminary forecasts for 2014­2024 electricity consumption and peak: Electricity Demand by Utility Planning Area MAY 2013 CEC-200-2013-004-SD-V2 Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION Robert P. Oglesby Executive

  5. Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STATEWIDE ELECTRICITY AND DEMAND CAPACITY SAVINGS FROM THE IMPLEMENTATION OF IECC CODE IN TEXAS: ANALYSIS FOR SINGLE?FAMILY RESIDENCES 11th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations New York City, October 18 ? 20, 2011 Hyojin...&M University System Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC Code in TX 11th ICEBO Conference Oct. 18 ? 20, 2011 2 Outline Introduction Methodology Base?Case Building Results Summary Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC...

  6. 588 IEEE SYSTEMS JOURNAL, VOL. 8, NO. 2, JUNE 2014 GTES: An Optimized Game-Theoretic Demand-Side

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    , Nei Kato, Fellow, IEEE, and Ivan Stojmenovic, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Demand-side management in smart]­[4]. For the successful deployment of the smart grid, demand-side management or demand response [5]­[7] is crucial. Demand-side in the shape of loads of the utility company. While demand-side management aims at producing a change

  7. Controlling electric power demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eikenberry, J.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, demand control has not been viewed as an energy conservation measure, its intent being to reduce the demand peak to lower the electric bill demand charge by deferring the use of a block of power to another demand interval. Any energy savings were essentially incidental and unintentional, resulting from curtailment of loads that could not be assumed at another time. This article considers a microprocessor-based multiplexed system linked to a minicomputer to control electric power demand in a winery. In addition to delivering an annual return on investment of 55 percent in electric bill savings, the system provides a bonus in the form of alarm and monitoring capability for critical processes.

  8. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

  9. Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management Programs Supervisory Committee Maximizing Energy Savings Reliability in BC Hydro Industrial Demand-side Management of Environmental Studies) Departmental Member For energy utilities faced with expanded jurisdictional energy

  10. Summary of the 2006 Automated Demand Response Pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the specific concept for, design of, and results from a pilot program to automate demand response with critical peak pricing. California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak pricing (CPP) to help reduce peak...

  11. Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELEcrRIC DEMAND COST Versus LABOR COST: A CASE STUDY Sanjay Agrawal Richard Jensen Assistant Director Director Industrial Assessment Center Department of Engineering Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549 ABSTRAcr Electric Utility companies...

  12. Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyra, K.; Hanel, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response October 10, 2012 ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS OVERVIEW ?Program rules and guidelines established by Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) ?All Texas investor...

  13. Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however...

  14. Emerging Technologies for Industrial Demand-Side Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, J. E.; Kasprowicz, L. M.

    Demand-side management (DSM) is a set of actions taken by an electric utility to influence the electricity usage by a customer. Typical DSM activities include rebates for higher efficiency appliances and discounted electric rates for electric...

  15. Proceedings of the 1992 EPRI heat rate improvement conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.E. (Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diverse but compelling forces such as increasing fuel prices, greater power demands, growing competition, and ever more aggressive regulatory incentives are causing utilities to place additional focus on power plant heat rate. The 1992 heat rate improvement conference was a gathering of utility industry experts to share knowledge and concerns on such key issues as on-line measurement of stack gas mass flow rate-increasingly important because of the regulations of the Clean Air Act of 1990. These proceedings present the latest developments by EPRI and the utility industry to improve heat rate. Representatives of utilities, architect/engineering firms, research firms, and manufacturers presented 71 papers, and a panel discussion by the ASME performance test code committee on PTC 46 provided a forum on the overall plant performance test code. These proceedings report on a number of heat rate improvement programs, both in development and in place, including EPRI's Plant Monitoring Workstation (PMW), the State-of-the-Art Power Plant (SOAPP) conceptual design tool, and several developments in boiler performance monitoring, including an on-line system at PEPCO's Morgantown unit 2. Other conference papers describe advances in heat rate improvement through (1) computer software tools modeling boiler cleanliness, heat balance, duct system dynamics, heat rate root cause diagnosis, and conceptual plant design; (2) new instruments and testing systems in the areas of performance testing, heat rate monitoring, circulating water flow measurement, and low-pressure turbine efficiency measurement; and (3) auxiliary equipment improvements such as condensing heat exchangers, macrobiofouling control, condenser in-leakage and air binding control, air heater monitoring, and feedwater heater level control. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  16. Proceedings: 1990 fossil plant cycling conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil plant cycling continues to be a key issue for many electric utilities. EPRI's previous cycling workshops, held in 1983, 1985, and 1987, allowed utilities to benefit from collective industry experience in the conversion of baseload fossil units to cyclic operation. Continued improvements in equipment, retrofits, diagnostics, and controls were highlighted at the 1990 conference. The objective is to provide a forum for utility discussions of the cycling operation of fossil fuel power plants. Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) hosted the 1990 EPRI Fossil Fuel Cycling Conference in Washington, DC, on December 4--6, 1990. More than 130 representatives from utilities, vendors, government agencies, universities, and industry associations attended the conference. Following the general session, technical sessions covered such topics as plant modifications, utility retrofit experience, cycling economics, life assessment, controls, environmental controls, and energy storage. Attendees also toured PEPCO's Potomac River generating station, the site of an earlier EPRI cycling conversion study.

  17. 5. annual clean coal technology conference: powering the next millennium. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference focuses on presenting strategies and approaches that will enable clean coal technologies to resolve the competing, interrelated demands for power, economic viability, and environmental constraints associated with the use of coal in the post-2000 era. The program addresses the dynamic changes that will result from utility competition and industry restructuring, and to the evolution of markets abroad. Current projections for electricity highlight the preferential role that electric power will have in accomplishing the long-range goals of most nations. Increase demands can be met by utilizing coal in technologies that achieve environmental goals while keeping the cost- per-unit of energy competitive. Results from projects in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program confirm that technology is the pathway to achieving these goals. The industry/government partnership, cemented over the past 10 years, is focused on moving the clean coal technologies into the domestic and international marketplaces. The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference provides a forum to discuss these benchmark issues and the essential role and need for these technologies in the post-2000 era. This volume contains technical papers on: advanced coal process systems; advanced industrial systems; advanced cleanup systems; and advanced power generation systems. In addition, there are poster session abstracts. Selected papers from this proceedings have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  18. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST, and utilities. Mitch Tian prepared the peak demand forecast. Ted Dang prepared the historic energy consumption STAFFFINALREPORT NOVEMBER 2007 CEC-200-2007-015-SF2 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY

  19. Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

  20. BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA EDISON COMPANY (U 338-E) AND THE UTILITY REFORM NETWORK RECOMMENDING A DEMAND RESPONSE COST Douglass & Liddell The Utility Reform Network On behalf of Ice Energy, Inc. 711 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 350 CALIFORNIA EDISON COMPANY (U 338-E) AND THE UTILITY REFORM NETWORK RECOMMENDING A DEMAND RESPONSE COST

  1. Demand and Price Uncertainty: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  2. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World crude oil and natural gas: a demand and supply model.analysis of the demand for oil in the Middle East. EnergyEstimates elasticity of demand for crude oil, not gasoline.

  3. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand. (energy conservation regulations). Public UtilitiesSupplemental Energy Whereas regulation reserves areDR Capacity Energy Ancillary Services Regulation Reserves

  4. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation National Institute of Standards and Technology Open Access Transmission Tariff Open Automated Demand Response Protocol Public Utility Commission Photovoltaic

  5. Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability - Emergency - Conservation - Environmental Protection - Efficient Shell, Equipment &equipment cycling. DR methods such as demand limiting and shifting can be utilized when the economics and reliability

  6. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

  7. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing conferences sponsored or co-sponsored by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 110.3. Canceled by DOE N 251.97.

  8. Demand and Price Volatility: Rational Habits in International Gasoline Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K. Rebecca

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Exploration of Australian Petrol Demand: Unobserv- ableRelative Prices: Simulating Petrol Con- sumption Behavior.habit stock variable in a petrol demand regression, they

  9. Demand Side Bidding. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spahn, Andrew

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

  10. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Grayson

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

  11. Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Demand Response Libin Jiang Steven Low Computing + Math Sciences Electrical Engineering Caltech Oct 2011 #12;Outline Caltech smart grid research Optimal demand response #12;Global trends 1

  12. Performance Assurance for Multi-Year Contracts Under the Utility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    describes guidance for Federal energy and facility managers about participating in utility programs for the management of electricity demand and energy and water conservation....

  13. THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC UTILITIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CongestionStudy2009.pdf. 2012 Congestion Study Plan - Mass DPU Comments Page 3 and demand response resources. 3 Massachusetts utilities will achieve compliance with this...

  14. antimicrobial utilization program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of energy conservation measures (ECMs... Lau, K.; Henderson, G.; Hebert, D. 3 Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission Power Transmission, Distribution...

  15. air conditioner utilizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conditions - The Utility Perspective Ammi Amarnath Technical Leader, Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Program Electric Power Research Institute 3420 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto,...

  16. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Manager Kae Lewis Acting Manager Demand Analysis Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy

  17. Breaking Down the Barriers: Federal Agency's Retention of Utility Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—covers energy efficiency funds, demand response programs, and the U.S. Department of Energy's opinion on utility rebates,

  18. Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niehus, T. L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper...

  19. ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400. Hall Deputy Director Energy Efficiency and Demand Analysis Division Scott W. Matthews Acting Executive

  20. Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity demand forecast means that the region's electricity needs would grow by 5,343 average megawattsDemand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required in electricity demand is, of course, crucial to determining the need for new electricity resources and helping

  1. Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2003deerhammerle.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System...

  2. Urea SCR and DPF System for Deisel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2002deerhammerle.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System...

  3. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Control Systems (12) 18418 Electric Energy Processing (12ugTR34:20 ) 18472 Fund. in Elec. Power Systems (12UG see notes) 18875 Econ+Engr Elec Energy Sys(12 TR4:305:50) 18819B Solar Arrays: Model, Analysis:305:20) Mechanical Engineering 24722 Energy System Modeling (12) 24640 Special Topics: Climate Mitigation (12) 24616

  4. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Storage (6) 19638 (18618) Smart Grids & F. Elec. Eng Sys (12)TR910:20 19714 (12714) Env. Life Cycle Prep (3)MW34:20 12706 Civil Systems Invest. Plan & Pricing (12)MW10:3012:20 12745 AID Systems Project:20 12743 Comp. Search & Decision in Civil Infrastructure (6) Electrical & Computer Engineering 18618 Smart

  5. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Engineering 18618 Smart Grids & Fut. Elec. Energy Sys (12) TBA 18771 Linear Systems (12)MW2:304:20,F2 to Sustainable Engr (12)MW34:20 19472 Fund. Electric Pwr Sys (12/note MW3:304:20) 19638 (18618) Smart Grids & F 12706 Civil Systems Invest. Plan & Pricing (12)MW10:3012:20 12741 Data Management & Analysis (A26)TR121

  6. 39610 Energy Conversion & Supply (6) 39611 Energy Demand &Utilization (6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    . Search & Decision Civil Infrastruc (6A3 TR121:20) Electrical & Computer Engineering 18618 Smart Grids Science & Policy (12 TR121:20) 19638 (18618) Smart Grids & F. Elec. 19653 (24640) S.T. Climate Change Mit) 12706 Civil Systems Investment Planning & Pricing (12) 12745 AIS Systems Project Course (12 TR34

  7. Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

    Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become...

  8. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist,theA12345Savings

  9. Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid Program Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid Program Manager February 14 utilities to invest in DR Regional situational analysis ­ issues to address #12;Nationally ­ Demand ResponseSource: FERC Demand Response & Advanced Metering Report, February 2011 Peak DR 65,000 MW 1,062 MW Peak DR

  10. Optimal Power Procurement and Demand Response with Quality-of-Usage Guarantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Longbo

    1 Optimal Power Procurement and Demand Response with Quality-of-Usage Guarantees Longbo Huang, Jean the utility company to jointly perform power procurement and demand response so as to maximize the social are the inte- gration of renewable energy technologies [1] and the design of efficient user demand-response

  11. An MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Demand control systems can be divided functionally into supply-side and load-side control/management systems. Supply-side demand management systems, implemented by the utilities, choose between maintainingAn MILP Formulation for Load-Side Demand Control Zhonghui Luo, Ratnesh Kumar* , Joseph Sottile

  12. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

  13. Demand Dispatch-Intelligent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITIONPortal DecisionRichlandDelegations,Demand

  14. Aggregated Data for Investor-Owned Utilities, Publicly Owned Utilities, and Combined Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilities: Electric Energy Consumption Electric Peak Demand Natural Gas Consumption #12;Sources: Data,000 300,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Year GWh CEC 2007 Forecast-Staff Draft that the incremental savings is kept equal to the annual savings in 2013. The CEC 2007 Forecast has incorporated

  15. A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real-World Electricity Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

    1 A Hierarchical Demand Response Framework for Data Center Power Cost Optimization Under Real for optimizing their utility bills. Our focus is on a subset of this work that carries out demand response (DR

  16. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEST PRACTICES AND RESULTS OF DR IMPLEMENTATION . 31 Encouraging End-User Participation: The Role of Incentives 16 Demand Response

  17. Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

  18. A dynamic model of industrial energy demand in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haji, S.H.H. [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the effects of input price movements, technology changes, capacity utilization and dynamic mechanisms on energy demand structures in the Kenyan industry. This is done with the help of a variant of the second generation dynamic factor demand (econometric) model. This interrelated disequilibrium dynamic input demand econometric model is based on a long-term cost function representing production function possibilities and takes into account the asymmetry between variable inputs (electricity, other-fuels and Tabour) and quasi-fixed input (capital) by imposing restrictions on the adjustment process. Variations in capacity utilization and slow substitution process invoked by the relative input price movement justifies the nature of input demand disequilibrium. The model is estimated on two ISIS digit Kenyan industry time series data (1961 - 1988) using the Iterative Zellner generalized least square method. 31 refs., 8 tabs.

  19. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014-2024 PRELIMINARY FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, End-User Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency The California Energy Demand 2014-2024 Preliminary Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  20. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information This conference will discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuel markets and the implications for Missouri farmsDr.JonHagler, DirectoroftheMissouriDepartment ofAgriculture. · Outlookpresentationsderivedfrom thelatestbaselineresultsof

  1. The geothermal partnership: Industry, utilities, and government meeting the challenges of the 90's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal community. This year's conference, Program Review IX, was held in San Francisco on March 19--21, 1991. The theme of this review was The Geothermal Partnership -- Industry, Utilities, and Government Meeting the Challenges of the 90's.'' The importance of this partnership has increased markedly as demands for improved technology must be balanced with available research resources. By working cooperatively, the geothermal community, including industry, utilities, DOE, and other state and federal agencies, can more effectively address common research needs. The challenge currently facing the geothermal partnership is to strengthen the bonds that ultimately will enhance opportunities for future development of geothermal resources. Program Review IX consisted of eight sessions including an opening session. The seven technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy and the progress associated with the Long Valley Exploratory Well. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  2. Assessment of Demand Response Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for PGE and Pacific Power Prepared for: Portland January 15, 2004 K:\\Projects\\2003-53 (PGE,PC) Assess Demand Response\\Report\\Revised Report_011504.doc #12;#12;quantec Assessment of Demand Response Resource Potentials for I-1 PGE and Pacific Power I. Introduction

  3. APS 2006 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Conferences & Workshops This section tracks conferences of interest to the APS researcher community. APS Renewal Planning Meetings and Workshops Argonne National Laboratory...

  4. APS 1998 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NY EPAC '98, Sixth European Particle Accelerator Conference (Jun. 22-26) Stockholm, Sweden Sixth International Conference on Biophysics & Synchrotron Radiation. (Aug. 4-8)...

  5. APS 2001 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Angeles, CA X-Ray Physics Gordon Conference. (Jul. 22-27) Connecticut College New London, CT The Thirteenth International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics...

  6. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

  7. Utility Conservation Programs: Opportunities and Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norland, D. L.; Wolf, J. L.

    . The utility may promote conservation through a variety of means that will be discussed -- traditional forms of financial incen tives such as loans or rebates or new institutional arrangements such as subsidiaries offering share-the -savings programs... the strategy the utility chooses to promote conservation investment. For example, a significant asset a utility possesses is the know ledge of the end-use patterns of its customers. Especially for commercial and industrial customers, demand characteristics...

  8. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  9. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. Conference Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submitCollector/Receiver CharacterizationConference Talks 1-2

  11. Materials for coal conversion and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifth Annual Conference on Materials for Coal Conversion and Utilization was held October 7-9, 1980, at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland. Sixty-six papers have been entered individually into ERA and EDB; two had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  12. Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyra, K.; Hanel, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs Solar Photovoltaic and Demand Response October 10, 2012 ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS OVERVIEW ?Program rules and guidelines established by Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) ?All Texas investor... to be administered by transmission-distribution utilities ?Programs are implemented by Energy Efficiency Services Providers and Retail Electric Providers 1 WHY DOES ONCOR DO SOLAR PV? ?Helps meet our energy efficiency goals ?Helps customers reduce...

  13. Demand Response Programs, 6. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

  14. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raising transportation oil demand. Growing internationalcoal by wire could reduce oil demand by stemming coal roadEastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand

  15. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas demands are forecast for the four natural gas utilitythe 2006-2016 Forecast. Commercial natural gas demand isforecasts and demand scenarios. Electricity planning area Natural gas

  16. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

  17. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

  18. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

  19. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

  20. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McParland, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, Lawrenceand Automating Demand Response Charles McParland, LBNLCommercial and Residential Demand Response Overview of the

  1. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.for Automated Demand Response. Technical Document to

  2. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

  3. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    District Small Business Summer Solutions: Energy and DemandSummer Solutions: Energy and Demand Impacts Monthly Energy> B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  4. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World: Renewable Energy and Demand Response Proliferation intogether the renewable energy and demand response communityimpacts of renewable energy and demand response integration

  5. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlledindicate the energy and cost savings for demand controlled24) (California Energy Commission 2008), demand controlled

  6. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy and environmental benefits of demand controlled indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand controlled 24) (California Energy  Commission 2008), demand controlled 

  7. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrating HECO and Hawaii Energy demand response relatedpotential. Energy efficiency and demand response efforts areBoth  energy  efficiency  and  demand  response  should  

  8. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy demand-side management energy information systemdemand response. Demand-side management (DSM) program goalsa goal for demand-side management (DSM) coordination and

  9. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 2.1 Demand-Side Managementbuildings. The demand side management framework is discussedIssues 2.1 Demand-Side Management Framework Forecasting

  10. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and best practices to guide HECO demand response developmentbest practices for DR renewable integration – Technically demand responseof best practices. This is partially because demand response

  11. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings DavidStrategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Davidadjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The

  12. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In terms of demand response capability, building operatorsautomated demand response and improve building energy andand demand response features directly into building design

  13. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND RESPONSE .7 Wholesale Marketuse at times of high wholesale market prices or when systemenergy expenditure. In wholesale markets, spot energy prices

  14. Introduction Water conservation is becoming increasingly important to many utilities worldwide. Not only are water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangel, Marc

    , to conserve. Utilities often use price structure and other demand side management tools to send a conservation on water demand. Ward (2012) discusses the management of residential water demand. Through survey data for managing residential consumption. Klaiber et al. (2010) estimate price elasticity of water demand using

  15. STEP Conference Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Conference Presentation, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  16. Progress toward Producing Demand-Response-Ready Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Sastry, Chellury

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes several historical and ongoing efforts to make small electrical demand-side devices like home appliances more responsive to the dynamic needs of electric power grids. Whereas the utility community often reserves the word demand response for infrequent 2 to 6 hour curtailments that reduce total electrical system peak load, other beneficial responses and ancillary services that may be provided by responsive electrical demand are of interest. Historically, demand responses from the demand side have been obtained by applying external, retrofitted, controlled switches to existing electrical demand. This report is directed instead toward those manufactured products, including appliances, that are able to provide demand responses as soon as they are purchased and that require few, or no, after-market modifications to make them responsive to needs of power grids. Efforts to be summarized include Open Automated Demand Response, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturer standard CHA 1, a simple interface being developed by the U-SNAP Alliance, various emerging autonomous responses, and the recent PinBus interface that was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  17. Proceedings: Tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  18. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference IX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The ninth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  19. Purdue Solar Energy Utilization Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Rakesh [Purdue] [Purdue

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to establish and set-up a laboratory that will facilitate research and development of new low-cost and high-efficiency solar energy utilization technologies at Purdue University. The outcome will help spur the creation of solar energy start-up companies and eventually a solar energy industry in Indiana that can help fulfill the growing national demand for solar energy.

  20. Demand Response Technology Roadmap A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    workshop agendas, presentation materials, and transcripts. For the background to the Demand Response Technology Roadmap and to make use of individual roadmaps, the reader is...

  1. ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005.................................................................................................................................3 PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC PLANNING AREA ........................................................................................9 Commercial Sector

  2. Driving Demand | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    strategies, results achieved to date, and advice for other programs. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements. This guide, developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National...

  3. Demand Response Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between May 2014 and February 2015. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Demand Response Executive Sponsor Team decided upon the scope of the project in May. Two subsequent...

  4. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission's final forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak, and natural gas demand Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand

  5. A First Look at Colocation Demand Response Shaolei Ren

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Shaolei

    programs and receive financial benefits by reducing energy consumption upon utility's request. However, on the other hand, can reduce server energy consumption but may not desire demand response unless response by using a trace-based simulation to show that iCODE can significantly reduce energy consumption

  6. Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5556E Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information TCP/IP over CDMA CAISO Utility Aggregator NOC Proprietary Comm. EMS GridLink Loads Interval Meter

  7. ENABLING ENERGY DEMAND RESPONSE WITH VEHICULAR MESH NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    ENABLING ENERGY DEMAND RESPONSE WITH VEHICULAR MESH NETWORKS Howard CheHao Chang1, Haining Du2 compared to their counterparts such as laptops in nomad computing or sensor networks. First, vehicles response (DR) [1] for automatic utility usage retrievals and price dispatching. DR is a project in- itiated

  8. Trends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Department of Energy in EIA form 861. Council staff takes annual reported retail sales by each utility. Street lighting sales are not metered but rather estimated . 10 #12;Losses are Defined as Energy LoadsTrends in Regional Electricity Demands 1995-2012 January 29, 2014 #12;In Today's Conversation

  9. A season without worry Summer gasoline demand 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Refining margins in the US appear to be widening after a few lean years. With the US cautiously emerging from its recession, large stock builds and high refinery utilization rates reflect a sense of optimism among refiners for robust petroleum product demand during the Summer 1993 driving season.

  10. Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barineau, Mark Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work has been done to address seasonal ...

  11. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

  12. Proceedings: 2003 Radiation Protection Technology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health physics professionals within the nuclear industry are continually upgrading their programs with new methods and technologies. The Third Annual EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference facilitated this effort by communicating technical developments, program improvements, and experience throughout the nuclear power industry. When viewed from the perspective of shorter outages, diminishing numbers of contract RP technicians and demanding emergent work, this information flow is critical for the industry.

  13. UBC STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    UBC STUDENT HOUSING DEMAND STUDY Presented by Nancy Knight and Andrew Parr FEBRUARY 5, 2010 #12;PURPOSE · To determine the need/demand for future on- campus student housing · To address requests from · A survey of students, and analysis of housing markets, and preparation of a forecast · The timeline

  14. Harnessing the power of demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

  15. ERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    changes or incentives.' (FERC) · `Changes in electric use by demand-side resources from their normalERCOT Demand Response Paul Wattles Senior Analyst, Market Design & Development, ERCOT Whitacre thermostats -- Other DLC Possible triggers: Real-time prices, congestion management, 4CP response paid

  16. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  17. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  18. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  19. 2009 International SWAT Conference Conference Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-356 2009 2009 International SWAT Conference Conference Proceedings August 5-7, 2009 University of Colorado at Boulder Boulder, Colorado Texas AgriLife Research... Proceedings August 5-7, 2009 University of Colorado at Boulder Boulder, Colorado Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University USDA-Agricultural Research Service Report No. TR356 2009 5th International SWAT Conference Proceedings August 5...

  20. Geothermal energy and the utility market -- the opportunities and challenges for expanding geothermal energy in a competitive supply market: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year's conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,'' focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  1. The process of resort second home development demand quantification : exploration of methodologies and case study application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wholey, Christopher J. (Christoper John)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prevalent methodologies utilized by resort second home development professionals to quantify demand for future projects are identified and critiqued. The strengths of each model are synthesized in order to formulate an ...

  2. Stochastic dynamic optimization of consumption and the induced price elasticity of demand in smart grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faghih, Ali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a mathematical model of consumer behavior in response to stochastically-varying electricity prices, and a characterization of price-elasticity of demand created by optimal utilization of storage and ...

  3. How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the past 12 months designated in the database (LADWP does this) Home > Groups > Utility Rate Submitted by Marcroper on 11...

  4. Three Case Studues of the Application of Energy Systems Optimization Best Prectices for Automatic Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Y.; Guiberteau, K.; Yagua, C.; Watt, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes three case study buildings located in Austin, Texas that were selected for inclusion in a review of the demand reduction program of the utility company Austin Energy. The buildings studied include a city government office...

  5. Demand Response in the U.S.- Key trends and federal facility participation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides demand response (DR) definition, current status of DR in the United States, key DR trends, and federal participation issues.

  6. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998 technologies, like photovoltaics (PV), can offer additional benefits to electric utility companies utility company to defer investments in upgrading transmission and distribution facilities, among other

  7. Utility reregulation: The ESCO fit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S.J. [Kiona International, Annapolis, MD (United States); Weisman, J.C. [Hansen Associates, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No one can think energy, and more particularly energy efficiency, these days without wondering what the impact of utility deregulation and competition will be on his or her operation. Suddenly, owners must get smart about buying power and making choices. The complexities inherent in this new era make what was learned through the deregulation of the telephone and natural gas industries look like rehearsals for the command performance. For ESCOs, the whole scenario becomes a crucial part of doing business. There is no question that changes in the new utility market place will have a significant impact on the way ESCOs do business. The market segments an ESCO strives to serve will change. In the near term, large industrial customers will have little interest in the relatively small action on the demand side of the meter when rate/price negotiations on the supply side can make a big difference in the utility bill.

  8. Incentives for demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, M.W.; Brown, J.B. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first product of an ongoing project to monitor the efforts of states to remove regulatory barriers to, and provide financial incentives for, utility investment in demand-side management (DSM) resources. The project was commissioned by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) in response to growing interest among regulators for a comprehensive survey of developments in this area. Each state report beings with an overview of the state's progress toward removing regulatory barriers and providing incentives for DSM. Information is organized under five headings: status; IRP regulations and practice; current treatment of DSM, directions and trends; commission contact person. Where applicable, each overview is followed by one or more sections that report on specific incentive proposals or mechanisms within the state. Information on each proposal or mechanism is organized under eight headings. A notation on each page identifies the utility or other group associated with the proposal or mechanism. The eight headings are as follows: status; background; treatment of cost recovery; treatment of lost revenues/decoupling; treatment of profitability; other features; issues, and additional observations.

  9. Incentives for demand-side management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, M.W.; Brown, J.B. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first product of an ongoing project to monitor the efforts of states to remove regulatory barriers to, and provide financial incentives for, utility investment in demand-side management (DSM) resources. The project was commissioned by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) in response to growing interest among regulators for a comprehensive survey of developments in this area. Each state report beings with an overview of the state`s progress toward removing regulatory barriers and providing incentives for DSM. Information is organized under five headings: status; IRP regulations and practice; current treatment of DSM, directions and trends; commission contact person. Where applicable, each overview is followed by one or more sections that report on specific incentive proposals or mechanisms within the state. Information on each proposal or mechanism is organized under eight headings. A notation on each page identifies the utility or other group associated with the proposal or mechanism. The eight headings are as follows: status; background; treatment of cost recovery; treatment of lost revenues/decoupling; treatment of profitability; other features; issues, and additional observations.

  10. Multi-scale Demand-Side Management for Continuous Power-intensive Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    (DR) Reduce demand on operational level Energy Efficiency (EE) Permanently reduce power consumption Demand-Side Management (DSM) "Systematic utility and government activities designed to change the amount and/or timing of the customer's use of electricity for the collective benefit of the society

  11. Abstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended to serve both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract--Implementation of Distribution Automation (DA) and Demand Side Management (DSM) intended with differentiate QoS in a multitasking environment. I. INTRODUCTION ODERN society demands a reliable and high by the distribution utility for the security. REMPLI (Remote Energy Management over Power Lines and Internet) system

  12. A Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhunia, Swarup

    energy generation and consumption parameters. The system uses economics inspired supply-demand modelA Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy Utilization Western Reserve University, *Cleveland State University, +Rockwell Automation, Cleveland, OR, USA Email

  13. Proceedings of the American power conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains papers and addresses presented at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Power Conference. The conference is an independent forum open to all persons interested in the generation, transmission, distribution or utilization of power, irrespective of society affiliations. It is sponsored by Illinois Institute of Technology with the cooperation of several universities and societies. Thirty-five of the policy-type or less-technical papers were processed for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 5 of these 35 abstracts will also appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). The technical papers will be processed for EDB later.

  14. Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Presents conference agenda including a general...

  15. Marketing Demand-Side Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, M. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand-Side Management is an organizational tool that has proven successful in various realms of the ever changing business world in the past few years. It combines the multi-faceted desires of the customers with the increasingly important...

  16. Community Water Demand in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald C.; Chang, Chan

    Solutions to Texas water policy and planning problems will be easier to identify once the impact of price upon community water demand is better understood. Several important questions cannot be addressed in the absence of such information...

  17. Gainesville Regional Utilities- Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) Solar Rebate Program, established in early 1997 as part of GRU's demand-side management initiatives, provides rebates of $500 to residential customers of...

  18. Enhancing spectrum utilization through cooperation and cognition in wireless systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul, Hariharan Shankar, 1975-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have seen a proliferation of wireless technologies and devices in recent years. The resulting explosion of wireless demand has put immense pressure on available spectrum. Improving spectrum utilization is therefore ...

  19. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  20. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mares, K.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

  1. Better Buildings Webinar: Making Utility Energy Efficiency Funds Work for You

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings will host a webinar on innovative collaborations with utilities to bring big energy savings to their building portfolios and help reduce utility peak electricity demand.

  2. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  3. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, EndUser Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency SEPTEMBER 2013 CEC2002013004SDV1REV CALIFORNIA The California Energy Demand 2014 ­ 2024 Revised Forecast, Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand and Methods

  4. Proceedings: Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Providence, RI, November 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Health physics (HP) professionals within the nuclear industry are continually upgrading their respective programs with new methods and technologies. The move to shorter outages combined with a diminishing group of contract HP technicians and demanding emergent work makes such changes even more important. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference focused on a number of key health physics issues and developments.

  5. Proceedings: 2002 Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Baltimore, MD, October 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to program pressures resulting from shorter outages, combined with a diminishing group of contract health physics (HP) technicians, HP professionals must continuously upgrade their programs. Demanding emergent work also requires HP technicians in the nuclear industry to use new methods and technologies. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference was directed at highlighting a number of key health physics issues and developments.

  6. Agility in Virtualized Utility Computing Hangwei Qian1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wills, Craig E.

    surges in demand [3, 11], and the quicker the system can reassign resources the less slack it needs demand. We refer to the capability of a utility computing platform to quickly reassign resources-level clusters. In this work, we examine resource reassignment mechanisms in these en- vironments from

  7. Industrial demand side management: A status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, M.F.; Conger, R.L.; Foley, T.J. [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of and rationale for industrial demand side management (DSM) programs. Benefits and barriers are described, and data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey are used to estimate potential energy savings in kilowatt hours. The report presents types and examples of programs and explores elements of successful programs. Two in-depth case studies (from Boise Cascade and Eli Lilly and Company) illustrate two types of effective DSM programs. Interviews with staff from state public utility commissions indicate the current thinking about the status and future of industrial DSM programs. A comprehensive bibliography is included, technical assistance programs are listed and described, and a methodology for evaluating potential or actual savings from projects is delineated.

  8. Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    human dimension of demand response technology from a caseArens, E. , et al. 2008. Demand Response Enabling TechnologyArens, E. , et al. 2006. Demand Response Enabling Technology

  9. Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Eto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barat, and D. Watson. 2007. Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby. 2009. Demand Response Spinning ReserveFormat of 2009-2011 Demand Response Activity Applications.

  10. REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the California Energy Commission staff's revised forecasts for 2012­2022 electricity consumption, peak Electricity, demand, consumption, forecast, weather normalization, peak, natural gas, self generation REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand

  11. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanCEC (2003a) California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast.CEC (2005a) California energy demand 2006-2016: Staff energy

  12. Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Utility Partnerships Webinar Series: Gas Utility Energy Efficiency Programs gasutilityeewebinarnov2...

  13. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  14. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

  15. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

  16. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    annual per-capita electricity consumption by demand15 California electricity consumption projections by demandannual per-capita electricity consumption by demand

  17. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use of demand control ventilation systems in general officedemand controlled  ventilation systems, Dennis DiBartolomeo the demand controlled ventilation system increased the rate 

  18. Supply chain planning decisions under demand uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanfeng Anna

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sales and operational planning that incorporates unconstrained demand forecasts has been expected to improve long term corporate profitability. Companies are considering such unconstrained demand forecasts in their decisions ...

  19. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sector, the demand response potential of California buildinga demand response event prohibit a building’s participationdemand response strategies in California buildings are

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: demand response inverter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demand response inverter ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities,...

  1. NET PRED UTILITY

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility  http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php 

  2. Materials for coal conversion and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth annual conference on materials for coal conversion and utilization was held October 13-15, 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards Gaithersburg, Maryland. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the National Bureau of Standards. Fifty-eight papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; four papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  3. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  4. Turkey's energy demand and supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

  5. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  6. US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

  7. What Marketing Strategies Make Sense for Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, T. D.

    that large commercial/industrial customers want the following from ' The successful utility will be the one who emp oys superior strategy, not the one who has superior resourc s. TIlE BUILDING OF UTILI1Y STRATEGY What strategy should utilities employ... their commercial/industrial efficiency (C/I) market Permit assistance SIC Power protection/conditioning. Size/control Needs/benefits 130 ESL-IE-89-09-28 Proceedings from the Eleventh National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, September...

  8. Photovoltaics for demand-side management: Opportunities for early commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, J.; Letendre, S.; Govindarajalu, C.; Wang, Y.D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Policy; Nigro, R. [Delmarva Power, Newark, DE (United States); Wallace, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, interest in utilizing photovoltaics (PV) in a demand-side management (DSM) role has been increasing. Research has shown that many utilities across the US have a good match between peak loads and the availability of the solar resource. Maximum value for PV in DSM applications can be achieved by incorporating a dispatching capability to PV systems (through the addition of storage). This enables utilities to evaluate PV systems as a peak-shaving technology. To date, peak-shaving has been a high-value DSM application for US utilities. The authors analysis of the value of dispatchable PV-DSM systems indicates that small-scale, customer-sited systems are approaching competitive cost levels in several regions of the US that have favorable load matching and high demand charges. This paper presents the results of an economic analysis for high-value PV-DSM systems located in the service territories of five case study utilities. The results suggest that PV is closer to commercialization when viewed as a DSM technology relative to analyses that focus on the technology as a supply-side option.

  9. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energy’s Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  10. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  11. An analysis of intraseasonal demand for Texas winter carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Chriss Heath

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variable in addition to traditional (quantity and income) pre- determined variables to test for systematic within season changes in demand. An alternative technique f' or allowing within season changes in slope or level utilizing "dussqy" (zero.... The second problem en- countered was derivation of a positive coefficient for the Cali- fornia and. Arizona interstate shipments variables, indicating an apparent, supply response by these two areas to changes in the general carrot pri. ce level. The posi...

  12. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  13. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% ? 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  14. Demand Response Programs for Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wholesale prices and looming shortages in Western power markets in 2000-01, Portland General Electric programs for large customers remain, though they are not active at current wholesale prices. Other programs demand response for the wholesale market -- by passing through real-time prices for usage above a set

  15. Revelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is willing to reveal the aggregate response (according to his company's policy) to the customer dataRevelation on Demand Nicolas Anciaux 1 · Mehdi Benzine1,2 · Luc Bouganim1 · Philippe Pucheral1 time to support epidemiological studies. In these and many other situations, aggregate data or partial

  16. Water demand management in Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

  17. obesity demands more than just

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    #12;The World That Makes Us Fat ***** ***** ***** Overcoming obesity demands more than just. By Melinda Wenner Moyer Illustrations by A. Richard Allen 27 #12;ON ONE LEVEL, of course, obesity has a sim to pollutants. Their research suggests that to solve the problem of obesity--and, ultimately, to prevent it from

  18. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . • . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

  19. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

  20. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

  1. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

  2. Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    #12;#12;2008 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy metering penetration and potential peak load reduction from demand response have increased since 2006. Significant activity to promote demand response or to remove barriers to demand response occurred at the state

  3. CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand, EndUser Natural Gas Demand, and Energy Efficiency DECEMBER 2013 CEC2002013004SFV1 CALIFORNIA and expertise of numerous California Energy Commission staff members in the Demand Analysis Office. In addition

  4. 4th International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring on Intelligent Infrastructure (SHMII-4) 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4th International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring on Intelligent Infrastructure (SHMII-4 University, USA Vibration-based health monitoring methods have been utilized to detect structural damages. Corresponding author's email: aamousav@ncsu.edu #12;4th International Conference on Structural Health Monitoring

  5. Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated Demand Response (DR) programs require that Utility/ISO's deliver DR signals to participants via a machine to machine communications channel. Typically these DR signals constitute business logic information (e.g. prices and reliability/shed levels) as opposed to commands to control specific loads in the facility. At some point in the chain from the Utility/ISO to the loads in a facility, the business level information sent by the Utility/ISO must be processed and used to execute a DR strategy for the facility. This paper explores the various scenarios and types of participants that may utilize DR signals from the Utility/ISO. Specifically it explores scenarios ranging from single end user facility, to third party facility managers and DR Aggregators. In each of these scenarios it is pointed out where the DR signal sent from the Utility/ISO is processed and turned into the specific load control commands that are part of a DR strategy for a facility. The information in these signals is discussed. In some cases the DR strategy will be completely embedded in the facility while in others it may be centralized at a third party (e.g. Aggregator) and part of an aggregated set of facilities. This paper also discusses the pros and cons of the various scenarios and discusses how the Utility/ISO can use an open standardized method (e.g. Open Automated Demand Response Communication Standards) for delivering DR signals that will promote interoperability and insure that the widest range of end user facilities can participate in DR programs regardless of which scenario they belong to.

  6. Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers, Peter

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with a particular focus on "price-based"mechanisms. The resulting deliberations, along with a variety of stateand regional demand response initiatives, are raising important policyquestions: for example, How much demand response is enough? How much isavailable? From what sources? At what cost? The purpose of this scopingstudy is to examine analytical techniques and data sources to supportdemand response market assessments that can, in turn, answer the secondand third of these questions. We focus on demand response for large(>350 kW), commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, althoughmany of the concepts could equally be applied to similar programs andtariffs for small commercial and residential customers.

  7. Voltage Control Technical Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intro Voltage Control Conference - BPA Active Power Control in Wind Parks - Siemens Interconnection Criteria for Frequency Response Requirements - NERC Model Validation...

  8. APS 2000 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IAT Workshop. (Jun. 15-16) Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL European Particle Accelerator Conference 2000 (EPAC) (Jun. 26-30) Vienna, Austria 9th Annual Fibre...

  9. APS 1997 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Source (Apr. 15-17) Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference. (May 12-16) Vancouver, B.C., Canada International Symposium on...

  10. APS 2003 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS-12). (Jun. 22-27) Malm, Sweden. First Workshop of the International Consortium on Ultra-Small-Angle Scattering...

  11. Geothermal Program Review X: proceedings. Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- the Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R&D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R&D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal city. This year`s conference, Program Review X, was held in San Francisco on March 24--26, 1992. The theme of the review, ``Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market -- The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market,`` focused on the needs of the electric utility sector. Geothermal energy, with its power capacity potential of 10 GWe by the year 2010, can provide reliable, enviromentally clean electricity which can help offset the projected increase in demand. Program Review X consisted of seven sessions including an opening session with presentations by Mr. Vikram Budhraja, Vice President of System Planning and Operations, Southern California Edison Company, and Mr. Richard Jaros, President and Chief Operating Officer, California Energy Company. The six technical sessions included presentations by the relevant field researchers covering DOE-sponsored R&D in hydrothermal, hot dry rock, and geopressured energy. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  12. Opportunities for utility involvement with solar domestic hot water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Christensen, C. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Barrett, L. (Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar water heating is one of a number of options that can be considered under utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. Utilities perceive a range of potential benefits for solar water heating in terms of customer service, energy conservation, load management, environmental enhancement, and public relations. The solar industry may benefit from utility marketing efforts, economies of scale, added credibility, financing options, and long-term maintenance arrangements. This paper covers three topics: (1) the energy and demand impacts of solar water heating on utility load profiles based on the results of four studies in the literature, (2) the results of workshops sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to identify key issues faced by utilities in considering residential solar water heating as a DSM option, (3) several current or planned utility programs to promote solar water heating. 7 refs.

  13. Energy Efficiency as a Preferred Resource: Evidence from Utility Resource Plans in the Western United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Nichole

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coordinating Council (WECC) (2005). Hourly Demands 1998-Coordinating Council (WECC, 2005). 3 To compare utilities’one to three years. The WECC control area roughly includes

  14. BRENNAN --DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    Senior Fellow, Resources for the Future email: brennan@umbc2.umbc.edu POWER Conference University that encourages on-peak consumption Incentives to overbuild generation plant Inability to bundle high;BRENNAN -- DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 5 Competition: Threat or Promise? · DSM programs funded by utilities

  15. Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    Near Optimal Demand-Side Energy Management Under Real-time Demand-Response Pricing Jin Xiao, Jae--In this paper, we present demand-side energy manage- ment under real-time demand-response pricing as a task, demand-response, energy management I. INTRODUCTION The growing awareness of global climate change has

  16. Utility -Owned Central Plant Load Management at the Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilley, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dennis Lilley, CEM, PMP Customer Energy Solutions, Austin Energy Mission: Deliver clean, affordable, reliable energy and excellent customer service. Utility Owned Load Management – Thermal Energy Storage ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air... District – Ice Storage • Two (2) localized plants – Chilled Water Storage • An estimated 112,000 ton-hours of storage capacity 4 Austin Energy – Thermal Utility ESL-KT-13-12-12 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas...

  17. Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Missouri Agriculture Outlook Conference Conference Information Join us to discuss the drivers of Missouri agricultural and bio-fuels markets and participate in a special review of international policy implications for Missouri agriculture. Registration Deadline To guarantee space availability, please register

  18. International Conference on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of energy systems; 5.Refrigeration & air conditioning; Heat pumps; 6.Fuel cells; 7.Biomass / biofuels; bio E C o S 2 0 JuNE 15-19 27th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, 1 4 Optimization International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy

  19. CONFERENCE REPORT ECIR 2013: 35th European Conference on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamps, Jaap

    CONFERENCE REPORT ECIR 2013: 35th European Conference on Information Retrieval Pavel Serdyukov Kamps University of Amsterdam kamps@uva.nl 1 Overview The European Conference on Information Retrieval meeting. To reflect its European scale, since 1998 the conference was held alternately in the UK

  20. Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Chia-Chin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

  1. Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy...

  2. BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings 2012 Bacterial Source Tracking State Conference Conference Proceedings Prepared by: Lucas Gregory, Texas Water Resources Institute Courtney Smith of the Science Conference Texas Water Resources Institute TR-427 June 2012 #12;#12;Texas Water Resources

  3. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silain Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services Silasuccessfully in the wholesale non- spinning ancillary

  4. Rural electric power conference, papers presented at the annual conference, 24th, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conference proceedings contains 14 papers, of which one is indexed separately. The topics discussed are the following: aspects of the Electric Power Research Institute; the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978; the cost of Service Computer Program; appliance saturation surveys; load management; supervisory control and the data acquisition system; power system harmonics; ground potential and currents; stray voltage on the dairy farm; temporary protective grounding of distribution circuits; capacitor bank protection; fault determination; and load characteristics of electric excavators.

  5. Physically-based demand modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calloway, Terry Marshall

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. AC-19, December 1974, pp. 887-893. L3] |4] LS] [6] [7] LB] C. W. Brice and S. K. Jones, MPhysically-Based Demand Modeling, d EC-77-5-01-5057, RF 3673, Electric Power Institute, Texas A&M University, October 1978.... C. W. Br ice and 5, K, Jones, MStochastically-Based Physical Load Models Topical Report, " EC-77-5-01-5057, RF 3673, Electric Power Institute, Texas A&M University, May 1979. S. K. Jones and C. W. Brice, "Point Process Models for Power System...

  6. Justice and the demands of realism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munro, Daniel K., 1972-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation examines how concerns about the demands of realism should be addressed in political theories of justice. It asks whether the demands of realism should affect the construction of principles of justice and, ...

  7. Industrial Equipment Demand and Duty Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, E. S.; Heffington, W. M.

    Demand and duty factors have been measured for selected equipment (air compressors, electric furnaces, injection molding machines, centrifugal loads, and others) in industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were near 100...

  8. Proceedings: 2001 EPRI International Low-Level Waste Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize cost. EPRI's tenth annual International Low Level Waste (LLW) Conference--coupled with the 22nd annual ASME/EPRI Radwaste Workshop--offered valuable insights into this effort by presenting papers covering new or improved technology developed worldwide for LLW management, processing, shipment, disposal, and regulation.

  9. To appear, WEDA 29th Technical Conference & 40th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    To appear, WEDA 29th Technical Conference & 40th TAMU Dredging Seminar, in press, 2009 DEPTH-UTILIZATION ANALYSIS FOR ESTIMATING ECONOMIC ACTIVITY SUPPORTED BY DREDGING Kenneth N. Mitchell1 and James E. Walker2 of dollars annually towards operation and maintenance, primarily dredging, of federal channels and waterways

  10. CALL FOR PAPERS The Sun Grant Initiative National Conference on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    on the "Science for Biomass Feedstock Production and Utilization". It will be held October 2-5, 2012 at the Hilton of best management practices for agricultural and forestry biomass feedstock production · Management CALL FOR PAPERS The Sun Grant Initiative National Conference on Science for Biomass

  11. Marketing & Driving Demand Collaborative - Social Media Tools...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    drivingdemandsocialmedia010611.pdf More Documents & Publications Marketing & Driving Demand: Social Media Tools & Strategies - January 16, 2011 Social Media for Natural...

  12. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable integration capability. Coordinating and integrating HECO and Hawaii Energy demand response related activities has the potential

  13. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature-based demand response in buildings that havedemand response advantages of global zone temperature setup in buildings

  14. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table x provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:

  15. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response (DR) can.S. and internationally and lay out ideas that could help move California forward. KEY WORDS demand response, peak

  16. THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE STATE OF DEMAND RESPONSE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared For: California Energy in this report. #12; ABSTRACT By reducing system loads during criticalpeak times, demand response can help reduce the threat of planned rotational outages. Demand response is also widely regarded as having

  17. Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response Resources in Pacific Northwest Chuck Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory cagoldman@lbl.gov Pacific Northwest Demand Response Project Portland OR May 2, 2007 #12;Overview · Typology Annual Reports ­ Journal articles/Technical reports #12;Demand Response Resources · Incentive

  18. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

  19. Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response and Ancillary Services September 2008 #12;© 2008 EnerNOC, Inc. All Rights Reserved programs The purpose of this presentation is to offer insight into the mechanics of demand response and industrial demand response resources across North America in both regulated and restructured markets As of 6

  20. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study F. Rubinstein, S. Kiliccote Energy Environmental Technologies Division January 2007 #12;LBNL-62226 Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy

  1. Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling Energy Demand Aggregators for Residential Consumers G. Di Bella, L. Giarr`e, M. Ippolito, A. Jean-Marie, G. Neglia and I. Tinnirello § January 2, 2014 Abstract Energy demand aggregators are new actors in the energy scenario: they gather a group of energy consumers and implement a demand

  2. Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05 as a source of energy. Global supply and demand trends will have a profound impact on the ability to use our) Transportation energy demand in the U.S. has increased because of the greater use of less fuel efficient vehicles

  3. A Full Demand Response Model in Co-Optimized Energy and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been widely accepted that demand response will play an important role in reliable and economic operation of future power systems and electricity markets. Demand response can not only influence the prices in the energy market by demand shifting, but also participate in the reserve market. In this paper, we propose a full model of demand response in which demand flexibility is fully utilized by price responsive shiftable demand bids in energy market as well as spinning reserve bids in reserve market. A co-optimized day-ahead energy and spinning reserve market is proposed to minimize the expected net cost under all credible system states, i.e., expected total cost of operation minus total benefit of demand, and solved by mixed integer linear programming. Numerical simulation results on the IEEE Reliability Test System show effectiveness of this model. Compared to conventional demand shifting bids, the proposed full demand response model can further reduce committed capacity from generators, starting up and shutting down of units and the overall system operating costs.

  4. Sixth clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 2: Technical papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth Clean Coal Technology Conference focused on the ability of clean coal technologies (CCTs) to meet increasingly demanding environmental requirements while simultaneously remaining competitive in both international and domestic markets. Conference speakers assessed environmental, economic, and technical issues and identified approaches that will help enable CCTs to be deployed in an era of competing, interrelated demands for energy, economic growth, and environmental protection. Recognition was given to the dynamic changes that will result from increasing competition in electricity and fuel markets and industry restructuring, both domestically and internationally. Volume 2 contains 28 papers related to fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification for combined cycle power plants, the Liquid Phase Methanol Process, use of coal in iron making, air pollution control of nitrogen oxides, coke making, and hot gas cleanup.

  5. Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) is an emerging research field and an effective tool that improves grid reliability and prevents the price of electricity from rising, especially in deregulated markets. This paper introduces the definition of DR and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). It describes the Auto-DR technology utilized at a commercial building in the summer of 2006 and the methodologies to evaluate associated demand savings. On the basis of field tests in a large office building, Auto-DR is proven to be a reliable and credible resource that ensures a stable and economical operation of the power grid.

  6. Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable AutomatedDemand Response Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automating demand response (DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation and improved reliability and repeatability of the demand response and customer facilities. Automated DR systems have been deployed for critical peak pricing and demand bidding and are being designed for real time pricing. The system is designed to generate, manage, and track DR signals between utilities and Independent System Operators (ISOs) to aggregators and end-use customers and their control systems.

  7. Demand Response in the West: Lessons for States and Provinces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Larson; Matt Lowry; Sharon Irwin

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This paper is submitted in fulfillment of DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-015F22369 on the experience of western states/provinces with demand response (DR) in the electricity sector. Demand-side resources are often overlooked as a viable option for meeting load growth and addressing the challenges posed by the region's aging transmission system. Western states should work together with utilities and grid operators to facilitate the further deployment of DR programs which can provide benefits in the form of decreased grid congestion, improved system reliability, market efficiency, price stabilization, hedging against volatile fuel prices and reduced environmental impacts of energy production. This report describes the various types of DR programs; provides a survey of DR programs currently in place in the West; considers the benefits, drawbacks and barriers to DR; and presents lessons learned and recommendations for states/provinces.

  8. Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open,Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the technical and architectural issues associated with automating Demand Response (DR) programs. The paper focuses on a description of the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS), which is the main component used to automate the interactions between the Utilities and their customers for DR programs. Use cases are presented that show the role of the DRAS in automating various aspects of DR programs. This paper also describes the various technical aspects of the DRAS including its interfaces and major modes of operation. This includes how the DRAS supports automating such Utility/Customer interactions as automated DR bidding, automated DR event handling, and finally real-time pricing.

  9. Deployment of Behind-The-Meter Energy Storage for Demand Charge Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Simpson, M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates how economically motivated customers will use energy storage for demand charge reduction, as well as how this changes in the presence of on-site photovoltaic power generation, to investigate the possible effects of incentivizing increased quantities of behind-the-meter storage. It finds that small, short-duration batteries are most cost effective regardless of solar power levels, serving to reduce short load spikes on the order of 2.5% of peak demand. While profitable to the customer, such action is unlikely to adequately benefit the utility as may be desired, thus highlighting the need for modified utility rate structures or properly structured incentives.

  10. The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic retail pricing, especially real-time pricing (RTP), has been widely heralded as a panacea for providing much-needed demand response in electricity markets. However, in designing default service for competitive retail markets, demand response has been an afterthought, and in some cases not given any weight at all. But that may be changing, as states that initiated customer choice in the past 5-7 years reach an important juncture in retail market design. Most states with retail choice established an initial transitional period during which utilities were required to offer a default or standard offer generation service, often at a capped or otherwise administratively-determined rate. Many retail choice states have reached the end of their transitional period, and several have adopted or are actively considering an RTP-type default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. In most cases, the primary reason for adopting RTP as the default service has been to advance policy objectives related to the development of competitive retail markets. However, if attention is paid in its design and implementation, default RTP service can also provide a solid foundation for developing price responsive demand, creating an important link between wholesale and retail market transactions. This article, which draws from a lengthier report, describes experience to date with RTP as a default service, focusing on its role as an instrument for cultivating price responsive demand.1 As of summer 2005, default service RTP was in place or approved for future implementation in five U.S. states: New Jersey, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois. For each of these states, we conducted a detailed review of the regulatory proceedings leading to adoption of default RTP and interviewed regulatory staff and utilities in these states, as well as eight competitive retail suppliers active in these markets.

  11. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  12. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities The average baseline demand at the Southeast facility was approximately 4 MW. During the rainy season (October-March) the facility treated 40% more wastewater than the dry season, but demand only increased by 4%. Submetering of the facility's lift pumps and centrifuges predicted load shifts capabilities of 154 kW and 86 kW, respectively, with large lift pump shifts in the rainy season. Analysis of demand data during maintenance events confirmed the magnitude of these possible load shifts, and indicated other areas of the facility with demand response potential. Load sheds were seen to be possible by shutting down a portion of the facility's aeration trains (average shed of 132 kW). Load shifts were seen to be possible by shifting operation of centrifuges, the gravity belt thickener, lift pumps, and external pump stations These load shifts were made possible by the storage capabilities of the facility and of the city's sewer system. Large load reductions (an average of 2,065 kW) were seen from operating the cogeneration unit, but normal practice is continuous operation, precluding its use for demand response. The study also identified potential demand response opportunities that warrant further study: modulating variable-demand aeration loads, shifting operation of sludge-processing equipment besides centrifuges, and utilizing schedulable self-generation.

  13. Climate Leadership Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  14. GIS TRANSFORMATIONS Conference Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobler, Waldo

    GIS TRANSFORMATIONS Conference Presentation Waldo Tobler Geography Department University, line, area, or field phenomena, then the sixteen common classes of transformation are: point -> point (scalar, vector, tensor) data, to obtain eighty distinct possible classes of transformation. The common

  15. Alaska Rural Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Rural Energy Conference is a three-day event offering a large variety of technical sessions covering new and ongoing energy projects in Alaska, as well as new technologies and needs for...

  16. DOE 2014 Biomass Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

  17. AISES National Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AISES National Conference is a one-of-a-kind, three day event convening graduate, undergraduate, and high school junior and senior students, teachers, workforce professionals, corporate and...

  18. APS 2007 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation workshop (MASR 2007) (Aug. 26-30) Saskatoon, Canada 29th International Free Electron Laser Conference (FEL07) (Aug. 26-31) Novosibirsk, Russia SSRL LCLS Users' Meeting...

  19. APS 2004 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for NSLS-II. (Mar. 15) Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY The Third Asian Particle Accelerator Conference (APAC2004). (Mar. 22-26) Gyeongju, Korea 11th Beam Instrumentation...

  20. APS 2002 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Jun. 4-5) Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL NANO-7ECOSS-21. (Jun. 24-28) Malm, Sweden more >> American Conference on Neutron Scattering. (Jun. 23-27) Knoxville, TN APS...

  1. NAIHC 2015 Legislative Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the National American Indian Housing Council (NAIHC), the 20th Annual Legislative Conference offers Tribes a chance to take part in the decisions made by Congress and the Administration in Washington, D.C.

  2. Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Secure Demand Shaping for Smart Grid On constructing probabilistic demand response schemes. Developing novel schemes for demand response in smart electric gird is an increasingly active research area/SCADA for demand response in smart infrastructures face the following dilemma: On one hand, in order to increase

  3. Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    #12;2 #12;Patterns of crude demand: Future patterns of demand for crude oil as a func- tion schemes, and/or change quality of the feedstock (crude). Demand for crude oil is growing, especially perspective. This thesis aims pre- cisely at understanding the quality of oil from a demand side perspective

  4. Other utilities, not IPPs key concern for electric executives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Driscoll, M.

    1994-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolving competitive electric utility world is making executives more cautious and focused on their core businesses at the expense of high-profile issues like international investment, global warming, demand side management and electric and magnetic fields, a new survey shows. The 1994 Electric Utility Outlook, conducted by the Washington International Energy Group, also shows growing concern about utility-on-utility competition and a decline of the independent power producer threat, a growing but grudging acknowledgement of retail wheeling and increasing discomfort with nuclear power.

  5. The Role of Demand Resources In Regional Transmission Expansion Planning and Reliable Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigating the role of demand resources in regional transmission planning has provided mixed results. On one hand there are only a few projects where demand response has been used as an explicit alternative to transmission enhancement. On the other hand there is a fair amount of demand response in the form of energy efficiency, peak reduction, emergency load shedding, and (recently) demand providing ancillary services. All of this demand response reduces the need for transmission enhancements. Demand response capability is typically (but not always) factored into transmission planning as a reduction in the load which must be served. In that sense demand response is utilized as an alternative to transmission expansion. Much more demand response is used (involuntarily) as load shedding under extreme conditions to prevent cascading blackouts. The amount of additional transmission and generation that would be required to provide the current level of reliability if load shedding were not available is difficult to imagine and would be impractical to build. In a very real sense demand response solutions are equitably treated in every region - when proposed, demand response projects are evaluated against existing reliability and economic criteria. The regional councils, RTOs, and ISOs identify needs. Others propose transmission, generation, or responsive load based solutions. Few demand response projects get included in transmission enhancement plans because few are proposed. But this is only part of the story. Several factors are responsible for the current very low use of demand response as a transmission enhancement alternative. First, while the generation, transmission, and load business sectors each deal with essentially the same amount of electric power, generation and transmission companies are explicitly in the electric power business but electricity is not the primary business focus of most loads. This changes the institutional focus of each sector. Second, market and reliability rules have, understandably, been written around the capabilities and limitations of generators, the historic reliability resources. Responsive load limitations and capabilities are often not accommodated in markets or reliability criteria. Third, because of the institutional structure, demand response alternatives are treated as temporary solutions that can delay but not replace transmission enhancement. Financing has to be based on a three to five year project life as opposed to the twenty to fifty year life of transmission facilities. More can be done to integrate demand response options into transmission expansion planning. Given the societal benefits it may be appropriate for independent transmission planning organizations to take a more proactive role in drawing demand response alternatives into the resource mix. Existing demand response programs provide a technical basis to build from. Regulatory and market obstacles will have to be overcome if demand response alternatives are to be routinely considered in transmission expansion planning.

  6. The Role of Demand Response in Default Service Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Chuck; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic retail electricity pricing, especially real-time pricing (RTP), has been widely heralded as a panacea for providing much-needed demand response in electricity markets. However, in designing default service for competitive retail markets, demand response often appears to be an afterthought. But that may be changing as states that initiated customer choice in the past 5-7 years reach an important juncture in retail market design. Most states with retail choice established an initial transitional period, during which utilities were required to offer a default or ''standard offer'' generation service, often at a capped or otherwise administratively-determined rate. Many retail choice states have reached, or are nearing, the end of their transitional period and several states have adopted an RTP-type default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. Are these initiatives motivated by the desire to induce greater demand response, or is RTP being called upon to serve a different role in competitive markets? Surprisingly, we found that in most cases, the primary reason for adopting RTP as the default service was not to encourage demand response, but rather to advance policy objectives related to the development of competitive retail markets. However, we also find that, if efforts are made in its design and implementation, default RTP service can also provide a solid foundation for developing price responsive demand, creating an important link between wholesale and retail market transactions. This paper, which draws from a lengthier report, describes the experience to date with default RTP in the U.S., identifying findings related to its actual and potential role as an instrument for cultivating price responsive demand [1]. For each of the five states currently with default RTP, we conducted a detailed review of the regulatory proceedings leading to its adoption. To further understand the intentions and expectations of those involved in its design and implementation, we also interviewed regulatory staff and utilities in each state, as well as eight of the most prominent competitive retail suppliers operating in these markets which, together, comprised about 60-65% of competitive C&I sales in the U.S. in 2004 [2].

  7. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; John P. Hurley; Ted R. Aulich; Bruce C. Folkedahl; Joshua R. Strege; Nikhil Patel; Richard E. Shockey

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Center for Biomass Utilization (CBU�®) 2006 project at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) consisted of three tasks related to applied fundamental research focused on converting biomass feedstocks to energy, liquid transportation fuels, and chemicals. Task 1, entitled Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Syngas and Chemical Feedstocks, involved three activities. Task 2, entitled Crop Oil Biorefinery Process Development, involved four activities. Task 3, entitled Management, Education, and Outreach, focused on overall project management and providing educational outreach related to biomass technologies through workshops and conferences.

  8. Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in num- ber. Wind and solar power hold promise for some day in the future, but they are generally not cost effective today with the exception of remote, off-grid locations. They are also not the most reliable forms of electrical genera- tion. One...- tion of new technologies and/or changes in be- havior. This is generally acceptable to regu- lators and provides a means for the utilities to meet their requirement to provide reliable service to their customer base. At the same time, demand side...

  9. Tribal Leader Training Session: NCAI Conference | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Training Session: NCAI Conference Tribal Leader Training Session: NCAI Conference 111101NCAIpresentationfinal.pdf More Documents & Publications Key Renewable Energy...

  10. Avista Utilities- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

  11. Mississippi Public Utility Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Public Utility Act is relevant to any project that plans to generate energy. It requires that a utility must first obtain a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN)...

  12. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

  13. Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) StandardsControl for Automated Demand Response, Grid Interop, 2009. [C. McParland, Open Automated Demand Response Communications

  14. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability signals for demand response GTA HTTPS HVAC IT kWand Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems. ”and Techniques for Demand Response. California Energy

  15. Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Ed

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

  16. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

  17. Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goli, Sasank

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

  18. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

  19. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    advanced metering and demand response in electricityGoldman, and D. Kathan. “Demand response in U.S. electricity29] DOE. Benefits of demand response in electricity markets

  20. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

  1. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

  2. Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

  3. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, June Han

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fully Automated Demand  Response in Large Facilities.  Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.  Open Automated  Demand Response Communication Standards: 

  4. Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    description of six energy and demand management concepts.how quickly it can modify energy demand. This is not a newimprovements in both energy efficiency and demand response (

  5. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Institute, “Curbing Global Energy Demand Growth: The Energyup Assessment of Energy Demand in India Transportationa profound effect on energy demand. Policy analysts wishing

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: How a Grid Manager Meets Demand...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demand (Load) How a Grid Manager Meets Demand (Load) In the "historical" electric grid, power-generating plants fell into three categories: No daily electrical demand data plot...

  7. Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for IndustrialDR Strategies The demand-side management (DSM) frameworkpresented in Table 2. Demand Side Management Framework for

  8. SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY SAN ANTONIO SPURS DEMAND FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY As a city that experiences seasonal...

  9. LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in California. DEMAND RESPONSE AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGSload and demand response against other buildings and alsoDemand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings",

  10. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: demand response, buildings, electricity use, Interface  Automated Demand Response  Building Automation of demand response in  commercial buildings.   One key 

  11. Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Ed

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings,Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

  12. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, June Han

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand  Response for Small Commercial Buildings.   CEC?500?automated demand response  For small commercial buildings, AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE FOR SMALL COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

  13. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. Inbased demand response information to building controlDemand Response Standard for the Residential Sector. California Energy Commission, PIER Buildings

  14. Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is manual demand response where building staff receive acommercial buildings’ demand response technologies andBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

  15. Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: Demand response, automation, commercial buildings,Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings,Building Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.

  16. Electrical utilities relay settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HACHE, J.M.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Hanford transmission and distribution system relay settings that are under the control of Electrical Utilities.

  17. GSA- Utility Interconnection Agreements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  18. Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006Auto-DR Strategies and Commissioning One common questionConference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006

  19. Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

  20. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  1. How good is this conference? Evaluating conference reviewing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Paul

    of conference quality in the first instance. Simkin and Roychowdhury [2005] make one of many clear cases against

  2. Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

  3. Proceedings: 2002 EPRI International Low Level Waste Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize cost. EPRI's 11th annual International Low Level Waste (LLW) Conference--coupled with the 25th annual Radwaste Workshop cosponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and EPRI--offered valuable insights into this effort. Industry representatives presented papers covering new or improved technology developed worldwide for LLW management, processing, shipment, disposal, and regulation. This year, in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), foreign participation increased, with papers from Canada, Korea, Germany, Finland, Ukraine, Belgium, the Slovak Republic, and the United Kingdom expanding the conference scope.

  4. Proceedings: 2003 EPRI International Low Level Waste Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize cost. EPRI's Twelfth Annual International Low Level Waste (LLW) Conference--coupled with the 24th Annual ASME/EPRI Radwaste Workshop--offered valuable insights into this effort by presenting papers covering new or improved technology developed worldwide for LLW management, processing, shipment, disposal, and regulation. EPRI accomplished the conference planning in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In addition to the United States, international representatives from the IAEA, Korea, Hungary, Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Germany presented papers.

  5. Lead -- supply/demand outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnull, T. [Noranda, Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Japan goes--so goes the world. That was the title of a recent lead article in The Economist that soberly discussed the potential of much more severe global economic problems occurring, if rapid and coordinated efforts were not made to stabilize the economic situation in Asia in general, and in Japan in particular. During the first 6 months of last year, commodity markets reacted violently to the spreading economic problems in Asia. More recent currency and financial problems in Russia have exacerbated an already unpleasant situation. One commodity after another--including oil, many of the agricultural commodities, and each of the base metals--have dropped sharply in price. Many are now trading at multiyear lows. Until there is an overall improvement in the outlook for these regions, sentiment will likely continue to be negative, and metals prices will remain under pressure. That being said, lead has maintained its value better than many other commodities during these difficult times, finding support in relatively strong fundamentals. The author takes a closer look at those supply and demand fundamentals, beginning with consumption.

  6. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 -based demand controlled ventilation using ASHRAE Standardoptimizing energy use and ventilation. ASHRAE TransactionsWJ, Grimsrud DT, et al. 2011. Ventilation rates and health:

  7. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for demand controlled ventilation in commercial buildings.The energy costs of classroom ventilation and some financialEstimating potential benefits of increased ventilation

  8. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drivers of demand: urbanization, heavy industry, and risingdemand: urbanization, heavy industry, and rising income Theprocesses of urbanization, heavy industry growth, and rising

  9. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition in RegionsDemand Response into Wholesale Electricity Markets,” (URL:1 2. Wholesale and Retails Electricity Markets in

  10. Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    prices or when grid reliability is jeopardized. In regions with centrally organized wholesale electricity markets, demand response can help stabilize volatile electricity prices...

  11. Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 19, 2013 ... efficient linear programming formulation for the demand response of such a consumer who could be a price taker, industrial or commercial user ...

  12. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    peak demand management. Photo sensors for daylight drivenare done by local photo-sensors and control hardwaresensing device in a photo sensor is typically a photodiode,

  13. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in peak demand. This definition of energy efficiency makesthe following definitions are used: Energy efficiency refersThis definition implicitly distinguishes energy efficiency

  14. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rollout Scenario Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Rollout Scenario Analysis Presentation by Margo Melendez at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for...

  15. Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles...

  16. Natural Gas Demand Markets in the Northeast

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Providing a Significant Opportunity for New and Expanding Natural Gas Demand Markets in the Northeast Prepared for: America's Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Prepared by: Bentek...

  17. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

  18. Wastewater plant takes plunge into demand response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission and the Bonneville Power Administration, the Eugene-Springfield Water Pollution Control Facility in Eugene, Ore., was put through a series of demand response tests....

  19. Robust newsvendor problem with autoregressive demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    May 19, 2014 ... business decision problems, in fields such as managing booking and ...... Q? having available the demand historical records for t = 1, ..., T. 2.

  20. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Response Controls for HVAC Systems Clifford Federspiel,tests. Figure 5: Specific HVAC electric power consumptioncontrol, demand response, HVAC, wireless Executive Summary

  1. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the dispatch of flexible loads and generation resources bothof controllable generation and flexible demand. In the casecontrollable generation resources and flexible loads in the

  2. Telecommunications Audio Conference 800 # (Permanent)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to continue when leader disconnects from the call Yes No Conference Entry/Exit announces the entry and exit

  3. How One Utility is Building Industrial Consumer Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, D. E.

    HOW ONE UT1~ITY IS BUILDING INDUSTRIAL CONSUMER RELATIONSHIPS DONALD E. HAMILTON Manager-Industrial Services and Cogeneration Gulf States Utilities Company Beaumont, Texas COMPETITION AND THE UTILITY INDUSTRY The refining and petrochemical... in the eighties: depletion of old low cost oil and gas fields within the United States, the formation of OPEC, a run-up in oil and gas prices, leveling of demand in the petrochemical industry, the transfer of substantial wealth from industrial to oil...

  4. FINAL DEMAND FORECAST FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ......................................................................... 11 3. Demand Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts................................... 13 4. Demand Sylvia Bender Manager DEMAND ANALYSIS OFFICE Scott W. Matthews Chief Deputy Director B.B. Blevins Forecast Methods and Models ....................................................... 14 5. Demand-Side

  5. Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    meter. All smart meters are connected to not only the power grid but also a communication infrastructure. This allows two-way communication among smart meters and the utility company. We analytically model each user1 Advanced Demand Side Management for the Future Smart Grid Using Mechanism Design Pedram Samadi

  6. 66 IAEI NEWS January.February 2007 www.iaei.org inspectors demand more answers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    . In the utility-interactive PV system, with a listed inverter, the only source of currents or over cur- rents A series of articles on photovoltaic (PV) power systems and the National Electrical Code Inspectors Demand are fuses required in the dc wiring of a PV system? Answer: Fuses are generally required in the dc sec

  7. Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities:...

  8. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

  9. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  10. PERSONAL REFUND REQUEST Conference Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    PERSONAL REFUND REQUEST Conference Housing Please print the following information: First Name: Last/Mastercard # Amount of refund requested: If you did not make your payment directly to Conference Housing, you must). This is mandatory to receive a refund. Your request will be reviewed by the Conference Housing Manager for approval

  11. 40th Indian Law Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Bar Association is hosting the 40th Annual Indian Law Conference. This two-day conference focuses on the significant changes that have occurred in the relationship between Tribal Nations and the United States in the last four decades. The conference will cover several topics, including climate change, Indian Law, tribal courts, and more.

  12. The strategic use of renewables to achieve demand-side management impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Hauser, S.; Potter, T.; Westby, R.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to both the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), utilities in the United States are now spending about $2 billion per year on demand-side management (DSM) activities. By the year 2000, EPRI and EEI predict that utilities will be spending $10 to $15 billion per year on DSM. If this expenditure is matched by consumers, total expenditures -- $30 billion a year -- will equal what the nation spent on power plant construction during the peak 1970s power plant building era. Historically, DSM programs at utilities utilize technologies that reduce the demand for electricity and energy used by their customers. This is accomplished primarily by increasing the efficacy of lighting, improving the conversion efficiency of heating, cooling, and process equipment, and reducing thermal losses through the building envelope. A broader definition of DSM -- one that incorporates renewable energy resources -- will greatly enhance the opportunity to impact customer loads. Renewable energy technologies use resources that are not depleted, such as heat and light from the sun, the force of winds, falling water, biomass, and geothermal heat from the earth. As related to utility systems, renewable technologies can contribute in three main ways: (1) the more traditional ``supply-side`` role as central generating plants or independent power producers, (2) as distributed generation (supply-side variation), and (3) as demand-side options. Distributed generation is being seriously studied by several utilities as a means of serving remote loads and reducing transmission and distribution costs, but is not discussed further in this paper. Demand-side renewable technologies (DSR) are technologies that utilize renewable energy to reduce the end-use load of a customer. In this paper we will describe specific DSR options, characterize their potential load impact, and recommend a method for effectively integrating them into current DSM programs.

  13. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

  14. Satisfying winter peak-power demand with phased gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.H.; Moss, T.E.; Ravikumar, R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study, commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration, was to investigate application of this concept to the Pacific Northwest. Coal gasification combined-cycle (GCC) plants are receiving serious attention from eastern utilities. Potomac Electric (PEPCO) has engaged Fluor Technology to perform conceptual and preliminary engineering for a nominal 375-MW coal GCC power generation facility to be located in northern Montgomery County, Maryland. Other eastern utilities are engaged in site-specific investigations of satisfying future power requirements employing this alternative, which involves an environmentally superior method of using coal. Coal is combined with oxygen to produce a medium-heating-value fuel gas as an alternative to natural gas. The fuel gas, cleaned to remove sulfur compounds, is burned in gas turbine-generator sets. The hot exhaust gas is used to generate steam for additional power generation. The gasification combined cycle plant is highly efficient and has a high level of flexibility to meet power demands. This study provided background for consideration of one alternative for satisfying winter peak-load demand. The concept is feasible, depending on the timing of the installation of the gasification system, projections of the cost and the availability of natural gas, and restrictions on the use of natural gas. It has the advantage of deferring capacity addition and capital outlay until power is needed and economics are favorable.

  15. Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day-ahead hourly pricing. We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication, prioritization of demand response signals, and control methods. Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management and demand response capabilities of two commercial buildings in New York City. Preliminary results reveal that providing machine-readable prices to commercial buildings can facilitate both demand response participation and continuous energy cost savings. Hence, efforts should be made to develop more sophisticated algorithms for building control systems to minimize customer's utility bill based on price and reliability information from the electricity grid.

  16. Performance Assurance for Multi-Year Contracts Under the Utility Incentive Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 4-page fact sheet provides guidance for federal energy and facility managers on participation in utility programs for the management of electricity demand, and energy and water conservation.

  17. Impact of Industrial Electric Rate Structure on Energy Conservation - A Utility Viewpiont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the price of energy rises, changes in industrial electric rates will have an impact on energy usage and conservation. Utilities interested in reducing system peak demands may reflect this need in the rate structure as an incentive...

  18. Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Strategies for Aligning Program Demand with Contractor's Seasonal Fluctuations Better Buildings Neighborhood Program...

  19. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel electricity demands, and generation from these plantplants .. 47 Additional generation .. 48 Electricityelectricity demand increases generation from NGCC power plants.

  20. MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call February 4, 2011 -...

  1. In late 2005, ACM President David Patterson charged the Health of Conferences Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Mark D.

    for Discussing and Promoting Best Practices in Research Dealing with the demands of escalating paper submissions with the following task: [C]ollect the best practices onto a Web page so that conference organizers can see committee a (short) response to reviewer concerns. This practice has been used by such SIGs as SIGARCH

  2. International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2006 Building skills for the knowledge society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of highly-qualified staff, lack of new scientific equipment, etc. On the other side, a growing demandInternational Scientific Conference Computer Science'2006 Building skills for the knowledge society, and the focus on ICT and e-business skills, innovation and knowledge management in organizations. It highlights

  3. Proceedings: National conference on environmental externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the proceedings of the National Conference on Environmental Externalities. A environmental externality is the environmental impact of a process or a plant that society must endure. It is a social cost and is paid, but not by the company who produced it or the company`s customers who endure it. The main purpose of this report is to gather the many designs and ideas of how and why to internalize the externalities into the pricing systems of the public utility commissions, especially that of the electric utilities. Economic and sociological aspects of the internalization of these externalities are given in these proceedings. Individual papers are processed separately for databases. (MB)

  4. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  5. Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goli, Sasank; McKane, Aimee; Olsen, Daniel

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

  6. Conferences and Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submitCollector/Receiver CharacterizationConferenceConferences and

  7. SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SUMMER 2007 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY AND DEMAND OUTLOOK DRAFTSTAFFREPORT May ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B assessment of the capability of the physical electricity system to provide power to meet electricity demand

  8. Optimal Trading Strategy Supply/Demand Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    prices through the changes in their supply/demand.2 Thus, to study how market participants trade can have interesting implications on the observed behavior of intraday volume, volatility and prices: November 15, 2004. This Draft: April 8, 2006 Abstract The supply/demand of a security in the market

  9. INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    . It may also be implemented by means of customer-sited emergency power generation (e.g., diesel generators the case that distributed PV generation deserves a substantial portion of the credit allotted to demand response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page 1 Lead Author L. Alexander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9-2 Page #12;Proceedings of the Canadian Hydrographic Conference and National Surveyors Conference 2008 9

  11. Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems. Final Report of the Princeton Power Systems Development of the 100kW Demand Response Inverter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, Ward Isaac; Heavener, Paul (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Hammell, Darren (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Holveck, Mark (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, electric utilities, academic institutions and the private sector. Recognizing the need to diversify the nation's energy portfolio, the SEGIS effort focuses on specific technologies needed to facilitate the integration of large-scale solar power generation into the nation's power grid Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) awarded a contract to Princeton Power Systems, Inc., (PPS) to develop a 100kW Advanced AC-link SEGIS inverter prototype under the Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for near-term commercial applications. This SEGIS initiative emphasizes the development of advanced inverters, controllers, communications and other balance-of-system components for photovoltaic (PV) distributed power applications. The SEGIS Stage 3 Contract was awarded to PPS on July 28, 2010. PPS developed and implemented a Demand Response Inverter (DRI) during this three-stage program. PPS prepared a 'Site Demonstration Conference' that was held on September 28, 2011, to showcase the cumulative advancements. This demo of the commercial product will be followed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., certification by the fourth quarter of 2011, and simultaneously the customer launch and commercial production sometime in late 2011 or early 2012. This final report provides an overview of all three stages and a full-length reporting of activities and accomplishments in Stage 3.

  12. Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. 1996) ? Annual statewide electricity savings ($/yr) = MWh savings/yr x annual average electricity price ($/kWh)1 1U.S. DOE EIA (2011) Statewide Electricity and Demand Savings from the IECC Code in TX 11th ICEBO Conference Oct. 18 ? 20, 2011 9... Methodology (1/4) Building?Level Analysis ? Calculated ?per?house? energy savings and peak demand reductions ? ESL simulation model based on the DOE?2.1e of a single?family residence ? Two options by the type of heating fuel ? Electric/gas house...

  13. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  14. A DISTRIBUTED INTELLIGENT AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auslander, David; Culler, David; Wright, Paul; Lu, Yan; Piette, Mary

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the 2.5 year Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) project was to reduce peak electricity load of Sutardja Dai Hall at UC Berkeley by 30% while maintaining a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment for the occupants. We sought to bring together both central and distributed control to provide “deep” demand response1 at the appliance level of the building as well as typical lighting and HVAC applications. This project brought together Siemens Corporate Research and Siemens Building Technology (the building has a Siemens Apogee Building Automation System (BAS)), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (leveraging their Open Automated Demand Response (openADR), Auto-­Demand Response, and building modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless control, and grid-­to-­building gateway development). Sutardja Dai Hall houses the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), which fosters collaboration among industry and faculty and students of four UC campuses (Berkeley, Davis, Merced, and Santa Cruz). The 141,000 square foot building, occupied in 2009, includes typical office spaces and a nanofabrication laboratory. Heating is provided by a district heating system (steam from campus as a byproduct of the campus cogeneration plant); cooling is provided by one of two chillers: a more typical electric centrifugal compressor chiller designed for the cool months (Nov-­ March) and a steam absorption chiller for use in the warm months (April-­October). Lighting in the open office areas is provided by direct-­indirect luminaries with Building Management System-­based scheduling for open areas, and occupancy sensors for private office areas. For the purposes of this project, we focused on the office portion of the building. Annual energy consumption is approximately 8053 MWh; the office portion is estimated as 1924 MWh. The maximum peak load during the study period was 1175 kW. Several new tools facilitated this work, such as the Smart Energy Box, the distributed load controller or Energy Information Gateway, the web-­based DR controller (dubbed the Central Load-­Shed Coordinator or CLSC), and the Demand Response Capacity Assessment & Operation Assistance Tool (DRCAOT). In addition, an innovative data aggregator called sMAP (simple Measurement and Actuation Profile) allowed data from different sources collected in a compact form and facilitated detailed analysis of the building systems operation. A smart phone application (RAP or Rapid Audit Protocol) facilitated an inventory of the building’s plug loads. Carbon dioxide sensors located in conference rooms and classrooms allowed demand controlled ventilation. The extensive submetering and nimble access to this data provided great insight into the details of the building operation as well as quick diagnostics and analyses of tests. For example, students discovered a short-­cycling chiller, a stuck damper, and a leaking cooling coil in the first field tests. For our final field tests, we were able to see how each zone was affected by the DR strategies (e.g., the offices on the 7th floor grew very warm quickly) and fine-­tune the strategies accordingly.

  15. National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

  16. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  17. Utility Data Collection Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the utility data collection service and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Spring meeting, held on May 3-4, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.

  18. Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease...

  19. Utility Regulation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission enforces regulations in this legislation that apply to all individuals, corporations, companies, and partnerships that may own, operate, manage, or control...

  20. Utility Service Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any upgrade to utility service provides an opportunity to revisit a Federal building's electrical loads and costs, but it also may provide an economic way to bundle the upgrade with an onsite renewable electricity project during renovation. Upgrading utility service to the site may involve improving or adding a transformer, upgrading utility meters, or otherwise modifying the interconnection equipment or services with the utility. In some cases, the upgrade may change the tariff structure for the facility and may qualify the property for a different structure with lower overall costs. In all cases, the implementation of renewable energy technologies should be identified during the design phase.

  1. Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

  2. Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response as a resource.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demand Response This is the first of the Council's power plans to treat demand response the resource and describes some of the potential advantages and problems of the development of demand response. WHAT IS DEMAND RESPONSE? Demand response is a change in customers' demand for electricity corresponding

  3. Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport utilities metering, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.M.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed this report for the US Navy's Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island (NUWC). The purpose of the report was to review options for metering electricity and steam used in the NUWC compound, and to make recommendations to NUWC for implementation under a follow-on project. An additional NUWC concern is a proposed rate change by the servicing utility, Newport Electric, which would make a significant shift from consumption to demand billing, and what effect that rate change would have on the NUWC utility budget. Automated, remote reading meters are available which would allow NUWC to monitor its actual utility consumption and demand for both the entire NUWC compound and by end-use in individual buildings. Technology is available to perform the meter reads and manipulate the data using a personal computer with minimal staff requirement. This is not meant to mislead the reader into assuming that there is no requirement for routine preventive maintenance. All equipment requires routine maintenance to maintain its accuracy. While PNL reviewed the data collected during the site visit, however, it became obvious that significant opportunities exist for reducing the utility costs other than accounting for actual consumption and demand. Unit costs for both steam and electricity are unnecessarily high, and options are presented in this report for reducing them. Additionally, NUWC has an opportunity to undertake a comprehensive energy resource management program to significantly reduce its energy demand, consumption, and costs.

  4. Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport utilities metering, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.M.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed this report for the US Navy`s Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Rhode Island (NUWC). The purpose of the report was to review options for metering electricity and steam used in the NUWC compound, and to make recommendations to NUWC for implementation under a follow-on project. An additional NUWC concern is a proposed rate change by the servicing utility, Newport Electric, which would make a significant shift from consumption to demand billing, and what effect that rate change would have on the NUWC utility budget. Automated, remote reading meters are available which would allow NUWC to monitor its actual utility consumption and demand for both the entire NUWC compound and by end-use in individual buildings. Technology is available to perform the meter reads and manipulate the data using a personal computer with minimal staff requirement. This is not meant to mislead the reader into assuming that there is no requirement for routine preventive maintenance. All equipment requires routine maintenance to maintain its accuracy. While PNL reviewed the data collected during the site visit, however, it became obvious that significant opportunities exist for reducing the utility costs other than accounting for actual consumption and demand. Unit costs for both steam and electricity are unnecessarily high, and options are presented in this report for reducing them. Additionally, NUWC has an opportunity to undertake a comprehensive energy resource management program to significantly reduce its energy demand, consumption, and costs.

  5. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr. (eds.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  6. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Rockoff, Alexandra; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities for industrial refrigerated warehouses in California. The report describes refrigerated warehouses characteristics, energy use and demand, and control systems. It also discusses energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities and provides analysis results from three demand response studies. In addition, several energy efficiency, load management, and demand response case studies are provided for refrigerated warehouses. This study shows that refrigerated warehouses can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for open automated demand response (OpenADR) at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to OpenADR due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

  7. Climate Leadership Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted and organized by the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO), Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES), and the Climate Registry, the three-day conference will showcase how new business opportunities, current policies, technologies, climate solutions and energy transformation will drive our low-carbon future.

  8. Proceedings: Second Annual Pacific Northwest Alternative and Renewable Energy Resources Conference.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers presented at the conference are published in this volume. The purpose of the conference was to solicit regional cooperation in the promoting of near-term development of such alternative and renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest as: cogeneration; biomass; wind; small hydro; solar end-use applications; and geothermal direct heat utilization. Separate abstracts of selected papers were prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  9. Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to BPA, and mitigate critical peak periods #12;New Electric Utility Rate Design Time-of-Use Rate without participants? #12;NEW ELECTRIC UTILITY RATE DESIGN SCHEDULE Time-of-Use retail electric rate design · Rate

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Fellow at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used in management, disposal, and sale of coal-combustion by-Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF UNDER-UTILIZED COAL- COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete, bricks, blocks, and8 paving stones, Wisconsin. She is involved in management,11 disposal, and sale of coal-combustion by-products. She alsoCenter for By-Products Utilization UNDER-UTILIZED COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE ROADWAY

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

  17. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  18. FERC sees huge potential for demand response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FERC study concludes that U.S. peak demand can be reduced by as much as 188 GW -- roughly 20 percent -- under the most aggressive scenario. More moderate -- and realistic -- scenarios produce smaller but still significant reductions in peak demand. The FERC report is quick to point out that these are estimates of the potential, not projections of what could actually be achieved. The main varieties of demand response programs include interruptible tariffs, direct load control (DLC), and a number of pricing schemes.

  19. AMI Communication Requirements to Implement Demand-Response: Applicability of Hybrid Spread Spectrum Wireless

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    While holistically defining the smart grid is a challenge, one area of interest is demand-response. In 2009, the Department of Energy announced over $4 billion in grant and project funding for the Smart Grid. A significant amount of this funding was allotted to utilities for cost sharing projects to deploy Smart Grid technologies, many of whom have deployed and are deploying advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). AMI is an enabler to increase the efficiency of utilities and the bulk power grid. The bulk electrical system is unique in that it produces electricity as it is consumed. Most other industries have a delay between generation and consumption. This aspect of the power grid means that there must be enough generation capacity to meet the highest demand whereas other industries could over produce during off-peak times. This requires significant investment in generation capacity to cover the few days a year of peak consumption. Since bulk electrical storage doesn't yet exist at scale another way to curb the need for new peak period generation is through demand-response; that is to incentivize consumers (demand) to curtail (respond) electrical usage during peak periods. Of the various methods proposed for enabling demand-response, this paper will focus on the communication requirements for creating an energy market using transactional controls. More specifically, the paper will focus on the communication requirements needed to send the peak period notices and receive the response back from the consumers.

  20. A Survey of Utility Experience with Real Time Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While more than 70 utilities in the U.S. have offered voluntary RTP tariffs on either a pilot or permanent basis, most have operated in relative obscurity. To bring this broad base of experience to bear on policymakers current efforts to stimulate price responsive demand, we conducted a survey of 43 voluntary RTP tariffs offered in 2003. The survey involved telephone interviews with RTP program managers and other utility staff, as well as a review of regulatory documents, tariff sheets, program evaluations, and other publicly available sources. Based on this review of RTP program experience, we identify key trends related to: utilities motivations for implementing RTP, evolution of RTP tariff design, program participation, participant price response, and program outlook. We draw from these findings to discuss implications for policymakers that are currently considering voluntary RTP as a strategy for developing price responsive demand.