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1

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Small power systems study technical summary report. Volume II. Inventory of small generating units in U. S. utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Data identifying small (less than or equal to 10 MW) power units in the United States are tabulated. The data are listed alphabetically by state and are reported sequentially for investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electrical cooperatives and other utility systems. For a given utility system, the generating units are divided into steam turbines, diesel generators and gas turbines. The number and size of generating units are listed. A summary tabulation of the number of generating units of each type and total generating capacity by state is presented.

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Third Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Third Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 240 to 258, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,547 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 416 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Of the 258 signed contracts and committed projects, 83 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 779 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 38 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 797 MW to 848 MW, and 19 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 152 MW to 159 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 21, with a generating capability of 528 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 17 wind farm projects, totaling 257 to 262 MW. There are 94 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There are 50 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 112 MW, as well as 67 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E is planning to construct.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Evaluation Ratings Definitions (Excluding Utilization of Small...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(WOSB), HUBZone small business, veteran-owned small business (VOSB) and service disabled veteran owned small business (SDVOSB). Complied with FAR 52.219-8, Utilization of...

10

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

11

Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance Program Eligibility Commercial...

12

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Legislation enacted in 2009 directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a program offering green power as an option to residential and small commercial customers in the state. The PUC issued rules in October 2010 and issued an RFP. The PUC selected a company, 3 Degrees, to manage the statewide green power program for Maine's transmission and distribution territories. The program includes community-based renewable

13

Glendale Water and Power - Small Business Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Installation of Energy-Saving Upgrades: Free Glendale Water and Power offers incentives to small business...

14

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via ...  

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via Responsive Loads Technology Summary A new methodology for dynamically managing an electrical ...

15

Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 Asheville, NC April 1996 Donald E. OsbornDavid E. Collier Sacramento Municipal Utility...

16

Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) Small Power Production and Cogeneration (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Maine's Small Power Production and Cogeneration statute says that any small

17

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

18

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via Responsive ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent ... •Manufacturers of equipment sold to utilities to maximize the efficiency power generation More ...

19

Concentrating solar power technologies offer utility-scale power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) is a utility-scale renewable energy option for generating electricity that is receiving considerable attention in the southwestern ...

20

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Eligibility Construction InstallerContractor MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

22

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Municipal Power Start Date 01/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan with Lights: $15 Dehumidifier: $25 Select Clothes Washer: $50 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Furnace Fan with ECM: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $250 CFLs: up to 85% of cost Efficiency Smart (tm) provides energy efficiency incentives to the American

25

The Sacramento power utility experience in solar  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the development of three solar power technologies for use in Sacramento, California is provided. A central receiver power plant, Solar One, is being converted to a molten salt design with thermal energy storage by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and six other utilities. SMUD is also investigating a solar dish/sterling engine system and technologies to reduce photovoltaic conversion costs.

Smeloff, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Utilities expand baseload power plant plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the plans being made by electric utilities to expand the number of baseload plants to accommodate increasing power demands. The results of a survey of utility's construction plans is presented. The topics include current construction, construction planning in the Southeast, current baseload technology, nuclear potential, and incorporation of environmental externalities impact in planning.

Smock, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider SaskPower The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from SaskPower or for selling all of the power generated to SaskPower. At the beginning of the application process, you need to choose between one of two options: Sell all of the power you produce to SaskPower, or sell the

28

Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate T8 Fluorescent lights, electronic ballasts and controls: 5,000 Programmable thermostats: 800 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T8 Fluorescent lights, electronic ballasts and controls: 75% of the cost Refrigeration and A/C tune-up: free Programmable thermostats: free Expert energy survey: free Provider Anaheim Public Utilities The Small Business Energy Management System Program provides participating

29

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs (as of December 2012) Which utilities are having the greatest success with their green power programs? NREL has compiled extensive data on utility green power programs and produced the following "Top Ten" lists of program characteristics and results: total sales of renewable energy to program participants; total number of customer participants; customer participation rates; percentage of renewable energy in total retail sales; the lowest premium charged to support new renewables development; and utilities using at least two percent solar to supply their green pricing programs. Download Information Release: NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders Previous Top Ten Lists - December 2010, December 2009, December 2008, December 2007, December 2006, December 2005, December 2004, December 2003, December 2002, December 2001, June 2001, November 2000, April 2000

31

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities (Montana) Facilities (Montana) Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Interconnection Provider Montana Public Service Commission For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that: : (a) produces electricity by the use, as a primary energy source, of biomass, waste, water, wind, or other renewable resource, or any combination of those sources; or : (b) produces electricity and useful forms of thermal energy, such as heat

32

Small power systems study. Volume. Study results. Technical summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Division of Solar Technology of the Department of Energy is currently examining the market potential of a number of dispersed solar energy systems, including the small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) solar thermal power system. Small fossil-fueled generating units in the United States utility system, (i.e., investor-owned, municipal, and cooperatives) have a current capacity of approximately 8000 MW/sub e/ or about 1.5 percent of the total US electrical capacity, and provide a large potential market for small solar thermal power systems. The Small Power Systems Study has as its objective the determination of conditions under which small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) solar thermal power units can provide cost-effective electrical power to a variety of users. Potential users, in addition to the utility systems; include Department of Defense installations and applications, remote mining and/or lumbering operations, and other industrial power systems with and without cogeneration. The first year's results on the Small Power Systems Study are summarized. The data base used and the breakeven cost analysis are discussed. Information on both small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) generating units and the utility systems using them is presented as well as data on fossil fuel costs, solar plant costs, and solar insolation values. The results of a survey of Department of Defense (DOD) worldwide electrical generating capacity at its military bases and on a potential DOD application are presented. Information on a potential small solar power system experiment in the interior of Alaska is given, and a limited amount of information on a remote application which would provide power or a large open pit copper mine is presented. Volume II of this Technical Summary Report contains an inventory, by state, of the small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) generating units in the US utility system. (WHK)

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Small power systems study. Volume. Study results. Technical summary report  

SciTech Connect

The Division of Solar Technology of the Department of Energy is currently examining the market potential of a number of dispersed solar energy systems, including the small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) solar thermal power system. Small fossil-fueled generating units in the United States utility system, (i.e., investor-owned, municipal, and cooperatives) have a current capacity of approximately 8000 MW/sub e/ or about 1.5 percent of the total US electrical capacity, and provide a large potential market for small solar thermal power systems. The Small Power Systems Study has as its objective the determination of conditions under which small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) solar thermal power units can provide cost-effective electrical power to a variety of users. Potential users, in addition to the utility systems; include Department of Defense installations and applications, remote mining and/or lumbering operations, and other industrial power systems with and without cogeneration. The first year's results on the Small Power Systems Study are summarized. The data base used and the breakeven cost analysis are discussed. Information on both small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) generating units and the utility systems using them is presented as well as data on fossil fuel costs, solar plant costs, and solar insolation values. The results of a survey of Department of Defense (DOD) worldwide electrical generating capacity at its military bases and on a potential DOD application are presented. Information on a potential small solar power system experiment in the interior of Alaska is given, and a limited amount of information on a remote application which would provide power or a large open pit copper mine is presented. Volume II of this Technical Summary Report contains an inventory, by state, of the small (less than or equal to 10 MW/sub e/) generating units in the US utility system. (WHK)

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of advanced concept solar power plants. For conditions offor the operation of a solar power plant is very small.success or failure of the solar thermal power program may be

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RefrigeratorFreezer Recycling: 35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers....

36

Green Power Network: Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option A number of states have adopted policies requiring or encouraging electricity suppliers to offer green power options to consumers. This section provides summaries of these policies and links to the full text of the legislation or public utility commission rules. Connecticut Iowa Maine Minnesota Montana New Jersey New Mexico Oregon Vermont Virginia Washington Connecticut June 2003—On June 26, Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland signed a bill (SB 733) amending the state's Electric Restructuring Act and granting authority to the Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to require electric distribution companies to offer green power options. The legislation enables the DPUC to determine the terms and conditions of renewable energy or energy efficiency options, including the contract terms and the minimum percentage of electricity to be derived from renewable energy sources. The green energy options will be developed and implemented by third-party companies selected through a competitive bidding process.

37

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

38

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

39

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to:...

40

Solar thermoelectrics for small scale power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past two decades, there has been a surge in the research of new thermoelectric (TE) materials, driven party by the need for clean and sustainable power generation technology. Utilizing the Seebeck effect, the ...

Amatya, Reja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Small Commercial Appliance and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Program Info Funding Source Fort Collins Utilities and the Governor's Energy Office State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes washer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers. The appliance rebate program offers a $50 rebate for Energy Star rated clothes washers and $25 for Energy Star dishwashers. Applications for equipment rebates are available on the Fort Collins web site as well as at select local manufacturers and

42

Public Power & Utility, Inc. (New York) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc. (New York) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Power & Utility, Inc. Place New York Utility Id 56259 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

43

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

green-power program. A "significant portion" of the electricity sold by a utility as green power must be generated using qualifying renewables, including wind energy,...

44

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to purchase green power from any licensed retail supplier. For information about the green power utilities and suppliers in Virginia, see the Department of Energy, Energy...

45

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Jump to: navigation, search Several states require certain electric utilities to offer customers the option of buying electricity generated from renewable resources, commonly known as “green power.” Typically, utilities offer green power generated using renewable resources that the utilities own (or for which they contract), or they buy renewable energy credits (RECs) from a renewable energy provider certified by a state public utilities commission [1] Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 17) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active DEMEC - Green Power Program (Delaware) Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Delaware Municipal Utility Solar Water Heat

46

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Iowa Utilities Board All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not rate-regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), are required to offer green power options to their customers. These programs allow customers to make voluntary contributions to support the development of renewable energy sources in Iowa. Utilities must file their program plans and tariff schedules with the IUB; however, the filings for non-rate-regulated utilities are intended to be for informational purposes only. This policy

47

Slim Holes for Small Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

Finger, John T.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Slim Holes for Small Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

Finger, John T.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under...

50

The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

Wills, R.H. [Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

52

Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable technologies. This policy complements Colorado's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires municipal utilities serving more than 40,000 customers to use renewable energy and energy recycling to account for 10% of retail sales by 2020.

53

Small geothermal electric systems for remote powering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes conditions and costs at which quite small (100 to 1,000 kilowatt) geothermal systems could be used for off-grid powering at remote locations. This is a first step in a larger process of determining locations and conditions at which markets for such systems could be developed. The results suggest that small geothermal systems offer substantial economic and environmental advantages for powering off-grid towns and villages. Geothermal power is most likely to be economic if the system size is 300 kW or greater, down to reservoir temperatures of 100{degree}C. For system sizes smaller than 300 kW, the economics can be favorable if the reservoir temperature is about 120{degree}C or above. Important markets include sites remote from grids in many developing and developed countries. Estimates of geothermal resources in many developing countries are shown.

Entingh, Daniel J.; Easwaran, Eyob.; McLarty, Lynn

1994-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

54

GRR/Section 7-CA-d - CPCN for Small Power Plant Exemption | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-CA-d - CPCN for Small Power Plant Exemption GRR/Section 7-CA-d - CPCN for Small Power Plant Exemption < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-CA-d - CPCN for Small Power Plant Exemption 07CADCPCNForSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Public Utilities Commission Regulations & Policies General Order 131-D California Environmental Quality Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07CADCPCNForSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf 07CADCPCNForSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A public utility seeking to construct a new generation facility in excess

55

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Washington State Department of Commerce In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible renewables include wind, solar, geothermal, landfill gas, wave or tidal action, wastewater treatment gas, certain biomass resources, and "qualified hydropower" that is fish-friendly. Beginning January 1, 2002, each electric utility must inform its customers

56

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geothermal Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, 2010 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Citation U.S. Geothermal Inc.. 2010. Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement. Boise Idaho: (!) . Report No.: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Idaho_Public_Utilities_Commission_Approves_Neal_Hot_Springs_Power_Purchase_Agreement&oldid=682748"

57

Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho, Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program was initiated in conjunction with the restoration of three power generating plants in Idaho Falls, Idaho, following damage caused by the Teton Dam failure on June 5, 1976. There were many parties interested in this project, including the state and environmental groups, with different concerns. This report was prepared by the developer and describes the design alternatives the applicant provided in an attempt to secure the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license. Also included are correspondence between the related parties concerning the project, major design alternatives/project plan diagrams, the license, and energy and project economics.

Gleeson, L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number NA DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase...

59

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa Sandra Halvatzis and David Keyser National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-53187 November...

60

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Number of Customers" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "RV CSU Power II LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UTILITIES UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone (720) 962-7154 Email drake@wapa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone (706) 213-3823 Email annc@sepa.doe.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone (918) 595-6671 Email gary.bridges@swpa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 OREGON BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN POC Greg Eisenach Telephone (360) 418-8063 Email gaeisenach@bpa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB - PA POC Larry Sullivan

62

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers. This is a 28 percent decrease from the peak following the storm.

63

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers.

64

Planning Your First Wind Power Project: A Primer for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most U.S. utilities, wind power is a new technology they need to understand in order to evaluate its use in their systems. This primer addresses questions commonly asked by utilities and the issues to be considered in bringing a wind power plant on-line.

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider New Mexico Public Regulation Commission In addition to meeting the requirements of the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... renewables portfolio standard], New Mexico investor-owned utilities (IOUs) are required to offer a voluntary program for purchasing renewable energy to customers. The voluntary renewable tariff may also allow consumers to purchase renewable energy within certain energy blocks and by source of

66

Program on Technology Innovation: Distributed Photovoltaic Power Applications for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging PV technology brings significant opportunities for many stakeholders including electric utilities, electric customers, energy-service providers and PV equipment vendors. The opportunities for utilities range from owning and deploying various PV generation resources and related products to incentivizing other owners to install PV systems and technology that provide benefits to the power system. This technical update describes PV power system concepts that utilities may want to consider as they pl...

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Georgia Power - Small and Medium Scale Advanced Solar Initiative...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small and Medium Scale Advanced Solar Initiative (GPASI) (Georgia) Georgia Power - Small and Medium Scale Advanced Solar Initiative (GPASI) (Georgia) Eligibility Agricultural...

68

Power-grade butanol recovery and utilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an alternative to the traditional recovery systems, it was proposed in a previous publication that the n-butanol/acetone/ethanol fermentation products could be recovered as a power grade fuel blend and used directly as a fuel. This would affect a savings in process energy requirements because each chemical component would not have to be processed individually to technical grade purity. Further, some residual water could be tolerated in the fuel blend. To develop such a power grade fuel recovery scheme beyond the conceptual stage, the Energy Research and Resource Division of the Kansas Energy Office undertook a two-fold program to demonstrate and test a power grade butanol/acetone/ethanol fuel recovery system, and further to demonstrate the feasibility of using the fuel blend in a standard type engine. A development program was initiated to accomplish the following objectives: design and test an operational power grade butanol recovery plant that would operate at one liter per hour output; and test and assess the performance of power grade butanol in a spark ignition automotive engine. This project has demonstrated that recovery of a power grade butanol fuel blend is simple and can be accomplished at a considered energy advantage over ethanol. It was further demonstrated that such a power grade blend works well in a typical spark ignition engine.

Noon, R.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

NREL: News - NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

213 213 NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders Top 10 programs support more than 4.2 million MWh of voluntary green power June 5, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today released its assessment of leading utility green power programs. Under these voluntary programs, residential and commercial consumers can choose to help support additional electricity production from renewable resources - such as wind and solar - that diversify our nation's energy portfolio and protect our air and water. "Participating in utility green power programs allows consumers to support renewable energy above and beyond what utilities are procuring to comply with state renewable portfolio standards," NREL Analyst Jenny Heeter said. "These utilities are offering first-rate programs that give

70

Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report NRELTP-670-43532 August 2008 Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs Lori A. Bird and Karlynn S. Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

71

Power generating system and method utilizing hydropyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor transmission cycle is described which burns a slurry of coal and water with some of the air from the gas turbine compressor, cools and cleans the resulting low-Btu fuel gas, burns the clean fuel gas with the remaining air from the compressor, and extracts the available energy in the gas turbine. The cycle lends itself to combined-cycle cogeneration for the production of steam, absorption cooling, and electric power.

Tolman, R.

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Non-utility power generation continues to grow  

SciTech Connect

This article examines why the number of non-utility power plants is increasing. The topics include the impact of the changes to the Public Utility Holding Company Act, and bidding for capacity. It includes a look at Texaco's Puget Sound oil refinery and how its efficiency problems were solved using cogeneration including the need to improve energy balance and engineering of the plant. Grayling generating station (wood waste) and Kalaeloa cogeneration power plant (low sulfur fuel oil) are also discussed.

Smith, D.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Utility Response to Railroad Market Power: Assessment of Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal transportation is one of the largest and potentially least competitive costs of power generation. This report reviews possible strategies and recourse available to utilities to counter railroad market power. The implosion of the major carriers into just two major companies in the east and the west heralds an era of duopoly pricing for which no single solution presents itself, past strategies may no longer apply, and the prospect of burgeoning power transactions may offer surprisingly little help to ...

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING A SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A.J.Hunt, "Small Particle Heat Exchangers" Lawrence BerkeleyUtilizing A Small Particle Heat Exchanger ArIon]. Hunt AprilA SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER Arlon J. Hunt Lawrence

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

GRR/Section 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant Exception < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-CA-b - State Plant Commissioning Process, Small Power Plant Exception 07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Energy Commission Regulations & Policies California Code of Regulations, Title 20 - Public Utilities and Energy Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

77

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a dispersion of very small particles suspended is a gas toa dispersion of very small particles suspended in a gas to

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Hunt, "Small Particle Heat Exchangers" Lawrence Berkeleythe small particle heat exchanger is the desire to maximizethe effectiveness of a heat exchanger is propor- tional to

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Working Group Combined Heat and Power C.A. Skip Cofield October 16, 2012 Agenda * Southern Company * Combined Heat and Power (CHP) * Southern Company CHP * Utility Partnerships 2 Southern Company Overview Operating Companies: * Alabama Power * Georgia Power * Gulf Power * Mississippi Power Subsidiaries: * Southern LINC * Southern Nuclear * Southern Power * Southern Telecom 3 Retail Generating Units Wholesale Generating Units * 4.4 million customers * 43,500+ MW * 26,000+ employees * 120,000 square miles of retail service territory * 27,000 mi. of transmission lines * 3,700 substations * $17.7B in operating revenue * $2.2B in net income * $39.2B in market cap * $59.3B in assets * $13.5B annual op. expense 4 Southern Company Overview

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Small, Clean, Stable Fusion Power Plant ---- Inventor Samuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Clean, Stable Fusion Power Plant ---- Inventor Samuel A. Cohen This invention discloses improvements in magnetic fusion reactor design and operational modes that reduce...

82

Design Concept and Application of Small Nuclear Power Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outline of the recent design concepts and those features of the small nuclear power rector are described, including specifications, present design status, application and so on.

Minato, Akio [CRIEPI, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (CRINES) Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Research on a super-small-scale MHD power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a super-small-scale MHD power system, which can generate 4--10W pulse power with a plasma produced by an explosive or combustion as a working substance. Heat shielding material was made and tested, with the result that electrical insulation is desirable. This power generator can be used as an electrical power source of rocket or missile fuses.

He, Z.; Huam, L.Z.; Yao, F.G. (East China Inst. of Tech., Nanjing (China))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design, reliability/ availability, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples of some of the major factors which could impact the project developer and his economics, as well as discuss potential mitigation measures. Areas treated include wheeling, utility ownership interests, dispatchability, regulatory acceptance and other considerations which could significantly affect the plant definition and, as a result, its attendant business and financing structure. Finally, suggestions are also made for facilitating the process of integration with the electric utility.

Felak, R. P.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Globally Optimal Distributed Power Control for Nonconcave Utility Maximization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future wireless networks are expected to operate in dense environments where the system capacity is fundamentally limited by severe co-channel interference among neighboring links. Transmit-power control has been recently explored as an important interference-mitigation technique that aims to maximize a system efficiency metric, which is often measured by a system utility function. Optimal power control is known to be difficult to achieve, mainly because the optimization problem is in general highly non-convex. This problem had eluded researchers and remained open until our recent work [11], where a centralized optimal power control algorithm, referred to as MAPEL, is developed based on a monotonic optimization framework. However, there does not yet exist a distributed power control algorithm that achieves the global optimal solution for generic utility functions, although the distributed implementation is crucial for the wireless infrastructureless networks such as ad hoc and sensor networks. This paper fill...

Qian, Li Ping; Zhang,; Chiang, Mung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

Farhar, B. C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A NEW SOLAR THERMAL RECEIVER UTILIZING A SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of advanced concept solar power plants. For conditions offor the operation of a solar power plant is very small.success of the solar thermal electric power program rests on

Hunt, Arlon J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

91

Power Switches Utilizing Superconducting Material for Accelerator Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power switches that utilize superconducting material find application in superconducting systems. They can be used for the protection of magnets as a replacement for warm DC breakers, as well as for the replacement of cold diodes. This paper presents a comparison of switches made of various superconducting materials having transport currents of up to 600 A and switching times of the order of milliseconds. The switches operate in the temperature range 4.2-77 K and utilize stainless steel clad YBCO tape and MgB2 tape with a nickel, copper, and iron matrix. Results from simulations and tests are reported.

March, S A; Yang, Y; 10.1109/TASC.2009.2017890

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NET SYSTEM POWER: A SMALL SHARE OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in-state generation and electricity imports by fuel type. Each year, the gross-system-power mix it was calculated and allocated to different fuel types and renewable energy technologies. In addition to generating used to generate it. Fuel types include coal, natural gas, nuclear, and other fuels, such as distillate

93

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2007) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MW)a 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 577,636,840 65.9 2 Portland General Electricb Geothermal, biomass, wind 553,677,903 63.2 3 PacifiCorpcde Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 383,618,885 43.8 4 Florida Power & Lightb Biomass, wind, landfill gas, solar 373,596,000 42.6 5 Xcel Energyef Wind 326,553,866 37.3 6 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, landfill gas, small hydro, solar 275,481,584 31.4 7 Puget Sound Energye Wind, solar, biomass, landfill gas 246,406,200 28.1 8 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Wind 226,474,000 25.9 9 National Gridgh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 180,209,571 20.6

94

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis: Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Prepared under Task No. HY61.3620 Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006

95

COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Study on Reactive Power and Voltage Control of Power Grid with Small Hydropower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When it is in the wet season and the load is low, reactive power surplus and voltage rise are caused by high-efficiency power generation of small hydropower and load reduction in Linjiang region, Baishan city, JiLin province. These problems, which exist ... Keywords: small hydro power, vally load, reactive power balance, the rise in voltage, generator in leading power factor on operation

Yaopeng Bai; Lijie Xu; Wei Wang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Central station advanced power conditioning: technology, utility interface, and performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept is proposed for central station SPV power conditioning. It avoids heavy dc bus and extensive ac distribution, and so offers technical, cost, and efficiency advantages. Cost and efficiency comparisons with a more conventional approach, akin to that being implemented for the SMUD installation, are presented. Although the capital gains are not great, the simplification of site preparation and installation is considerable. The design used to generate data for this paper if fully compatible with utility transmission system requirements.

Wood, P.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Power quality - Utilities begin to set up monitoring networks  

SciTech Connect

The time of day at which power-quality problems occur, and their coincidence with other events on the electrical system, are two of the earliest clues to the source of the problem. Today, utilities are beginning to answer customer complaints by installing networks of power-monitoring devices and showing the customer how to use the data they supply. A monitoring network often provides the additional benefit of enabling an engineer to anticipate power-quality problems before the begin to affect production. Advanced electronic packaging allows power-quality monitors to perform three functions that originally required several different instruments: Transient recording and analysis; Harmonics analysis; and, Power measurement-including demand, kilowatt-hours, VArs, power factor, etc. There is a wide range of power-quality monitors on the market with a confusing array of capabilities. The problem is complicated by the frequent introduction of new models, designed to meet specific applications at the lowest possible cost. This paper describes the important features to look for, which include: sampling rate, peak detection, channels, communications, environmental capability, analysis, protocols, and portability. 3 figs.

Reason, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

UTILITY RESTRUCTURING Electric Utility Restructuring: What Does It Mean for Residential and Small Retail Consumers in Maine?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

poses both advantages and disadvantages to residential and small retail consumers in Maine. While electric restructuring in Maine has been thoughtfully developed, the basic question of whether electricity rates will be lower for the average consumer will remain uncertain for some time. This uncertainty is linked not only to Maine’s electricity rate bidding process but also to potentially oligopolistic national trends. In addition, whether individual consumers achieve savings in their electricity costs will be determined, in part, by their choice of electricity supplier. While some consumers may prefer a higher-cost supplier because of the value-added services that accompany that option, others may make no choice and, by default, receive the standard option—where rates are determined by the Maine Public Utilities Commission (MPUC). ? In this article, the authors describe the factors that initiated the push toward restructuring, the history of the enabling legislation, and relevant portions of the MPUC’s Consumer Education Program. To consumers, the authors emphasize the importance of aggregation—clusters of buying groups—and detail how the nature of open competition may affect them. In particular, they call attention to the additional services that may be provided by electricity suppliers. Finally, in discussing the implications of deregulation, they lay out the uncertainties that lie ahead for consumers, policymakers, and regulators as Maine opens itself up to competition in the electric power market.

Lewis Tagliaferre; Susan Greenwood

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Small power plant reverse trade mission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This draft report was prepared as required by Task No. 2 of the US Department of Energy, Grant No. FG07-89ID12850 Reverse Trade Mission to Acquaint International Representatives with US Power Plant and Drilling Technology'' (mission). As described in the grant proposal, this report covers the reactions of attendees toward US technology, its possible use in their countries, and an evaluation of the mission by the staff leaders. Note this is the draft report of one of two missions carried out under the same contract number. Because of the diversity of the mission subjects and the different attendees at each, a separate report for each mission has been prepared. This draft report has been sent to all mission attendees, specific persons in the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Lab., the California Energy Commission (CEC), and various other governmental agencies.

Not Available

1989-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Reference guide to small cogeneration systems for utilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers systems performance and cost data for selected smaller cogeneration systems, which are defined generally as those cogeneration systems in the range below 5 megawatts. The data presented in this guide are expected to be used in two main ways. First, the data can be used to extend the existing DEUS Computer Evaluation Model data base to the smaller cogeneration systems. Second, the data will serve as a general guide to smaller cogeneration systems for use by the utilities companies and others. The data pertain to the following cogeneration system: gas turbine with heat recovery boiler, back pressure and extraction/condensing steam turbine, combined cycle, internal combustion (reciprocating) engine, steam bottoming cycle using industrial process exhaust, and gas turbine topping cycle with standard industrial process steam generators. A no-cogeneration base case is included for comparison purposes.

Rodden, R.M.; Boyen, J.L.; Waters, M.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Dependence of delivered energy on power conditioner electrical characteristics for utility-interactive PV systems  

SciTech Connect

In a utility-interactive photovoltaic system, the electrical characteristics of the dc-to-ac power-conditioning unit (inverter) influence the quantity of electrical energy delivered by the system, and therefore, affect the user worth of the system. An analysis of the effect of relevant inverter electrical characteristics on the quantity of system-delivered energy is undertaken using computer simulations of system behavior. Significant conclusions are that: (1) the annual system performance advantage of maximum-power-point voltage tracking is small compared with fixed-dc-input voltage operation; (2) low levels of inverter ac-power consumption during times of zero insolation can significantly degrade system performance; (3) the effect of small changes in the array-to-inverter size ratio on the user worth of the system is small; and (4) most of the system energy is delivered at power levels greater than one-half of the nominal array rating, and consequently, the inverter low-power efficiency is less important than is its full-power efficiency. A formula that approximates the inverter annual throughput efficiency with only four laboratory measurements on the inverter is presented.

Rasmussen, N.E.; Branz, H.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Green Power Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2004) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MWa) 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas, small hydro 334,446,101 38.2 2 Portland General Electricb Existing geothermal, wind, small hydro 262,142,564 29.9 3 PacifiCorpcd Wind, biomass,solar 191,838,079 21.9 4 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Landfill gas, wind, small hydro, solar 176,774,804 20.2 5 Xcel Energy Wind 137,946,000 15.7 6 National Gridfgh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 88,204,988 10.1 7 Los Angeles Department of Power & Water Wind and landfill gas 75,528,746 8.6 8 OG&E Electric Services Wind 56,672,568 6.5 9 Puget Sound Energy Wind, solar, biogas 46,110,000 5.3 10 We Energiese Landfill gas, wind, small hydro 40,906,410 4.7

105

Georgia Power - Small and Medium Scale Advanced Solar Initiative (GPASI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Power - Small and Medium Scale Advanced Solar Initiative Georgia Power - Small and Medium Scale Advanced Solar Initiative (GPASI) (Georgia) Georgia Power - Small and Medium Scale Advanced Solar Initiative (GPASI) (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 03/01/2013 State Georgia Program Type Other Incentive Provider GPASI Project Manager '''''Note: The application process for the small and medium scale solar programs began on March 1, 2013 and will continue through March 11, 2013. If completed applications exceed program capacity limit of 45 megawatts (MW), a lottery will be conducted, with Georgia Public Service Commission

106

Connecticut Light & Power - Small ZREC Tariff | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Light & Power - Small ZREC Tariff Connecticut Light & Power - Small ZREC Tariff Connecticut Light & Power - Small ZREC Tariff < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info Funding Source RPS Start Date 01/08/2013 State Connecticut Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $164.22 per ZREC Provider Connecticut Light and Power Note: The 2013 application period has closed. In July 2011, Connecticut enacted legislation amending the state's [http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT04R&re... Renewables Portfolio Standard] (RPS) and creating two new classes of

107

Opportunities for Small Biomass Power Systems. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to provide information to key stakeholders and the general public about biomass resource potential for power generation. Ten types of biomass were identified and evaluated. The quantities available for power generation were estimated separately for five U.S. regions and Canada. A method entitled ''competitive resource profile'' was used to rank resources based on economics, utilization, and environmental impact. The results of the analysis may be used to set priorities for utilization of biomass in each U.S. region. A review of current biomass conversion technologies was accomplished, linking technologies to resources.

Schmidt, D. D.; Pinapati, V. S.

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Opportunities for Small Biomass Power Systems. Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to provide information to key stakeholders and the general public about biomass resource potential for power generation. Ten types of biomass were identified and evaluated. The quantities available for power generation were estimated separately for five U.S. regions and Canada. A method entitled ''competitive resource profile'' was used to rank resources based on economics, utilization, and environmental impact. The results of the analysis may be used to set priorities for utilization of biomass in each U.S. region. A review of current biomass conversion technologies was accomplished, linking technologies to resources.

Schmidt, D. D.; Pinapati, V. S.

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

Pleva, E. F. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Mehrotra, V. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 2009 December 2009 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2009) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (aMW)a 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 764,895,830 87.3 2 Portland General Electricb Wind, biomass, geothermal 740,880,487 84.6 3 PacifiCorpcde Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 578,744,080 66.1 4 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districtc Wind, hydro, biomass, solar 377,535,530 43.1 5 Xcel Energycf Wind, solar 374,296,375 42.7 6 Puget Sound Energycg Wind, landfill gas, biomass, small hydro, solar 303,046,167 34.6 7 Connecticut Light and Power/ United Illuminating Wind, hydro 197,458,734 22.5 8 National Gridh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 174,536,130 19.9 9 Public Service Company of New Mexico Wind 173,863,751 19.8

111

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Utility interface requirements for a solar power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study specifies that the southern tier of the US (south of the 36th parallel) should be examined to see what problems might develop with the installation of a Satellite Power System (SPS) in the year 2000. One or more 5-GW SPS units could be installed in the utility systems of the southern states in the year 2000. The 345- and 500-kV transmission systems that will probably exist at that time could be readily extended to accommodate the SPS units. The operation of the units will present the utilities with new and difficult problems in system stability and frequency control. The problems will arise because a somewhat variable 5-GW output will be produced by a generator having no mechanical inertia. The unavoidable time lag in controlling the position of the energy beam at the receiving station may have a very critical effect on the stability of the utility systems. The maintenance problems associated with the energy-receiving device, a continuous structure covering more than 40 mi/sup 2/, must be given careful consideration. Repair of lightning damage while maintaining SPS operation may be the most critical requirement. Acquisition and preparation of the 90 mi/sup 2/ land required for the receiving antenna (rectenna) will create many new and difficult environmental problems.

Donalek, P.J.; Whysong, J.L.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller propose to utilize solar power in wireless sensor networks, establishing a topology where ­ changing over show that both protocols provide significant energy savings when utilizing solar power. The paper shows

Voigt, Thiemo

116

Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors  

SciTech Connect

Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicates but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat.

Trauger, D.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Green Power Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2005) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MWa) 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 435,140,739 49.7 2 Portland General Electricb Existing geothermal and hydro, wind 339,577,170 38.8 3 PacifiCorpcd Wind, biomass, solar 234,163,591 26.7 4 Florida Power & Light Biomass, wind, solar 224,574,530 25.6 5 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, landfill gas, small hydro, solar 195,081,504 22.3 6 Xcel Energyef Wind 147,674,000 16.9 7 National Gridghi Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 127,872,457 14.6 8 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Wind 113,957,000 13.0 9 Puget Sound Energy Wind, solar, biogas 71,341,000 8.1 10 OG&E Electric Services Wind 63,591,526 7.3

120

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Green Power Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2006) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MWa) 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 580,580,401 66.3 2 Portland General Electricb Existing geothermal and hydro, wind 432,826,408 49.4 3 Florida Power & Light Landfill gas, biomass, wind, solar 302,792,000 34.6 4 PacifiCorpcd Wind, biomass, solar 299,862,690 34.2 5 Xcel Energyef Wind 236,505,718 27.0 6 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Wind 217,427,000 24.8 7 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, landfill gas,small hydro 216,476,278 24.7 8 National Gridghi Biomass, wind,small hydro, solar 156,447,869 17.9 9 OG&E Electric Services Wind 134,553,920 15.4 10 Puget Sound Energy Wind, solar, biogas 131,742,000 15.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SMALL POWER REACTOR PROJECTS OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

SciTech Connect

Information on small power reactor projects of the USAEC is summarized. General information concerning the projects as a whole is given. Specific projects discussed include: the Elk River Power Reactor, the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, the BONUS Power Reactor, the Pathfinder Power Reactor, the small-size pressurized water power reactor, and the experimental low-power process heat reactor. (M.C.G.)

1961-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest New Crop (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop is a trifold brochure that strives to educate rural landowners and rural co-op utilities about the benefits of wind power development. It provides examples of rural utilities that have successful wind energy projects and supportive statements from industry members.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Solar thermal small power systems study, program summary report. Phase II: study results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase II Study of small solar power systems (SSPS) has been structured to determine conditions under which SSPS can be cost-effective sources of electric power in the US in the period 1985 to 2015. An extensive data base, which provides a discrete identification of all utility and industrial electric generating units up to and including 10 MW/sub e/ in rated capacity, has been prepared. This data base defines the market for which comparative evaluations are made of SSPS and alternative fossil-fueled power plants. The market penetration of SSPS is determined and the effect of economic incentives on accelerating the penetration is evaluated. The solar electric power system is evaluated as either a complete replacement for existing conventional electric power systems or as a repowering installation for boilers supplying steam to turbine-driven generators. The cost data used in the market penetration analysis are for a central receiver-type of small solar theral power system. While the market penetration discussed herein is for this type of SSPS, the sensitivity data in the report can be used to determine the market penetration of other types of solar thermal power systems (e.g., point focus distributed receiver) with different system costs.

Lapedes, D.E.; Munjal, P.K.; Sitney, L.R.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

124

DESIGN STUDY OF SMALL BOILING REACTORS FOR POWER AND HEAT PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

A design study has been made of a small "Package" nuclear power plant for the production of electric power and heat in remotely located, inaccessible areas devoid of natural fuels. The design utilizes a horizontal boiling reactor as a steam generator consistent with safe and simple equipment and a minimum building height. A reactor design of 51/2 Mw capacity, with a combined net electric power output of 750 kw and a heat plant output of 4500 kw, was studied in detail. Tertative cost estimates are presented on the basis of this combination. General comparisons have been made between different systems designed for either independent or combined production of 425 kw net electric power and 2500 kw available heat. (auth)

Treshow, M.

1954-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Superconducting magnetic energy storage applications and benefits for electric utility power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large SMES units are being studied for electric utility applications as diurnal, load-curve leveling and as transient stabilizer units. Such SMES units show promise of providing greater operating flexibility than pumped-hydro or other types of energy storage. This operating flexibility, together with its fast response capability to provide transient and dynamic stabilization benefits to a power system, are discussed. Small SMES units are being designed for dynamic stability applications on electric power systems for use when negatively damped system operating conditions are encountered. The 30-MJ, 10-MW SMES dynamic-stabilizer design is presented; and the status of the component development and fabrication contracts which have been placed with commercial manufacturers is discussed.

Turner, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Program on Technology Innovation: Review of EPRI Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirement Document to Include Small Modular Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a limited scope assessment to better understand what areas of the current EPRI advanced light water reactor (ALWR) Utility Requirement Document (URD) should be modified to ensure that the document is applicable to light water small modular reactors (LWSMRs). The LWSMRs differ from current light water reactors in that LWSMRs are significantly smaller than existing plants and utilize revolutionary design and construction strategies.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

128

Optimal site selection and sizing of distributed utility-scale wind power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As electric market product unbundling occurs, sellers in the wholesale market for electricity will find it to their advantage to be able to specify the quantity of electricity available and the time of availability. Since wind power plants are driven by the stochastic nature of the wind itself, this can present difficulties. To the extent that an accurate wind forecast is available, contract deviations, and therefore penalties, can be significantly reduced. Even though one might have the ability to accurately forecast the availability of wind power, it might not be available during enough of the peak period to provide sufficient value. However, if the wind power plant is developed over geographically disperse locations, the timing and availability of wind power from these multiple sources could provide a better match with the utility`s peak load than a single site. There are several wind plants in various stages of planning or development in the US. Although some of these are small-scale demonstration projects, significant wind capacity has been developed in Minnesota, with additional developments planned in Wyoming and Iowa. As these and other projects are planned and developed, there is a need to perform analysis of the value of geographically diverse sites on the efficiency of the overall wind plant. In this paper, the authors use hourly wind-speed data from six geographically diverse sites to provide some insight into the potential benefits of disperse wind plant development. They provide hourly wind power from each of these sites to an electric reliability simulation model. This model uses generating plant characteristics of the generators within the state of Minnesota to calculate various reliability indices. Since they lack data on wholesale power transactions, they do not include them in the analysis, and they reduce the hourly load data accordingly. The authors present and compare results of their methods and suggest some areas of future research.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Uses and Applications of Climate Forecasts for Power Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uses and potential applications of climate forecasts for electric and gas utilities were assessed 1) to discern needs for improving climate forecasts and guiding future research, and 2) to assist utilities in making wise use of forecasts. In-...

Stanley A. Changnon; Joyce M. Changnon; David Changnon

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

132

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales" Sales" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Sales (Megawatthours)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",33463,".",33463 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",6883,".",6883 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1820,".",".",1820 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",9651,".",".",9651

133

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue" Revenue" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Revenue (thousand dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1735,".",1735 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",798,".",798 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",243,".",".",243 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",603,".",".",603

134

Small-scale AFBC hot air gas turbine power cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the Will-Burt Company (W-B) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully developed and completed pilot plant tests on a small scale atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. This system can be used to generate electricity, and/or hot water, steam. Following successful pilot plant operation, commercial demonstration will take place at Cedar Lane Farms (CLF), near Wooster, Ohio. The system demonstration will be completed by the end of 1995. The project is being funded through a cooperative effort between the DOE, EER, W-B, OARDC, CLF and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO). The small scale AFBC, has no internal heat transfer surfaces in the fluid bed proper. Combining the combustor with a hot air gas turbine (HAGT) for electrical power generation, can give a relatively high overall system thermal efficiency. Using a novel method of recovering waste heat from the gas turbine, a gross heat rate of 13,500 Btu/kWhr ({approximately}25% efficiency) can be achieved for a small 1.5 MW{sub e} plant. A low technology industrial recuperation type gas turbine is used that operates with an inlet blade temperature of 1,450 F and a compression ratio of 3.9:1. The AFBC-HAGT technology can be used to generate power for remote rural communities to replace diesel generators, or can be used for small industrial co-generation applications.

Ashworth, R.A. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Orrville, OH (United States); Keener, H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center; Hall, A.W. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Solar Thermal Small Power Systems Study. Inventory of US industrial small electric power generating systems. [Less than 10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This inventory of small industrial electric generating systems was assembled by The Aerospace Corporation to provide a data base for analyses being conducted to estimate the potential for displacement of these fossil-fueled systems by solar thermal electric systems no larger than 10 MW in rated capacity. The approximately 2100 megawatts generating capacity of systems in this category constitutes a potential market for small solar thermal and other solar electric power systems. The sources of data for this inventory were the (former) Federal Power Commission (FPC) Form 4 Industrial Ledger and Form 12-C Ledger for 1976. Table 1 alphabetically lists generating systems located at industrial plants and at Federal government installations in each of the 50 states. These systems are differentiated by type of power plant: steam turbine, diesel generator, or gas turbine. Each listing is designated as a power system rather than a power unit because the FPC Ledgers do not provide a means of determining whether more than one unit is associated with each industrial installation. Hence, the user should consider each listing to be a system capacity rating wherein the system may consist of one or more generating units with less than 10 MW/sub e/ combined rating. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart™ provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

137

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Residential Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart ™ provides energy efficiency incentives to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. Efficiency Smart assists residential, commercial , and...

138

AFBC-HAGT, an efficient small scale power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A team comprised of the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), the Will-Burt Company, and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC) designed installed and tested a pilot scale atmospheric fluidized (bubbling) bed combustion (AFBC) system to heat hot water. Following testing, a commercial prototype unit was installed at Cedar Lane Farms (CLF), near Wooster, Ohio. The unit was started up in January, 1995, and is currently in operation. It provides hot water for greenhouse heating, requiring about two hours per day of operator attention. The development was funded by the Ohio Coal Development Office, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the team members. Based on the success of the prototype operation a commercial size unit was recently designed for hot water heating use. This small scale AFBC system can be designed not only to produce hot water or steam but also to efficiently generate electricity (60 kWe to 3.5 MWe size range). Most small scale fluidized bed systems use in-bed heat transfer tubes to generate saturated steam which can then be superheated and fed to a steam turbine for electrical power generation. This AFBC has no internal heat transfer surfaces. It can be combined with an air heater that is integrated with a recuperated Hot Air Gas Turbine (HAGT), to yield a more efficient power plant than that possible with small steam plants of comparable size that have optimal gross efficiencies of about 12% (29,060 Btu/kWhr). Depending on ambient air temperature, this AFBC-HAGT power cycle can reach efficiencies of 28% without auxiliary diesel fuel oil firing. The system is ideally suited for rural communities that are not tied into an electric power grid. It is low tech, easy to operate, provides approximately double the efficiency of small steam cycle power plants, and can be used in areas where water is scarce. When firing local coal and/or bio-mass it can be very cost effective compared to diesel power generation.

Ashworth, R.A. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Orrville, OH (United States); Webner, R.L. [Will-Burt Company, Orrville, OH (United States); Keener, H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Reti attive di distribuzione: le applicazioni Virtual Power Plant e Virtual Utility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Il presente lavoro si occupa di nuove applicazioni per la gestione e l’ottimizzazione di risorse distribuite, cosě dette Virtual Power Plant (VPP) o Virtual Utility… (more)

Baroncelli, Paolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Delimiting “Thunderstorm Watch” Periods by Real-Time Lightning Location for a Power Utility Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During times of thunderstorm activity, the power utility serving metropolitan New York enters a potentially costly “thunderstorm watch” mode of operation which is designed to prevent a major power outage caused by lightning. To evaluate the ...

Vincent P. Idone; Richard E. Orville

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES [1] American Wind Power Association (AWEA), Road-CHOICE FOR SMALL-SCALE WIND POWER UNDER UNCERTAINTY Stein-Power production from wind power has stochastic inflows, and

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project October 31, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced a new concentrating solar power (CSP) project led by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The project will integrate utility-scale CSP technology with SMUD's 500-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired Cosumnes Power Plant. Supported by a $10 million Energy Department investment, this project will help design, build and test cost-competitive CSP-fossil fuel power generating systems in the United

144

Design & optimization of automotive power electronics utilizing FITMOS MOSFET technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power electronics are essential to many automotive applications, and their importance continues to grow as more vehicle functions incorporate electronic controls. MOSFETs are key elements in automotive power electronic ...

Li, Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Solar two: Utility-scale power from the sun  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented on the Solar Two solar-powered electric generating plant located east of Barstow California.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M. Misakian, TL Nelson and WE Feero. Regarding Electric Energy Savings, Power Factors, and Carbon Footprints: A Primer. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

148

Assessment and design of small-scale hydro-electric power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Appraisal and design of small-scale hydro power plants requires a knowledge of hydraulics, hydrology, civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering, and basic economics. Further, small hydro… (more)

Jones, ID

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Interruptible Power Rates and Their Role in Utility Distributed Resources Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-site generators installed primarily for use during power outages represent a significant distributed resource (DR). These generators can be readily incorporated into power markets through existing "interruptible" rate structures where customers agree to reduce the electrical demand (on the utility) for specified periods. The extent to which utilities have adopted and/or encouraged interruptible rates is the subject of this report.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dynamic simulation of a solar-driven carbon dioxide transcritical power system for small scale combined heat and power production  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide is an environmental benign natural working fluid and has been proposed as a working media for a solar-driven power system. In the current work, the dynamic performance of a small scale solar-driven carbon dioxide power system is analyzed by dynamic simulation tool TRNSYS 16 and Engineering Equation Solver (EES) using co-solving technique. Both daily performance and yearly performance of the proposed system have been simulated. Different system operating parameters, which will influence the system performance, have been discussed. Under the Swedish climatic condition, the maximum daily power production is about 12 kW h and the maximum monthly power production is about 215 kW h with the proposed system working conditions. Besides the power being produced, the system can also produce about 10 times much thermal energy, which can be used for space heating, domestic hot water supply or driving absorption chillers. The simulation results show that the proposed system is a promising and environmental benign alternative for conventional low-grade heat source utilization system. (author)

Chen, Y.; Lundqvist, Per [Div. of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Pridasawas, Wimolsiri [King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Small break LOCA analysis for Maanshan nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

Since 1990, Taiwan Power Company has conducted a LWR LOCA technology transfer program on RELAP5YA computer code from Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC). One objective of this program is to acquire the RELAP5YA computer code from YAEC for Taipower in-house licensing analysis. The RELAP5YA is a computer program developed at YAEC for analysing the dynamic behaviour of thermal-hydraulic systems, and it can cover most of the postulated accidents and transients in light water reactor systems. In this paper, Taipower`s engineers have performed a small break loss of coolant accidents analysis for Maanshan nuclear power plant. Thais action is used to perform the licensing actions for increasing the operation margin on the steam generator tube plugging. The result is shown that the steam generator tube can be plugged slightly without a reduction in safety margins. This analysis covers a spectrum of break size for a small break LOCA. For a complete spectrum of the transient and accident analysis, the large break LOCA and the non-LOCA analysis were performed by the fuel vendor for the reload safety evaluation.

Jer-Cherng Kang; Shou-Chuan Chiang; Lang-Chen Wang [Taiwan Power Company, Taipei (China)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy-based analysis of utility scale hybrid power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The promise of large-scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for supplying electrical power is tempered by the sources' transient behavior and the… (more)

Agyenim-Boateng, Kwame

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing...

154

Novel Power Cycle for Combined-Cycle Systems and Utility Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The description of a new power cycle, based on the use of a multicomponent working fluid, was published earlier. A thermodynamic analysis of this cycle has demonstrated its superiority over the currently used Rankine Cycle, and a distribution of losses in the subsystems of this cycle has been established. A new, improved variant of the cycle, which provides 10% efficiency improvement over the initial variant, has been developed. The new variant employs a cooling of the working fluid between turbine stages and a recuperation of the released heat for supplementation of the boiler heat supply. Analysis shows that with this new, improved cycle efficiencies of up to 52% for a combined-cycle system employing standard turbines, and of up to 55% when modern high-temperature gas turbines are employed, can be achieved. The same cycle can be utilized to retrofit existing direct-fired power plants, providing an efficiency of up to 42%. The possible implications off such a cycle implementation are briefly discussed. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is now conducting a study of this cycle.

Kalina, A. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Utility-Scale Power Router: Dynamic Control of Grid Assets Using Direct AC Converter Cells  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Georgia Tech is developing a cost-effective, utility-scale power router that uses an enhanced transformer to more efficiently direct power on the grid. Existing power routing technologies are too expensive for widespread use, but the ability to route grid power to match real-time demand and power outages would significantly reduce energy costs for utilities, municipalities, and consumers. Georgia Tech is adding a power converter to an existing grid transformer to better control power flows at about 1/10th the cost of existing power routing solutions. Transformers convert the high-voltage electricity that is transmitted through the grid into the low-voltage electricity that is used by homes and businesses. The added converter uses fewer steps to convert some types of power and eliminates unnecessary power storage, among other improvements. The enhanced transformer is more efficient, and it would still work even if the converter fails, ensuring grid reliability.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Wireless Product Applications for Utilities: Technical Services for Power Utilities in Wireless Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless technology applications are abundant, with products and services ranging from two-way paging to Personal Communications Services (PCS) to low cost satellite data transmission. With this in mind, utilities are encouraged to develop relationships and business arrangements with telecommunication companies--relationships that can benefit both industries. These arrangements promise to streamline utility operations and, in selected cases, create new businesses and provide sources of revenue for utilit...

1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

157

Feasibility of Utility-Provided Uninterruptible DC Power for Telecommunication Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing uninterruptible power to the telecommunication industry is a natural fit for the expertise of the electric utility industry and represents a significant opportunity for revenue growth. This report analyzes the power requirements for different sectors of the telecommunication industry and examines existing and emerging technologies for providing uninterruptible power.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant Field Verification Projects: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory issued a Request for Proposal for the construction of small-scale (300 kilowatt [kW] to 1 megawatt [MW]) geothermal power plants in the western United States. Five projects were selected for funding. Of these five, subcontracts have been completed for three, and preliminary design work is being conducted. The three projects currently under contract represent a variety of concepts and locations: a 1-MW evaporatively enhanced, air-cooled binary-cycle plant in Nevada; a 1-MW water-cooled Kalina-cycle plant in New Mexico; and a 750-kW low-temperature flash plant in Utah. All three also incorporate direct heating: onion dehydration, heating for a fish hatchery, and greenhouse heating, respectively. These projects are expected to begin operation between April 2002 and September 2003. In each case, detailed data on performance and costs will be taken over a 3-year period.

Kutscher, C.

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) (Redirected from Burbank Water and Power) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery

160

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scott Distributed power generation (New York, Marcel Dekker,the renewable share of power generation. The American Windin small-scale wind power generation, as well as the choice

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Small-Scale Power Spectrum of Cold Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the best motivated hypotheses in cosmology states that most of the matter in the universe is in the form of weakly-interacting massive particles that decoupled early in the history of the universe and cooled adiabatically to an extremely low temperature. Nevertheless, the finite temperature and horizon scales at which these particles decoupled imprint generic signatures on their small scales density fluctuations. We show that the previously recognized cut-off in the fluctuation power-spectrum due to free-streaming of particles at the thermal speed of decoupling, is supplemented by acoustic oscillations owing to the initial coupling between the cold dark matter (CDM) and the radiation field. The power-spectrum oscillations appear on the scale of the horizon at thermal decoupling which corresponds to a mass scale of \\~10^{-4}*(T_d/10MeV)^{-3} solar masses for a CDM decoupling temperature T_d. The suppression of the power-spectrum on smaller scales by the acoustic oscillations is physically independent from the free-streaming effect, although the two cut-off scales are coincidentally comparable for T_d~10MeV and a particle mass of M~100GeV. The initial conditions for recent numerical simulations of the earliest and smallest objects to have formed in the universe, need to be modified accordingly. The smallest dark matter clumps may be detectable through gamma-ray production from particle annihilation, through fluctuations in the event rate of direct detection experiments, or through their tidal gravitational effect on wide orbits of objects near the outer edge of the solar system.

Abraham Loeb; Matias Zaldarriaga

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Small hydro, landfill gas, solar 87,845,342c 10.0 7 Tennessee Valley Authorityd Biogas, wind, solar 40,491,000 4.6 8 We Energiesd Landfill gas, wind, hydro 34,648,566 4.0 9...

163

From Investor-owned Utility to Independent Power Producer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L G & E Energy Corporation Xcel Energy IPP Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y YAmerican Electric Power Co Ine Xcel Energy IPP Y Y Y N Y Y NPower Co Ine UtiliCorp United Xcel Energy American Electric

Ishii, Jun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

SMALL SCALE FUEL CELL AND REFORMER SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New developments in fuel cell technologies offer the promise of clean, reliable affordable power, resulting in reduced environmental impacts and reduced dependence on foreign oil. These developments are of particular interest to the people of Alaska, where many residents live in remote villages, with no roads or electrical grids and a very high cost of energy, where small residential power systems could replace diesel generators. Fuel cells require hydrogen for efficient electrical production, however. Hydrogen purchased through conventional compressed gas suppliers is very expensive and not a viable option for use in remote villages, so hydrogen production is a critical piece of making fuel cells work in these areas. While some have proposed generating hydrogen from renewable resources such as wind, this does not appear to be an economically viable alternative at this time. Hydrogen can also be produced from hydrocarbon feed stocks, in a process known as reforming. This program is interested in testing and evaluating currently available reformers using transportable fuels: methanol, propane, gasoline, and diesel fuels. Of these, diesel fuels are of most interest, since the existing energy infrastructure of rural Alaska is based primarily on diesel fuels, but this is also the most difficult fuel to reform, due to the propensity for coke formation, due to both the high vaporization temperature and to the high sulfur content in these fuels. There are several competing fuel cell technologies being developed in industry today. Prior work at UAF focused on the use of PEM fuel cells and diesel reformers, with significant barriers identified to their use for power in remote areas, including stack lifetime, system efficiency, and cost. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have demonstrated better stack lifetime and efficiency in demonstrations elsewhere (though cost still remains an issue), and procuring a system for testing was pursued. The primary function of UAF in the fuel cell industry is in the role of third party independent testing. In order for tests to be conducted, hardware must be purchased and delivered. The fuel cell industry is still in a pre-commercial state, however. Commercial products are defined as having a fixed set of specifications, fixed price, fixed delivery date, and a warrantee. Negotiations with fuel cell companies over these issues are often complex, and the results of these discussions often reveal much about the state of development of the technology. This work includes some of the results of these procurement experiments. Fuel cells may one day replace heat engines as the source of electrical power in remote areas. However, the results of this program to date indicate that currently available hardware is not developed sufficiently for these environments, and that significant time and resources will need to be committed for this to occur.

Dennis Witmer

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Siting Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, Congress asked the U.S. Department of Energy to develop and scope out an initiative to fulfill the goal of having 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new parabolic trough, power tower, and dish engine solar capacity supplying the southwestern United States. In this paper, we present a review of the solar resource for Arizona, California, Nevada, and New Mexico. These four states have the greatest number of ''premium'' solar sites in the country and each has a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). We present information on the generation potential of the solar resources in these states. We also present regions within New Mexico that may be ideally suited for developing large-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants because of their proximity to load and their access to unconstrained transmission.

Mehos, M.; Owens, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

168

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power, California (Utility Company) Power, California (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $62,650,755.

169

Reducing Power Production Costs by Utilizing Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke. It is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance, and is generally less reactive than coal. Therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the comb...

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

170

Commercialization of coal diesel engines for non-utility and export power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic motivation behind this project is to develop coal-burning heat engine technology primarily for 10-100 MW modular stationary power applications in the late 1990`s and beyond, when oil and gas prices may return to the $5--7/MMBtu range. The fuel is a low-cost, coal-based liquid with the consistency of black paint, composed of 12-micron mean size premium 2% ash coal dust mixed 50/50 with water. The Clean Coal Diesel Plant of the future is targeted for the 10-100 MW non-utility generation (NUG) and small utility markets, including independent power producers (IPP) and cogeneration. A family of plant designs will be offered using the Cooper-Bessemer 3.8, 5.0, and 6.3 MW Model LS engines as building blocks. In addition, larger plants will be configured with an engine in the 10-25 MW class (Cooper will license the technology to other large bore stationary engine manufacturers). The reciprocating engine offers a remarkable degree of flexibility in selecting plant capacity. This flexibility exists because the engines are modular in every sense (fuel cell stacks have similar modularity). Scale-up is accomplished simply by adding cylinders (e.g., 20 vs 16) or by adding engines (4 vs 3). There is no scale-up of the basic cylinder size. Thus, there is essentially no technical development needed to scale-up the Cooper-Bessemer Clean Coal Diesel Technology all the way from 2 MW (one 6-cylinder engine) to 50 MW (eight 20-cylinder engines), other than engineering adaptation of the turbocharger to match the engine.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E.; Mayville, R.A.; Itse, D.; Kimberley, J.; Parkinson, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Power Consumption Reduction Explorations in Processors by Enhancing Performance Using Small ESL Reprogrammable eFPGAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power consumption has become the biggest challenge in industry for chip design. We will present that by using small reprogrammable embedded FPGAs (eFPGA) coupled with a processor we can achieve power and energy reduction with a very small silicon overhead. ... Keywords: embedded FPGA, Power Consumption, Reconfigurable computing, MIPS, eFPGA accelerator

Syed Zahid Ahmed; Julien Eydoux; Michael Fernandez; Laurent Rougé; Gilles Sassatelli; Lionel Torres

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Coordination of reactive power scheduling in a multi-area power system operated by independent utilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the problem of reactive power scheduling in a power system with several areas controlled by independent transmission system operators (TSOs). To design… (more)

Phulpin, Yannick

173

Offering Premium Power to Select Customer Segments: Using Distributed Resources for Distribution Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric sector restructuring will likely lead to increased opportunities for distributed resources (DR) technologies and solutions. In particular, distribution utilities may be able to use DR to provide innovative services that can help increase customer value and open new sources of revenue. Using DR to offer premium power services to customers with special sensitivity to power quality disturbances is one such opportunity.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage iterations. We demonstrate our method in simulations with various wind scenarios and prices for energy. INTRODUCTION Today, wind power is the most important renewable energy source. For the years to come, many

175

Design and analysis of modern three-phase AC/AC power converters for AC drives and utility interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant advances in modern ac/ac power converter technologies and demands of industries have reached beyond standard ac/ac power converters with voltage-source inverters fed from diode rectifiers. Power electronics converters have been matured to stages toward compact realization, increased high-power handling capability, and improving utility interface. Modern ac/ac power converter topologies with various control strategies have been introduced for the further improvements, such as matrix converters, current-fed converters, PWM rectifiers, and active power filters. In this dissertation, several new converter topologies are proposed in conjunction with developed control schemes based on the modern ac/ac converters which enhance performance and solve the drawbacks of conventional converters. In this study, a new fault-tolerant PWM strategy is first proposed for matrix converters. The added fault-tolerant scheme would strengthen the matrix converter technology for aerospace and military applications. A modulation strategy is developed to reshape output currents for continuous operation, against fault occurrence in matrix converter drives. This study designs a hybrid, high-performance ac/ac power converter for high power applications, based on a high-power load commutated inverter and a mediumpower voltage source inverter. Natural commutation of the load commutated inverter is actively controlled by the voltage source inverter. In addition, the developed hybrid system ensures sinusoidal output current/voltage waveforms and fast dynamic response in high power areas. A new topology and control scheme for a six-step current source inverter is proposed. The proposed topology utilizes a small voltage source inverter, to turn off main thyristor switches, transfer reactive load energy, and limit peak voltages across loads. The proposed topology maximizes benefits of the constituent converters: highpower handling capability of large thyristor-based current source inverters as well as fast and easy control of small voltage source inverters. This study analyzes, compares, and evaluates two topologies for unity power factor and multiple ac/ac power conversions. Theoretical analyses and comparisons of the two topologies, grounded on mathematical approaches, are presented from the standpoint of converter kVA ratings, dc-link voltage requirements, switch ratings, semiconductor losses, and reactive component sizes. Analysis, simulation, and experimental results are detailed for each proposed topology.

Kwak, Sangshin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that...

177

A 48-month extended fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small, rail-shippable pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and an electric power output of 150 MW, which is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height, but otherwise standard, PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array on a 21.5 cm inter-assembly pitch. The B and W mPower core design and cycle management plan, which were performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, follow the pattern of a typical nuclear reactor fuel cycle design and analysis performed by most nuclear fuel management organizations, such as fuel vendors and utilities. However, B and W is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for four years of continuous power operations without refueling and without the hurdles of chemical shim. (authors)

Erighin, M. A. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Hydrogen storage of energy for small power supply systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power supply systems for cell phone base stations using hydrogen energy storage, fuel cells or hydrogen-burning generators, and a backup generator could offer an improvement over current power supply systems. Two categories ...

Monaghan, Rory F. D. (Rory Francis Desmond)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

180

Integration of Combined Heat and Power Generators into Small Buildings - A Transient Analysis Approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Small combined heat and power generators have the potential to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of residential buildings. Recently, much attention has been… (more)

DeBruyn, Adrian Bryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Var Coordinated Control of DFIG Impact on Small Signal Stability of Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind farm based on Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) is built. Not only it can be as active power source to provide active power to network, but also as reactive power source to stabilize voltage or supply Var compensation (reactive power absorbed ... Keywords: Doubly Fed Induction Generator, Var coordinated control, low-frequency oscillation, small signal stability

Lei Wang; Hongjie Jia

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging problems is known as islanding phenomenon. This situation occurs when a network is disconnected from utility grid and is energized by local DFPGs. It can possibly result in injury to utility personnel arriving to service isolated feeders, equipment damage, and system malfunction. In response to the concern, this dissertation aims to develop a robust anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of DFPGs. In the first part, digital signal processor (DSP) controlled power electronic converters for utility interconnection of DFPGs are developed. Current control in a direct-quadrature (dq) synchronous frame is proposed. The real and reactive power is controlled by regulating inverter currents. The proposed digital current control in a synchronous frame significantly enhances the performance of DFPGs. In the second part, the robust anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of a DFPG is developed. The power control algorithm is proposed based on analysis of a real and reactive power mismatch. It continuously perturbs (±5%) the reactive power supplied by the DFPG while monitoring the voltage and frequency. If islanding were to occur, a measurable frequency deviation would take place, upon which the real power of the DFPG is further reduced to 80%; a drop in voltage positively confirms islanding. This method is shown to be robust and reliable. In the third part, an improved anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of multiple DFPGs is presented. The cross correlation method is proposed and implemented in conjunction with the power control algorithm. It calculates the cross correlation index of a rate of change of the frequency deviation and (±5%) the reactive power. If this index increases above 50%, the chance of islanding is high. The algorithm initiates (±10%) the reactive power and continues to calculate the correlation index. If the index exceeds 80%, islanding is now confirmed. The proposed method is robust and capable of detecting islanding in the presence of several DFPGs independently operating. Analysis, simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed.

Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 2001 December 2001 Customer Participants (as of December 2001) Rank Utility Program # of Participants 1 Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Green Power for a Green L.A. 87,0001 2 Xcel Energy (Colorado) WindSource 18,600 3 Sacramento Municipal Utility District Greenergy - All Renewables 14,200 4 Xcel Energy (Colorado) Renewable Energy Trust 10,900 5 Wisconsin Electric Power Company Energy for Tomorrow 10,700 6 PacifiCorp Blue Sky 7,300 7 Austin Energy GreenChoice 6,600 8 Portland General Electric Company Salmon Friendly Clean Wind Power 5,700 9 Wisconsin Public Service SolarWise for Schools 5,200 10 Tennessee Valley Authority Green Power Switch 4,9002 Source: NREL Notes: 1 About half of the total are low-income customers that receive existing renewables at no extra cost.

184

The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric power generation business. Included is a comparison between heavy-duty industrial combustion turbines and their rapidly evolving competition, aeroderivative machines, with emphasis on the appropriate application of each. The prospects for future improvements in the cost and performance of combustion turbines are reviewed, and the likely impact of advanced combustion turbine power generation concepts is considered. Also summarized is the outlook for power generation fuels, including the longer term reemergence of coal and the potential for widespread use of coal gasification-based combustion turbine systems. The paper draws heavily from a technical, economic, and business analysis, Combustion Turbine Power Systems, recently completed by SFA Pacific. The analysis was sponsored by an international group of energy companies that includes utilities, independent power producers (IPPs), and power industry equipment vendors.

Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Site Assessment: Wind Powering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental impacts have increased the demand for small wind energy systems for homeowners, schools, businesses, and local governments. Over the past decade, the knowledge,...

186

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions (PUCs). Economic performance incentives established by state PUCs are applicable to the construction or operation of about 45 nuclear power reactors owned by 30 utilities in 17 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Petersen, J.C.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state Public Utility Commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic performance incentives established by state Public Utility Commissions (PUCs) currently are applicable to the construction or operation of approximately 73 nuclear power reactors owned by 27 utilities with investment greater than 10% in 18 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its headquarters and regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state PUCs presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Martin, R.L.; Olson, J. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Hendrickson, P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant January 19, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in the Texas Clean Energy Project. | Photo courtesy of llnlphotos. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon

189

Railroad Consolidation and Market Power: Challenges to a Deregulating Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The railroad industry is shrinking into a handful of mega-carriers, a development of great importance to the electric utility industry, which depends on railroads for most shipments of coal. As the electric utilities face deregulation, the impact of railroad market power on the delivered price of coal is a critical competitive issue. This report examines the motivations for railroad consolidation and assesses the likely business strategies of the five major coal hauling railroads.

1997-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

SciTech Connect

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

Thermal power systems: Small Power Systems Applications Project. Volume II. Detailed report. Annual technical report, fiscal year 1978  

SciTech Connect

Small Power Systems Applications activities for FY 1978 are reported. Studies were conducted to address current small power system technology as applied to power plants up to 10 MWe in size. Markets for small power systems were characterized and cost goals were established for the project. Candidate power plant system design concepts were selected for evaluation and preliminary performance and cost assessments were made. Economic studies were conducted at JPL and under contract to Burns and McDonnell. Breakeven capital costs were determined for leading contenders among the candidate systems. An applications study was made of the potential use of small power systems in providing part of the demand for pumping power by the extensive aqueduct system of California, estimated to be 1000 MWe by 1985. Criteria and methodologies were developed for application to the ranking of candidate power plant system design concepts. Experimental power plants concepts of 1 MWe rating were studied by three contractors as a Phase I effort leading toward the definition of a power plant configuration for subsequent detail design, construction, testing and evaluation as Engineering Experiment No. 1 (EE No. 1). Site selection criteria and ground rules for the solicitation of EE No. 1 site participation proposals by DOE were developed.

1979-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Original article: Comparison of maximum peak power tracking algorithms for a small wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms dedicated for small wind turbines (SWTs). Many control strategies with different features are available and it is very important to select proper one in order to achieve best performance ... Keywords: Maximum power point tracking (MPPT), PMSG, Small wind turbine (SWT)

R. Kot, M. Rolak, M. Malinowski

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Wind power and electric utilities: a review of the problems and prospects. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of windpower poses a variety of problems for utilities primarily due to the uncontrollability of the power source and the high degree of variability of the wind. Differences in the dynamic behavior of the wind and of utility load patterns and the problems that arise from these differences are described. Utility capacity expansion methods and modifications to them to incorporate the characteristics of wind machines into the analytic procedure are outlined and results from initial studies employing these modifications are reviewed. These results indicate that, in general, storage devices are too expensive to be purchased by utilities if they serve mainly to balance the output of the wind machines; wind machines tend to supplant purchases of conventional baseload capacity but require additional peaking units; and the economic value of wind machines to utilities is composed of savings in both fuel and capacity related expenditures for conventional equipment.

Davitian, H

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

197

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Small turbines in distributed utility application: Natural gas pressure supply requirements  

SciTech Connect

Implementing distributed utility can strengthen the local distribution system and help avoid or delay the expense of upgrading transformers and feeders. The gas turbine-generator set is an attractive option based on its low front-end capital cost, reliable performance at unmanned stations, and environmental performance characteristics. This report assesses gas turbine utilization issues from a perspective of fuel supply pressure requirements and discusses both cost and operational factors. A primary operational consideration for siting gas turbines on the electric distribution system is whether the local gas distribution company can supply gas at the required pressure. Currently available gas turbine engines require gas supply pressures of at least 150 pounds per square inch gauge, more typically, 250 to 350 psig. Few LDCs maintain line pressure in excess of 125 psig. One option for meeting the gas pressure requirements is to upgrade or extend an existing pipeline and connect that pipeline to a high-pressure supply source, such as an interstate transmission line. However, constructing new pipeline is expensive, and the small volume of gas required by the turbine for the application offers little incentive for the LDC to provide this service. Another way to meet gas pressure requirements is to boost the compression of the fuel gas at the gas turbine site. Fuel gas booster compressors are readily available as stand-alone units and can satisfactorily increase the supply pressure to meet the turbine engine requirement. However, the life-cycle costs of this equipment are not inconsequential, and maintenance and reliability issues for boosters in this application are questionable and require further study. These factors may make the gas turbine option a less attractive solution in DU applications than first indicated by just the $/kW capital cost. On the other hand, for some applications other DU technologies, such as photovoltaics, may be the more attractive option.

Goldstein, H.L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

Wind power for farms, homes, and small industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning basic wind turbine energy conversion; wind behavior and site selection; power and energy requirements; the components of a wind energy conversion system; selecting a wind energy conversion system and system economics; and legal aspects.

Park, J.; Schwind, D.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Indianapolis Power & Light - Small-Scale Renewable Energy Incentive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

customers. IP&L has requested to extend the program (https:myweb.in.govIURCedsTab.aspx?tabid28&dnSEARCHDOCKETEDCASE IURC Cause No. 43623)''''' Indianapolis Power &...

202

Exergy efficiency of small coal-fired power plants as a criterion of their wide applicability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applicability of small coal-fired power plants as an independent and reliable power supply source was considered. The advantages of using small thermal power plants were given, and the classification characteristics of small coal-fired power plants were put forward. The exergy method was chosen as a versatility indicator for the operating efficiency of a flowsheet in question. The exergy efficiency factor of the flowsheet was 32%. With the manufacture of by-products, such as activated carbons, the exergy efficiency of the flowsheet increased to 35%. The studies undertaken substantiated the wide applicability of small coal-fired power plants for the development of decentralized power supply. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

O.V. Afanas'eva; G.R. Mingaleeva [Russian Academy of Sciences, Tatarstan (Russian Federation). Research Center of Power Engineering Problems

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Real power regulation for the utility power grid via responsive loads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for dynamically managing an electrical power system that determines measures of performance and control criteria for the electric power system, collects at least one automatic generation control (AGC) input parameter to at least one AGC module and at least one automatic load control (ALC) input parameter to at least one ALC module, calculates AGC control signals and loads as resources (LAR) control signals in response to said measures of performance and control criteria, propagates AGC control signals to power generating units in response to control logic in AGC modules, and propagates LAR control signals to at least one LAR in response to control logic in ALC modules.

McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN); Kirby, Brendan J. (Knoxville, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN), Van Dyke, James W. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

204

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine Dr. Fletcher Miller SDSU Department of Mechanical Engineering Abstract Solar thermal power for electricity will describe the design of a high temperature solar receiver capable of driving a gas turbine for power

Ponce, V. Miguel

205

Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Co-utilization of biomass and natural gas: a new route for power productin from biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Co-utilization of biomass and natural gas: a new route for power productin from biomass production is proposed in which biomass energy is used to partially reform natural gas in gas turbines. As a result, part of the natural gas fuel supply can be replaced by biomass while keeping the biomass

Glineur, François

207

Low complexity subcarrier and power allocation for utility maximization in uplink OFDMA systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the joint subcarrier and power allocation problem with the objective of maximizing the total utility of users in the uplink of an OFDMA system. Our formulation includes the problems of sum rate maximization, proportional fairness and max-min ...

Cho Yiu Ng; Chi Wan Sung

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability  

SciTech Connect

Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Concentrating Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics Projects: A Technology and Market Overview Michael Mendelsohn, Travis Lowder, and Brendan Canavan Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51137 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics Projects: A Technology and Market Overview Michael Mendelsohn, Travis Lowder, and Brendan Canavan Prepared under Task No. SM10.2442

210

Notices DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

670 Federal Register 670 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 212 / Wednesday, November 2, 2011 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Hold Public Scoping Meetings AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Rural Utilities Service (RUS), an agency within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for Basin Electric Power Cooperative's (Basin Electric) proposed Antelope Valley Station (AVS) to Neset Transmission Project (Project) in North Dakota. RUS is issuing this Notice of Intent (NOI) to inform the public and interested parties about the proposed Project, conduct a public

211

DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More August 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars August 21: Live Webinar on the 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Program The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled "2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications" on Wednesday,

212

Expected Power-Utility Maximization Under Incomplete Information and with Cox-Process Observations  

SciTech Connect

We consider the problem of maximization of expected terminal power utility (risk sensitive criterion). The underlying market model is a regime-switching diffusion model where the regime is determined by an unobservable factor process forming a finite state Markov process. The main novelty is due to the fact that prices are observed and the portfolio is rebalanced only at random times corresponding to a Cox process where the intensity is driven by the unobserved Markovian factor process as well. This leads to a more realistic modeling for many practical situations, like in markets with liquidity restrictions; on the other hand it considerably complicates the problem to the point that traditional methodologies cannot be directly applied. The approach presented here is specific to the power-utility. For log-utilities a different approach is presented in Fujimoto et al. (Preprint, 2012).

Fujimoto, Kazufumi, E-mail: m_fuji@kvj.biglobe.ne.jp [Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., Corporate Risk Management Division (Japan)] [Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., Corporate Risk Management Division (Japan); Nagai, Hideo, E-mail: nagai@sigmath.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, Division of Mathematical Science for Social Systems, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan)] [Osaka University, Division of Mathematical Science for Social Systems, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan); Runggaldier, Wolfgang J., E-mail: runggal@math.unipd.it [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Commercialization of PV-powered pumping systems for use in utility PV service programs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report was a commercialization effort focused on cost-effective remote water pumping systems for use in utility-based photovoltaic (PV) service programs. The project combined a commercialization strategy tailored specifically for electric utilities with the development of a PV-powered pumping system that operates conventional ac pumps rather than relying on the more expensive and less reliable PV pumps on the market. By combining these two attributes, a project goal was established of creating sustained utility purchases of 250 PV-powered water pumping systems per year. The results of each of these tasks are presented in two parts contained in this Final Summary Report. The first part summarizes the results of the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN) as a new business venture, while the second part summarizes the results of the Golden Photon system installations. Specifically, results and photographs from each of the system installations are presented in this latter part.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wind Power for Municipal Utilities. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Brochure.  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Clean energy has a bright future. Today a growing number Clean energy has a bright future. Today a growing number of public utilities are harvesting a new source of homegrown energy. From Massachusetts to California, more than two dozen municipal utilities have wind power in their energy mix. Wind energy is attractive for many reasons: * Wind energy is clean and renewable. * Wind energy is economically competitive. * Wind energy reduces energy price risks. Unlike coal, natural gas, or oil, the "fuel" for a wind turbine will always be free. * Wind energy is popular with the public. A RECORD YEAR - Wind power is booming. Worldwide, a record 3,800 megawatts (MW) were installed in 2001. These sleek, impressive wind turbines have closed the cost gap with conventional power plants. Depending on size and location, wind farms produce electricity for 3-6

215

Efficient Power Converters for PV Arrays : Scalable Submodule Power Conversion for Utility-Scale Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar ADEPT Project: SolarBridge is developing a new power conversion technique to improve the energy output of PV power plants. This new technique is specifically aimed at large plants where many solar panels are connected together. SolarBridge is correcting for the inefficiencies that occur when two solar panels that encounter different amounts of sun are connected together. In most conventional PV system, the weakest panel limits the energy production of the entire system. That’s because all of the energy collected by the PV system feeds into a single collection point where a central inverter then converts it into useable energy for the grid. SolarBridge has found a more efficient and cost-effective way to convert solar energy, correcting these power differences before they reach the grid.

None

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

Oconomowoc Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Oconomowoc Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13963 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

217

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume I. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is presented. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces), (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces), and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. With these engine options, 10 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 10 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 10 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California as input to the code. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size. For all 10 concepts, subjective values were estimated for four additional power plant characteristics: plant flexibility, forced outage rate, environmental and safety effects, and R and D necessary for commercialization. Multiattribute utility methodology was used to rank the 10 concepts. (WHK)

Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Currie, J.W.; Drost, M.K.; Jannol, M.; Schulte, S.C.; Sutey, A.M.; Williams, T.A.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, including states with new programs, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Elliot, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Impingement starting and power boosting of small gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The technology of high-pressure air or hot-gas impingement from stationary shroud supplementary nozzles onto radial outflow compressors and radial inflow turbines to permit rapid gas turbine starting or power boosting is discussed. Data are presented on the equivalent turbine component performance for convergent/divergent shroud impingement nozzles, which reveal the sensitivity of nozzle velocity coefficient with Mach number and turbine efficiency with impingement nozzle admission arc. Compressor and turbine matching is addressed in the transient turbine start mode with the possibility of operating these components in braking or reverse flow regimes when impingement flow rates exceed design.

Rodgers, C.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Power Electronics for Distributed Energy Systems and Transmission and Distribution Applications: Assessing the Technical Needs for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power electronics can provide utilities the ability to more effectively deliver power to their customers while providing increased reliability to the bulk power system. In general, power electronics is the process of using semiconductor switching devices to control and convert electrical power flow from one form to another to meet a specific need. These conversion techniques have revolutionized modern life by streamlining manufacturing processes, increasing product efficiencies, and increasing the quality of life by enhancing many modern conveniences such as computers, and they can help to improve the delivery of reliable power from utilities. This report summarizes the technical challenges associated with utilizing power electronics devices across the entire spectrum from applications to manufacturing and materials development, and it provides recommendations for research and development (R&D) needs for power electronics systems in which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) could make a substantial impact toward improving the reliability of the bulk power system.

Tolbert, L.M.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

Acoustic and thermal packaging of small gas turbines for portable power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To meet the increasing demand for advanced portable power units, for example for use in personal electronics and robotics, a number of studies have focused on portable small gas turbines. This research is concerned with ...

Tanaka, Shinji, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Repowering a small coal-fired power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arkansas River Power Authority (ARPA) Lamar Repowering Project is moving forward. The new generator, capable of producing 18 MW of electricity, is scheduled to be online in June 2008 bringing the total generation to 43 MW. New coal handling equipment, with infrared fire detectors, is almost complete. The new 18 MW steam turbine will be cooled by an air-cooled condenser. Coal will be delivered in a railroad spur to an unloading site then be unloaded onto a conveyor under the tracks and conveyed to two storage domes each holding 6000 tons of coal. It will be drawn out of these through an underground conveyor system, brought into a crusher, conveyed through overhead conveyors and fed into the new coal- fired fluidized bed boilers. 1 photo.

Miell, R.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

PQ TechWatch: What To Expect from Normal, Utility-Grade Electrical Power: Educating End Users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although “perfect” electrical power—power that never stops or deviates from a true sine wave—may be an impossibility, consumers want to know what kind of power they can expect from electric power providers. It is up to utilities to educate their customers on what normal, utility-grade power looks like, how it is generated and distributed, and how to identify and deal with problems related to reliability and power quality. This education should also lead to a two-way ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIR TOXICS AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Prepared Under Burns and Roe Services Corporation Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC92100 .Subtask 44.02 July 1996 SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN . . UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center . Prepared by Adrian Radziwon and Edward Winter Burns and Roe Services Corporation Terence J. McManus, Oak Ridge Associated Universities July 1996 TABLE OF CONTERlW SECTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................... 1 Background . : .................. 1 Objectives .................... 1 Report Structure ................. 3 Uncertainties ................... 3 SECTION 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................. 7

226

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Harmonization of Utility Common Information Model (CIM) with other IEC Power System Management Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has sponsored the development of a number of international standards which provide the basis for information exchange to support power system management. One of the most important is the Common Information Model (CIM), which is rapidly gaining acceptance throughout the world as a common semantic model to unify and integrate the data from a myriad of systems involved in support of real-time electric utility operations. As its acceptance as the basis for information integration grows and areas of appl...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Methods for obtaining an operating point sufficiently small signal stable in power systems including wind parks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows a simple approach to obtain an operating point sufficiently small signal stable. In the case of a stable operating point with a poorly damped oscillatory mode, the objective is to increase the damping of that mode. That is, the power ... Keywords: critical mode, damping, eigenvalues, inter-area oscillations, linearization, wind power converter

P. Ledesma; C. Gallardo

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter: Agile Direct Grid Connect Medium Voltage 4.7-13.8 kV Power Converter for PV Applications Utilizing Wide Band Gap Devices  

SciTech Connect

Solar ADEPT Project: Satcon is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levels—eliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers “step up” the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually “stepped down” to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the voltage is high and current is low. Satcon’s new power conversion devices will eliminate these heavy transformers and connect a utility-scale solar power system directly to the grid. Satcon’s modular devices are designed to ensure reliability—if one device fails it can be bypassed and the system can continue to run.

None

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

232

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS RECEIVER UTILIZING SMALL PARTICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for powering a gas turbine or to supply industrial processin conjunetion with a gas turbine system providing severalincluding heating a gas to operate a turbine (4), providing

Hunt, Arlon J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

MHK Technologies/Small power take off module | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power take off module power take off module < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Small power take off module.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wavegen subsidiary of Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The 18 5kW power modules consist of a 5th generation Wells turbine valve and noise attenuator The complete modules weigh less than a tonne so installation or removal is easily achievable using a small mobile crane The modules are very simple and rugged the blades are fixed onto the rotor have no pitching mechanism no gearbox and have no contact with seawater

234

An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

Scarangella, M. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Multi-area power system state estimation utilizing boundary measurements and phasor measurement units ( PMUs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to prove the validity of a multi-area state estimator and investigate the advantages it provides over a serial state estimator. This is done utilizing the IEEE 118 Bus Test System as a sample system. This thesis investigates the benefits that stem from utilizing a multi-area state estimator instead of a serial state estimator. These benefits are largely in the form of increased accuracy and decreased processing time. First, the theory behind power system state estimation is explained for a simple serial estimator. Then the thesis shows how conventional measurements and newer, more accurate PMU measurements work within the framework of weighted least squares estimation. Next, the multi-area state estimator is examined closely and the additional measurements provided by PMUs are used to increase accuracy and computational efficiency. Finally, the multi-area state estimator is tested for accuracy, its ability to detect bad data, and computation time.

Freeman, Matthew A

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sacramento Municipal Utility District 100 MW Photovoltaic Power Plant: Final environmental impact report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) proposes constructing a 100 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. The project, to be built in increments over the next 12 years, is the largest facility of its kind proposed by any utility in the country. The initial 1 MW photovoltaic field will consist of four 250 kW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. Photovoltaic cell modules will be mounted on flat-plate arrays attached to centrally located torque tubes which allow the arrays to rotate on their long axis to )openreverse arrowquotes)track)closereverse arrowquotes) the sun. This Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) addresses environmental aspects of the proposed project according to the guidelines for implementing the California Environmental Quality Act and the National Enviornmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

100-MW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UTILIZING A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a 100 Mw(e) nuclear power plant is described. The plant utilized a sodium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor with stainless- steel clad. slightiy enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel. The reactor is provided with three main coolant circuits, and the steam cycle has three stages of regenerative heating. The plant control system allows automatic operation over the range of 20 to 100% load, or manual operation at all loads. The site, reactor, sodium systems, reactor auxiliaries, fuel handling, instrumentation, turbine-generator, buildings. and safety measures are described. Engineering drawings are included. (W.D.M.)

1958-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

240

Public Utilities (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities (Florida) Utilities (Florida) Public Utilities (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Florida Public Service Commission Chapter 366 of the Florida Statutes governs the operation of public utilities, and includes a section pertaining to cogeneration and small power production (366.051). This section establishes the state's support for incorporating cogenerators and small power producers into the grid, and directs the Public Service Commission to establish regulations and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Soft-stall control versus furling control for small wind turbine power regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many small wind turbines are designed to furl (turn) in high winds to regulate power and provide overspeed protection. Furling control results in poor energy capture at high wind speeds. This paper proposes an alternative control strategy for small wind turbines -- the soft-stall control method. The furling and soft-stall control strategies are compared using steady state analysis and dynamic simulation analysis. The soft-stall method is found to offer several advantages: increased energy production at high wind speeds, energy production which tracks the maximum power coefficient at low to medium wind speeds, reducing furling noise, and reduced thrust.

Muljadi, E.; Forsyth, T.; Butterfield, C.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.  

SciTech Connect

We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Power Transistors: 15 kV SiC IGBT Power Modules for Grid Scale Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Cree is developing silicon carbide (SiC) power transistors that are 50% more energy efficient than traditional transistors. Transistors act like a switch, controlling the electrical energy that flows through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon semiconductors to conduct electricity. However, transistors with SiC semiconductors operate at much higher temperatures, as well as higher voltage and power levels than their silicon counterparts. SiC-based transistors are also smaller and require less cooling than those made with traditional silicon power technology. Cree's SiC transistors will enable electrical circuits to handle higher power levels more efficiently, and they will result in much smaller and lighter electrical devices and power converters. Cree, an established leader in SiC technology, has already released a commercially available SiC transistor that can operate at up to 1,200 volts. The company has also demonstrated a utility-scale SiC transistor that operates at up to 15,000 volts.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry  

SciTech Connect

Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

Klara, J.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Weinstein, R.E. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Wherley, M.R. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A control system for improved battery utilization in a PV-powered peak-shaving system  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic (PV) power systems offer the prospect of allowing a utility company to meet part of the daily peak system load using a renewable resource. Unfortunately, some utilities have peak system- load periods that do not match the peak production hours of a PV system. Adding a battery energy storage system to a grid-connected PV power system will allow dispatching the stored solar energy to the grid at the desired times. Batteries, however, pose system limitations in terms of energy efficiency, maintenance, and cycle life. A new control system has been developed, based on available PV equipment and a data acquisition system, that seeks to minimize the limitations imposed by the battery system while maximizing the use of PV energy. Maintenance requirements for the flooded batteries are reduced, cycle life is maximized, and the battery is operated over an efficient range of states of charge. This paper presents design details and initial performance results on one of the first installed control systems of this type.

Palomino, E [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiles, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-metal reactor. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preapplication safety evaluation report (PSER) presents the results of the preapplication desip review for die Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Project No. 674. The PRISM conceptual desip was submitted by the US Department of Energy in accordance with the NRC`s ``Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants`` (51 Federal Register 24643). This policy provides for the early Commission review and interaction with designers and licensees. The PRISM reactor desip is a small, modular, pool-type, liquid-mew (sodium)-cooled reactor. The standard plant design consists of dim identical power blocks with a total electrical output rating of 1395 MWe- Each power block comprises three reactor modules, each with a thermal rating of 471 MWt. Each module is located in its own below-grade silo and is co to its own intermediate heat transport system and steam generator system. The reactors utilize a metallic-type fuel, a ternary alloy of U-Pu-Zr. The design includes passive reactor shutdown and passive decay heat removal features. The PSER is the NRC`s preliminary evaluation of the safety features in the PRISM design, including the projected research and development programs required to support the design and the proposed testing needs. Because the NRC review was based on a conceptual design, the PSER did not result in an approval of the design. Instead it identified certain key safety issues, provided some guidance on applicable licensing criteria, assessed the adequacy of the preapplicant`s research and development programs, and concluded that no obvious impediments to licensing the PRISM design had been identified.

Donoghue, J.E.; Donohew, J.N.; Golub, G.R.; Kenneally, R.M.; Moore, P.B.; Sands, S.P.; Throm, E.D.; Wetzel, B.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Associate Directorate for Advanced Reactors and License Renewal

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NREL Innovations Contribute to an Award-Winning Small Wind Turbine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficient and quieter than most. Small wind turbines are electric generators that utilize wind energy to produce clean, emissions-free power for individual homes, farms, and small...

249

The Implications of Carbon Taxation on Microgrid Adoption of Small-Scale On-Site Power Generation Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49309 The Implications of Carbon Taxation on Microgrid Adoption of Small-Scale On-Site Power .................................................................................................................1 1.1 Microgrid Concept

250

Western Regional Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement: Rulemaking for Small Power Production and Cogeneration Facilities - Exemptions for Geothermal Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Section 643 of the Energy Security Act of 1980 directed the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to develop rules to further encourage geothermal development by Small Power Production Facilities. This rule amends rules previously established in Dockets No. RM79-54 and 55 under Section 201 and 210 of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). The analysis shows that the rules are expected to stimulate the development of up to 1,200 MW of capacity for electrical generation from geothermal facilities by 1995--1,110 MW more than predicted in the original PURPA EIS. This Final Supplemental EIS to the DEIS, issued by FERC in June 1980, forecasts likely near term development and analyzes environmental effects anticipated to occur due to development of geothermal resources in the Western United States as a result of this additional rulemaking.

Heinemann, Jack M.; Nalder, Nan; Berger, Glen

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Rice Lake Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rice Lake Utilities Rice Lake Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Rice Lake Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15938 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

252

Reedsburg Utility Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reedsburg Utility Comm Reedsburg Utility Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Reedsburg Utility Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15804 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

253

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Second Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Second Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 223 to 240, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,449 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 361 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of currently operating facilities is provided as Figure A. Of the 240 signed contracts and committed projects, 75 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 740 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 32 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 858 MW to 921 MW, and 10 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 113 MW to 121 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 19, with a generating capability of 471 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 12 wind farm projects, totaling 273 to 278 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 10 other projects under active discussion. There are 47 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 110 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 30 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2008) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MW)a 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 723,824,901 82.6 2 Portland General Electricb Wind, biomass 681,943,576 77.9 3 PacifiCorpcde Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 492,892,222 56.3 4 Xcel Energyef Wind 362,040,082 41.3 5 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, solar, biomass, landfill gas, hydro 325,275,628 37.1 6 Puget Sound Energye Wind, solar, biomass, landfill gas, hydro 291,166,600 33.2 7 Public Service Company of New Mexico Wind 176,497,697 20.1 8 We Energiese Wind, landfill gas, solar 176,242,630 20.1 9 National Gridgh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 174,612,444 19.9 10 PECOi Wind 172,782,490 19.7

255

Small scale hydroelectric power potential in Nevada: a preliminary reconnaissance survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary reconnaissance survey is intended to: develop a first estimate as to the potential number, location and characteristics of small-scale (50 kW to 15 MW) hydroelectric sites in Nevada; provide a compilation of various Federal and state laws and regulations, including tax and financing regulations, that affect small-scale hydroelectric development and provide information on sources of small-scale hydroelectric generation hardware and consultants/ contractors who do small scale hydroelectric work. The entire survey has been conducted in the office working with various available data bases. The site survey and site evaluation methods used are described, and data are tabulated on the flow, power potential, predicted capital expenditures required, etc. for 61 potential sites with measured flows and for 77 sites with derived flows. A map showing potential site locations is included. (LCL)

Cochran, G.F.; Fordham, J.W.; Richard, K.; Loux, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Small-scale hydroelectric power in the Pacific Northwest: new impetus for an old energy source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy supply is one of the most important issues facing Northwestern legislators today. To meet the challenge, state legislatures must address the development of alternative energy sources. The Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Policy Project of the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) was designed to assist state legislators in looking at the benefits of one alternative, small-scale hydro. Because of the need for state legislative support in the development of small-scale hydroelectric, NCSL, as part of its contract with the Department of Energy, conducted the following conference on small-scale hydro in the Pacific Northwest. The conference was designed to identify state obstacles to development and to explore options for change available to policymakers. A summary of the conference proceedings is presented.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2002) Rank Utility Resources Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MW)1 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas, solar 251,520,000 28.7 2 Sacramento Municipal Utility District Landfill gas, wind, solar 104,344,0002 11.9 3 Xcel Energy Wind and solar 103,739,0003 11.8 4 Los Angeles Department of Power and Water Wind and landfill gas 66,666,0004 7.6 5 Portland General Electric5 Wind and geothermal 57,989,000 6.6 6 PacifiCorp5 Wind and geothermal 55,615,000 6.3 7 Tennessee Valley Authority Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 35,955,000 4.1 8 We Energies Landfill gas, wind, hydro 35,161,000 4.0 9 Puget Sound Energy Wind and solar 20,334,000 2.3 10 Madison Gas and Electric Wind 15,593,000 1.8

258

Utility-scale combined-cycle power systems with Kalina bottoming cycles  

SciTech Connect

A new power-generation technology, often referred to as the Kalina cycle, is being developed as a direct replacement for the Rankine steam cycle. It can be applied to any thermal heat source, low or high temperature. Among several Kalina cycle variations, there is one that is particularly well suited as a bottoming cycle for utility combined-cycle applications. It is the subject of this paper. Using an ammonia/water mixture as the working fluid and a condensing system based on absorption-refrigeration principles, the Kalina bottoming cycle outperforms a triple-pressure steam cycle by 16%. Additionally, this version of the Kalina cycle is characterized by an intercooling feature between turbine stages, diametrically opposite to normal reheating practice in steam plants. Energy and mass balances are presented for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina bottoming cycle. Kalina cycle performance is compared to a triple-pressure steam plant. Energy and mass balances are presented as well for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina direct-fired cycle designed for utility purposes.

Kalina, A.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A peak power tracker for small wind turbines in battery charging applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, implementation and testing of a prototype version of a peak power tracking system for small wind turbines in battery charging applications. The causes for the poor performance of small wind turbines in battery charging applications are explained and previously proposed configurations to increase the power output of the wind turbines are discussed. Through computer modeling of the steady-state operation the potential performance gain of the proposed system in comparison with existing systems is calculated. It is shown that one configuration consisting of reactive compensation by capacitors and a DC/DC converter is able to optimally load the wind turbine and thus obtain maximum energy capture over the whole range of wind speeds. A proof of concept of the peak power tracking system is provided by building and testing a prototype version. The peak power tracking system is tested in combination with a typical small wind turbine generator on a dynamometer. Steady-state operating curves confirming the performance improvement predicted by calculations are presented.

De Broe, A.M.; Drouilhet, S.; Gevorgian, V.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electricity supply system is undergoing major regulatory and technological change with significant implications for the way in which the sector will operate (including its patterns of carbon emissions) and for the policies required to ensure socially and environmentally desirable outcomes. One such change stems from the rapid emergence of viable small-scale (i.e., smaller than 500 kW) generators that are potentially competitive with grid delivered electricity, especially in combined heat and power configurations. Such distributed energy resources (DER) may be grouped together with loads in microgrids. These clusters could operate semi-autonomously from the established power system, or macrogrid, matching power quality and reliability more closely to local end-use requirements. In order to establish a capability for analyzing the effect that microgrids may have on typical commercial customers, such as office buildings, restaurants, shopping malls, and grocery stores, an economic mod el of DER adoption is being developed at Berkeley Lab. This model endeavors to indicate the optimal quantity and type of small on-site generation technologies that customers could employ given their electricity requirements. For various regulatory schemes and general economic conditions, this analysis produces a simple operating schedule for any installed generators. Early results suggest that many commercial customers can benefit economically from on-site generation, even without considering potential combined heat and power and reliability benefits, even though they are unlikely to disconnect from the established power system.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solar photovoltaic applications seminar: design, installation and operation of small, stand-alone photovoltaic power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This seminar material was developed primarily to provide solar photovoltaic (PV) applied engineering technology to the Federal community. An introduction to photoconductivity, semiconductors, and solar photovoltaic cells is included along with a demonstration of specific applications and application identification. The seminar details general systems design and incorporates most known information from industry, academia, and Government concerning small solar cell power system design engineering, presented in a practical and applied manner. Solar PV power system applications involve classical direct electrical energy conversion and electric power system analysis and synthesis. Presentations and examples involve a variety of disciplines including structural analysis, electric power and load analysis, reliability, sizing and optimization; and, installation, operation and maintenance. Four specific system designs are demonstrated: water pumping, domestic uses, navigational and aircraft aids, and telecommunications. All of the applications discussed are for small power requirement (under 2 kilowatts), stand-alone systems to be used in remote locations. Also presented are practical lessons gained from currently installed and operating systems, problems at sites and their resolution, a logical progression through each major phase of system acquisition, as well as thorough design reviews for each application.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth… (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandReactivePowerCharge | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandReactivePowerCharge DemandReactivePowerCharge Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandReactivePowerCharge" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 00b7ccdc-c7e0-40d2-907f-acb6ae828292 + 0.25 + 00e0b930-90c6-43c2-971a-91dade33f76a + 0.32 + 00e2a43f-6844-417a-b459-edf32d33b051 + 0.0092 + 00fb7dca-d0a6-4b11-b7de-791c2fb9f2e1 + 2.7 + 01a64840-7edc-4193-8073-ed5604e098ca + 0.83 + 035f3d22-3650-47cc-a427-bb35170db128 + 0.3 + 042f06f4-6a5b-424f-a31f-8e1c5a838700 + 0.27 + 0479cd85-894d-412b-b2ce-3b96912e9014 + 0.2 + 04bab597-fe1e-4507-8d90-144980aeba73 + 0.3 + 05211bd7-b6d3-425c-9f96-0845b7828c3c + 0.27 + 052fbe23-ac02-4195-b76d-e572cc53f669 + 0.68 + 05490683-8158-4d2f-ad96-66d5e4980890 + 0.25 +

264

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

File:07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07CABPlantCommissioningProcessSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 84 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:30, 12 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:30, 12 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (84 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs) 15:23, 29 June 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:23, 29 June 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (64 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 15:53, 26 June 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:53, 26 June 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (83 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) June 26th version

266

File:07CADCPCNForSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CADCPCNForSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf CADCPCNForSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:07CADCPCNForSmallPowerPlantExemption.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:03, 22 January 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:03, 22 January 2013 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (71 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file:

267

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Small-scale AFBC-hot air gas turbine power cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the Will-Burt Company (W-B) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully developed and completed pilot plant tests on a small scale atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. This system can be used to generate electricity, and/or hot water, steam. Following successful pilot plant operation, commercial demonstration will take place at Cedar Lane Farms (CLF), near Wooster, Ohio. The system demonstration will be completed by the end of 1995. The project is being funded through a cooperative effort between the DOE, EER, W-B, OARDC, CLF and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO). The small scale AFBC, has no internal heat transfer surfaces in the fluid bed proper. Combining the combustor with a hot air gas turbine (HAGT) for electrical power generation, can give a relatively high overall system thermal efficiency. Using a novel method of recovering waste heat from the gas turbine, a gross heat rate of 13,500 Btu/kWhr ({approximately}25% efficiency) can be achieved for a small 1.5 MW, plant. A low technology industrial recuperation type gas turbine is used that operates with an inlet blade temperature of 1450{degrees}F and a compression ratio of 3.9:1. The AFBC-HAGT technology can be used to generate power for remote rural communities to replace diesel generators, or can be used for small industrial co-generation applications.

Ashworth, R.C. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Orrville, OH (United States); Keener, H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States); Hall, A.W. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Self-powered automatic secondary air controllers for woodstoves and small furnaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A controller for automatically regulating the supply of secondary combustion air to woodstoves and small furnaces. The controller includes a movable air valve for controlling the amount of secondary air admitted into the chamber. A self powered means monitors the concentration of combustible gases and vapors and actuates the movable air valve to increase the supply of secondary air in response to increasing concentrations of the combustible gases and vapors. The self-powered means can be two fluid filled sensor bulbs, one of which has a coating of a combustion catalyst. Alternatively, the self powered means can be two metallic stripes laminated together, one of which is coated with a combustion catalyst, and when heated, causes the air valve to actuate.

Siemer, Darryl D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

DOE/EA-1498: Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky (01/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1498 EA-1498 Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky Final Environmental Assessment January 2005 Note: No comments were received during the public comment period from September 25 to October 25, 2004. Therefore, no changes to the Draft Environmental Assessment were necessary. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed Federal action is to provide funding, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF), Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), for the design, construction, and operation of an advanced coal ash beneficiation processing plant at Kentucky Utilities (KU) Ghent Power Station in Carroll County, Kentucky.

271

Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Three Human Factors Engineering Training Courses for Utilities Involved in New Nuclear Power Plant Designs, Construction and Operati on  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This product provides an assembled package of three Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed human factors engineering (HFE) training courses to support a range of needs. The training materials for these courses were developed for utility personnel involved in new nuclear power plant (NPP) design, construction and operation. The training material is also useful for vendors and other stakeholders. The primary focus of the HFE training courses is the main control room and its human-system interfa...

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sacramento Municipal Utility District, 100-MW photovoltaic power plant: draft environmental impact report  

SciTech Connect

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District proposes constructing a 100 MW solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. After a brief description of the proposed facility, including the location and an explanation of the need for it, the project-specific environmental analysis is presented. This addresses: geology/seismicity, soils, biological resources, land use, air quality, water resources, water quality, wastes management, public/occupational health, safety, energy and material resources, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and aesthetics. For each of these areas, the setting is described, impacts analyzed, mitigation measures given where appropriate, and cumulative impacts described. Unavoidable adverse environmental effects, irreversible environmental changes and irretrievable commitments of energy and materials are summarized. Also briefly summarized is the relationship between local short-term use of the environment and the maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity. Environmental benefits and disadvantages associated with various alternatives to building and operating the proposed solar photovoltaic power plant are described, considering project objectives other than producing electricity. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

$18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations...

275

Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities.

Information Center

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart™ provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

277

Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines utility experiences when offering the fixed-price benefits of renewable energy in green pricing programs, including the methods utilized and the impact on program participation. It focuses primarily on utility green pricing programs in states that have not undergone electric industry restructuring.

Bird, L. A.; Cory, K. S.; Swezey, B. G.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The ambiguous infrastructural ideal: the urbanisation of water and power and the 'golden age' of utility networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The ambiguous infrastructural ideal: the urbanisation of water and power and the 'golden age' of utility networks Denis Bocquet (CNRS-LATTS) and Fionn Mackillop (LATTS) Abstract Current debates around historically allowed for service universalization and the emergence of a "modern infrastructural ideal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily generation flexibility in the installed hydro capacity, the total annual energy produced, 2003] 6 #12;· Renewable (non-conventional hydro) energy generation. This includes wind, solar, conventional hydro power, and renewable energy capacities because these are already fully utilized. Nuclear

280

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind PowerUnder Uncertainty  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for evaluation of investments in small-scale wind power under uncertainty. It is assumed that the price of electricity is uncertain and that an owner of a property with wind resources has a deferrable opportunity to invest in one wind power turbine within a capacity range. The model evaluates investment in a set of projects with different capacity. It is assumed that the owner substitutes own electricity load with electricity from the wind mill and sells excess electricity back to the grid on an hourly basis. The problem for the owner is to find the price levels at which it is optimal to invest, and in which capacity to invest. The results suggests it is optimal to wait for significantly higher prices than the net present value break-even. Optimal scale and timing depend on the expected price growth rate and the uncertainty in the future prices.

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low-power, miniature {sup 171}Yb ion clock using an ultra-small vacuum package  

SciTech Connect

We report a demonstration of a very small microwave atomic clock using the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of the trapped {sup 171}Yb ions inside a miniature, completely sealed-off 3 cm{sup 3} ion-trap vacuum package. In the ion clock system, all of the components are highly miniaturized with low power consumption except the 369 nm optical pumping laser still under development for miniaturization. The entire clock, including the control electronics, consumes <300 mW. The fractional frequency instability of the miniature Yb{sup +} clock reaches the 10{sup -14} range after a few days of integration.

Jau, Y.-Y.; Schwindt, P. D. D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Partner, H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Prestage, J. D.; Kellogg, J. R.; Yu, N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Design and construction of an advanced power conditioning subsystem for small photovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect

The power inverter development described in this report is based on the technical approach development during a previous project funded by the US Department of Energy. That project was completed in mid-1981. During that investigation the high-frequency transformer-link power conditioning system was selected as the preferred approach. This approach appears to have the greatest potential for cost reduction when compared to other transformer-isolated designs because of its significant reduction of magnetic component size and weight. This report describes the details of a microcomputer-controlled 4 kW inverter design intended for residential applications. The theory of operation, detailed design, and some operational results are given. The inverter was designed to deliver utility quality power to the residential grid. Total harmonic current distortion of less than 5% and efficiencies around 90% were achieved. This report also gives reliability and cost analyses of the inverter and presents an equivalent circuit of the inverter useful for system analysis.

Steigerwald, R.L.; Bose, B.K.; Szczesny, P.M.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Survey of Instrumentation and Control Practices in the Process Industries for Application to the Power Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With impending deregulation and ever-tightening environmental constraints, utilities are increasing their emphasis on maximizing operating efficiency and reducing maintenance and operational costs. It is likely that utilities can use the capabilities of modern control and information management systems more effectively than they currently do. This report documents lessons learned over many years by experts in the process industries that might benefit the utility industry as it transitions to a competitiv...

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Manitowoc Public Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Utilities Public Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Manitowoc Public Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 11571 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

285

Power Harvesting for Sensors in Electric Power Utility Applications: State of Science Review and Test Bed Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The value of wireless sensor networks in remote locations or at high-voltage applications depends on the networks’ reliable operation for extended period of times without human intervention. Therefore, a major consideration when using wireless sensors is the problem of providing power to the sensors. Presently, wireless sensor nodes are commonly powered by batteries. This situation presents a substantial roadblock to the widespread deployment of wireless sensors due to battery lifetimes and other issues ...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Optimization of renewable power system for small scale seawater reverse osmosis desalination unit in Mrair-Gabis village, Libya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential of renewable power system for small scale seawater reverse osmosis desalination unit in Mrair-Gabis village, Libya is evaluated. HOMER optimization model is used to evaluate the different possible configuration options for supplying the electrical ... Keywords: HOMER, Mrair-Gabis-Libya, power system, reverse osmosis seawater desalination

Kh. Abulqasem; M. A. Alghoul; M. N. Mohammed; Alshrif. Mustafa; Kh. Glaisa; Nowshad. Amin; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Non-pulp utilization of above-ground biomass of mixed-species forests of small trees  

SciTech Connect

This solution proposes to rehabilitate annually - by clear felling, site preparation, and planting - 25,000 acres of level to rolling land averaging about 490 cubic feet per acre of stemwood in small hardwood trees 5 inches in diameter at breast height (dbh) and larger, and of many species, plus an equal volume of above-ground biomass in stembark and tops, and in trees smaller than 5 inches in dbh. By usual utilization procedures, such wood is an unmerchantable residue from the harvest of merchantable southern pines. On an annual basis, 398,265 tons (oven-dry basis) of such wood and bark will be harvested and converted in an energy self-sufficient plant to the following: 208,688 tons of structural flakeboard sheathing and decking (sold at $200/ton), 16,298 tons of decorative hardwood plywood ($400/ton), and 20.191 tons of long fabricated joists with parallel-laminated veneer flanges and flakeboard webs ($600/ton), for a total product yield of about 60% - all on a dry-weight basis. Following are projected operating results and other essential data for a three-shift operation: capital investment, including working capital, $50,000,000; operating costs, annual, $40,000,000; sales, annual, $60,371,400; net profit, annual (before income taxes) $20,371,400; return on sales 33.7%; return on investment 40.7%; number of mill employees (harvesting and planting are contracted 250; electrical energy purchased annually 0 kWh; diesel fuel and propane for front-end loaders and lift trucks (oil equivalent) 150,000 gallons; wood residues burned annually (oven-dry-weight basis), all available from mill residues. (Refs. 16).

Koch, P.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

UMCP-BG and E collaboration in nuclear power engineering in the framework of DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program has been established to support the education of students in Nuclear Engineering Programs to maintain a knowledgeable workforce in the United States in order to keep nuclear power as a viable component in a mix of energy sources for the country. The involvement of the utility industry ensures that this grant program satisfies the needs and requirements of local nuclear energy producers and at the same time establishes a strong linkage between education and day-to-day nuclear power generation. As of 1997, seventeen pairs of university-utility partners existed. UMCP was never a member of that group of universities, but applied for the first time with a proposal to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in January 1999 [1]. This proposal was generously granted by BG&E [2,3] in the form of a gift in the amount of $25,000 from BG&E's Corporate Contribution Program. Upon the arrival of a newly appointed Director of Administration in the Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, the BG&E check was deposited into the University's Maryland Foundation Fund. The receipt of the letter and the check enabled UMCP to apply for DOE's matching funds in the same amount by a proposal.

Wolfe, Lothar PhD

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Human Factors Engineering Training Course for Utilities Involved in New Nuclear Power Plant Designs, Construction, and Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides training materials for a three-day course in human factors engineering (HFE). The course was developed for utility personnel involved in new nuclear power plant (NPP) design and is also useful for vendors and other stakeholders. The primary focus of the HFE training is the main control room and its human-system interfaces (HSIs). However, it also addresses other operator work locations such as the remote shutdown station, local control stations, and emergency response facilities. In ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hustisford Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hustisford Utilities Hustisford Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Hustisford Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9124 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional Time-of-Day Service Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional

291

Documenting Wind Speed and Power Deficits behind a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-spatial-and-temporal-resolution radial velocity measurements surrounding a single utility-scale wind turbine were collected using the Texas Tech University Ka-band mobile research radars. The measurements were synthesized to construct the ...

Brian D. Hirth; John L. Schroeder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Integrated Control of Active and Reactive Power Flow Controllers to Optimize Transmission System Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized power system control requires oversight of numerous control elements to efficiently and reliably transfer power across the system. The objective of this project was to minimize losses in the Consolidated Edison Electric power system via modification of control variables available to the system operator. These variables include generator voltages, transformer voltage/phase angle tap set points, and switched shunt status. System constraints include bus voltages, branch/interface flow limits, ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Studies of solar hybrid repowering of utility electric-power plants (interim report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A baseline repowering configuration used as a reference is defined, and the potential benefits of repowering are outlined from the programmatic, utility, and national viewpoints. The market size for solar repowering is reviewed with the split by plants and their requirements imposed on solar technology and plant design. Various solar technology implementation options are discussed. Highlights of the key results of studies on the economics of integration of solar repowered plants into utility systems are presented. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage performance on the Bonneville Power Administration utility transmission system*  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western U.S. Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. The unit can follow a sinusoidal power demand signal with an amplitude of up to 8.6 MW with the converter working in a 12 pulse mode. When the converter operates in the constant VAR mode, a time varying real power demand signal of up to 5 MW can be met. Experiments showed that the Pacific AC Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. In this mode, the energy of the power spectrum is not concentrated at one frequency to avoid exciting a resonance frequency of the ac transmission system. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined. Accurate power system data are necessary for tuning the control algorithm so that the SMES unit can operate in the closed loop stabilizer mode.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demonstration of a Small Modular BioPower System Using Poultry Litter  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to assess poultry grower residue, or litter (manure plus absorbent biomass), as a fuel source for Community Power Corporation's small modular biopower system (SMB). A second objective was to assess the poultry industry to identify potential ''on-site'' applications of the SMB system using poultry litter residue as a fuel source, and to adapt CPC's existing SMB to generate electricity and heat from the poultry litter biomass fuel. Bench-scale testing and pilot testing were used to gain design information for the SMB retrofit. System design approach for the Phase II application of the SMB was the goal of Phase I testing. Cost estimates for an onsite poultry litter SMB were prepared. Finally, a market estimate was prepared for implementation of the on-farm SMB using poultry litter.

John P. Reardon; Art Lilley; Jim Wimberly; Kingsbury Browne; Kelly Beard; Jack Avens

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

Demonstration of a Small Modular BioPower System Using Poultry Litter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to assess poultry grower residue, or litter (manure plus absorbent biomass), as a fuel source for Community Power Corporation's small modular biopower system (SMB). A second objective was to assess the poultry industry to identify potential ''on-site'' applications of the SMB system using poultry litter residue as a fuel source, and to adapt CPC's existing SMB to generate electricity and heat from the poultry litter biomass fuel. Bench-scale testing and pilot testing were used to gain design information for the SMB retrofit. System design approach for the Phase II application of the SMB was the goal of Phase I testing. Cost estimates for an onsite poultry litter SMB were prepared. Finally, a market estimate was prepared for implementation of the on-farm SMB using poultry litter.

John P. Reardon; Art Lilley; Jim Wimberly; Kingsbury Browne; Kelly Beard; Jack Avens

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mars Pathfinder Microrover A Small, Low-Cost, Low-Power Spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On December 5, 1996, NASA will launch its first Discovery Class Mission, the Mars Pathfinder. On July 4, 1997 the 450 kg spacecraft will enter into the Martian atmosphere and descend directly to the surface using a viking style aeroshell, parachutes, RAD rockets, and airbags to slow its decent. Once on the surface the tetrahedrally-shaped lander will open like a flower and release a 10.5 kg rover previously to the inside surface of one of the lander's three deployable petals. The rover will then drive off the lander and begin to perform a wide range of scientific and technological experiments. The significance of the rover is that although it is formally part of the mission's instrument payload, it is in reality a small spacecraft. It performs all the functions that a typical spacecraft performs including: navigation; command and data handling (command execution, data acquisition, telemetry packetization); power generation, distribution, and control; thermal control; telecommunications...

Henry Stone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

New London Electric&Water Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Util Util Jump to: navigation, search Name New London Electric&Water Util Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13467 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

299

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public paper: Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System, dated September 13, 2007. The Grant done a very thorough job of assessing the current and future carbon dioxide footprints of the Northwest

300

Village of Prairie Du Sac, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Du Sac, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Du Sac, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Prairie Du Sac Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15312 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service Industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume IV. Comparative ranking of concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is presented. Cogeneration and total energy systems were beyond the scope of this study. Seven generic type of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. With these engine options, 10 systems were formulated for analysis. This is the fourth volume of a five-volume report on the work performed to analyze the alternative concepts, and the results obtained. Included in this volume are descriptions of the methodology used with, and concept ranks obtained from, potential users and R and D fund allocators.

Currie, J.W.; Jannol, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume III. Analysis of concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is given. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces; (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting suraces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. This volume describes the systems analyses performed on all the alternative configurations of the seven generic collector concepts and the results obtained. The SOLSTEP computer code used to determine each configuration's system cost and performance is briefly described. The collector and receiver performance calculations used are also presented. The capital investment and related costs that were obtained from the systems studies are presented, and the levelized energy costs are given as a function of capacity factor obtained from the systems studies. Included also are the values of the other attributes used in the concepts' final ranking. The comments, conclusions, and recommendations developed by the PNL study team during the concept characterization and systems analysis tasks of the study are presented. (WHK)

Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

International partnerships in renewable energy: Promoting climate challenge partnerships by small U.S. utilities. Fourth project report, October 1997--March 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1997, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) received a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to implement a program to promote the participation of NRECA members in the President`s Climate Challenge Action Plan. NRECA had been in discussions with Salt River Project (SRP) and the Arizona Electric Power Cooperative (AEPCO) to pursue the opportunity of supporting a small solar energy rural electrification project in Sonora prior to the signature of this agreement. When the Climate Challenge project was approved, an agreement between NRECA, SRP, and AEPCO was reached to implement the Sonora project with funding from DOE, SRP, and AEPCO. This periodic report will summarize the results of the Sonora solar electrification project. While other Climate Challenge activities were also underway during this reporting period, due to the impact of this project it was decided to provide an in-depth report of this single project. Information directly relevant to the actions taken on this project is provided in Annexes 1 and 2. The goals of the Sonora Solar Electrification project were the following: (1) demonstrate the willingness and ability of US electric utilities to undertake a climate challenge project using renewable energy technologies; (2) select one or more communities distant from the electric grid with sufficient interest and resources to accept and sustain rural electric service using solar photovoltaic energy; (3) organize a payment system that would provide for the long-term technical and institutional viability of the project; (4) train users to operate the solar home systems safely and within proper operating parameters; (5) train local technicians to maintain the solar home systems; (6) procure and install high quality equipment at affordable costs; and (7) ascertain market conditions for expansion of program in the future.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Independent Power Independent Power Producer Financing Co-op Financing Cost of Energy (cents /kWh) 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 Installed Wind Turbine Capacity 2 MW 10 MW 50 MW 50 MW Without Federal incentives (current $) With Federal incentives (current $) WIND ECONOMICS AT A GLANCE Wind power is one of mankind's oldest energy sources. In 1700, the most powerful machines in Europe were Dutch windmills. During the 1930s, half a million windmills pumped water on the Great Plains. Today's wind turbine is a far cry from the old water pumpers. By using state-of-the-art engineering, wind turbine manufacturers have produced sleek, highly efficient machines that produce inexpensive electricity, and lots of it. Depending on their size and location, wind farms can produce electricity for 4-6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

306

Utilizing Load Response for Wind and Solar Integration and Power System Reliability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Responsive load is still the most underutilized reliability resource in North America. This paper examines the characteristics of concern to the power system, the renewables, and to the loads.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of wind turbine and related technology for both onshore and offshore applications and presents the results of an engineering and economic evaluation of the performance and cost of onshore and offshore wind power plants.

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Computer simulation of the operations of utility grid connected photovoltaic power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the commercial viability of photovoltaic power systems it is necessary to have reliable estimates and descriptions of the supply of electricity generated by the solar technology, the demand for that electricity, and the market application. ...

Chester S. Borden

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Test of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell / Uninterruptible Power Supply for Electric Utility Battery Replacement Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sub-scale polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell/capacitor uninterruptible power supply (UPS) was designed and constructed based on previous research. Testing of this sub-scale UPS as a replacement for existing battery systems is documented in this report. The project verified that the PEM fuel cells, coupled with an ultracapacitor, could functionally replace batteries used for emergency power at electric generating stations. Remaining steps to commercialization include continuing market research...

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

The influence of utility - interactive PV system characteristics to AC power network  

SciTech Connect

Two experimental PV systems are constructed and operated. One is a system with a line-commutated inverter and another uses a self-commutated inverter and is operated alone as an independent power source when the power network is in trouble. Operating and generating characteristics have been measured for the line-commutated inverter system and for the self-commutated inverter system connected to the Ac simulated network which simulates the actual power distribution system. For the system voltage fluctuation, amplitude of variation in AC voltage was measured at the joining point of the simulated distribution network connected to the PV system by changing the system short circuit current ration. For the harmonics characteristics, the line-commutated inverter system is a harmonic current power source and the self-commutated inverter system is a harmonic voltage power source. The protective sequence for failures in the power system or PV system is also studied. An optimum protection control method with an emphasis on safety is proposed for the self-commutated inverter system. This paper also describes examples of failures in solar cell arrays during the operation of these PV systems and proposes data for improving the reliability of solar cell arrays.

Takeda, Y.; Kaminosono, H.; Takigawa, K.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Utility Activities for Nuclear Power Plant Life Cycle Management and License Renewal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to nuclear utilities on steps to take, industry activities undertaken, and products developed for life cycle management and license renewal (LCM/LR) activities. It provides information for establishing LCM/LR programs and may be useful to those underway.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Public Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Public Power The U.S. utility market consists of investor-owned utilities, public-owned utilities, cooperatives, and Federal utilities. The information below shows you what three public power markets are doing with wind energy. An image of the cover of the Wind Power for Municipal Utilities publication. Wind Power for Rural Electric Utilities The nation's electric cooperative utilities have begun to include wind power in their energy supply portfolios. Read the stories of four wind power pioneers. Wind Power for Municipal Utilities From Oregon to Maine, municipal utilities are beginning to harness the wind. Read stories about six of the early pioneers, ranging in size from small to large. Public-Owned Utilities

313

Jefferson Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jefferson Utilities Jefferson Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9690 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional Time-of-Day Service 7am-9pm with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional

314

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume III. Analysis of concepts  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is given. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces; (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting suraces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. This volume describes the systems analyses performed on all the alternative configurations of the seven generic collector concepts and the results obtained. The SOLSTEP computer code used to determine each configuration's system cost and performance is briefly described. The collector and receiver performance calculations used are also presented. The capital investment and related costs that were obtained from the systems studies are presented, and the levelized energy costs are given as a function of capacity factor obtained from the systems studies. Included also are the values of the other attributes used in the concepts' final ranking. The comments, conclusions, and recommendations developed by the PNL study team during the concept characterization and systems analysis tasks of the study are presented. (WHK)

Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

City of Princeton, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin Wisconsin Utility Id 15385 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Commercial Cp-2 Large Power Service Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-2 TOD Large Power Optional Time-of-Day Service with Parallel

316

ORNL R and D on advanced small and medium power reactors: Selected topics  

SciTech Connect

From 1984-1985, ORNL studied several innovative small and medium power nuclear concepts with respect to viability. Criteria for assessment of market attractiveness were developed and are described here. Using these criteria and descriptions of selected advanced reactor concepts, and assessment of their projected market viability in the time period 2000-2010 was made. All of these selected concepts could be considered as having the potential for meeting the criteria but, in most cases, considerable RandD would be required to reduce uncertainties. This work and later studies of safety and licensing of advanced, passively safe reactor concepts by ORNL are described. The results of these studies are taken into account in most of the current (FY 1989) work at ORNL on advanced reactors. A brief outline of this current work is given. One of the current RandD efforts at ORNL which addresses the operability and safety of advanced reactors is the Advanced Controls Program. Selected topics from this Program are described. 13 refs., 1 fig.

White, J.D.; Trauger, D.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Village of Pardeeville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pardeeville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Pardeeville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Pardeeville Place Wisconsin Utility Id 14451 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

318

Village of New Glarus, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glarus, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Glarus, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of New Glarus Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13438 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel

319

City of New Lisbon, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin (Utility Company) Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of New Lisbon Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13466 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

320

Village of Mt Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Horeb, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mt Horeb Village of Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13036 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

City of Clintonville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clintonville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Clintonville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Clintonville Place Wisconsin Utility Id 3814 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

322

City of Richland Center, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin (Utility Company) Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Richland Center Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15978 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

323

City of New Holstein, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin (Utility Company) Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of New Holstein Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13448 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

324

Village of Cadott, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cadott, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Cadott, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Cadott Place Wisconsin Utility Id 2759 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount & Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount & Transformer Ownership

325

Optimal consumption and investment with bounded downside risk for power utility functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate optimal consumption and investment problems for a Black-Scholes market under uniform restrictions on Value-at-Risk and Expected Shortfall. We formulate various utility maximization problems, which can be solved explicitly. We compare the optimal solutions in form of optimal value, optimal control and optimal wealth to analogous problems under additional uniform risk bounds. Our proofs are partly based on solutions to Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, and we prove a corresponding verification theorem. This work was supported by the European Science Foundation through the AMaMeF programme.

Kluppelberg, Claudia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Solar cogeneration: Cimarron River station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The site-specific conceptual design progress is described for a solar central receiver cogeneration facility at a Kansas utility. The process is described which led to the selection of the preferred solar cogeneration facility. The status of the conceptual design is presented. The evaluation of system performance is described. A test program is described that is to determine the magnitude of impact that local environmental factors have on collector system performance and to measure the direct normal insolation at the cogeneration facility site. The system specification is appended. (LEW)

Harder, J.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

High geothermal energy utilization geothermal/fossil hybrid power cycle: a preliminary investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combining geothermal and fossil fuel energy into the so-called hybrid cycle is compared with a state-of-the-art double-flash geothermal power cycle using resources which vary from 429/sup 0/K (312/sup 0/F) to 588/sup 0/K (598/sup 0/F). It is demonstrated that a hybrid plant can compete thermodynamically with the combined output from both a fossil-fired and a geothermal plant operating separately. Economic comparison of the hybrid and double-flash cycles is outlined, and results are presented that indicate the performance of marginal hydrothermal resources may be improved enough to compete with existing power cycles on a cost basis. It is also concluded that on a site-specific basis a hybrid cycle is capable of complementing double-flash cycles at large-capacity resources, and can operate in a cycling load mode at constant geothermal fluid flow rate.

Grijalva, R. L.; Sanemitsu, S. K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

European legislation in the United Kingdom: a threat to coal-fired power station product utilization?  

SciTech Connect

The author considers that the European Union has not taken the approach adopted in the USA where environmental regulators are keen to promote the use of coal-fired power station ash by-product and recycled materials. The United Kingdom has seen, with some dismay, the effects EU legislation is having on the ash industry. This article outlines only some of the problems being tackled. The Waste Framework Directive is difficult to interpret and fails to define critical aspects of the problem. This directive is discussed at some length in the article. A total of nine directives effect the operation of coal-fired power plant. Many are imprecise and open to interpretation and cause a deal of frustration, delays and confusion to the ash supplier and contractor. This is causing markets to suffer.

Sear, K.A. [Quality Ash Association (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Enloe power development feasibility assessment report. Public utility district No. 1 of Okanogan County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of rehabilitating an existing power house at the Enloe Dam in Washington was evaluated with consideration of expected power production, social and environmental impacts, regulatory aspects, technical requirements, financing, costs, and market potential. This assessment showed that rebuilding the existing powerhouse and appurtenant facilities is technically feasible. Rebuilding the existing turbines and generators proved to be the most desirable of three alternatives considered. The following four factors lead to this conclusion: rebuilding the old equipment is less costly than installing new turbines and generators; no major structural changes to the powerhouse would be required; rebuilding the turbines with increased flow capacity made the rebuilding alternative competitive with new equipment from an energy production standpoint; and rebuilding is compatible with the Enloe site's recent addition to the National Register of Historic Places.

None

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

{open_quotes}Secure Bus{close_quotes} disturbance-free power at the utility substation level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 18 months Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), El Camino Real Engineering, Inc. (CRE), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have worked on the development of disturbance-free power at the medium voltage substation level. The work resulted in the Secure Bus concept, a system in which a medium voltage bus in a substation is immune to power outages and voltage sags on the utility source. The Secure Bus voltage is also immune to voltage sags resulting from faults on any distribution feeder connected to the bus. The Secure Bus concept originated from work conducted to improve power quality for large high-tech manufacturing facilities, in particular for large semiconductor manufacturing plants. For the demands on quality power of a modern facility conventional equipment is not adequate for protecting the end user. For example, the operation of conventional vacuum breakers during short circuit conditions on a feeder circuit, requiring 3 to 5 cycles for breaker opening, does not allow for fast enough current interruption to avoid a voltage dip on the main bus. A sever voltage sag could result in a shut down of sensitive equipment being supplied by the other feeder circuits, which are connected to the main bus. The circumvent the problem, a fast breaker was introduced which interrupts the short circuit before the current causes a significant voltage disturbance. To make the bus immune also to power disturbances caused by power outages, energy storage is introduced to provide the necessary energy back-up in case the primary source is not available.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jones, W.H. [El Camino Real Engineering, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Re-Examining first principles of regulation: NRG power marketing, LLC v. Maine public utilities Commission  

SciTech Connect

Maine PUC and Morgan Stanley have resolved some of the key issues facing the energy industry. The Supreme Court has plainly and directly in both cases reaffirmed the central role that private contracts play in the energy industry and set terms to balance the need to secure long-term investment with the public interest that lies at the heart of the Federal Power Act. (author)

Haskell, Mark R.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Investigation of a family of power conditioners integrated into a utility grid: final report Category I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted of the requirements for and technologies applicable to power conditioning equipment in residential solar photovoltaic systems. A survey of companies known or thought to manufacture power conditioning equipment was conducted to asses the technology. Technical issues regarding ac and dc interface requirements were studied. A baseline design was selected to be a good example of existing technology which would not need significant development effort for its implementation. Alternative technologies are evaluated to determine which meet the baseline specification, and their costs and losses are evaluated. Areas in which cost improvements can be obtained are studied, and the three best candidate technologies--the current-sourced converter, the HF front end converter, and the programmed wave converter--are compared. It is concluded that the designs investigated will meet, or with slight improvement could meet, short term efficiency goals. Long term efficiency goals could be met if an isolation transformer were not required in the power conditioning equipment. None of the technologies studied can meet cost goals unless further improvements are possible. (LEW)

Wood, P.; Putkovich, R.P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

None

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Juneau Utility Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comm Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Juneau Utility Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9936 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering

338

Many Small Consumers, One Growing Problem: Achieving Energy Savings for Electronic Equipment Operating in Low Power Modes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Consumers, One Growing Problem: Achieving Energy Savings Small Consumers, One Growing Problem: Achieving Energy Savings for Electronic Equipment Operating in Low Power Modes Christopher Payne, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Alan Meier, International Energy Agency ABSTRACT An increasing amount of electricity is used by equipment that is neither fully "on" nor fully "off." We call these equipment states low power modes, or "lopomos." "Standby" and "sleep" are the most familiar lopomos, but some new products already have many modes. Lopomos are becoming common in household appliances, safety equipment, and miscellaneous products. Ross and Meier (2000) reports that several international studies have found standby power to be as much as 10% of residential energy consumption. Lopomo energy consumption is

339

NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Village of Sauk City, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Village of Sauk City Village of Sauk City Place Wisconsin Utility Id 16680 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount Industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

City of Plymouth, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plymouth Plymouth Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15159 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Secondary Voltage Metering with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Secondary Voltage Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Secondary Voltage Metering Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Secondary Voltage Service Industrial

342

Analysis of an improved solar-powered cooling system utilizing open-cycle absorbent regeneration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar-powered cooling system which promises high system C.O.P.'s and low collector costs is analyzed. It consists of a desiccant and an absorption cooling system operating in series to both dry and cool the air. A common solution of lithium chloride is used as the absorbant. The lithium chloride solution is regenerated by evaporating the excess water to the atmosphere in an ''open'' collector. This collector consists merely of a blackened flat surface. The weak solution of lithium chloride is introduced at the top of the collector and then flows by gravity over the entire collector surface where it is subsequently heated and dried. The daily performance of this combined system is compared by computer simulation to that of either an absorption or desiccant system alone using actual weather data for five typical U.S. cities. The performance improvement of the combined system ranged from 25% to 95%, the greatest improvement being for humid, windy conditions.

Collier, R.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An assessment of the use of direct contact condensers with wet cooling systems for utility steam power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential use of a direct contact condenser for steam recovery at the turbine exhaust of a utility power plant using a wet cooling system is investigated. To maintain condensate separate from the cooling water, a bank of plate heat exchangers is used. In a case study for a nominal 130-MW steam power plant, two heat rejection systems, one using a conventional surface condenser and another using a direct contact condenser together with a set of plate heat exchangers are compared on the basis of their performance, operation and maintenance, and system economics. Despite a higher initial cost for the direct contact system, the advantages it offers suggests that this system is viable both technically and economically. Key to the improvements the direct contact system offers is a higher equivalent availability for the power system. Reduction of dissolved oxygen and other metallic ions in the condensate, reduced use of chemical scavengers and polishers, and potential elimination of a plant floor are also major benefits of this system. Drawbacks include added plant components and higher initial cost. The potential for long-term cost reduction for the direct contact system is also identified.

Bharathan, D.; Hoo, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); D`Errico, P. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Fort Valley Utility Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Comm Utility Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Valley Utility Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 6617 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL: #20 Commercial INDUSTRIAL LARGE POWER: #26/28 Industrial INSTITUTIONAL: #14 Commercial Industrial Small Power Industrial RESIDENTIAL: #10 Residential SMALL COMMERCIAL: #22 Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0787/kWh Commercial: $0.1030/kWh Industrial: $0.0772/kWh References

345

Evidence for departure from a power-law flare size distribution for a small solar active region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active region 11029 was a small, highly flare-productive solar active region observed at a time of extremely low solar activity. The region produced only small flares: the largest of the $>70$ Geostationary Observational Environmental Satellite (GOES) events for the region has a peak 1--$8{\\AA}$ flux of $2.2\\times 10^{-6} {\\rm W} {\\rm m}^{-2}$ (GOES C2.2). The background-subtracted GOES peak-flux distribution suggests departure from power-law behavior above $10^{-6} {\\rm W} {\\rm m}^{-2}$, and a Bayesian model comparison strongly favors a power-law plus rollover model for the distribution over a simple power-law model. The departure from the power law is attributed to this small active region having a finite amount of energy. The rate of flaring in the region varies with time, becoming very high for two days coinciding with the onset of an increase in complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. The observed waiting-time distribution for events is consistent with a piecewise-constant Poisson model. These res...

Wheatland, M S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates {mu}- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k {approx}window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido, E-mail: jchluba@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

SciTech Connect

Large blackouts, such as the August 14-15, 2003 blackout in the northeasternUnited States and Canada, focus attention on the importance of reliable electric service. As public and private efforts are undertaken to improve reliability and prevent power interruptions, it is appropriate to assess their effectiveness. Measures of reliability, such as the frequency and duration of power interruptions, have been reported by electric utilities to state public utility commissions for many years. This study examines current state and utility practices for collecting and reporting electricity reliability information and discusses challenges that arise in assessing reliability because of differences among these practices. The study is based primarily on reliability information for 2006 reported by 123 utilities to 37 state public utility commissions.

LaCommare, Kristina H.; Eto, Joseph H.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability of biomass as transportation fuel depends upon the allocation of limited resources for fuel, power, and products. By focusing on mature markets, this report identifies how biomass is projected to be most economically used in the long term and the implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and petroleum use. In order to better understand competition for biomass between these markets and the potential for biofuel as a market-scale alternative to petroleum-based fuels, this report presents results of a micro-economic analysis conducted using the Biomass Allocation and Supply Equilibrium (BASE) modeling tool. The findings indicate that biofuels can outcompete biopower for feedstocks in mature markets if research and development targets are met. The BASE tool was developed for this project to analyze the impact of multiple biomass demand areas on mature energy markets. The model includes domestic supply curves for lignocellulosic biomass resources, corn for ethanol and butanol production, soybeans for biodiesel, and algae for diesel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Ruth, M.; Mai, T.; Newes, E.; Aden, A.; Warner, E.; Uriarte, C.; Inman, D.; Simpkins, T.; Argo, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.  

SciTech Connect

The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Opportunities for Small Geothermal Projects: Rural Power for Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Philippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide information on small geothermal project (less than 5 MW) opportunities in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Philippines. This overview of issues facing small geothermal projects is intended especially for those who are not already familiar with small geothermal opportunities. This is a summary of issues and opportunities and serves as a starting point in determining next steps to develop this market.

Vimmerstedt, L.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Generation, Distributed Generation, Risk Analysis,both central and distributed generation is needed. Small-Among proponents of distributed generation there is a desire

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Offshore Wind Power - Opportunity and strategy for a small engineering consultants firm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??GVA is a small engineering consultancy firm, with specialized focus in design of floating structures such as oil production platforms. The key business is at… (more)

Jobson Sellström, Carin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTMENT TIMING AND CAPACITY CHOICE FOR SMALL-SCALE WINDvalue as a func- tion of capacity is declining because ais reduced with increased capacity. A possible approach for

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers & Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) that was enacted to promote conservation and to...

355

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. S. Schwartz, Electricity prices and power derivatives –is a thresh- old level of electricity prices at which theinformation about electricity prices equals the marginal net

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume II. Identification and characterization of concepts for analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to provide DOE with an independent, objective assessment of the principal solar thermal conversion concepts that have the potential for achieving commercial success as small electric power sytems in the 1- to 10-MWe range. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered in this study. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). These collectors can be combined with energy transport, energy storage, and power conversion subsystems in a wide variety of ways to formulate conceptual systems for electric power generation. In this study, attention was restricted to configurations that are potentially suitable for development as small power systems (1 to 10 MWe) in the long term (1990 to 2000), with initial commercialization by the mid-1980s. Cogeneration and total energy systems were beyond the scope of this study. All seven types of collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. Because they can operate at particularly high concentration ratios, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were also analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines. In addition, the latter of the two was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. With these engine options, 10 conceptual systems were formulated for analysis. Results are presented in detail. (WHK)

Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Williams, T.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project. Pennsylvania Hydroelectric Development Corporation Flat Rock Dam: Project summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho, Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program was initiated in conjunction with the restoration of three power generating plants in Idaho Falls, Idaho, following damage caused by the Teton Dam failure on June 5, 1976. There were many parties interested in this project, including the state and environmental groups, with different concerns. This report was prepared by the developer and describes the design alternatives the applicant provided in an attempt to secure the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license. Also included are correspondence between the related parties concerning the project, major design alternatives/project plan diagrams, the license, and energy and project economics.

Gleeson, L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Preferences and concerns of potential users in the selection of solar thermal systems for industrial and small utility applications  

SciTech Connect

To achieve widespready application in the industrial and utility sectors, solar systems must be economically competitive. Economic viability is, in turn, determined by a number of supporting criteria, ranging from system reliability to dispatch characteristics to how the system supports the main product line. In addition, solar systems possess some inherent attributes that may render some of the traditional supporting criteria inappropriate or require their redefinition. Those criteria and their relation to the solar investments are discussed in three steps. First, the main concerns and preferences of the potential users, as identified in recent SERI studies, are identified. Second, the equitability of the resulting decision criteria for solar investments are examined. Finally, the implications of these criteria for solar energy's penetration into these markets are discussed.

Gresham, J.B.; Kriz, T.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Self-powered automatic secondary air controllers for woodstoves and small furnaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the regulation of combustion in woodstoves, small furnaces and the like, so as to produce efficient combustion, while maximizing the possible heat output and minimizing air pollution. More specifically, the invention relates to controllers for automatically regulating and the supply of secondary combustion air to woodstoves, small furnaces or the like. 9 figs.

Siemer, D.D.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Waupun Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waupun Utilities Waupun Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Waupun Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20213 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Renewable Energy Residential Residential Small Power Industrial Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.0968/kWh Industrial: $0.0770/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

362

Litchfield Public Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Utilities Public Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Public Utilities Place Minnesota Utility Id 11064 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single Phase General Service- Three Phase Commercial Large Power Commercial Residential Residential Rural Residential Small Power Commercial Wind Power Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0876/kWh Commercial: $0.0932/kWh Industrial: $0.0686/kWh

363

Optimal control in energy conversion of small wind power systems with permanent-magnet-synchronous-generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experimental investigation of a low-power wind energy conversion system (WECS), based on a permanent-magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) connected directly to the turbine. A development system was built in order to ... Keywords: hardware-in-the-loop simulation, maximum power point tracking, optimal control, permanent-magnet synchronous generator, wind system

C. Vlad; I. Munteanu; A. I. Bratcu; E. Ceanga

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Early, Cost-Effective Applications of Photovoltaics in the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV)-powered systems can compete economically with conventional utility approaches such as distribution line extensions and step-down transformer installation for powering small electric loads. This study identified more than 60 cost-effective applications of PV-powered systems for utilities and their customers.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Village of Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) (Redirected from City of Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company)) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Muscoda Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13145 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

367

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

City of Bangor, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin (Utility Company) Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangor City of Place Wisconsin Utility Id 1181 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial Cp-2 Large Power Service Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service Primary Metering Discount & Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service Primary Metering Discount & Transformer Ownership

369

Village of Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Muscoda Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13145 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

370

Superconducting Power Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power cables constructed from superconducting materials are being realized in utility demonstrations within the United States. Cooled by liquid nitrogen, high temperature superconducting power cables can transfer large amounts of power through relatively small cross sections. The key to their high power capacity is the high current density inherent with superconductors; a superconducting wire can conduct several times as much current as copper or aluminum conductors of the same cross section. For the pas...

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Customer adoption of small-scale on-site power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 p ($/kW) Regulated tariff for energy purchases during hourthe Tariff scenario installed capacity is high, while energytariff type, a monthly- ratcheted power charge and an energy

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Rubio, F. Javier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

373

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter - March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the First Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 204 to 224, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,246 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 259 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. Of the 224 signed contracts and committed projects, 70 were cogeneration and solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 687 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 30 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 744 MW to 821 MW, and 12 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 118 MW to 126 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 17, with a generating capability of 330 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 9 wind farm projects, totaling 184 to 189 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 9 other projects under active discussion. There are 38 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 103 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 183 MW. In addition, there are 29 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of March 31, 1983.

None

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

New small HTGR power plant concept with inherently safe features - an engineering and economic challenge  

SciTech Connect

Studies are in a very early design stage to establish a modular concept High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant of about 100-MW(e) size to meet the special needs of small energy users in the industrialized and developing nations. The basic approach is to design a small system in which, even under the extreme conditions of loss of reactor pressure and loss of forced core cooling, the temperature would remain low enough so that the fuel would retain essentially all the fission products and the owner's investment would not be jeopardized. To realize economic goals, the designer faces the challenge of providing a standardized nuclear heat source, relying on a high percentage of factory fabrication to reduce site construction time, and keeping the system simple. While the proposed nuclear plant concept embodies new features, there is a large technology base to draw upon for the design of a small HTGR.

McDonald, C.F.; Sonn, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

New small HTGR power plant concept with inherently safe features - an engineering and economic challenge  

SciTech Connect

Studies are in a very early design stage to establish a modular concept High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant of about 100-MW(e) size to meet the special needs of small energy users in the industrialized and developing nations. The basic approach is to design a small system in which, even under the extreme conditions of loss of reactor pressure and loss of forced core cooling, the temperature would remain low enough so that the fuel would retain essentially all the fission products and the owner's investment would not be jeopardized. To realize economic goals, the designer faces the challenge of providing a standardized nuclear heat source, relying on a high percentage of factory fabrication to reduce site construction time, and keeping the system simple. While the proposed nuclear plant concept embodies new features, there is a large technology base to draw upon for the design of a small HTGR.

McDonald, C.F.; Sonn, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Comparison of large central and small decentralized power generation in India  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This reports evaluates two options for providing reliable power to rural areas in India. The benefits and costs are compared for biomass based distributed generation (DG) systems versus a 1200-MW central grid coal-fired power plant. The biomass based DG systems are examined both as alternatives to grid extension and as supplements to central grid power. The benefits are divided into three categories: those associated with providing reliable power from any source, those associated specifically with biomass based DG technology, and benefits of a central grid coal plant. The report compares the estimated delivered costs of electricity from the DG systems to those of the central plant. The analysis includes estimates for a central grid coal plant and four potential DG system technologies: Stirling engines, direct-fired combustion turbines, fuel cells, and biomass integrated gasification combined cycles. The report also discusses issues affecting India`s rural electricity demand, including economic development, power reliability, and environmental concerns. The results of the costs of electricity comparison between the biomass DG systems and the coal-fired central grid station demonstrated that the DG technologies may be able to produce very competitively priced electricity by the start of the next century. The use of DG technology may provide a practical means of addressing many rural electricity issues that India will face in the future. Biomass DG technologies in particular offer unique advantages for the environment and for economic development that will make them especially attractive. 58 refs., 31 figs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Statistical Characterization of Solar Photovoltaic Power Variability at Small Timescales: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Integrating large amounts of variable and uncertain solar photovoltaic power into the electricity grid is a growing concern for power system operators in a number of different regions. Power system operators typically accommodate variability, whether from load, wind, or solar, by carrying reserves that can quickly change their output to match the changes in the solar resource. At timescales in the seconds-to-minutes range, this is known as regulation reserve. Previous studies have shown that increasing the geographic diversity of solar resources can reduce the short term-variability of the power output. As the price of solar has decreased, the emergence of very large PV plants (greater than 10 MW) has become more common. These plants present an interesting case because they are large enough to exhibit some spatial smoothing by themselves. This work examines the variability of solar PV output among different arrays in a large ({approx}50 MW) PV plant in the western United States, including the correlation in power output changes between different arrays, as well as the aggregated plant output, at timescales ranging from one second to five minutes.

Shedd, S.; Hodge, B.-M.; Florita, A.; Orwig, K.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP while demonstrating the ICCT CT-121 FGD Project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is performing comprehensive assessments of toxic emissions from eight selected coal-fired electric utility units. This program responds to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utility power plants for Potential health risks. The resulting data will be furnished to EPA utility power plants and health risk determinations. The assessment of emissions involves the collection and analysis of samples from the major input, process, and output streams of each of the eight power plants for selected hazardous Pollutants identified in Title III of the Clean Air Act. Additional goals are to determine the removal efficiencies of pollution control subsystems for these selected pollutants and the Concentrations associated with the particulate fraction of the flue gas stream as a function of particle size. Material balances are being performed for selected pollutants around the entire power plant and several subsystems to identify the fate of hazardous substances in each utility system. Radian Corporation was selected to perform a toxics assessment at a plant demonstrating an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project. The site selected is Plant Yates Unit No. 1 of Georgia Power Company, which includes a Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 demonstration project.

Not Available

1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Off-grid Power for Small Communities with Renewable Energy Sources in Rural Guatemalan Villages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract--This paper describes the process used to plan, design, and implement an off-grid electrical system for a village with less than 50 homes in rural Guatemala. The community has a small school, community center, community kitchen, and 43 homes/families. ... Keywords: photovoltaic, hydroelectric, Guatemala, battery, EWB, Engineers Without Borders, solar energy, microhydro, off-grid.

Eugene D. Moe; Andrea P. Moe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Techno-economic projections for advanced small solar thermal electric power plants to years 1990--2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced technologies applicable to solar thermal electric power systems in the 1990--2000 time-frame are delineated for power applications that fulfill a wide spectrum of small power needs with primary emphasis on power ratings <10 MWe. Techno-economic projections of power system characteristics (energy and capital costs as a function of capacity factor) are made based on development of identified promising technologies. The key characteristic of advanced technology systems is an efficient low-cost solar energy collection while achieving high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. Two-axis tracking systems such as the central receiver or power tower concept and distributed parabolic dish receivers possess this characteristic. For these two basic concepts, advanced technologies including, e.g., conversion systems such as Stirling engines, Brayton/Rankine combined cycles and storage/transport concepts encompassing liquid metals, and reversible-reaction chemical systems are considered. In addition to techno-economic aspects, technologies are also judged in terms of factors such as developmental risk, relative reliability, and probability of success. Improvements accruing to projected advanced technology systems are measured with respect to current (or pre-1985) steam-Rankine systems, as represented by the central receiver pilot plant being constructed near Barstow, California. These improvements, for both central receivers and parabolic dish systems, indicate that pursuit of advanced technology across a broad front can result in post-1985 solar thermal systems having the potential of approaching the goal of competitiveness with conventional power systems; i.e., capital costs of $600 kWe and energy costs of 50 mills/kWe-hr (1977 dollars).

Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E.J.; El Gabalawi, N.; Herrera, G.; Kuo, T.J.; Chen, K.H.

1978-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Power Distribution and Conditioning for a Small Student Satellite Design of the NUTS Backplane & EPS Module  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Space-related Education). The projects goal is to design, manufacture and launch a double CubeSat by 2014. As part of the NUTS satellite design, there is a need for a system backplane, which different sub-modules can be plugged into. The backplane will form the basis of the satellite, and must provide distribution of power and communication buses to the rest of the system. The Electrical Power System is a very important part of any satellite mission, and must handle power conversion and battery charging, as well as provide regulated supply to the rest of the system. Together with the system backplane, an EPS module has to be designed for the NUTS satellite. The candidate will: • Gain an overview of the project and outline the necessary requirements and constraints. • Become familiar with previous work on the subject. • Propose a solution for a system backplane and electrical power system. • Implement and test prototypes of the solutions, as extensively as allowed by the project time frame. • Evaluate the proposed design and the results obtained from testing.

Dewald De Bruyn; Co-supervisor Roger Birkel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of Power Extraction to Linear Gain Scheduling Controllers in a Small Wind Energy Conversion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources have focused a special attention in wind energy conversion systems, where the goal is maximal power extraction. This paper presents an evaluation of the linear controllers eigen structure assingment, linear quadratic regulator, ... Keywords: Wind turbines, permanent magnet synchronous generator, eigenstructure assingment, linear quadratic regulator, loop shaping design procedure

Santiago Sanchez Acevedo; Eduardo Giraldo; Edilson Delgado Trejos

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

City of Barron, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barron, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Barron, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Barron Place Wisconsin Utility Id 1278 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount& Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial

387

City of Kiel, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiel, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Kiel, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Kiel Place Wisconsin Utility Id 10243 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering Discount Industrial

388

City of Menasha, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Menasha, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Menasha, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Menasha Place Wisconsin Utility Id 12298 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering

389

City of River Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Falls, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of River Falls Place Wisconsin Utility Id 16082 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

390

City of Elkhorn, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elkhorn, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Elkhorn, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Elkhorn Place Wisconsin Utility Id 5777 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC MRO Yes NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 75kW and 200kW Demand Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 75kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 75kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial

391

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Small-Scale, Biomass-Fired Gas Turbine Plants Suitable for Distributed and Mobile Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of small-scale, biomass-fired gas turbine plants that use an indirectly-fired gas turbine cycle. Such plants were originally thought to have several advantages for distributed generation, including portability. However, detailed analysis of two designs revealed several problems that would have to be resolved to make the plants feasible and also determined that a steam turbine cycle with the same net output was more economic than the gas turbine cycle. The incre...

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

City of Harriman, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee (Utility Company) Tennessee (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Harriman Place Tennessee Utility Id 8147 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power, Large Commercial Commercial General Power, Over 1,000 kw General Power, small commercial < 15,000 kwh, 50 kw Commercial General Power, small commercial < 15,000 kwh, 50 kw (300Kwh or less) Commercial Residential Residential Security Lights, High Pressure Sodium, 100W Lighting Security Lights, High Pressure Sodium, 200W Lighting

395

City of Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Thomaston Place Georgia Utility Id 18847 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Industrial Service Industrial Large Power Commercial Medium Power Rate Commercial Off-Peak Billing Demand Rider Residential Power Residential School Electric Service Commercial Small General Service Non-Demand Commercial Small-Power Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0840/kWh

396

Small-Scale Low Cost Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in tasks seeking greater cell power density and lower cost through new cell designs, new cell materials and lower operating temperature is summarized. The design of the program required Proof-of-Concept unit of residential capacity scale is reviewed along with a summary of results from its successful test. Attachment 1 summarizes the status of cell development. Attachment 2 summarizes the status of generator design, and Attachment 3 of BOP design.

S. D. Vora

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

City of Vermillion, South Dakota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermillion, South Dakota (Utility Company) Vermillion, South Dakota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Vermillion Place South Dakota Utility Id 19788 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commerical Power Rates Commercial Residential Electric Utility Rates Residential RiverWinds Project Commercial Small Commercial Power Rates Commercial Small Commercial Power Rates, Three Phase Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1000/kWh Commercial: $0.0771/kWh

398

City of Columbus, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin Wisconsin Utility Id 4073 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

399

City of New Richmond, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Richmond New Richmond Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13481 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering & Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering & Transformer Ownership Discount

400

Analysis of Two Biomass Gasification/Fuel Cell Scenarios for Small-Scale Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two scenarios were examined for small-scale electricity production from biomass using a gasifier/fuel cell system. In one case, a stand-alone BCL/FERC gasifier is used to produce synthesis gas that is reformed and distributed through a pipeline network to individual phosphoric acid fuel cells. In the second design, the gasifier is integrated with a molten carbonate fuel cell stack and a steam bottoming cycle. In both cases, the gasifiers are fed the same amount of material, with the integrated system producing 4 MW of electricity, and the stand-alone design generating 2 MW of electricity.

Amos, W. A.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Final Environmental Assessment Small-Scale Geothermal Power Plant and Direct-Use Geothermal Application at AmeriCulture Inc., Cotton City, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado 80401-3393 Colorado 80401-3393 August 26, 2002 DOE/EA-1396 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT For the SMALL-SCALE POWER PLANT AND DIRECT-USE GEOTHERMAL APPLICATION At AMERICULTURE, INC., COTTON CITY, NEW MEXICO AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Small-Scale Power Plant and Direct-Use Application at AmeriCulture, Inc. to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operations that would be funded in part by DOE. Small geothermal power plants have the potential for widespread application, but achieving cost- effectiveness in small plant sizes presents a number of challenges. To address these challenges, DOE is supporting the small-scale field verification projects to (1) determine and validate the

402

Many small consumers, one growing problem: Achieving energy savings for electronic equipment operating in low power modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powered devices, where power consumption is critical) canpower consumption. With the advent of electronics, devices

Payne, Christopher T.; Meier, Alan K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Analysis of system wide distortion in an integrated power system utilizing a high voltage DC bus and silicon carbide power devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the distortion on the electrical distribution system for a high voltage DC Integrated Power System (IPS). The analysis was concentrated on the power supplied to a propulsion motor driven by an ...

Fallier, William F. (William Frederick)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Small Gas Turbines for Distributed Generation Markets: Technology, Products, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small gas turbines (300 kW to 5 MW) offer an attractive way for utilities and energy service companies to generate electric power within distribution grids and for consumers to generate their own power. Distributed generation also benefits utilities by deferring or avoiding costly expansion of the power transmission and distribution system, which could allow them to offer customers lower cost power. Gas turbines process more power-generation cycle air per unit size and weight of machine than do reciproca...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

Interpretation of the Spatial Power Spectra of Neutral Hydrogen in the Galaxy and in the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent 21 cm radio observations of H$_I$ regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud, have revealed spatial power spectra of the intensity, which are quite similar in shape to those previously deduced for the Galaxy. The similarity, in spite the differences in the physical parameters between the Galaxy and the SMC, suggests that the shape of the power spectra reflects some underlying mechanism which is not too sensitive to the environmental specifics. In this paper we present an interpretation for the observational power spectra in terms of a large scale turbulence in the interstellar medium, in which the emitting H$_I$ regions are embedded. The turbulence gives rise to density fluctuations which lead to the observed intensity fluctuations, in the H$_I$ regions. The observational power spectra are used to deduce the turbulence spectral function. In the SMC, the turbulence largest eddies are comparable in scale to the SMC itself. This implies that turbulent mixing should have smoothed out any large scale abundance gradients. Indeed, this seems to be the case, observationally. The turbulence is also expected to amplify and shape up the large scale magnetic field. Indeed, the observational data indicate the existence of a large scale disordered field of the strength expected from energy equilibrium with the turbulent velocity field. The large scale turbulence is most probably generated by instabilities in the large scale flows induced by the tidal close encounter with the LMC $ \\sim 2\\times 10^8{\\rm yr}$ ago. The life-time of the largest eddies is $\\sim 4\\times 10^8{\\rm yr}$ so the turbulence had not yet enough time to decay and persists even though the energy source is no longer there.

Itzhak Goldman

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Category:SmallHotel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SmallHotel SmallHotel Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "SmallHotel" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVSmallHotel Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVSmallHotel Bismarck ... 71 KB SVSmallHotel International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVSmallHotel Internati... 83 KB SVSmallHotel LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVSmallHotel LA CA Cit... 87 KB SVSmallHotel Memphis TN City of Memphis Tennessee (Utility Company).png SVSmallHotel Memphis T... 65 KB SVSmallHotel Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVSmallHotel Minneapol... 83 KB SVSmallHotel Minot ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png

407

Florence Utility Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florence Utility Comm Florence Utility Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Florence Utility Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 6424 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation (20 kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand 7am-9pm with Parallel Generation(20 kW or less) Industrial

408

Effectiveness of External Window Attachments Based on Daylight Utilization and Cooling Load Reduction for Small Office Buildings in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the effectiveness of selected external shading devices and glazing treatments used to minimize the total annual energy consumption in small office buildings in hot humid climates. The external shading devices included a permanent horizontal overhang and a light shelf. The selected types of glazing included clear, reflective, tinted, low-emissivity coating, and heat-mirror glass. One concern about using external window attachments is that while reducing the solar heat gains, they also reduce the amount of the daylight needed to supplement interior lighting. Therefore the objective of this study was to explore which strategy would give a balance between solar heat gain reduction and daylight utilization and result in the most energy savings in the building. Computer simulations using an hourly energy calculation model were conducted to predict the building's total energy consumption using each strategy. The economics of each strategy were analyzed with lifecycle costing techniques using the present value technique. Results show that properly designed overhangs that shade clear glazing are slightly more cost-effective than specialized low-e glazing systems. These results are unique for hot humid climates where winter heating is not an issue. On the contrary, when used in cold climates, external shading devices tend to increase the building's energy consumption.

Soebarto, V. I.; Degelman, L. O.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Human Factors Engineering for Managers: Computer-Based Training for Utilities Involved in New Nuclear Power Plant Designs, Construct ion and Operation - 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This product provides a computer-based training (CBT) course in human factors engineering (HFE) for managers. The training materials for this course were developed to provide a foundation in HFE for managers at utilities involved in new nuclear power plants (NPPs). This course will help managers who may be expected to manage the interactions with the vendor and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) during new plant design certification, detailed design and implementation, and development of procedur...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Methods of Using Existing Wire Lines (power lines, phone lines, internet lines) for Totally Secure Classical Communication Utilizing Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We outline some general solutions to use already existing and currently used wire lines, such as power lines, phone lines, internet lines, etc, for the unconditionally secure communication method based on Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise (KLJN). Two different methods are shown. One is based on filters used at single wires and the other one utilizes a common mode voltage superimposed on a three-phase powerline.

Laszlo B. Kish

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

Executive Director for Operations UPDATE OF ISSUES RELATED TO NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR FINANCIAL QUALIFICATIONS IN RESPONSE TO RESTRUCTURING OF THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide the Commission with an update of electric utility deregulation and restructuring issues regarding the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their facilities safely. BACKGROUND: On October 24, 1997, the staff sent to the Commission SECY-97-253, "Policy Options for Nuclear Power Reactor Financial Qualifications in Response to Restructuring of the Electric Utility Industry. " In that paper, the staff discussed three options for the Commission's consideration regarding possible approaches that the NRC could use in assessing the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their plants safely. (The impact of deregulation and restructuring on decommissioning funding assurance is being addressed in a separate rulemaking, which was published in the Federal Register on September 10, 1997. A final rule is scheduled to be sent to the Commission by June 30, 1998.) In response to SECY-97-253, the Commission issued a staff requirements memorandum on January 15, 1998, and directed the staff to maintain the existing financial qualifications framework as discussed in Option 2 of SECY-97-253 and to "develop a coherent, efficient plan that would allow timely confirmation of the status of licensees (i.e., whether they meet the definition of 'electric utility')as deregulation actions are finalized by States. " In response, on April 16, 1998, the

L. Joseph Callan /s; Robert S. Wood

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the European Wind Energy Conference held February 27--March 2, 2006, in Athens, Greece, showing grid impacts of wind power variability.

Parsons, B.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

414

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Delaware...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Chesapeake Utilities Information for Businesses Delmarva Power...

415

Making Biopower Work for Utilities: A Rationale for Near-Term Investment in Integrated Biomass Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the feasibility studies of six very different integrated biomass power systems suggests potentially large future payoffs from near-term R&D. At this time, when biomass crops are more expensive than fossil fuels, it is the corollary benefits or coproducts associated with biomass power production that make the economics of a system work.

1996-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

Three-phase power conversion system for utility-interconnected PV applications. Phase 1 technical progress report, 1 October 1995--17 April 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Omnion Power Corporation under Phase 1 of a two-phase subcontract. During this phase, Omnion researchers: designed an advanced product specification to guide prototype design and development; analyzed field failure data with Omnion`s hard-switched insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor technology hardware to better understand where design improvements were needed; presented and reviewed product specifications with key customers/users; drafted a working product specification to serve as a baseline in developing the new power conversion system; developed the core-resonant converter technology in conjunction with Soft Switching Technologies Corp.; designed a 100-kW prototype power conversion system; designed a prototype system package; initiated interaction with vendors to optimize component selection and specifications; initiated the preparation of design documentation; built the prototype core-resonant converter and initiated preliminary testing; and initiated the assembly of a 1-kW prototype power conversion system. This work has demonstrated the potential of the soft-switching resonant DC link (RDCL) inverter and its application to a three-phase utility-interconnected PV power conversion system. The RDCL inverter has demonstrated its advantage over hard-switching pulse-width modulated inverters in terms of efficiency and audible noise. With proper package design and manufacturing process design and implementation, the RDCL power conversion system has the potential to be low-cost and reliable with superior performance.

Porter, D.G.; Meyer, H.; Leang, W. [Omnion Power Engineering Corp., East Troy, WI (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

City of Cimarron, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cimarron, Kansas (Utility Company) Cimarron, Kansas (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Cimarron Place Kansas Utility Id 3535 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png City Residential Residential Commercial and Small Power Service Commercial Large Power Industrial Median Power Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1100/kWh Commercial: $0.1010/kWh Industrial: $0.1020/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Cimarron,_Kansas_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409448

419

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

• Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utilities small power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top...

422

Power Quality Mitigation Technology Demonstration at Industrial Customer Sites: Industrial and Utility Harmonic Mitigation Guideline s and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However the restructuring of the electric power industry shakes out, the commercial/industrial customer's need for quality power will increase; and customer service will remain a key to retaining current accounts and attracting new customers. The need for demonstrating new harmonics mitigation technologies will thus be an important factor for the wire side of the business as well as for energy service companies. This report provides guidelines for implementing harmonics mitigation demonstration projects ...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development utilizing advanced, high-performance heat transfer techniques. Volume 1. Conceptual design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant. In turn, this Demonstration Plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an ocean thermal power plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the Demonstration Plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibility studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report describes the full-size power system module, and summarizes the design parameters and associated costs for the Demonstration Plant module (prototype) and projects costs for commercial plants in production. The material presented is directed primarily toward the surface platform/ship basic reference hull designated for use during conceptual design; however, other containment vessels were considered during the design effort so that the optimum power system would not be unduly influenced or restricted. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Many small consumers, one growing problem: Achieving energy savings for electronic equipment operating in low power modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-House Measurements of Standby Power Consumption" InGlobal Implications of Standby Power Use." Proceedings ofmodes, or “lopomos. ” “Standby” and “sleep” are the most

Payne, Christopher T.; Meier, Alan K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Small Generator Aggregation (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generator Aggregation (Maine) Generator Aggregation (Maine) Small Generator Aggregation (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Green Power Purchasing Provider Public Utilities Commission This section establishes requirements for electricity providers to purchase

426

Combined cycle and waste heat recovery power systems based on a novel thermodynamic energy cycle utilizing low-temperature heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A new thermodynamic energy cycle has been developed, using a multicomponent working agent. Condensation is supplemented with absorption, following expansion in the turbine. Several combined power systems based on this cycle have been designed and cost-estimated. Efficiencies of these new systems are 1.35 to 1.5 times higher than the best Rankine Cycle system, at the same border conditions. Investment cost per unit of power output is about two-thirds of the cost of a comparable Rankine Cycle system. Results make cogeneration economically attractive at current energy prices. The first experimental installation is planned by Fayette Manufacturing Company and Detroit Diesel Allison Division of General Motors.

Kalina, A.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Village of Gresham, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gresham Gresham Place Wisconsin Utility Id 7665 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 40kW and 200kW Demand Transformer Ownership discount with Excess Meter Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 40kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering Discount with Excess Meter and Parallel Generation(20 kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 40kW and 200kW Demand Transformer Ownership discount with Parallel Generation(20 kW or less) Industrial

428

City of Cumberland, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cumberland City of Cumberland City of Place Wisconsin Utility Id 4627 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20 kW or less)-Net Energy Billing Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and

429

City of Marshfield, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marshfield Marshfield Place Wisconsin Utility Id 11740 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering

430

Overview of the small engine component technology (SECT) studies. [Commuter, rotorcraft, cruise missile and auxiliary power applications in year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the joint NASA/Army SECT studies were to identify high payoff technologies for year 2000 small gas turbine engine applications and to provide a technology plan for guiding future research and technology efforts applicable to rotorcraft, commuter and general aviation aircraft and cruise missiles. Competitive contracts were awarded to Allison, AVCO Lycoming, Garrett, Teledyne CAE and Williams International. This paper presents an overview of the contractors' study efforts for the commuter, rotorcraft, cruise missile, and auxiliary power (APU) applications with engines in the 250 to 1000 horsepower size range. Reference aircraft, missions and engines were selected. Advanced engine configurations and cycles with projected year 2000 component technologies were evaluated and compared with a reference engine selected by the contractor. For typical commuter and rotorcraft applications, fuel savings of 22 percent to 42 percent can be attained. For $1/gallon and $2/gallon fuel, reductions in direct operating cost range from 6 percent to 16 percent and from 11 percent to 17 percent respectively. For subsonic strategic cruise missile applications, fuel savings of 38 percent to 54 percent can be achieved which allows 35 percent to 60 percent increase in mission range and life cycle cost reductions of 40 percent to 56 percent. High payoff technologies have been identified for all applications. 5 references.

Vanco, M.R.; Wintucky, W.T.; Niedwiecki, R.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Category:SmallOffice | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SmallOffice SmallOffice Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "SmallOffice" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVSmallOffice Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVSmallOffice Bismarck... 74 KB SVSmallOffice Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVSmallOffice Cedar Ci... 55 KB SVSmallOffice International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVSmallOffice Internat... 95 KB SVSmallOffice LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVSmallOffice LA CA Ci... 83 KB SVSmallOffice Memphis TN City of Memphis Tennessee (Utility Company).png SVSmallOffice Memphis ... 62 KB SVSmallOffice Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png

432

City of St Marys, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas (Utility Company) Kansas (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of St Marys Place Kansas Utility Id 17894 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial -within city Commercial Commercial- Rural Commercial Large power-City Industrial Large power-Rural Industrial Residential-City All-Electrical Service Residential Residential-Rural All-Electrical Service Residential Small Commercial All Electric service Watt-Hour Meter - City Commercial Small Commercial All Electric service Watt-Hour Meter - Rural Commercial

433

City of Robertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Robertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Robertsdale Place Alabama Utility Id 16140 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Industrial Service Industrial Residential Residential Small Light and Power Service Commercial Lighting Small Light and Power Service Industrial Industrial Unmetered Protective Lighting 1500 W Lighting Unmetered Protective Lighting 175 W Lighting Unmetered Protective Lighting 250 W Lighting Unmetered Protective Lighting 400 W Lighting

434

Town of Braintree, Massachusetts (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Braintree, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Braintree, Massachusetts (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Braintree Town of Place Massachusetts Utility Id 2144 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COGENERATION AND SMALL POWER PRODUCTION SERVICE - SINGLE PHASE Commercial COGENERATION AND SMALL POWER PRODUCTION SERVICE - THREE PHASE Commercial

435

City of Bronson, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bronson, Kansas (Utility Company) Bronson, Kansas (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Bronson Place Kansas Utility Id 2270 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Excessive Power Rate Commercial Commercial Power Rate Commercial Residential And Small Commercial Inside City Limits Residential Residential And Small Commercial Outside City Limits Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0954/kWh Commercial: $0.0955/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

436

City of Kaukauna, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kaukauna, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Kaukauna, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Kaukauna Place Wisconsin Utility Id 10056 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount(2,300-15,000 volts) with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering

437

City of Evansville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evansville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Evansville, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Evansville Place Wisconsin Utility Id 6043 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 45kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20 kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 45kW and 200kW Demand Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount with Parallel Generation(20 kW or less)

438

City of Oxford, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxford Oxford Place Kansas Utility Id 14276 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial and Small Power Outside city limits Commercial Commercial and Small Power Within city limits Commercial Non-Profit Organizations Power Service Outside city limits Commercial Power Service Within city limits Commercial Residential Service Outside city limits Residential Residential Service Within city limits Residential

439

City of Argyle, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argyle Argyle Place Wisconsin Utility Id 792 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Commercial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Commercial Cp-2 Large Power Service Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Gs-1 General Service Single Phase Commercial Gs-1 General Service Single Phase with Parallel Generation(20kW or less)

440

Technology R&D Needs for Integrating High Penetrations of Variable Utility-Scale Renewable Power Sources into the Electric Power Inf rastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the North American electric energy resource portfolio continues to evolve, integrating large-scale renewable resources into the electric power infrastructure presents significant challenges. This is particularly true of variable renewable resources, such as wind and solar, which represent two of the most rapidly growing renewable resources being deployed. The root of this challenge lies in the inherent variability of wind and solar resources, which differentiates these from other renewable resource...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As par