Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Subsurface stratigraphy and petrophysical analysis of the Middle Devonian interval, including the Marcellus Shale, of the central Appalachian basin; northwestern Pennsylvania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the central Appalachian basin, the multiple organic-rich intervals of the Middle Devonian, including the Marcellus Shale, are an emerging large resource play with high… (more)

Yanni, Anne.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparative Study of the A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin DOE/NETL-2011/1478 Cover. Top left: The Barnett Shale exposed on the Llano uplift near San Saba, Texas. Top right: The Marcellus Shale exposed in the Valley and Ridge Province near Keyser, West Virginia. Photographs by Kathy R. Bruner, U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Bottom: Horizontal Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, Pennsylvania producing gas at 10 million cubic feet per day at about 3,000 pounds per square inch. Photograph by Tom Mroz, USDOE, NETL, February 2010. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors greatly thank Daniel J. Soeder (U.S. Department of Energy) who kindly reviewed the manuscript. His criticisms,

3

Outcrop lithostratigraphy and petrophysics of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale in West Virginia and adjacent states.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A stratigraphic study of 15 partial outcrops of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Maryland has identified six lithofacies. These include grey calcareous… (more)

Walker-Milani, Margaret E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Impact of Marcellus Shale Total Organic Carbon on Productivity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the Appalachian basin, the Devonian organic-rich shale interval, including the Marcellus Shale, is an important target for natural gas exploration. It has been utilized… (more)

Fakhouri, Eyad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors greatly thank Daniel J. Soeder (U.S. Department of Energy) who kindly reviewed the manuscript. His criticisms,

Devonian Marcellus Shale; R. Bruner; Richard Smosna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sub-surface stratigraphy and petrophysical analysis of the Middle Devonian Interval of the Central Appalachian Basin; West Virginia and Southwest Pennsylvania.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the central Appalachian basin, the Middle Devonian organic-rich shale interval, including the Marcellus Shale, is an important target for natural gas exploration. It has… (more)

Boyce, Matthew L. (Matthew Louis), 1985-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The application of improved NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies neural network in Marcellus Shale lithofacies prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organic-rich Marcellus Shale was deposited in a foreland basin during Middle Devonian. In terms of mineral composition and organic matter richness, we define seven mudrock lithofacies: three organic-rich lithofacies and four organic-poor lithofacies. ... Keywords: Lithofacies prediction, Marcellus Shale, NEAT, Node location, Organism population size evolution, RCC

Guochang Wang, Guojian Cheng, Timothy R. Carr

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) Place Oshkosh, Wisconsin Product Utica Energy, founded by 5 investing farmers built an ethanol plant west of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. References Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) is a company located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utica_Energy_LLC_formerly_Algoma_Ethanol&oldid=352687" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

9

Utica, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utica, Kentucky: Energy Resources Utica, Kentucky: Energy Resources (Redirected from Utica, KY) Jump to: navigation, search GeoNames ID 4311915 Coordinates 37.60227°, -87.11305° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.60227,"lon":-87.11305,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Marcellus Shale Litigation and Legislation December 17, 2009 7 . Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Law1 Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar Series October 2009 - March 2010 Penn State Cooperative Extension #12;2 Marcellus Shale Webinar Series Planning Committee · Members ­ Mark Douglass, Jefferson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

11

MARCELLUS SHALE APRIL 2011 EDITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CWIA-MS MARCELLUS SHALE APRIL 2011 EDITION Each of the following sections is a quick snapshot of labor market information for Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale (MS) industries and related economic related to the Marcellus Shale industry. While several data sources are utilized in this document

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

12

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§ Karl T. Schroeder,§ and Harry M. Edenborn

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

14

Production analysis of Marcellus Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to analyze the production potential of Marcellus shale using actual field data. By using real field production data for… (more)

Belyadi, Hossein.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Porosity and permeability of Eastern Devonian gas shale  

SciTech Connect

High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight Devonian gas shale samples from the Appalachian basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian Age Huron member of the Ohio shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eight core sample consists of Middle Devonian Age Marcellus shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, WV. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the work has identified a number of geological factors that influence gas production from organic-rich shales. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and gas permeability of the rock matrix is commonly less than 0.1 ..mu..d at reservoir stress. The Marcellus shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10%, and a surprisingly high permeability of 20 ..mu..d. Gas permeability of the Marcellus was highly stress-dependent, however; doubling the net confining stress reduced the permeability by nearly 70%. The conclusion reached from this study is that the gas productivity potential of Devonian shale in the Appalachian basin is influenced by a wide range of geologic factors. Organic content, thermal maturity, natural fracture spacing, and stratigraphic relationships between gray and black shales all affect gas content and mobility. Understanding these factors can improve the exploration and development of Devonian shale gas.

Soeder, D.J.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

UTICA 4, NEW YORK COFIPOR~TION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DROf fORGE & TOOL DROf fORGE & TOOL UTICA 4, NEW YORK COFIPOR~TION PHONE 3- 2331 July 5, 1955 ?:r. E. J. Block Director of Production Division United Staton Atomic ::norgy Commission Yiashington, D. C. Dear Xr. 1310~1~: Xe had a visit last Thursday from Kr. R. C. Sale11 of the: Atomic Energy Commission who inspected our vacuum melting facilities. EIz suggested that we should get in touch with you and that you r+ht be interested in the use of our facilities for the i>roduction of uranium fuel elements. Xe have at the present time the largest coxnercial vacuum installation in the country and m have been producin; high tc~poraturc alloys for the aircraft industry for over txro 'years. ;Is have produced to date Over 400,000 pounds of mtal. Our present rate of production is of the order

17

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the natural gas potential of the Devonian Age shales of West Virginia. For this, the study: (1) compiles the latest geological and reservoir data to establish the gas in-place; (2) analyzes and models the dominant gas production mechanisms; and (3) examines alternative well stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering the in-place gas. The major findings of the study include the following: (1) The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Huron, Rhinestreet, and Marcellus intervals) in West Virginia is estimated to range from 11 to 44 trillion cubic feet. (2) The Devonian shales in this state entail great geological diversity; the highly fractured, permeable shales in the southwest respond well to traditional development practices while the deep, tight shales in the eastern and northern parts of the state will require new, larger scale well stimulation technology. (3) Beyond the currently developed Huron and Rhinestreet shale intervals, the Marcellus shale offers a third attractive gas zone, particularly in the north central portion of the state. 21 references, 53 figures, 27 tables.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Porosity and permeability of eastern Devonian gas shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight samples of Devonian gas shale from the Appalachian Basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian age Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eighth core sample consists of Middle Devonian age Marcellus Shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, West Virginia. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the results have also shown that there are a number of previously unknown factors which influence or control gas production from organic-rich shales of the Appalachian Basin. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron Shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and permeability of the rock matrix to gas is less than 0.1 microdarcy at reservoir stress. The Marcellus Shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10% under stress with a fairly strong ''adsorption'' component. Permeability to gas (K/sub infinity/ was highly stress-dependent, ranging from about 20 microdarcies at a net stress of 3000 psi down to about 5 microdarcies at a net stress of 6000 psi. The conclusion reached from this study is that Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin is a considerably more complex natural gas resource than previously thought. Production potential varies widely with geographic location and stratigraphy, just as it does with other gas and oil resources. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Soeder, D.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

20

Rig count in Utica Shale doubles from year ago - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The number of active oil and natural gas rigs in the Appalachian Basin's Utica Shale formation for the last week of October 2012 (ending October 26) ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Impacts of Marcellus Shale Development on Municipal Governments in Susquehanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Marcellus Shale Development on Municipal Governments in Susquehanna and Washington Marcellus shale gas development. The study focused on how gas development is affecting the demand (1) their already extensive shale activity; (2) their divergent geographical, cultural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

22

Reply to Engelder: Potential for fluid migration from the Marcellus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tension and imbibition sequester frack fluid in Marcellus gas shale. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas

Jackson, Robert B.

23

Focus on the Marcellus Shale By Lisa Sumi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas: Focus on the Marcellus Shale By Lisa Sumi FOR THE OIL & GAS ACCOUNTABILITY PROJECT on potential oil and gas development in the Marcellus Shale formation in northeastern Pennsylvania · www.ogap.org #12;Shale Gas: Focus on the Marcellus Shale A REPORT COMPILED FOR THE OIL AND GAS

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

24

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

25

Ohio: Devonian evaluated for most favorable potential production  

SciTech Connect

Commercial quantities of gas are likely to occur within closely spaced natural fracture systems close to, or within, organic-rich source beds. Four principal source beds have been identified within the shales of east Ohio. Ranked in order of importance based on geographic distribution and thickness, they are the Huron, Rhinestreet, Cleveland, and Marcellus shales. Within each of these zones, there is believed to be a north-south trending area of most favorable shale lying between immature shales to the west and shales too organically lean to the east. Closely spaced localized fracturing of the Devonian shale sequence is likely to occur along 2 regional trends in east Ohio: the Cambridge arch and the Lake Erie shoreline. Operators drilling within these areas, or near any structurally disturbed area, should evaluate and test shale zones that exhibit indications of being naturally fractured.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind #12;1 Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind November 15, 2010 Author.....................................................................................................................3 Marcellus Shale Natural Gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

27

Launching a Cornell Examination of the Marcellus System The issues related to the development of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are emblematic of a whole family of extremely complicated Energy. The development plans for the Marcellus Shale are unfolding immediately in our backyards and require of different ways of developing the Marcellus Shale and the economics of not developing the Marcellus Shale. We

Angenent, Lars T.

28

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

29

Marcellus natural gas production gains affect spreads between ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... issues, and trends. FAQs Glossary For ... Marcellus natural gas production gains affect spreads ... Supporting increased use of natural gas for power ...

30

Spot natural gas prices at Marcellus trading point reflect ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Daily natural gas spot prices between Tennessee Gas Pipeline ... Dry natural gas production in Pennsylvania, a key part of the Marcellus supply basin, ...

31

Effects of diagenesis on the Nd-isotopic composition of black shales from the 420 Ma Utica Shale Magnafacies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of diagenesis on the Nd-isotopic composition of black shales from the 420 Ma Utica Shale Abstract The Utica black shales were deposited in the Taconic Foreland basin 420 Ma ago. The organic matter in these shales is of marine origin and the timing of deposition of these shales has been constrained

Basu, Asish R.

32

The Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INCIDENT #12;#12;#12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - EnvironmentalThe Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities Bernard D. Goldstein, MD Department using Data.FracTracker.org. #12;Drilling Rig in Rural Upshur County, WV Source: WVSORO, Modern Shale Gas

Sibille, Etienne

33

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and Controversies Kyle J Ferrar;UNITED STATES SHALE BASINS Modern Shale Gas Development in the U.S.: A Primer, (2009) U.S. Dept of Energy Development http://www.secinfo.com/DB/SEC/2007 #12;Where to Drill? Harper, John A. (2008). The Marcellus Shale

Sibille, Etienne

34

Intergrated study of the Devonian-age black shales in eastern Ohio. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This integrated study of the Devonian-age shales in eastern Ohio by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey is part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The six areas of research included in the study are: (1) detailed stratigraphic mapping, (2) detailed structure mapping, (3) mineralogic and petrographic characterization, (4) geochemical characterization, (5) fracture trace and lineament analysis, and (6) a gas-show monitoring program. The data generated by the study provide a basis for assessing the most promising stratigraphic horizons for occurrences of natural gas within the Devonian shale sequence and the most favorable geographic areas of the state for natural gas exploration and should be useful in the planning and design of production-stimulation techniques. Four major radioactive units in the Devonian shale sequence are believed to be important source rocks and reservoir beds for natural gas. In order of potential for development as an unconventional gas resource, they are (1) lower and upper radioactive facies of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, (2) upper Olentangy Shale (Rhinestreet facies equivalent), (3) Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale, and (4) lower Olentangy Shale (Marcellus facies equivalent). These primary exploration targets are recommended on the basis of areal distribution, net thickness of radioactive shale, shows of natural gas, and drilling depth to the radioactive unit. Fracture trends indicate prospective areas for Devonian shale reservoirs. Good geological prospects in the Devonian shales should be located where the fracture trends coincide with thick sequences of organic-rich highly radioactive shale.

Gray, J.D.; Struble, R.A.; Carlton, R.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Honeycutt, F.M.; Kingsbury, R.H.; Knapp, N.F.; Majchszak, F.L.; Stith, D.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Spot natural gas prices at Marcellus trading point reflect ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the spot price of natural gas at the TGP Zone 4 Marcellus trading point has fallen—at times considerably—below the spot price at Henry Hub in Louisiana, ...

36

Evaluation of Devonian shale potential in West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

In West Virginia, all significant areas of current Devonian shale gas production are situated where the radioactive shale units are thicker than 200 feet. Most areas of current gas production exhibit a close correlation with the trend of the Rome trough structure, and nearly all lie within the optimum stress-ratio zone. In addition, most of the current gas-producing areas are located within the zone of optimum shale thermal maturity, and optimum shale thermal maturity nearly coincides with the optimum shale stress-ratio value (0.43) in western and southwestern West Virginia. Areas adjacent to existing gas fields, within northeastern Cabell County, northern Lincoln County, and central Wayne County, are excellent prospects for future production. Additional deeper drilling in existing gas fields within the main trend may tap potential new reservoirs in the Rhinestreet and Marcellus Shales. The area east of the Warfield anticline in central Boone, Logan, and eastern Mingo Counties also may be favorable for gas exploitation of the radioactive Huron Shale. Fractures associated with the flank of the anticline and possible reactivation of basement faults in this area should be sufficient to provide the means for production. Further drilling should also be conducted along extensions of the border fault zone of the Rome trough in the western portion of the state. However, the subsurface trend of the trough must be carefully delineated to successfully develop gas production from potential fractured reservoir systems.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utica Street Warehouse - NY 0-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Street Warehouse - NY 0-23 Street Warehouse - NY 0-23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UTICA STREET WAREHOUSE (NY.0-23) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 240 West Utica Street , Buffalo , New York NY.0-23-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-23-1 Site Operations: Stored and rebarrelled uranium process residues from operations at Linde. NY.0-23-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Original building demolished. Current land use - Parking facility. Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote. NY.0-23-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes NY.0-23-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Natural Uranium Process Residues NY.0-23-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated NY.0-23-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP NY.0-23-1

38

Subcontract Report: Modular Combined Heat & Power System for Utica College: Design Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utica College, located in Utica New York, intends to install an on-site power/cogeneration facility. The energy facility is to be factory pre-assembled, or pre- assembled in modules, to the fullest extent possible, and ready to install and interconnect at the College with minimal time and engineering needs. External connections will be limited to fuel supply, electrical output, potable makeup water as required and cooling and heat recovery systems. The proposed facility will consist of 4 self-contained, modular Cummins 330kW engine generators with heat recovery systems and the only external connections will be fuel supply, electrical outputs and cooling and heat recovery systems. This project was eventually cancelled due to changing DOE budget priorities, but the project engineers produced this system design specification in hopes that it may be useful in future endeavors.

Rouse, Greg [Gas Technology Institute

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - Environmental and human health salt (Proprietary) 10.0 - 30.0% #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale ActivitiesPotential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public Health Surveillance

Sibille, Etienne

40

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group Analysis from Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas play has significant potential to affect in the Barnett Shale region of north Texas. The Barnett Shale play is very similar in geology to the Marcellus

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

What is the Issue? The Marcellus Shale is a geologic shale bed that extends across much  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is the Issue? The Marcellus Shale is a geologic shale bed that extends across much of the Marcellus Shale. Energy companies plan to nearly double the number of drilling rigs by the end of the year, this development illustrates the attractiveness of market proximity and the quality of Marcellus Shale gas

Wang, Z. Jane

42

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

43

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

44

Water Withdrawals for Development of Marcellus Shale Gas in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Withdrawals for Development of Marcellus Shale Gas in Pennsylvania Introduction states where other shale fields are already in full- fledged gas production. The abun- dance of water of precipita- tion. Water is a critical component of the process of removing natural gas from underground shale

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

45

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale M. O. Eshkalak, SPE, S. D of hydrocarbons from the reservoirs, notably shale, is attributed to realizing the key fundamentals of reservoir and mineralogy is crucial in order to identify the "right" pay-zone intervals for shale gas production. Also

Mohaghegh, Shahab

46

Characterization of Organics in the Marcellus Shale Flowback and Produced Waters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective was to accurately characterize organic matter in flowback and produced (> 30 days after fracking) water from Marcellus shale gas development. Flowback and… (more)

Wolford, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Resilience, Community, and Perceptions of Marcellus Shale Development in the Pennsylvania Wilds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas development in deep shale formations forms a major, promising option for energy development. The Marcellus Shale in the northeastern United States is… (more)

Weigle, Jason

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A study of the effects of well and fracture design in a typical Marcellus shale well.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The problem with typical Marcellus shale wells is the lack of information that has beenaccumulated and the amount of information that is commercially available to… (more)

Schweitzer, Ross T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Marcellus region to provide 18% of total U.S. natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production of natural gas in the Marcellus region, located in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, is expected to exceed 13 billion cubic feet per day ...

50

Energy Transitions/Marcellus White Paper September 22, 2010 version A Systems Research Approach to Regional Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions/Marcellus White Paper September 22, 2010 version Page 1 A Systems Research Approach to Regional Energy Transitions: The Case of Marcellus Shale Gas Development White Paper A Report/Marcellus White Paper September 22, 2010 version Page 2 A Systems Research Approach to Regional Energy Transitions

Wang, Z. Jane

51

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein reservoir being the Marcellus Shale play. The Marcellus Shale play stretches across an area of 95,000 square

Mohaghegh, Shahab

52

Devonian gas shales bibliography. Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports and publications (1983 to May 1991) on Devonian shale research are listed by title. The reports cover topics such as geology, reservoirs, production, drilling technology, and gas yields.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2010 Geothermal Pressure Reduction Marcellus Shale Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Production Overview (problem and challenges) During the preliminary production stage, Marcellus Shale natural gas wells have a wellhead pressure that exceeds the material limits of typical above understanding of Marcellus Shale natural gas wells and drilling was gathered on-site. Evaluation of (5

Demirel, Melik C.

54

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

55

Material balance assay of Devonian gas shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Devonian shale retorting method, similar to the TOSCO Material Balance Assay, was developed. Oil, gas, water, and spent shale collected from the thermal decomposition of Devonian shale provide material balance closure. Elemental and other analyses were used to characterize the products and evaluate their fuel potential. The precision of each analysis was estimated by running a series of material balance assays on a composite shale sample. The elemental composition of this shale oil was shown to remain unchanged on aging. Typical material balance assays from each well where core samples were taken are presented.

Kapsch, D.M.; Frye, J.O.; Nunn, E.B.

1979-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Framing of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling Issues in Pennsylvania Newspapers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thousands of articles on Marcellus Shale gas drilling and development were written in Pennsylvania newspapers from 2008-2012 (NewsBank, 2013). These stories can have an influence… (more)

Brown, Elise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and other gas shale basins in the U.S., this paper discusses the impact of shale gas exploration and production on the potential for CCS in the Marcellus and other units in...

59

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 ©2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1 Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 August 2011 www.msetc.org The Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center (MSETC

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

60

Natural Gas and Power in the Marcellus Super-Region: Regional and National Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic increases in shale gas production across the United States have fundamentally changed the outlook for gas markets in the near term, and perhaps for decades. The Marcellus shale has emerged in just a few years as the second largest gas field in the nation. The Marcellus region, which has historically been a large natural gas importer, is now poised to be a significant exporter, and a large producer of natural gas liquids. This report explores the resource base and cost ranges of production, ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Oil and natural gas drilling in Ohio on the rise - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Escalating industry interest in the Utica Shale, which lies under the more familiar Marcellus shale and covers a wider geographic area, may boost Ohio into the ranks ...

62

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quick Facts. Current interest in Ohio oil and gas exploration is focusing on two Ohio shale plays – the Marcellus Shale and the Utica Shale. Ohio had the eighth ...

63

Ohio - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quick Facts. Current interest in Ohio oil and gas ... the Marcellus Shale and the Utica Shale. Ohio had the eighth largest crude oil ... See state fact sheets ...

64

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Lower demand and fairly stable production contributed to higher ... capacity and a new pipeline to move NGL from the Utica and Marcellus production areas to the ...

65

New York Marcellus Shale: Industry boom put on hold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key catalysts for Marcellus Shale drilling in New York were identified. New York remains the only state in the nation with a legislative moratorium on high-volume hydraulic fracturing, as regulators and state lawmakers work to balance the advantages of potential economic benefits while protecting public drinking water resources and the environment. New York is being particularly careful to work on implementing sufficiently strict regulations to mitigate the environmental impacts Pennsylvania has already seen, such as methane gas releases, fracturing fluid releases, flowback water and brine controls, and total dissolved solids discharges. In addition to economic and environmental lessons learned, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) also acknowledges impacts to housing markets, security, and other local issues, and may impose stringent measures to mitigate potential risks to local communities. Despite the moratorium, New York has the opportunity to take advantage of increased capital investment, tax revenue generation, and job creation opportunities by increasing shale gas activity. The combination of economic benefits, industry pressure, and recent technological advances will drive the pursuit of natural gas drilling in New York. We identify four principal catalysts as follows: Catalyst 1: Pressure from Within the State. Although high-volume hydraulic fracturing has become a nationally controversial technology, shale fracturing activity is common in every U.S. state except New York. The regulatory process has delayed potential economic opportunities for state and local economies, as well as many industry stakeholders. In 2010, shale gas production accounted for $18.6 billion in federal royalty and local, state, and federal tax revenues. (1) This is expected to continue to grow substantially. The DEC is under increased pressure to open the state to the same opportunities that Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming are pursuing. Positive labor market impacts are another major economic draw. According to the Revised Draft SGEIS on the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory Program (September 2011), hydraulic fracturing would create between 4,408 and 17,634 full-time equivalent (FTE) direct construction jobs in New York State. Indirect employment in other sectors would add an additional 29,174 FTE jobs. Furthermore, the SGEIS analysis suggests that drilling activities could add an estimated $621.9 million to $2.5 billion in employee earnings (direct and indirect) per year, depending upon how much of the shale is developed. The state would also receive direct tax receipts from leasing land, and has the potential to see an increase in generated indirect revenue. Estimates range from $31 million to $125 million per year in personal income tax receipts, and local governments would benefit from revenue sharing. Some landowner groups say the continued delay in drilling is costing tens of thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in growth for New York, especially in the economically stunted upstate. A number of New York counties near Pennsylvania, such as Chemung, NY, have experienced economic uptick from Pennsylvania drilling activity just across the border. Chemung officials reported that approximately 1,300 county residents are currently employed by the drilling industry in Pennsylvania. The Marcellus shale boom is expected to continue over the next decade and beyond. By 2015, gas drilling activity could bring 20,000 jobs to New York State alone. Other states, such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia, are also expected to see a significant increase in the number of jobs. Catalyst 2: Political Reality of the Moratorium. Oil and gas drilling has taken place in New York since the 19th century, and it remains an important industry with more than 13,000 currently active wells. The use of hydraulic fracturing in particular has been employed for decades. Yet, as technological

Mercurio, Angelique

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

67

Marcellus Shale Exploration in Greene County, Pennsylvania: A Land Cover Study of the Cumulative Effects of Forest Fragmentation in Well Pad Site Selection and Construction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale geologic formation has increased greatly over the last decade. Of all the states that share this resource,… (more)

Steiner, Joshua Eugene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale  

SciTech Connect

This Final Scientific/ Technical Report submitted with respect to Project DE-FE0000833 titled 'An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale' in support of final reporting requirements. This final report contains a compilation of previous reports with the most current data in order to produce one final complete document. The goal of this research was to provide an integrated approach aimed at addressing the increasing water resource challenges between natural gas production and other water stakeholders in shale gas basins. The objective was to demonstrate that the AltelaRain{reg_sign} technology could be successfully deployed in the Marcellus Shale Basin to treat frac flow-back water. That objective has been successfully met.

Matthew Bruff; Ned Godshall; Karen Evans

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Economic Impact of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling What Have We Learned? What are the Limitations?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: What is the issue? Several studies have projected large positive economic impacts of shale gas development in the Marcellus region. To make informed choices for their communities, policy makers need to understand the strengths and limitations of these studies. Most importantly, they need to understand that there is a tenuous relationship between positive economic impacts in the short run and long term economic development based on an extractive, exhaustible natural resource. In addressing the relationship, proactive policy can make a difference.

David Kay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

71

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

73

Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

74

Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;CONTENTS Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2 Meet the staff, the contour interval should be 6 inches. #12;STATE GEOLOGIST'S EDITORIAL Shale We Look For Gas? Recently, you

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

75

Methodology of organic-rich shale lithofacies identification and prediction: A case study from Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of shale gas in North America has attracted increased interest in ''unconventional'' reservoirs. Two critical factors for shale-gas reservoirs are units amenable to hydrologic fracture stimulation and sufficient natural gas content. The effectiveness ... Keywords: Lithofacies, Marcellus Shale, Mineral composition, Organic matter richness

Guochang Wang; Timothy R. Carr

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Marcellus Shale Amirmasoud Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, West Virginia University, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, SPE Continuous, low-permeability, fractured, organic-rich gas shale units are widespread and are possible of how much carbon dioxide or methane can be stored in shale at a given pressure. In this paper, a shale

Mohaghegh, Shahab

77

Evaluation of Devonian-shale potential in Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to inform interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Appalachian basin in eastern Ohio. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized, and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined. Because the data presented in this report are generalized and not suitable for evaluation of specific sites for exploration, the reader should consult the various reports cited for more detail and discussion of the data, concepts, and interpretations presented. A complete list of EGSP sponsored work pertinent to the Devonian shales in Ohio is contained as an appendix to this report. Radioactive shale zones are also mapped.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy of Northwestern Montana: a petroleum system approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian stratigraphy in the Antler foreland basin of northwestern Montana is the current focus of exploration for several petroleum companies.… (more)

Schietinger, Paul S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

PYRITE FRAMBOID SIZE DISTRIBUTION: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ACCUMULATION OF DEVONIAN - MISSISSIPPIAN SHALES, CENTRAL KENTUCKY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The depositional environment that existed during the accumulation of Devonian - Mississippian black shales of the eastern US has been a topic of debate in… (more)

Hagemann, Lucas Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Impact of formation properties and well design on cumulative gas production from Devonian Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Devonian Shale refers to all the shale strata sandwiched between two different formations; the younger Berea sandstone above it and the older limestone termed Onondaga… (more)

Ita, Jacques.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Discovery of agglutinated benthic foraminifera in Devonian black shales and their relevance for the redox state of ancient seas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discovery of agglutinated benthic foraminifera in Devonian black shales and their relevance Received in revised form 4 October 2008 Accepted 31 October 2008 Keywords: Black shale Redox Devonian. The discovery that they occur widely in Late Devonian black shales has a bearing on the boundary conditions

Polly, David

82

Adsorption studies of natural gas storage in Devonian shales  

SciTech Connect

Significant amounts of natural gas exist as an adsorbed, or condensed, phase in Devonian shale formations and other unconventional gas resources. The amount of the adsorbed phase depends on the pressure and temperature. The Langmuir isotherm has been used to describe the pressure dependence. However, temperature dependence has not been explored. This is important to evaluate thermal simulation as a recovery method and to extrapolate laboratory measurements to reservoir conditions. The authors investigate adsorption as a function of both pressure and temperature. They found that the effects of temperature are significant and that the Langmuir model does not describe adsorption adequately. They reconciled the data with bi-Langmuir models.

Lu, X.C.; Li, F.C.; Watson, A.T. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Preliminary effects of Marcellus shale drilling on Louisiana waterthrush in West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary effects of Marcellus shale drilling on Louisiana Waterthrush in West Virginia Page 1 of 1 Doug Becker and James Sheehan, WV Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Petra Bohall Wood, U.S. Geological Survey, WV Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV 26506, USA; Harry Edenborn, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, USA. Spurred by technological advances and high energy prices, extraction of natural gas from Marcellus shale is increasing in the Appalachian Region. Because little is known about effects on wildlife populations, we studied immediate impacts of oil and gas CO&G) extraction on demographics and relative abundance of Louisiana Waterthrush'CLOWA), a riparian obligate species, to establish a baseline for potential future changes. Annually in 2008-2010, we conducted point counts, monitored Mayfield nesting success, spotted-mapped territories, and measured habitat quality using the EPA Rapid Bioassessment protocol for high gradient streams and a LOWA Habitat Suitability Index CHSI) on a 4,100 ha study area in northern West Virginia. On 11 streams, the stream length affected by O&G activities was 0-58%. Relative abundance, territory denSity, and nest success varied annually but were not significantly different across years. Success did not differ between impacted and unimpacted nests, but territory density had minimal correlation with percent of stream impacted by O&G activities. Impacted nests had lower HSI values in 2010 and lower EPA indices in 2009. High site fidelity could mask the immediate impacts of habitat disturbance from drilling as we measured return rates of 57%. All returning individuals were on the same stream they were banded and 88% were within 250 m of their territory from the previous year. We also observed a spatial shift in LOWA territories, perhaps in response to drilling activities. Preliminary results identified few differences at low habitat disturbance levels but highlight the need for continued monitoring with increasing disturbance. file:

Becker, D.; Sheehan, J.; Wood, P.B.; Edenborn, H.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in Devonian shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of five carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) /sand well stimulations were successfully executed with two Devonian shale operators in Perry and Pike Counties, Kentucky. This new stimulation method offers a minimum formation damage proppant stimulation approach for natural gas producers in the United States. Some operators have been concerned about the frac fluid formation damage associated with the water and chemicals used in conventional foam stimulations, whereas other operators have been concerned about the lack of proppant in straight nitrogen fracs used by service companies today. Two carefully screened geological areas of established Devonian shale production were selected based on active ongoing drilling and completion operations. One selected control area contained an existing set of wells with established production histories. The logistics and field layout of a typical carbon dioxide/sand frac treatment has been described and highlighted. The importance and unique aspects of the closed system blender that is required for job execution is discussed. Five stimulation treatments have been reviewed, and stimulation and preliminary production data compared to offset wells stimulated with nitrogen, and explosives. Initial production results indicate more than a 50 percent increase in production rate compared to nitrogen fraced wells in the Pike County area. In addition, production is also 4.8 times better than conventional shot wells in the same area. These results are encouraging enough to formally combine existing pumping equipment, a closed system blender, and liquid carbon dioxide supplies to develop a new fracturing service in the eastern US A total of 22 additional jobs are planned in the eastern US in low permeability gas formations over the next year.

Yost, A.B. II [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Mazza, R.L. [Petroleum Consulting Services, Canton, OH (United States); Gehr, J.B. [Natural Gas Resources Corporation (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

CO{sub 2}/sand fracturing in Devonian shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of five carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2})/sand well stimulations were successfully executed with two Devonian shale operators in Perry and Pike Counties, Kentucky. This new stimulation method offers a minimum formation damage proppant stimulation approach for natural gas producers in the United States. Some operators have been concerned about the frac fluid formation damage associated with the water and chemicals used in conventional foam stimulations, whereas other operators have been concerned about the lack of proppant in straight nitrogen fracs used by service companies today. Two carefully screened geological areas of established Devonian shale production were selected based on active ongoing drilling and completion operations. One selected control area contained an existing set of wells with established production histories. More specifically, one operator furnished three offset wells which were stimulated with the carbon dioxide/sand frac method. The quantity of proppant and fluids pumped during each well stimulation ranged from 23,000 to 43,000 pounds of proppant and from 120 to 160 tons of liquid carbon dioxide. Another operator furnished two offset wells which were each stimulated with approximately 47,000 pounds of proppant and 120 tons of carbon dioxide. The logistics and field layout of a typical carbon dioxide/sand frac treatment has been described and highlighted. The importance and unique aspects of the closed system blender that is required for job execution is discussed. Five stimulation treatments have been reviewed, and stimulation and preliminary production data compared to offset wells stimulated with nitrogen, and explosives. Initial production results indicate more than a 50 percent increase in production rate compared to nitrogen fraced wells in the Pike County area.

Yost, A.B. II [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Mazza, R.L. [Petroleum Consulting Services, Canton, OH (United States); Gehr, J.B. [Natural Gas Resources Corporation (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Depositional Model of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia Based on Facies Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lithologic analysis of well exposed Marcellus outcrops has identified six different facies in West Virginia and neighboring states: (1) light gray calcareous shale, (2) fossiliferous limestone, (3) black calcareous shale, (4) black noncalcareous shale, (5) dark gray noncalcareous shale, and (6) K-bentonite. Close interbedding of these rock types attests to a complex, ever-changing environment on the eastern foreland ramp of the Appalachian Basin. The environmental setting was clearly not a deep trough, permanently anoxic, salinity stratified, sediment starved, and populated exclusively by phytoplankton—the traditional depositional model. To the contrary, our sedimentary data suggest a rather shallow water depth, intermittent anoxia, normal-marine salinity, a fluctuating input of siliciclastic mud, and faunal communities of low and moderate diversity. Interbedding of the shale and limestone lithofacies as well as the vertical stacking of facies associations is explained most simply by fluctuations in water depth coupled with fluctuations in sediment supply. The sea floor was, at times, immediately below wave base (Facies 1 and 2), around the depth of the thermocline (Facies 2 and 3), or below the thermocline (Facies 4 and 5), relative sea level changing through two sequences of lowstand, transgression, and highstand. Simultaneously the supply of siliciclastic mud was greater at times of lowstand (increased erosion) and highstand (prograding shoreline), and the supply smaller during transgression (sediment stored in distant coastal plain).

Bruner, Kathy

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

89

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

90

Exploration-production studies in newly drilled Devonian-Shale gas wells. Annual report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian shale has been recognized as an important source of gas in the Appalachian Basin. The program aids producers in the collection of reservoir data not normally collected and assists in the evaluation of the effectiveness of zone selection and stimulation designs and methods. The study should provide a fuller understanding of the relationships that affect productivity in the Devonian shale. The relationships between gas flows and geological features that control the production characteristics in the Devonian shale are being developed.

Graham, R.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Shale Webinar Series to Start September 13th The Penn State Marcellus Education Team will be offering a new monthly Shale webinar series beginning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Webinar Series to Start September 13th The Penn State Marcellus Education Team will be offering a new monthly Shale webinar series beginning Thursday, September 13th from 1:00 to 2:00 PM. Tom the series with an overview of trends and updates on shale development. Tom will provide an analysis of shale

92

Controls on reservoir development in Devonian Chert: Permian Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Chert reservoirs of the Lower Devonian Thirtyone Formation contain a significant portion of the hydrocarbon resource in the Permian basin. More than 700 million bbl of oil have been produced from these rocks, and an equivalent amount of mobile oil remains. Effective exploitation of this sizable remaining resource, however, demands a comprehensive appreciation of the complex factors that have contributed to reservoir development. Analysis of Thirtyone Formation chert deposits in Three Bar field and elsewhere in the Permian basin indicates that reservoirs display substantial heterogeneity resulting from depositional, diagenetic, and structural processes. Large-scale reservoir geometries and finer scale, intra-reservoir heterogeneity are primarily attributable to original depositional processes. Despite facies variations, porosity development in these cherts is principally a result of variations in rates and products of early silica diagenesis. Because this diagenesis was in part a function of depositional facies architecture, porosity development follows original depositional patterns. In reservoirs such as Three Bar field, where the Thirtyone Formation has been unroofed by Pennsylvanian deformation, meteoric diagenesis has created additional heterogeneity by causing dissolution of chert and carbonate, especially in areas of higher density fracturing and faulting and along truncated reservoir margins. Structural deformation also has exerted direct controls on heterogeneity that are particularly noteworthy in reservoirs under waterflood. High-density fracture zones create preferred flow paths that result in nonuniform sweep through the reservoir. Faulting locally creates compartments by offsetting reservoir flow units. As such, the processes and models defined here improve understanding of the causes of heterogeneity in all Thirtyone chert reservoirs in the Permian basin and aid recovery of the sizable hydrocarbon resource remaining in these rocks.

Ruppel, S.C.; Hovorka, S.D. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale water O2interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in ourfield study.

Jin, Lixin [University of Texas at El Paso; Ryan, Mathur [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Alex, Carone [Pennsylvania State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale-water-O2 interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in our field study.

Jin, Lixin [ORNL; Mathur, Ryan [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Carone, Alex [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Brantley, Susan L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Eduardo S. Brondizio,¹ Anthony Cak,² Marcellus M. Caldas,³ Carlos Mena,⁴  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 a 143 7 a 143 Pequenos Produtores e o Desmatamento na Amazônia Eduardo S. Brondizio,¹ Anthony Cak,² Marcellus M. Caldas,³ Carlos Mena,⁴ , ⁵ Richard Bilsborrow,⁶ Celia Futemma,⁷ Thomas Ludewigs,⁸ Emilio F. Moran,¹ e Mateus Batistella⁹ Este capítulo discute a relação entre o uso da terra por pequenos agricultores e o desmatamento, com uma atenção especial aos últimos 30 anos da colonização amazônica no Brasil e Equador. Nossa análise chama a atenção para aspectos comuns que unem diferentes grupos sociais, como os pequenos produtores (ex. identidade social, acesso à terra e recursos, tecnologia, mercado e crédito), assim como para a variabilidade entre pequenos produtores em termos de tempo de permanência na

96

Occurrence of oil and gas in Devonian shales and equivalents in West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

During the Devonian, an epicontinental sea was present in the Appalachian basin. The Catskill Clastic Wedge was formed in the eastern part of the basin by sediments derived from land along the margin of the continent. Three facies are recognized in the Catskill Clastic Wedge: (1) a red-bed facies deposited in terrestrial and nearshore marine environments; (2) a gray shale and sandstone facies deposited in a shallow- to moderately-deep marine environment; and (3) a dark-gray shale and siltstone facies deposited in the deepest part of the epicontinental sea. Oil and natural gas are being produced from Devonian shales in the western part of West Virginia and from upper Devonian sandstones and siltstones in the north-central part of the state. It is suggested that in addition to extending known areas of gas production, that drilling for natural gas be conducted in areas underlain by organic-rich shales and thick zones of interbedded siltstone and shale in the Devonian section in central, southern, and western West Virginia. The most promising areas for exploration are those areas where fractures are associated with folds, faults, and lineaments. 60 references.

Schwietering, J. F.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The most pervasive systematic joints hosted by Devonian black shale of the Appa-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The most pervasive systematic joints hosted by Devonian black shale of the Appa- lachian equivalent black shale of the distal, shallower region of the delta to the west, 25% of the joint inter into and abutting cross- fold joints. East-northeast joints in the distal shale propagated early but were neither

Engelder, Terry

98

Physical and chemical characterization of Devonian gas shale. Quarterly status report, April 1-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general location of wells and the corresponding well data used by the Mound Facility in its EGSP study of Devonian gas shales are presented. The data include: vitrinite, bitumen, and pyrolysis-GC analyses; biostratigraphy; depths; C1-C7 analysis; bulk density measurements; total organic carbon contents; lithology; kerogen analysis; permeability; dilatometry; and sorption studies. (DC)

Zielinski, R.E.; Moteff, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States)); Daniel, J. (Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116). A recent gas exploration and extraction. In return for lease rights, parties recovering gas customarily pay

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

105

Did Devonian shale wells drilled during the 1980`s and early 1990`s in West Virginia measure up to expectations?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the mid-1980`s, a model of future Devonian shale drilling and production was prepared for the Gas Research Institute (GRI). In late 1995, the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (WVGES) was contracted by GRI to evaluate actual drilling and production in the 1980`s and early 1990`s and compare these data to the predictions made in the existing model. Drilling activity data were compiled for the years 1979-1993 for all wells drilled, and for all Devonian shale wells drilled. Monthly and annual production data were summarized for both categories. The Devonian shale wells were subdivided into two subsets: (1) the western black shales trend and (2) the eastern black and gray shales and siltstones trend, according to the play definitions used in the {open_quotes}Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Reservoirs{close_quotes}. Devonian shale wells were subdivided into vintages by completion year. Finally, each Devonian shale well was assigned to a 30 minute geographic grid or {open_quotes}cell{close_quotes} and production data were compiled and compared between cells. Analysis of the data led to the following conclusions: fewer shale wells were being drilled in the early 1990s, but these wells had better recoveries than the wells drilled in the 1980s. Some grid cells showed higher recoveries for the black and gray shales and siltstones play than in cells with black shale reservoirs alone. These higher recoveries perhaps can be attributed to the common practice of completing and producing shallower zones (i.e. Mississippian sandstones) in addition to the Devonian shales.

Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Matchen, D.L. [West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, Morgantown, WV (United States); Woods, T.J. [Gas Research Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

High-pressure mechanical and sonic properties of a Devonian shale from West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

Static mechanical properties and sonic velocities were determined on each of four members of the Devonian shale from Columbia Gas Transmission's well 20403, Huntington, West Virginia. They were: Pressure - volume data to 4.0 GPa; Compressive strength at confining pressures up to 300 MPa, both parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Extensile strength at 100 to 700 MPa confining pressure, both parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Loading and unloading path in uniaxial strain at 20 to 500 MPa confining pressure, both parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Tensile strength at ambient pressure, parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Shear and compressional wave velocities at confining pressures up to 1000 MPa parallel, at 45/sup 0/, and perpendicular to bedding. Results are presented and discussed. 32 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Heard, H.C.; Lin, W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Physicochemical properties of methane storage and transport in Devonian shale. Annual technical report, June 1988-May 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report deals with the determination of how natural gas is stored in Devonian shales and what the theoretical implications of the storage mechanisms are. Isotherm measurements show that approximately 50% of the methane present in shale is either dissolved in other fluids or is adsorbed; the remainder exists as gas in the pore spaces of the shale matrix. The interrelationship of mercury-porosimetry measurements, and helium and methane isotherm determinations are discussed. The possible potential of NMR as a tool for determining the nature of adsorption on the shales is explored. The errors and accuracy of isotherm determination is discussed. Different natural gas components have different isotherms in Devonian shale. One implication of this is that production from fractured reservoirs of shale ought to fluctuate in response to wellbore pressure fluctuations. Relevant results from both an analytical model and a new numerical simulator are presented.

Schettler, P.D.; Parmely, C.R.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Thermal Maturity and Organic Facies of Devonian Shales From Selected Wells  

SciTech Connect

An organic geochemical study was performed on core samples of the Devonian shale from wells in Ohio, Kentucky, and Illinois. The thermal maturity of the organic matter (kerogen) contained in the fine-grained sediments was investigated by vitrinite reflectance and kerogen coloration (Thermal Alteration Index). The results indicate that the organic matter has been thermally matured to the early stages of petroleum and associated gas generation. A suite of geochemical analyses designed to evaluate the organic richness, the hydrocarbon potential for gas, condensate, and/or oil, and the type of organic matter was performed on the samples analyzed for thermal maturity. In general, two types of organic facies were encountered. The rich organic facies (A) is characterized by abundant gas, gasoline, and gas-oil hydrocarbons, a high organic carbon content, and organic matter prone to gererate abundant oil and associated gas. Based on the geochemical data, a second type of organic facies (B) interbedded with the rich organic facies (A) was encountered in Kentucy and Ohio wells. Organic facies B consists of sediments relatively lean in organic carbon and gas-oil hydrocarbons, and abundant gas and gasoline hydrocarbons. In most cases, facies B is composed of woody and coaly types of kerogen. The woody-coaly kerogen is presumed to indicate a nonmarine derived depositional source prone to generate predominately gas (methane).

Zielinski, R. E.; Martin, L. J.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Seismic detection of fractured Devonian shale reservoir. Annual report, July 1985-June 1986  

SciTech Connect

Interpretation of seismic data over the Cottageville gas field in West Virginia reveals the presence of numerous changes in reflection character across the top of the Lower Huron shales. Production from the Lower Huron is fracture-controlled, and some of the more-pronounced changes in amplitude and shape occur in the more-productive areas of the field. Model studies indicate that these changes are related to the development of low-impedance intervals that extend into the overlying shales of the Middle Huron. Analysis of geophysical logs indicates that these differences are not produced by lithologic variability in the shale. Hence, the observed changes in reflection character are believed to be associated with intense fracturing. Studies here suggest that the analysis of seismic data can be combined with other data to reduce the risk associated with exploration and development of Devonian shale gas resources. Final open-flow of gas and geologic structure from >4000 shale gas wells in eastern Kentucky outlines two high-flow areas. Interrelationships between geologic structure and gas flow are direct in one, but they are complex and unresolved in the other. Linear, steep flow gradients and the interrelationships of high-flow to structure confirm the importance of tectonic fracture permeability to shale productivity.

Wilson, T.H.; Shumaker, R.C.; Sims, C.S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Inorganic geochemistry of Devonian shales in southern West Virginia: geographic and stratigraphic trends  

SciTech Connect

Samples of cuttings from twenty-one wells and a core from a single well in southern West Virginia were analyzed for major and minor elements: silicon, aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, titanium, phosphorus, manganese, sulfur, zinc, and strontium. Stratigraphic and geographic controls on elemental abundances were studied through canonical correlations, factor analyses, and trend surface analyses. The most abundant elements, silicon and aluminum, show gradual trends through the stratigraphic column of most wells, with silicon increasing and aluminum decreasing up-section. Other elements such as calcium, sulfur, and titanium change abruptly in abundance at certain stratigraphic boundaries. Important geographic trends run east-west: for instance, one can see an increase in sulfur and a decrease in titanium to the west; and a decrease in silicon from the east to the central part of the study area, then an increase further west. Although observed vertical trends in detrital minerals and geographic patterns in elemental abundances agree with the accepted view of a prograding delta complex during Late Devonian time, geographically-local, time restricted depositional processes influenced elemental percentages in subsets of the wells and the stratigraphic intervals studied. The black shales of lower Huron age do not represent simply a return of depositional conditions present in the earlier Rhinestreet time; nor do the gray shales of the Ohio Shale represent the same environmental conditions as the Big White Slate.

Hohn, M.E.; Neal, D.W.; Renton, J.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Utica, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

42313°, -82.4512699° 42313°, -82.4512699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2342313,"lon":-82.4512699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Utica, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

095975°, -90.6234323° 095975°, -90.6234323° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.1095975,"lon":-90.6234323,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Utica, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55569°, -89.1220579° 55569°, -89.1220579° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9655569,"lon":-89.1220579,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Geochemical constraints on microbial methanogenesis in an unconventional gas reservoir: Devonian Antrim shale, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian Antrim Shale is a self-sourced, highly fractured gas reservoir. It subcrops around the margin of the Michigan Basin below Pleistocene glacial drift, which has served as a source of meteoric recharge to the unit. The Antrim Shale is organic-rich (>10% total organic carbon), hydrogen-rich (Type I kerogen) and thermally immature (R[sub o] = 0.4 to 0.6). Reserve estimates range from 4-8 Tcf, based on assumptions of a thermogenic gas play. Chemical and isotopic properties measured in the formation waters show significant regional variations and probably delineate zones of increased fluid flow controlled by the fracture network. [sup 14]C determinations on dissolved inorganic carbon indicate that freshwater recharge occurred during the period between the last glacial advance and the present. The isotopic composition of Antrim methane ([delta][sup 13]C = -49 to -59[per thousand]) has been used to suggest that the gas is of early thermogenic origin. However, the highly positive carbon of co-produced CO[sub 2] gas ([delta][sup 13]C [approximately] +22[per thousand]) and DIC in associated Antrim brines ([delta][sup 13]C = +19 to +31[per thousand]) are consistent with bacterially mediated fractionation. The correlation of deuterium in methane ([delta]D = -200 to -260[per thousand]) with that of the co-produced waters (SD = -20 to -90176) suggests that the major source of this microbial gas is via the CO[sub 2] reduction pathway within the reservoir. Chemical and isotopic results also demonstrate a significant (up to 25%) component of thermogenic gas as the production interval depth increases. The connection between the timing of groundwater recharge, hydrogeochemistry and gas production within the Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin, is likely not unique and may find application to similar resources elsewhere.

Martini, A.M.; Budal, J.M.; Walter, L.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Horizontal Devonian shale well, Columbia Natural Resources, Inc.`s, Pocohontas Development Corp. Well 21747, Martin County, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Gas and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully completed field work on a horizontally drilled Devonian shale well located in Martin County, Kentucky. The objective of this cofunded project is to assess the effectiveness and economic feasibility of applying horizontal drilling and hydraulically fracturing stimulation techniques to enhance the extraction of natural gas from the Devonian shale. The well is comprised of three segments: a conventional vertical section, an angle build section and a horizontal section. The well reached a measured depth (MD) of 6263 feet, 3810 feet true vertical depth (TVD), with a horizontal displacement of 2812 feet achieved in the desired direction of N10{degrees}W. Both air and foam were used as drilling fluids. The vertical, lateral and tangent sections were drilled using conventional rotary drilling methods. Downhole motors were used to build angle. A total combined final open flow of 3.1 MMcfd was measured from all zones. Total well expenditures are approximately $1,460,000. Of this amount, $700,000 is directly related to the research and learning curve experience aspects. It is projected that the same horizontal well could be drilled with existing technology for $700,000. If advanced can be made in MWD systems for air drilling environments, wells of this type could be drilled routinely for $500,000. It appears that application of horizontal drilling will result in at least acceleration of gas production and possibly the addition of recoverable reserves from the Devonian shale. Production data, necessary to validate this statement, are also required to determine the economics. As we gain experience and technology advances, cost reductions will occur; this will result in economic improvement.

Koziar, G.; Ahmad, M.M.; Friend, L.L.; Friend, M.L.; Rothman, E.M.; Stollar, R.L. [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Horizontal Devonian shale well, Columbia Natural Resources, Inc. 's, Pocohontas Development Corp. Well 21747, Martin County, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Gas and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully completed field work on a horizontally drilled Devonian shale well located in Martin County, Kentucky. The objective of this cofunded project is to assess the effectiveness and economic feasibility of applying horizontal drilling and hydraulically fracturing stimulation techniques to enhance the extraction of natural gas from the Devonian shale. The well is comprised of three segments: a conventional vertical section, an angle build section and a horizontal section. The well reached a measured depth (MD) of 6263 feet, 3810 feet true vertical depth (TVD), with a horizontal displacement of 2812 feet achieved in the desired direction of N10{degrees}W. Both air and foam were used as drilling fluids. The vertical, lateral and tangent sections were drilled using conventional rotary drilling methods. Downhole motors were used to build angle. A total combined final open flow of 3.1 MMcfd was measured from all zones. Total well expenditures are approximately $1,460,000. Of this amount, $700,000 is directly related to the research and learning curve experience aspects. It is projected that the same horizontal well could be drilled with existing technology for $700,000. If advanced can be made in MWD systems for air drilling environments, wells of this type could be drilled routinely for $500,000. It appears that application of horizontal drilling will result in at least acceleration of gas production and possibly the addition of recoverable reserves from the Devonian shale. Production data, necessary to validate this statement, are also required to determine the economics. As we gain experience and technology advances, cost reductions will occur; this will result in economic improvement.

Koziar, G.; Ahmad, M.M.; Friend, L.L.; Friend, M.L.; Rothman, E.M.; Stollar, R.L. (Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)) [Columbia Gas System Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bibliography of the paleontology and paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in North America  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence is one of the most prominent and well-known stratigraphic horizons in the Paleozoic of the United States, yet the paleontology and its paleoecologic and paleoenvironmental implications are poorly known. This is in larger part related to the scarcity of fossils preserved in the shale - in terms of both diversity and abundance. Nonetheless, that biota which is preserved is well-known and much described, but there is little synthesis of this data. The first step in such a synthesis is the compilation of an inclusive bibliography such as this one. This bibliography contains 1193 entries covering all the major works dealing with Devonian-Mississippian black-shale paleontology and paleoecology in North America. Articles dealing with areas of peripheral interest, such as paleogeography, paleoclimatology, ocean circulation and chemistry, and modern analogues, are also cited. In the index, the various genera, taxonomic groups, and other general topics are cross-referenced to the cited articles. It is hoped that this compilation will aid in the synthesis of paleontologic and paleoecologic data toward a better understanding of these unique rocks and their role as a source of energy.

Barron, L.S.; Ettensohn, F.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: Devonian shale  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to identify and examine potential public health and safety issues and the potential environmental impacts from recovery of natural gas from Devonian age shale. This document will serve as background data and information for planners within the government to assist in development of our new energy technologies in a timely and environmentally sound manner. This report describes the resource and the DOE eastern gas shales project in Section 2. Section 3 describes the new and developing recovery technologies associated with Devonian shale. An assessment of the environment, health and safety impacts associated with a typical fields is presented in Section 4. The typical field for this assessment occupies ten square miles and is developed on a 40-acre spacing (that is, there is a well in each 40-acre grid). This field thus has a total of 160 wells. Finally, Section 5 presents the conclusions and recommendations. A reference list is provided to give a greater plant. Based on the estimated plant cost and the various cases of operating income, an economic analysis was performed employing a profitability index criterion of discounted cash flow to determine an interest rate of return on the plant investment.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF UPPER DEVONIAN GORDON SANDSTONE, JACKSONBURG STRINGTOWN OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN WEST VIRGINIA  

SciTech Connect

The Jacksonburg-Stringtown oil field contained an estimated 88,500,000 barrels of oil in place, of which approximately 20,000,000 barrels were produced during primary recovery operations. A gas injection project, initiated in 1934, and a pilot waterflood, begun in 1981, yielded additional production from limited portions of the field. The pilot was successful enough to warrant development of a full-scale waterflood in 1990, involving approximately 8,900 acres in three units, with a target of 1,500 barrels of oil per acre recovery. Historical patterns of drilling and development within the field suggests that the Gordon reservoir is heterogeneous, and that detailed reservoir characterization is necessary for understanding well performance and addressing problems observed by the operators. The purpose of this work is to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production. Conventional stratigraphic correlation and core description shows that the Gordon sandstone is composed of three parasequences, formed along the Late Devonian shoreline of the Appalachian Basin. The parasequences comprise five lithofacies, of which one includes reservoir sandstones. Pay sandstones were found to have permeabilities in core ranging from 10 to 200 mD, whereas non-pay sandstones have permeabilities ranging from below the level of instrumental detection to 5 mD; Conglomeratic zones could take on the permeability characteristics of enclosing materials, or could exhibit extremely low values in pay sandstone and high values in non-pay or low permeability pay sandstone. Four electrofacies based on a linear combination of density and scaled gamma ray best matched correlations made independently based on visual comparison of geophysical logs. Electrofacies 4 with relatively high permeability (mean value > 45 mD) was determined to be equivalent to the pay sandstone within the Gordon reservoir. Three-dimensional models of the electrofacies in the pilot waterflood showed that electrofacies 4 is present throughout this area, and the other electrofacies are more disconnected. A three-layer, back-propagation artificial neural network with three slabs in the middle layer can be used to predict permeability and porosity from gamma ray and bulk density logs, the first and the second derivatives of the log data with respect to depth, well location, and log baselines. Two flow units were defined based on the stratigraphic model and geophysical logs. A three-dimensional reservoir model including the flow units, values of permeability calculated through the artificial neural network and injection pressure-rate information were then used as inputs for a reservoir simulator to predict oil production performance for the center producers in the pilot area. This description of the reservoir provided significantly better simulation results than earlier results obtained using simple reservoir models. Bulk density and gamma ray logs were used to identify flow units throughout the field. As predicted by the stratigraphic analysis, one of the flow units crosses stratigraphic units in the reservoir. A neural network was used to predict permeability values for each flow unit in producer and injection wells. The reservoir simulator was utilized to predict the performance of two flood patterns located to the north of the pilot area. Considering the simple model utilized for simulation, the results are in very good agreement with the field history.

S. Ameri; K. Aminian; K.L. Avary; H.I. Bilgesu; M.E. Hohn; R.R. McDowell; D.L. Matchen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

Analysis of Devonian Black Shales in Kentucky for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Enhanced Natural Gas Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO2. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine both CO2 and CH4 adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO2 displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO2 adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton in the more organic-rich zones. There is a direct linear correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO2 adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial volumetric estimates based on these data indicate a CO2 sequestration capacity of as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. In the Big Sandy Gas Field area of eastern Kentucky, calculations using the net thickness of shale with 4 percent or greater total organic carbon, indicate that 6.8 billion tonnes of CO2 could be sequestered in the five county area. Discounting the uncertainties in reservoir volume and injection efficiency, these results indicate that the black shales of Kentucky are a potentially large geologic sink for CO2. Moreover, the extensive occurrence of gas shales in Paleozoic and Mesozoic basins across North America make them an attractive regional target for economic CO2 storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall; Cortland F. Eble; James A. Drahovzal; R. Marc Bustin

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Stratigraphy and organic petrography of Mississippian and Devonian oil shale at the Means Project, East-Central Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The Means Oil Shale Project is under consideration for financial assistance by the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation. The project site is located in southern Montgomery County, about 45 miles east of Lexington, Kentucky. In the site area the Devonian Ohio Shale and the Mississippian Sunbury Shale are under study; these oil shales were deposited in the Appalachian Basin. The objective of the Means Project is to mine, using open pit methods, an ore zone which includes the Sunbury and upper Cleveland and which excludes the Bedford interburden. The thick lower grade oil shale below this ore zone renders the higher grade shale at the base of the Huron commercially unattractive. The oil shale at Means has been classified as a marinite, an oil shale containing abundant alginite of marine origin. Lamalginite is the dominant liptinite and comprises small, unicellular alginite with weak to moderate fluorescence at low rank and a distinctive lamellar form. Telalginite, derived from large colonial or thick-walled, unicellular algae, is common in several stratigraphic intervals.

Solomon, B.J.; Hutton, A.C.; Henstridge, D.A.; Ivanac, J.F.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CO2 hardage cover_January2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to to Evaluation of Fracture Systems and Stress Fields Within the Marcellus Shale and Utica Shale and Characterization of Associated Water-Disposal Reservoirs: Appalachian Basin. 08122-55.Final January 2013 Principal Investigator: Bob A. Hardage Co-Authors: Engin Alkin, Milo M. Backus, Michael V. DeAngelo, Diana Sava, Donald Wagner, and Robert J. Graebner Subcontractor: Bureau of Economic Geology Subcontractor: The University of Texas at Austin Telephone: 512-471-0300 http://www.beg.utexas.edu/ Email: bob.hardage@beg.utexas.edu Evaluation of Fracture Systems and Stress Fields Within the Marcellus Shale and Utica Shale and Characterization of Associated Water-Disposal Reservoirs: Appalachian Basin RPSEA Subcontract: 08122-55 QAd9239 0.9 1.2 1.3 1.4

137

Pyrolysis and hydrocarbon source bed potential of the Upper Devonian Woodford Shale, Hovey Channel, southern Permian basin, west Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian Woodford Shale in the Hovey Channel area, southern Permian basin, is 50 m thick and composed largely of brown to black, pyritic, spore-bearing, organic-rich, fissile shale an chert. Total organic carbon, distillable hydrocarbons, genetic potential, organic carbon index, hydrogen index, temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation, and kerogen transformation index of the Woodford Shale suggest a matured to overmatured, gas-generating source bed. The total organic carbon content of the formation ranged from a low of 0.77% in the cherty samples to a high of 4.59% in a shaley sample, averaging 2.18%. Distillable hydrocarbon content of the samples is fairly high (averaging 1.72 mg HC/gm{degree} rock), varying from 0.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock to 3.22 mg HC/gm{degree} rock. Genetic potential evaluated in terms of both residual and total generative potential showed above average potential, averaging 3.25 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the residual and 4.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the total, respectively. Live organic carbon index values ranged from 11-28%, characterizing the formation as a moderate to good source bed. Hydrogen index values ranged from 73 mg HC/gm{degree} C org to 155 mg HC/gm{degree} C org, suggesting overmaturity and gas-generation potential of the source bed. Temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation values and kerogen transformation ratio values (averaging 0.34) also indicate overmatured nature of the Woodford Shale.

Hussain, M.; Bloom, M.A. (Sul Ross State Univ., Alpine, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in eastern Kentucky with an atlas of some common fossils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence of eastern North America is a distinctive stratigraphic interval generally characterized by low clastic influx, high organic production in the water column, anaerobic bottom conditions, and the relative absence of fossil evidence for biologic activity. The laminated black shales which constitute most of the black-shale sequence are broken by two major sequences of interbedded greenish-gray, clayey shales which contain bioturbation and pyritized micromorph invertebrates. The black shales contain abundant evidence of life from upper parts of the water column such as fish fossils, conodonts, algae and other phytoplankton; however, there is a lack of evidence of benthic life. The rare brachiopods, crinoids, and molluscs that occur in the black shales were probably epiplanktic. A significant physical distinction between the environment in which the black sediments were deposited and that in which the greenish-gray sediments were deposited was the level of dissolved oxygen. The laminated black shales point to anaerobic conditions and the bioturbated greenish-gray shales suggest dysaerobic to marginally aerobic-dysaerobic conditions. A paleoenvironmental model in which quasi-estuarine circulation compliments and enhances the effect of a stratified water column can account for both depletion of dissolved oxygen in the bottom environments and the absence of oxygen replenishment during black-shale deposition. Periods of abundant clastic influx from fluvial environments to the east probably account for the abundance of clays in the greenish-gray shale as well as the small amounts of oxygen necessary to support the depauparate, opportunistic, benthic faunas found there. These pulses of greenish-gray clastics were short-lived and eventually were replaced by anaerobic conditions and low rates of clastic sedimentation which characterized most of black-shale deposition.

Barron, L.S.; Ettensohn, F.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of Devonian shale stratigraphic, production, and completion data in West Virginia. Annual report, 1 July 1986-30 June 1987  

SciTech Connect

The Huron Shale Member is the major Devonian shale producing zone in all counties under study. To the north and east, the organic shales of the Huron are replaced by inorganic shales and siltstones; gas production in these areas probably comes from the entire shale interval. Gas-producing potential of the Rhinestreet has not been fully exploited despite its similar lithologic character to the Huron. Structure maps on the top of the Berea and base of the Huron show two northeast-to-southwest trending synclines in Cabell and Wayne Counties, and a north-south anticline in Cabell County. Berea and Onondaga structure maps reveal benches at both levels in Jackson, Mason, and Putnam Counties, possibly indicating continued effects of normal faulting throughout the shale interval. The Huron and Rhinestreet Members display the largest ratio of shows to penetrations in Devonian shale wells in southwestern West Virginia, confirming the role of the Huron in total shale gas production, and emphasizing the potential of the deeper Rhinestreet Member. Smoothed maps of initial potentials are appropriate in the study of regional trends, but unreliable for precise estimation of gas volumes at individual locations. Maps of initial potentials show sets of linearities parallel and perpendicular to regional structural trends. These linearities implicate fractures as a control on gas volumes.

Hohn, M.E.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology  

SciTech Connect

This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Characterization and analysis of Devonian shales as related to release of gaseous hydrocarbons. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is to determine the relationships between the shale characteristics, hydrocarbon gas contents, and well location, for assessing the productive capacity of the Eastern Devonian Gas Shale deposits and guiding research, development, and demonstration projects to enhance the recovery of natural gas from the shale deposits. One well was sampled during this reporting period. Another well from Monongalia County, WV (M-1) was cored in April. 31 samples were obtained for Battelle with additional 55 samples canned for other DOE contractors. Characterization tasks on shale samples from R-146 (Mason County, WV.) and M-1 wells (Monongalia) have been completed. In the preliminary analysis correlations were observed between the hydrocarbon gas contents and can pressure, propane content, well location, oxygen content CO/sub 2/ content, bulk density and carbon contents. Higher pressures are attributed to higher hydrocarbon gas contents. For high gas pressures, propane content is an important indication of hydrocarbon gas content. At low gas pressure, butane contents more accurately predict the hydrocarbon gas contents. High CO/sub 2/ and carbon contents indicate high hydrocarbon gas values, whereas oxygen contents are inversely related to hydrocarbon gas contents. Analysis of the limited wire-line log data shows that correlations between the laboratory and well log data can be utilized to predict potential hydrocarbon gas contents of the wells. 15 tables, 27 figures.

Kalyoncu, R.S.; Snyder, M.J.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

Marcellus natural gas pipeline projects to primarily ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... ...

145

Marcellus Shale Advisory Commission Report Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for failure to comply. #12;2 Enhance Pennsylvania's Energy Independence. Develop "Green Corridors of designated highways. Include natural gas vehicles in Pennsylvania Clean Vehicles Program. Provide incentives for the conversion of mass transit and school bus fleets to natural gas. Provide incentives

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

146

January 20, 2011 Marcellus Shale 101  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Will oil shale be viable as well? Oil shale will not be economically viable anytime in the near future

Hardy, Christopher R.

147

Understanding the Marcellus Shale Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impacted by a shift in domestic manufacturing from energy-intensive manufacturing industries to less energy-intensive manufacturing industries. Increased energy efficiency of equipment and processes used in the industrial sector drilling rates. Drill bits also come with small industrial diamonds embedded in it on the cutting surface

Benos, Takis

148

Markets expect Marcellus growth to drive Appalachian natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions.

149

Development of the Natural Gas Resources in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remove Exotics Manually or Chemically Air Quality X X Speed Limits Water Roads & Pads Flare Gas (Rather with drilling and pipeline compression operations. The main pollutant of concern is nitrogen oxides (NOx), which

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

150

Marcellus natural gas pipeline projects to primarily benefit New ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

On October 17, the Federal Energy Regulatory Agency (FERC) authorized the start of initial service on these expansions. New England consumers, however, ...

151

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in… (more)

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Market changes contribute to growing Marcellus area spot natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (REX) to Clarington, Ohio led to new natural gas trading points formed to facilitate commercial transactions. REX deliveries to Clarington, ...

153

Autopoietic landscapes : the architectural implications of mining the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing, a form of natural gas extraction, is a process deeply embedded in the networks of politics, power, economics, energy, infrastructure, and land use. Hydraulic fracturing has become a standard practice ...

Winfield, Catherine (Catherine Anne)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in the United States is natural gas. However, with the increased use of natural ...

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Markets expect Marcellus growth to drive Appalachian natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas prices in the Mid-Atlantic have ... Growth is mostly from dry gas production in northeastern Pennsylvania. ... (Wetzel County , WV) and Natrium ...

156

Marcellus natural gas production gains affect spreads between ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This basis swap is a financial instrument representing the difference in the value between natural gas in southwest Pennsylvania and the ... The natural gas price ...

157

CONTENTS Seismic Evaluates Marcellus Shale for Flow-Back Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contact Chandra Nautiyal at NETL (chandra.nautiyal@netl.doe.gov or 281-494-2488) or W. Lynn Watney at the University of Kansas (lwatney@ku.edu or 785-864-2184). Acknowledgements...

158

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Microsoft Word - 201309_Fuels_Industry_Newsletter_September_2013.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

opens bidding for ethane at proposed Beaver County cracker plant" opens bidding for ethane at proposed Beaver County cracker plant" By Anya Litvak, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 27, 2013 Royal Dutch Shell hasn't decided if it will build an ethane cracker in Beaver County, but it's taking bids from oil and gas companies in the Marcellus and Utica shales to gauge how much ethane would be available if it pulls the trigger. Shell began a two-month bidding period Tuesday to supplement commitments it already has secured with Consol Energy Inc., Noble Energy Inc., Seneca Resources Corp., and Hilcorp Energy Co. Shell's own exploration and production company also would feed ethane into a potential cracker. Absent from that list are some of the region's largest so-called wet gas producers, including Range Resources, Chevron Corp., Chesapeake Energy Corp. and EQT Corp.

160

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State. Volume III. Experience of drilling five shale-gas wells in New York State  

SciTech Connect

Five shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the South-Central areas of New York State as part of this program. The program was undertaken by Arlington Exploration Company (AEC) during 1981 and 1982. The wells were drilled on educational properties in an attempt to demonstrate the economic prospect of natural gas for institutional and small commercial consumers to develop their own source of energy. All five wells were completed in the Marcellus section of the Devonian shale. Each of the five wells was connected to an appropriate heat load for the purpose of production testing. The project supports the theory that a well drilled anywhere in South-Central New York and completed in the Marcellus Shale using modern fracturing techniques (i.e. nitrogen foam) is likely to produce some gas. Important factors not yet predictable are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the volume of recoverable reserves. Depths to the Marcellus Shale generally increase from north (i.e. Houghton College) to south (i.e. Portville Central School).

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in itsof Marcellus shale gas production may not be fully

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Horizontal well success spurs more Devonian work in Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this DOE-sponsored project was to drill a horizontal demonstration well in order to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee reservoir in Crystal field. In addition, a modern log suite through the entire Dundee formation and a conventional core through the productive interval, the oil/water contact, and the upper part of the water leg were to be obtained. During the early years of Dundee development in central Michigan, it was common practice to drill only a short distance below the cap limestone into the top of the Dundee porosity zone before completing a well in order to prevent lost circulation and blowouts in vuggy and fractured dolomites and to avoid penetration of the oil/water contact and minimize water coning. As a result, the characteristics of the Dundee reservoir in central Michigan are poorly known and the decision to attempt an improved recovery program in Crystal field had to be based on field volumetrics, individual well productivities, and well development/abandonment histories. The new core and log data from the demonstration well will provide an important anchor point for regional Dundee reservoir characterization studies.

Wood, J.R.; Allan, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Harrison, W.B. III [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Taylor, E.; Tester, C.J. [Cronus Development Corp., Traverse City, MI (United States)

1996-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydrogeochemistry of the Antrim Shale (Devonian) in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Antrim shale has been the focus of active exploration and production in the Michigan Basin since 1987. The producing trend is presently located along the northern rim of the basin, but new ventures are expanding into the southern part of the basin and a predictive model for gas generation and production is greatly needed. The authors have undertaken a geochemical investigation of the waters co-produced with gases in the Antrim shale. There is unusual regional variability in the water chemistry. For example, salinity ranges from near potable water to nearly 10 times the salinity of ocean water within a distance of 80 km. Understanding the origin of solutes, waters and natural gas being produced from the Antrim Shale will aid in developing a model for natural gas generation and migration within the basin. The chemical and isotopic compositions of Antrim waters suggest that there are two sources of water and salinity within the reservoir: (1) saline, high-bromide basinal brine moving updip into the producing areas, and (2) ancient, dilute glacial melt water. Either of these waters can gain additional NaCl from dissolving Br-poor halite located within the updip pinch-out of the Detroit River Salt. When plotted geographically, variations in these components exhibit distinct regional patterns and may ultimately highlight major water and gas migration avenues. In addition to variable water salinity, the authors' preliminary results suggest that complexities in natural gas chemistry are reflected in the composition of coexisting waters.

Martini, A.M.; Walter, L.M.; Richards, J.A.; Budai, J.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fracture analysis of the upper devonian antrim shale, Michigan basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antrim Shale is a fractured, unconventional gas reservoir in the northern Michigan basin. Controls on gas production are poorly constrained but must depend on the fracture framework. Analyses of fracture geometry (orientation, spacing, and aperture width) were undertaken to better evaluate reservoir permeability and, hence, pathways for fluid migration. Measurements from nearly 600 fractures were made from outcrop, core, and Formation MicroScanner logs covering three members of the Antrim Shale (Norwood, Paxton, Lachine) and the Ellsworth Shale. Fracture analyses indicate pronounced reservoir anisotropy among the members. Together related with lithologic variations, this leads to unique reservoir characteristics within each member. There are two dominant fracture sets, northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast. Fracture density varies among stratigraphic intervals but always is lowest in the northwest-southeast fracture set and is greatest in the northeast-southwest fracture set. While aperture width decreases markedly with depth, subsurface variation in mean aperture width is significant. Based on fracture density and mean aperture width, the Norwood member has the largest intrinsic permeability and the Ellsworth Shale the lowest intrinsic permeability. The highest intrinsic fracture permeability in all intervals is associated with the northeast-southwest fracture set. The Norwood and Lachine members thus exhibit the best reservoir character. This information is useful in developing exploration strategies and completion practices in the Antrim Shale gas play.

Richards, J.A.; Budai, J.M.; Walter, L.M.; Abriola, L.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Should fracking stop? Nature 477:271­275. 4. Osborn SG, Vengosh A, Warner NR, Jackson RB (2011) Methane

166

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:5679­5684. 3. Howarth RW, Ingraffea A, Engelder T (2011) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477

Jackson, Robert B.

167

Ontogenic landscapes: hydro-fracking, potentiality, and the assemblage of identity over the northeastern Marcellus Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent environmental, ecological, and economic concerns have interwoven in an increasingly complex manner with movements often coalescing around both particular practices and regions. Of great… (more)

Danza, Daniel J., 1987-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

FACTORS AFFECTING HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED WELL PERFORMANCE IN THE MARCELLUS SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional reservoirs such as shale, hydrates, tight sand, ultra tight sand and coal bed methane reservoirs serves as alternative sources to meet the increasing demand… (more)

Osholake, Tunde

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

OF MARCELLUS SHALE GAS DEVELOPMENT IN WEST VIRGINIA: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS USING PUBLICLY AVAILABLE DATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE/NETL- 402033110DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect

Anthony M. Zammerilli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Modeling and History Matching Hydrocarbon Production from Marcellus Shale using Data Mining and Pattern Recognition Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for individual wells and for the entire field. Introduction Shale gas reservoirs pose a tremendous potential resource for future development, and study of these systems is proceeding apace. Shale gas reservoirs the gas in the pore space is free gas, the gas in shale is stored by compression (as free gas

Mohaghegh, Shahab

171

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable resources for selected shale gas plays as of January 1, 2010 5. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable resources for selected shale gas plays as of January 1, 2010 Basin/Play Area (square miles) Average well spacing (wells per square mile) Percent of area untested Percent of area with potential Average EUR (billion cubic feet per well) Number of potential wells TRR (billion cubic feet) Appalachian Marcellus 104,067 5 99 18 1.56 90,216 140,565 Utica 16,590 4 100 21 1.13 13,936 15,712 Arkoma Woodford 3,000 8 98 23 1.97 5,428 10,678 Fayetteville 5,853 8 93 23 1.30 10,181 13,240 Chattanooga 696 8 100 29 0.99 1,633 1,617 Caney 2,890 4 100 29 0.34 3,369 1,135 TX-LA-MS Salt Haynesville/Bossier 9,320 8 98 34 2.67 24,627 65,860

172

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) 7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) AEO2010 AEO2011 AEO2012 Basin/Play Range Average Range Average Range Average Appalachian Marcellus 0.25-0.74 0.49 0.86-4.66 1.62 0.02-7.80 1.56 Utica -- -- -- -- 0.10-2.75 1.13 Arkoma Woodford 1.43-4.28 2.85 3.00-5.32 4.06 0.40-4.22 1.97 Fayetteville 0.91-2.73 1.82 0.86-2.99 2.03 0.19-3.22 1.30 Chattanooga -- -- -- -- 0.14-1.94 0.99 Caney -- -- -- -- 0.05-0.66 0.34 TX-LA-MS Salt Haynesville/Boosier 2.30-6.89 4.59 1.13-8.65 3.58 0.08-5.76 2.67 Western Gulf Eagle Ford 1.10-3.29 2.19 1.73-7.32 2.63 0.41-4.93 2.36 Pearsall -- -- -- -- 0.12-2.91 1.22

173

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

OPTIMIZATION OF THE TRANSPORT OF CO2 GENERATED FROM THE PRODUCTION OF THE MARCELLUS SHALE GAS IN PENNSYLVANIA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The trapping of radiant heat from the sun in the Earth’s atmosphere, a natural occurring process known as greenhouse effect, is brought about by the… (more)

Madu, Christian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

Karapataki, Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Oil and gas developments in New York in 1981  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, there were 646 wells completed in New York. This figure is partly estimated. In existing fields, 107 oil and 450 gas wells were completed. The results of exploratory drilling included 12 new gas field discoveries, 4 new gas pool discoveries, 3 deeper pool discoveries, 1 shallower pool discovery, and 36 extensions to existing gas fields. Two Medina Sandstone discoveries were made in Allegany County, Nine Devonian black shale wells were completed in western New York. An Onondaga reef discovery was made in Cattaraugus County. Three Trenton Limestone discoveries were made in central New York. Arco completed a dry hole in eastern New York near the Eastern Overthrust area. A significant oil discovery from the Bass islands zone below the Onondaga Limestone was made in eastern Chautauqua County. Thirty-five extensions to Medina Sandstone gas fields were completed in 1981. There was also 1 extension to the Houghton, Marcellus black shale gas field. In all, 8 Devonian black shale discoveries, 8 Silurian Medina Sandstone discoveries, and 3 Ordovician Trenton Limestone discoveries were made in New York during 1981. Oil production in 1981 was 848,969 bbl and gas production amounted to 19,000 mmcf. The price for New York stripper crude was $38.00/bbl on January 1, 1981, and ended the year at $35.00/bbl. Wellhead gas prices ranged up to $3.18/mcf. Drilling for Medina Sandstone gas production and Devonian black shale gas production will continue. However, it is expected that overall drilling will decline due to a softening in crude oil prices and an oversupply of gas. Federal government approval of leasing and drilling for gas in Lake Erie has still not been forthcoming.

Van Tyne, A.M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives results on use of a minipermeameter on cores to study very finescale trends in permeability, and use of neural networks to predict permeability in logged, uncored wells.

Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Petrology of the Devonian gas-bearing shale along Lake Erie helps explain gas shows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Comprehensive petrologic study of 136 thin sections of the Ohio Shale along Lake Erie, when combined with detailed stratigraphic study, helps explain the occurrence of its gas shows, most of which occur in the silty, greenish-gray, organic poor Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed. Both have thicker siltstone laminae and more siltstone beds than other members of the Ohio Shale and both units also contain more clayshales. The source of the gas in the Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale is believed to be the bituminous-rich shales of the middle and lower parts of the underlying Huron Member of the Ohio Shale. Eleven petrographic types were recognized and extended descriptions are provided of the major ones - claystones, clayshales, mudshales, and bituminous shales plus laminated and unlaminated siltstones and very minor marlstones and sandstones. In addition three major types of lamination were identified and studied. Thirty-two shale samples were analyzed for organic carbon, whole rock hydrogen and whole rock nitrogen with a Perkin-Elmer 240 Elemental Analyzer and provided the data base for source rock evaluation of the Ohio Shale.

Broadhead, R.F.; Potter, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production.

Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Nuraral Gas, Coal,Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_. Ries. LTRs. , Aug.acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in its

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

182

Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement On The Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

And High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing to Develop the Marcellus Shale and Other Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs

Sabine Pass Liquefaction; Sabine Pass Lng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Pennsylvania natural gas production rose 69% in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... While accelerated drilling in recent years (primarily in the Marcellus Shale formation) ...

184

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... Marcellus natural gas pipeline projects to primarily benefit New York and New Jersey.

185

Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Marcellus Shale Gas Development and Production in West Virginia By: Anthony Cugini, Director National energy Technology Laboratory

186

Subsurface structure of the north Summit gas field, Chestnut Ridge anticline of the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge anticline is the westernmost of the High Plateau folds in southwestern Pennsylvania and north-central West Virginia that are detached primarily in the Marcellus Shale, and the Martinsburg, Salina, and Rome Formations. The primary, basal detachment at the Summit field occurs in the Salina salt. Production from fracture porosity in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone commenced in 1936. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, 14 wells were drilled preparatory to conversion of the reservoir to gas storage. Schlumberger`s Formation MicroScanner (FMS) logs were run in each of these wells to provide information on the structural configuration and fracture patterns of the reservoir. These data indicate that two inward-facing, tight folds at the Oriskany level form the upper flanks and core of the anticline at the northern end of the field, whereas the main part of the field to the south is a comparatively simple, broad closure at the Oriskany level. The structure is a broad, slightly asymmetric open fold in the Mississippian Greenbrier Formation at the surface. Fracture patterns mapped using FMS logs indicate a complex fracture system which varies slightly along the trend of the fold and among the units analyzed, including the Helderberg Formation, Huntersville Chert, Oriskany Sandstone, and Onondaga Formation. An orthogonal joint system strikes toward the northwest and northeast slightly askew to the trend of the fold`s crestal trace. A similar, but more complex fracture pattern is found in an oriented core of these units.

Zhou, G.; Shumaker, R.C. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Staub, W.K. [Consolidated Gas Transmission Co., Clarksburg, WV (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A study of additives for aquagel/bentonite based drilling fluids in relation to filtration and rheological properties, smectite inhibition and their application to Marcellus Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since the dawn of rotary drilling, engineers and scholars have persevered, through study and research, to formulate an optimum inhibitive drilling fluid for the shale… (more)

Onuoha, Ike Eleanya .O.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments… (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

REGIONAL DEPOSITIONAL TRENDS IN THE DEVONIAN GENESEO/BURKET BLACK SHALE BASED ON GAMMA RAY-DENSITY TRENDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACTGas shales are becoming increasingly important as new technologies are applied to enhance their production of natural gas. The Barnett, the Fayetteville, and the Haynesville… (more)

Arnold, LaMichelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Characterization and analysis of Devonian shales as related to release of gaseous hydrocarbons. Well R-109, Washington County, Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coring of Well R-109 (Washington County, Ohio) was accomplished in August 1976. A total of 25 samples were collected. Hydrocarbon gas analyses indicate that higher chain hydrocarbon gases (C/sub 2/-C/sub 5/) make up a significant portion of total hydrocarbons in the shales, but methane is still the dominant single gas. Distinct relationships exist between the carbon and hydrocarbon gas contents, showing increase in hydrocarbon gas contents with increasing carbon. Similar relationships between hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas contents exist, though they are not as pronounced. Gas contents appear not to be related to the bulk densities in any quantitative manner, though organic contents (carbon and hydrogen) seem to be related to bulk density values much more clearly. R-109 shales are virtually impermeable to gases and other fluids, as attempted helium gas permeability measurements indicated extremely small (< 10/sup -12/ Darcy) permeability values.

Kalyoncu, R.S.; Boyer, J.P.; Snyder, M.J.

1979-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Physical and chemical characterization of Devonian gas shale. Quarterly status report, October 1, 1980-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data were obtained from wells located in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Illinois, Tennessee, and New York. Geochemical analysis was performed including whole rock composition analyses for the following elements: sulfur, uranium, vanadium, nickel, hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Also completed were the pyrolysis-gas chromatography and kerogen composition analysis. Hydrocarbon analyses were performed of headspace gases from each well. (DMC)

Zielinski, R.E.; Moteff, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Authors: Ruppel,...

193

Press Room - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear ... Marcellus natural gas pipeline projects to primarily benefit New York and New ...

194

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear ... Marcellus natural gas pipeline projects to primarily benefit New York and New ...

195

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2012 - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the face of unprecedented levels of domestic natural gas production, ... in New England that hinder natural gas flow from the Marcellus shale play and ...

196

MT@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2010 ... The process used in drilling Marcellus shale—also known as “fracking”—entails pumping millions of gallons of water and chemicals deep ...

197

Top 5 producing states' combined marketed natural gas output rose ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary › All Reports ... Due primarily to drilling programs in the Marcellus shale ... Alaska is the country's second leading natural gas producer in terms of ...

198

National Institute of Standards and Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of energy use per passenger mile, cars versus rail ... and re-manufacture of diesel electric locomotives for ... right now in the Marcellus Gas Industries, so ...

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

EIA State Profile  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual gross natural gas production more than doubled in Pennsylvania in 2011, exceeding 1 trillion cubic feet, due to production from the Marcellus shale.

200

Natural gas prices near 10-year low amid mild weather, higher ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production from the Marcellus formation accounted for much of the year-over-year growth in dry natural gas production. Natural gas demand was down, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fossil Energy Today - First Quarter, 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In This Issue.... CT Scanners Give Energy Researchers a Core Understanding of Marcellus Shale Large-Scale CO2 Injection Begins SPR Completes Drawdown of 30 Million Barrels...

202

multi-stage stochastic programming on shale gas infrastructure and production planning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The rich resource of Marcellus gas has recently boosted up the interest of people as the drilling technology advances. Apart from the difficulties in exploration… (more)

Wu, Xiaohuang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

He will work on natural gas resource assessment and environmental issues in the Marcellus Shale, other unconventional gas and oil studies, and the geologic sequestration of carbon...

204

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas Supply  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Oil and Natural Gas Supply Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Additional Information Onsite operations and water quality testing of the...

205

First Edition Geologic Storage Formation Classification: Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

storage. Currently, these tight organic rich shales are being developed as gas and oil shale plays, such as the Marcellus Shale, and are a significant contributor to the...

206

NETL: News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

could help significantly reduce potential environmental impacts from producing natural gas from the Marcellus shale and other geologic formations, according to the Department of...

207

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joins FE Staff; Coal Cleaning Commercial Success; Sonar Survey Program; Heating Oil Reserve Converts Stock; and, Marcellus Shale Water Management. http:energy.govfe...

208

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2010 ... University of Buffalo researchers have determined that the hydraulic ... in drilling Marcellus shale—also known as “fracking”—entails pumping ...

209

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

research applied towards carbon dioxide capture, carbon dioxide storage, and enhanced oilgas recovery. This work includes activities related to analysis of Marcellus Shale...

210

U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil Exploration, Ms. Tucker examined bacterial diversity in Marcellus shale flowback water. Specifically, the project determined best way to isolate DNA from deep...

211

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania natural gas production rose 69% in 2012 despite reduced drilling activity. ... Spot natural gas prices at Marcellus trading point reflect pipeline ...

212

New pipeline project could lower natural gas transportation costs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The spread between the price of natural gas at a supply ... Bottlenecks exist moving Marcellus natural gas out of Pennsylvania and delivering natural gas into ...

213

West Virginia - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These basins also hold smaller conventional natural gas and crude oil reserves. Unconventional shale gas can also be found within the Appalachian Basin’s Marcellus ...

214

Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Natural Gas Technology Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

imported sources and includes conventional and unconventional extraction * Marcellus Shale has an EUR (estimated ultimate recovery) of 489 Tcf (Engelder, 2009) Source: EIA,...

215

Synchrotron X-ray Applications Toward an Understanding of Elastic Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production and modification of gases in sedimentary basins: A geochemical case study from a Devonian shale

Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation on Production from Shale Formations: Application to New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) of southeastern Indiana, in Proceedings, 1989 Eastern Oil Shale Symposium

Mohaghegh, Shahab

217

1Prepared by BG Rahm & SJ Riha (NYS Water Resources Institute), D Yoxtheimer (Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transporter, without after-treatment, idle conditions 13d 31/08/2009 cold idle 60 to 130 nm 0.11 14d 02 particle-associated organics (Robinson et al., 2007). The mass of PM emitted by diesel engines with no aftertreatment devices can decrease with in- creasing dilution ratio. This mass reduction is associated with semi

218

A Political Ecology of Hydraulic Fracturing for Natural Gas in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[:] shale gas in the US, sand mines in Wisconsin, oil in the Ecuadoran Amazon, oil in the Niger Delta's Marcellus Shale Laura J. Stroup, Ph.D. Dept. of Geography, Texas State University Michael H. Finewood, Ph ! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Scott, Christopher

219

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments and are very salty, like the Marcellus shale and other oil and gas formations underlying the areaUnderground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies), Region 3. Marcellus Shale Educational Webinar, February 18, 2010 (Answers provide below by Karen Johnson

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

220

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas in the Marcellus shale natural gas industry in the Mid-Atlantic region. Using publicly available information, we

Maranas, Costas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of other chemicals used to extract gas and oil from underground rocks--used in its Marcellus shale wells natural gas in the United States.1 This figure accounted for undiscovered, unproved, and unconventional discoveries of unconventional natural gas reserves, including the Marcellus shale in the Appalachian region

Argonne National Laboratory

222

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R compositions of the effluents reflect the composition of Marcellus Shale produced waters. The discharge to concentrations in Marcellus Shale produced waters. Nonetheless, 226 Ra levels in stream sediments (544-8759 Bq

Jackson, Robert B.

223

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation (Devonian) of the Michigan Basin using horizontal drains. Final report, April 28, 1994--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Total hydrocarbon production in the Michigan Basin has surpassed 1 billion barrels (Bbbls) and total unrecovered reserves are estimated at 1--2 BBbls. However, hydrocarbon production in Michigan has fallen from 35 MMbbls/yr in 1979 to about 10 MMbbls/yr in 1996. In an effort to slow this decline, a field demonstration project designed around using a horizontal well to recover bypassed oil was designed and carried out at Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI. The project had two goals: to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee Formation, and to characterize additional Dundee reservoirs (29) that are look alikes to the Crystal Field. As much as 85 percent of the oil known to exist in the Dundee Formation in the Michigan Basin remains in the ground as bypassed oil. Early production techniques in the 137 fields were poor, and the Dundee was at risk of being abandoned, leaving millions of barrels of oil behind. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, Michigan is a good example of a worn out field. Crystal Field was once a prolific producer which had been reduced to a handful of wells, the best of which produced only 5 barrels per day. The demonstration well drilled as a result of this project, however, has brought new life to the Crystal Field. Horizontal drilling is one of the most promising technologies available for oil production. The new well was completed successfully in October of 1995 and has been producing 100 barrels of oil per day, 20 times better than the best conventional well in the field.

Wood, J.R.; Pennington, W.D.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Northeastern Geology & Environmental Sciences, v. 30, no. 4, 2008, p. 330-343. STABLE ISOTOPE SIGNATURE OF MIDDLE DEVONIAN SEAWATER FROM HAMILTON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northeastern Geology & Environmental Sciences, v. 30, no. 4, 2008, p. 330-343. STABLE ISOTOPE and Drew Koff Department of Geology, 13 Oak Drive, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY 13346; bselleck@mail.colgate.edu ABSTRACT: Stable isotope ratios of oxygen in articulate brachiopod shell low-magnesium calcity have been

Soja, Constance M.

225

Surface and subsurface fault and fracture systems with associated natural gas production in the Lower Mississippian and Upper Devonian, Price Formation, southern West Virginia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production from natural gas deposits is often enhanced by fault and fracture systems associated with reservoirs. This study presents analyses of fault and fracture systems… (more)

Johnson, S. Reed.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dr. Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wm. E. Mott, Director Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div. 0f.f ice of Environment (EU- 14) Dept. of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Dr. Mott: MED Warehousing Location The sites listed in your letter of Febru; to determine present utilization and ownershi] the information available at this time: 1. Utica Street Warehouse 240 W. Utica Street Buffalo, ?pI The area of 240 and 242 W. Utica St, drive to a 4-story parking garage for Ch The ramp is about 4 years old and previol there was a paved parking lot on the sit 1960' s. The warehouse structure was denI unknown previous date. 2. West Genesee Street Warehouse Buffalo, NY The W. Genesee area is currently abc in .length. About half of the streets prc eliminated to make way for the Niagara E: the remaining streets there is one old bl

227

Effects of diagenesis on the Nd-isotopic composition of black shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Utica black shales were deposited in the Taconic Foreland basin ?420 Ma ago. The organic matter in these shales is of marine origin and the timing of deposition of these shales has been constrained by graptolite biostratigraphy and bentonite chronostratigraphy. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations and Nd-isotopic ratios were measured in whole rock black shales with different grades of thermal maturity from the Utica Shale Magnafacies of Quebec (immature), Ontario (mature), and New York (post mature). These measurements were also made in the organic, carbonate, and sulfide fractions of the shales, that were isolated by sequential leaching. The purpose of this study is to understand how diagenesis (thermal maturation) may affect the Nd-isotopic compositions of different components as well as the whole rock black shales. Bulk rock REE concentrations of the Utica black shales are similar to average shales. However, these rocks show large range in

A Chakrabarti A; Peter A. Ab; Robyn E. Hannigan B; Asish R. Basu A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

229

ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using mapping, he helps locate the best sites for natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale. Augusto Tentori Augusto Tentori Augusto Tentori, a participant in the U.S. Department...

230

Risk assessment of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing fluid spills in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast-paced growth in natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale has fueled intense debate over the risk of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing and the shale gas extraction process at large. While several ...

Fletcher, Sarah Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Publication Price Quantity Total Economic Outlook Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Work in WV 2010 20.00$ $ Other Studies >> The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009 20.00$ ___________ >> Consensus Coal Production

Mohaghegh, Shahab

232

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; A-Z Index A B C D E ... The rise of Marcellus production in both absolute terms and as a share of total U.S. production is ...

233

NETL: News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

event in Charleston, W.Va. 10.31.2011 News New Recycling Solution Introduced to Treat Marcellus Shale Flowback Frack Water A new joint partnership between Casella Waste...

234

CX-007940: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02152012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy...

235

CX-008518: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

236

CX-008914: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/29/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

237

CX-007941: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/15/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

238

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marcellus Marcellus 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Marcellus 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 Dec 39 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 41 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Marcellus +4 -2 +2 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 200 400 600 Dec 13,303 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 13,721 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Marcellus +612 -193 +419 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Marcellus Rig count rigs (3) (2) (1) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change

239

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Marcellus unproved technically recoverable resources: AEO2011, USGS 2011, and AEO2012 1. Marcellus unproved technically recoverable resources: AEO2011, USGS 2011, and AEO2012 Well spacing Estimate Area (square miles) Acres Wells per square mile Percent of area untested Percent of area with potential Average EUR (billion cubic feet per well) TRR (billion cubic feet) AEO2011 (as of 1/1/2009) Marcellus 94,893 80 8 99% 34% 1.62 410,374 USGS (2011 assessment) Marcellus 104,067 132 4.9 99% 18% 0.93 84,198 Foldbelt 19,063 149 4.3 100% 5% 0.21 765 Interior 45,156 149 4.3 99% 37% 1.15 81,374 Western 39,844 117 5.5 99% 7% 0.13 2,059 AEO2012 (as of 1/1/2010) Marcellus 104,067 132 4.9 99% 18% 1.56 140,541 Foldbelt 19,063 149 4.3 100% 5% 0.21 757 Interior 45,161 149 4.3 99% 37% 1.95 137,677

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

400 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Natural gas production million cubic feet/day 0 250 500 750 1,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well oil production per rig barrels/day 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feet/day (450) (400) (350) (300) (250) (200) (150) (100) (50) 0 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Legacy gas production change million cubic feet/day

242

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2012 0, 2012 Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site System to Monitor Environmental Conditions Developed with Department of Energy Funding Washington, D.C. - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley has NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley has developed a technology to remotely monitor the environment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University. The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently

243

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2013 | Release Date: November 14, 13, 2013 | Release Date: November 14, 2013 | Next Release: November 21, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices As reported in October, natural gas pipeline expansions were slated to add nearly 1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of capacity to flow gas to markets in New York and New Jersey on November 1. These expansions happened on schedule, increasing access for consumers in the New York City metropolitan area to natural gas produced in the Appalachian Basin's Marcellus Shale play. This has resulted in lower gas prices for New York consumers, and has eased supply backup in the Marcellus Basin.

244

Feasibility study on modeling and prediction of production behavior in naturally fractured shale reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of predicting production characteristics in a Devonian Shale reservoir. This paper discusses the use of… (more)

Huls, Boyd T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

TO UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 18% MT. HEALTHY WATION CINCINNATI 51. OHIO December 9, 1955 FROM Herbert Davis REFERENCE OBJECTIVEOFlRIF This visit was made to observe the physical equipment and the personnel at Utica Metals Division as a possible source for development work i'n vacuum melting and casting. CONCLU!3IOZG AND RECOMMENDATIOlYS The prime business of this Division of the Utica Drop Forge & Tool Corp. is the production of ingots and fabricated shapes from hia temperature alloys for the aircraft, automotive and electronics industries. This company has no apparent interest In development work but would be interested in providing facilities for a long range production program.

246

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State: Part II. Experience of locating and drilling four shale-gas wells in New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the south-central area of New York State as part of this project. The four wells that were drilled are: the Rathbone well, in Steuben County, was located on the north side of a graben, in an old shale-gas field; it penetrated the Rhinestreet, Geneseo and Marcellus shales. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Rhinestreet, without marked success, and in the Marcellus; the latter formation has a calculated open flow of 110 Mcf/day and appears capable of initial production of 100 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 500 psi. The Dansville well, in Livingston County, tested the Geneseo and Marcellus shales at shallower depth. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Marcellus. The calculated open flow is 95 Mcf/day, and the well appears capable of initial production of 70 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 300 psi. The Erwin and N. Corning wells, both near Corning in Steuben County, were designed to test the possibility of collecting gas from a fractured conduit layer connecting to other fracture systems in the Rhinestreet shale. The N. Corning well failed; the expected conduit was found to be only slightly fractured. The Erwin well encountered a good initial show of gas at the conduit, but the gas flow was not maintained; even after artificial stimulation the production is only 10 Mcf/day. The present conclusion is that the most likely source of shale gas in south-central New York is the Marcellus shale formation. Important factors not yet established are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the potential of the Geneseo after stimulation.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The six regions analyzed in this report accounted for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-12. December 2013 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken 3 Eagle Ford 4 Haynesville 5 Marcellus 6 Niobrara 7 Permian 8 Explanatory notes 9 Sources 10 Bakken Marcellus Niobrara Haynesville Eagle Ford Permian U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville

248

1-800-666-2211WWW.CornellpreSS.Cornell.eDU Cornell University Press  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.CornellpreSS.Cornell.eDU G e n e r a l i n t e r e s t 5 under the surface Fracking, Fortunes, and the Fate of the Marcellus Wilber takes us to the living rooms, farms, meeting halls, and mountain streams where the fracking drama developments that combine horizontal drilling with hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") have removed physical

Manning, Sturt

249

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

250

Statement of David P. Russ Regional Executive for the Northeast, U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geologicallybased energy resources, including unconventional resources such as shale gas and shale oil. USGS a new assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Marcellus Shale. Results from Subcommittee To Examine Shale Gas Production and Water Resources in the Eastern United States October 20

Fleskes, Joe

251

What is it? A process that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and oil from shale rock by pumping sand, water, and various toxic chemicals into the rock. Why blowout, Bradford Country, PA (Marcellus Shale) in April 2011 BP Oil spill, Gulf of Mexico in April 2010 is it important? It is an advanced drilling method that can utilize the vast reserves of shale deposits in the US

Toohey, Darin W.

252

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE APPALACHIAN GATEWAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, natural gas demand is forecast to increase through 2035. The Marcellus shale play and the new natural gas supply it represents is expected to meet this demand, provided that there is sufficient natural gas in the Appalachian region in West Virginia and Pennsylvania to meet the demand for natural gas from the residential

Mohaghegh, Shahab

253

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List This list is in no way exhaustive. Rather, it attempts to provide a set of primary references that offer key pieces of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development Impact Assessment of Natural Gas Production in the New York City Water Supply Watershed (2009). NYCDEP http://home2.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/news/natural_gas_drilling.shtml Review of water related and infiltration events Short Scholarly Features Natural Gas Plays in the Marcellus Shale: Challenges & Potential

Wang, Z. Jane

254

Implementation of FracTracker.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implementation of FracTracker.org: A GeoWeb platform to manage and communicate shale gas slm75@pitt.edu | 412-624-9379 #12;Shale Gas Plays Shale gas plays in the continental U.S. The Marcellus is highlighted in blue. Map created using Data.FracTracker.org. #12;Natural gas drilling in shale

Sibille, Etienne

255

8 | NewScientist | 28 January 2012 RALPHWILSON/AP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of metres GAS SAND Deep fracture There are several possible risks associated with shale fracking to be exploited US SHALE GAS RESERVES MARCELLUS SHALE PENNSYLVANIA NEW YORK High pressure fracking fluid first cracks the shale Sand particles keep the fractures open SHALE GAS Air pollution Wastewater discharges

Jackson, Robert B.

256

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: FWP 49462  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers Submitted by: John A. Veil Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, and gas shales. Figure 1 shows EIA projections of the source of natural gas supplies through 2030 productive oil and gas activities in the country today are shale gas plays. Figure 1 ­ U.S. Natural Gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

257

Fossil Energy Today - First Quarter, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here are just some of the stories featured in this issue: CT Scanners Give Energy Researchers a Core Understanding of Marcellus Shale; Large-Scale CO2 Injection Begins; SPR Completes Drawdown of 30 Million Barrels; and, Methane Hydrate Technology to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope.

258

Implementation of FracTracker.org: A GeoWeb platform to manage and communicate shale gas information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implementation of FracTracker.org: A GeoWeb platform to manage and communicate shale gas Health, GSPH. Background Natural gas drilling in shale formations worldwide employs relatively new drilling in the Marcellus Shale (See Figure 1.) of the northeastern United States necessitates better

Sibille, Etienne

259

Synchrotron X-ray Applications Toward an Understanding of Elastic Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sachsenhofer, R.F. (2010) Shale gas in Europe: a regionalC.M. (2008) Coalbed- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs. J. Petrol.study from a Devonian shale gas play, Michigan basin. AAPG

Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Modeling gas injection into the shale oil reservoirs in the Sanish field, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Bakken Formation, a late Devonian-early Mississippian relatively thin unit, is deposited in the Williston Basin, covering 200,000 square miles of the north central United… (more)

Dong, Cuiyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson...

262

INJECTING CARBON DIOXIDE INTO UNCONVENTIONAL STORAGE RESERVOIRS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CBM wells over a one-year period Perform a small Huff and Puff test in a Devonian shale gas well Duration: 4 years (October 1, 2011 - September 30, 2015) Research...

263

January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences | OSTI, US...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Herrmann, R; Harkrider, D; Pasyanos, M Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in eastern Kentucky with an atlas of some common fossils Barron, L.S.;...

264

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through...

265

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

266

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well  

SciTech Connect

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 2013 | Next Release: September 26, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Marcellus gas pipe capacity seen rising 0.5 Bcf/d by month's end; additional expansions expected this winter Initial service could begin by the end of September for two projects that would increase natural gas takeaway capacity from the Marcellus Shale formation by a combined 0.5 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). These two projects are a 7.9 mile, 0.23 Bcf/d looping pipeline added to Kinder Morgan's Tennessee Gas Pipeline (TGP) (known as the MPP Project's "313 Loop") and a 2.5 mile, 0.22 Bcf/d pipeline connecting NiSource's Columbia Gas Transmission (TCO) pipeline to a 1,329-megawatt gas-fired

269

Shale Reservoir Characterization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Characterization Shale Reservoir Characterization Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Gas-producing shales are predominantly composed of consolidated clay-sized particles with a high organic content. High subsurface pressures and temperatures convert the organic matter to oil and gas, which may migrate to conventional petroleum traps and also remains within the shale. However, the clay content severely limits gas and fluid flow within the shales. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the mineral and organic content, occurrence of natural fractures, thermal maturity, shale volumes, porosity

270

File:EIA-shaleusa5.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

shaleusa5.pdf shaleusa5.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Marcellus Shale Play, Appalachian Basin Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 4.37 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Marcellus Shale Play, Appalachian Basin Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-17 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:42, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:42, 20 December 2010 1,275 × 1,650 (4.37 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

271

NETL: LabNotes -April 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2011 April 2011 Unconventional Oil and Gas Unconventional fossil energy resources consist of petroleum and natural gas that are either difficult to reach or challenging to extract. Examples include fine-grainedformations that contain oil and/or natural gas. These fine-grained source rocks generally have very low permeability, which for a long time made extraction uneconomical. Advances in directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, to which NETL R&D contributed, were required before the resources could be recovered economically in commercial quantities (Figure 1). Figure 1. Gas from a Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, PA is flared prior to a workover in the winter of 2010 (photo by Tom Mroz, DOE). Figure 1. Gas from a Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, PA is flared prior to a workover in the winter of 2010 (photo by Tom Mroz, DOE).

272

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2013 | Release Date: October 24, 23, 2013 | Release Date: October 24, 2013 | Next Release: October 31, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: FERC approves service on projects providing almost 1 Bcf/d of gas to New York/New Jersey consumers Last week, on October 17, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved the start of service on November 1 of two related projects that would provide almost 1.0 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of natural gas from the Appalachian Basin's Marcellus Shale play to consumers in the New York/New Jersey region. The projects would take advantage of the significant rise in Marcellus gas production that has taken place over the past two years to increase gas supply to the New York area, where pipeline

273

EPNews 2010 Summer.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges Facing Developers ...1 Challenges Facing Developers ...1 Commentary ...................................2 Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use..... 10 Test Use for Mine Drainage Water ........................... 14 Tool for Water Management .....17 E&P Snapshots ............................ 20 Upcoming Meetings and Presentations ............................... 23 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager- Ultra-Deepwater, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 281-494-2520 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Albert Yost Technology Manager- Exploration & Production, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4479 albert.yost@netl.doe.gov Oil & Natural Gas Program Newsletter Summer 2010 1 Challenges Facing Developers of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin Development of the Marcellus Shale play will result in 1000s to 10,000s of

274

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ See All Petroleum Reports ‹ See All Petroleum Reports Drilling Productivity Report Release Date: December 9, 2013 | Next Release: January 13, 2014 | full report Previous Issue (pdf) month: December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 Go Contents Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Year-over-year summary Explanatory notes and sources Full report Report data (aggregated by region) Frequently Asked Questions Related Today in Energy articles Marcellus region to provide 18% of total U.S. natural gas production this month Bakken oil production forecast to top 1 million barrels per day next month Production, depletion trends are keys to predicting natural gas and oil production Drilling efficiency is a key driver of oil and natural gas production Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production

275

Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.  

SciTech Connect

Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

276

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State: Part I. How to find and develop shale gas in New York State  

SciTech Connect

The Appalachian Basin contains vast volumes of shale gas, and a significant potion of this is contained in three shales in south-central New York - the Rhinestreet, the Geneseo and the Marcellus. The economics of shale-gas exploration in New York are not very attractive to the large oil and gas companies, which seek a rapid return on their investments. The situation may be quite different for organizations which are more concerned with security of supply and stability of cost; these may include manufacturing companies, colleges, hospitals, state institutions and industrial or agricultural cooperatives. For these, production of even a modest 50 Mcf/day/well, declining slowly over many years, would be appealing if it could be guaranteed. To date three wells have been artificially fractured in the Marcellus shale of New York, and all three appear to be producers. This is only a small sample, and one of the wells is known to have encountered natural fractures. However, it does raise the possbility that (while nothing in exploration can be truly guaranteed) the chances of extracting at least some gas from the Marcellus - using modern fracturing techniques - are good. The chances are improved if geological techniques can identify zones of a suitable degree of natural fracturing in the shale. These techniques are aided by detailed structure maps of the shale units; such a map has been prepared for the Geneseo shale, as part of this project. The present conclusion is that the most likely source of shale gas in south-central New York is the Marcellus formation. Shale-gas wells should be drilled with air. The dry open hole should be logged with gamma-ray, density, temperature and noise logs. The shale should be artificially fractured using a nitrogen stimulation technique. Recommendations are given for each of these steps in the text.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chattan  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chattan Chattan ooga Eag le For d Devo nian (Ohi o) Mar cellu s Utica He rm osa Nio bra ra* Bak ken *** Nio bra ra* Mo nte rey Mo nte rey - Tem blo r Ava lon Heath ** Tuscaloosa Mow ry Ant rim Bar net t Ben d New Alban y Wo odf ord Ba rn ett - Wo od for d Le wis Hilli ard- Ba xter - Man cos -Nio bra ra Exc e llo- Mul ky Fay ette ville Floyd- Neal Gam m on Cody Hayn esvil le- Boss ier Ma nco s Pie rre- Nio bra ra Conasauga Colo rado Grou p Utica Doig Phosphate Montney Muskwa- Otter Park Muskwa-Otter Park, Evie-Klua Lower Besa River Frederick Brook Horton Bluff Pimienta Eagle Ford, Tithonian Maltrata Eagle Ford, La Casita Pimienta, Tamaulipas North American shale plays 0 400 800 200 600 Miles ± Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies. Canada and Mexico plays from ARI. Updated: May 9, 2011 (as of May 2011) * Mixed shale & chalk play

278

NETL: Features - May 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 NETL Technologies Turn Shale Gas into a Reliable, Domestic Star Energy Resource The Setting: Devonian Period swamps, 360 - 415 million years ago, a warm, humid climate. The Players: Flourishing marine life. Testing out their new lungs, some of the first creatures to crawl out of the water and the beginnings of great forests colonize the land. The Action: Exploration, survival, and finally death. As these primitive land dwellers died, their remains ended up in the water and were pressed down within the forming rock layers. And why is NETL so interested in this never-to-be-Hollywood-blockbuster? Geologists believe the land looked like this during the Middle Devonian period when shale gas was forming. Today's states are shown in outline. Geologists believe the land looked like this during the Middle Devonian period when shale gas was forming. Today's states are shown in outline. (Photo courtesy of Prof. Ron Blakey, Northern Arizona University)

279

Eastern gas shale database development program. Annual report 1 May 1983-30 April 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) Eastern Gas Data System is an interactive information resource developed to provide ready access to substantive data on wells producing from the Devonian shales. The system is a computerized database which contains descriptive and historical geological and engineering data on a large number of Devonian shale gas wells in the Appalachian Basin. The principal purpose of the system is to meet the requirements for technical data of gas producers, researchers and GRI. The data is provided by cooperating industry sources, many of whom were also instrumental in the original definition and design of the system. The information which has been collected and compiled on individual wells includes data on identification, location, elevation, drilling, geology, cementing, perforation, stimulation, cleanup, and production histories. The Eastern Gas Data System currently contains extensive information on over 620 Devonian shale gas wells completed in the Appalachian Basin.

DeVos, D.R.; Hasselback, F.W.; Hoffmann, R.L.; Lerner, B.J.; May, J.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Project 281  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALE IN ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALE IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION Background Global climate change is an area of increasing concern, and many scientists believe the cause is due, at least in part, to increased emissions of CO 2 , especially from the combustion of fossil fuels. These concerns are driving initiatives to develop carbon management technologies. One promising approach is geologic sequestration of CO 2 . Options being investigated include sequestration in saline aquifers, oil and gas reservoirs, and unminable coal seams In analogy with sequestration in coal seams, another option may be sequestration in Devonian black shales, organic-rich rocks that serve as both a source and trap for natural gas. Most of the natural gas is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jan. 4, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 5, Jan. 4, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 5, 2012 | Next Release: Jan. 12, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Shale Prospects Attract Foreign Companies This week, two major shale joint ventures were announced between foreign energy companies and U.S.-based production companies: Total S.A. (France) will partner with Chesapeake Energy Corporation and EnerVest, Ltd. at the cost of $2.3 billion to Total. Total will get a 25 percent stake of the joint venture in acreage in the liquids rich area of the Utica Shale in Ohio. Total has partnered with Chesapeake previously, in a 2010 $2.3 billion joint venture in the Barnett Shale. For $2.2 billion, Sinopec International Petroleum Exploration and

283

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Authors: Ruppel, Stephen C. and Robert G. Loucks, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of GeoSciences, University of Texas at Austin Venue: West Texas Geological Society Symposium, in Midland, Texas September 10-12, 2008. http://www.wtgs.org [external site] Abstract: The Devonian Woodford and Mississippian Barnett formations document a long (approximately 70-80 million year) period of clay-rich sedimentation along the southern margin of the Laurentian paleocraton during the middle Paleozoic. As might be expected, these rocks display many general similarities, for example in thickness, mineralogy, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, organic matter type, etc. Both also display conspicuous and systematic changes in composition from more proximal to more distal areas. However, our studies of more than 75 cores across the Permian and Ft. Worth Basins demonstrate that dissimilarities between the two systems are perhaps even more common than similarities. Many of the differences can be related to paleogeography, basin hydrography, and global sea level.

284

Fish and Tetrapods Geology 331  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and ostracoderms (armored jawless fish) Gnathostomes: jawed fish (an evolutionary grade, not a taxon) Class Placoderms: armored fish Class Chondrichthyes: cartilaginous fish Class Osteichthyes: bony fish Subclass the armored fish of the Paleozoic. Grew up to 10 m in length. #12;Placoderm, Dunkleosteus, Devonian of Ohio

Kammer, Thomas

285

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-04NT15510  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-04NT15510 Final Report A Systems Approach has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due

286

Joint sets that enhance production from Middle and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E&P NOTE Joint sets that enhance production from Middle and Upper Devonian gas shales joint sets (J1 and J2 sets) as observed in outcrop, core, and borehole images. These joints formed close thermal matura- tion of organic matter. When present together, earlier J1 joints are crosscut by later J2

Engelder, Terry

287

Joint interaction with embedded concretions: joint loading congurations inferred from propagation paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint interaction with embedded concretions: joint loading con®gurations inferred from propagation The interaction between propagating joints and embedded concretions in a Devonian black shale near Seneca Lake, NY, permits identi®cation of the loading con®gurations responsible for two joint sets of dierent ages striking

Engelder, Terry

288

By Terry Engelder and Gary G. Lash UNIVERSITY PARK, PA.The shale gas rush is on. Excitement over natural gas production from a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By Terry Engelder and Gary G. Lash UNIVERSITY PARK, PA.­The shale gas rush is on. Excitement over natural gas production from a number of Devonian-Mississippian black shales such as the Barnett by the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP), a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored investigation of gas potential

Engelder, Terry

289

Synthetic fuels from US oil shales: a technical and economic verification of the HYTORT Process. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the HYTORT process for both Eocene and Devonian shales. The program is divided into five major task areas: laboratory program, bench-scale program, process development unit tests, process environmental assessment, and process design and economics. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (“EPA”) development of UIC Class II permitting guidance for hydraulic fracturing activities that use diesel fuels in fracturing fluids. The Natural Resources Defense Council (“NRDC”) is a national, non-profit legal and scientific organization with 1.3 million members and activists worldwide. Since its founding in 1970, NRDC has been active on a wide range of environmental issues, including fossil fuel extraction and drinking water protection. NRDC is actively engaged in issues surrounding oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing, particularly in the Rocky Mountain West and Marcellus Shale regions. Earthjustice is a non-profit public interest law firm originally founded in 1971. Earthjustice works to protect natural resources and the environment, and to defend the right of all people to a healthy environment. Earthjustice is actively addressing threats to air, water, public health and wildlife from oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus Shale and Rocky Mountain regions. Founded in 1892, the Sierra Club works to protect communities, wild places, and the planet itself. With 1.4 million members and activists worldwide, the Club works to provide healthy communities in which to live, smart energy solutions to combat global warming, and an enduring legacy of for America’s wild places. The Sierra club is actively addressing the environmental threats to our land, water, air from natural gas extraction across the United States.

Sabine Pass Liquefaction; Sabine Pass Lng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

UNPERMITTED INJECTION OF DIESEL FUELS THROUGH HYDRAULIC FRACTURING IS A VIOLATION...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (“EPA”) development of UIC Class II permitting guidance for hydraulic fracturing activities that use diesel fuels in fracturing fluids. The Natural Resources Defense Council (“NRDC”) is a national, non-profit legal and scientific organization with 1.3 million members and activists worldwide. Since its founding in 1970, NRDC has been active on a wide range of environmental issues, including fossil fuel extraction and drinking water protection. NRDC is actively engaged in issues surrounding oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing, particularly in the Rocky Mountain West and Marcellus Shale regions. Earthjustice is a non-profit public interest law firm originally founded in 1971. Earthjustice works to protect natural resources and the environment, and to defend the right of all people to a healthy environment. Earthjustice is actively addressing threats to air, water, public health and wildlife from oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus Shale and Rocky Mountain regions. Founded in 1892, the Sierra Club works to protect communities, wild places, and the planet itself. With 1.4 million members and activists worldwide, the Club works to provide healthy communities in which to live, smart energy solutions to combat global warming, and an enduring legacy of for America’s wild

Ariel Rios Building

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Facies development and porosity relationships in Dundee Limestone of Gladwin County, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian of the Michigan basin was a time of transgressive seas and extensive carbonate deposition, including coral and stromatoporoid buildups. Deposited during the Middle Devonian, the Dundee Limestone represents deposition in subtidal, intertidal, and restricted environments. The Buckeye oil field, located in south-central Gladwin County, is a combined stratigraphic and structural carbonate trap that produces from a series of intertonguing patch reefs, fringing sand bodies, and intertidal island fenestral zones. The major reef-building organisms include stromatoporoids, corals, calcareous algae, brachiopods, and crinoids, with the stromatoporoids providing the major framework. The patch-reef facies is composed of massive stromatoporoid boundstones that contain primary intraparticle porosity. The fringing grainstone sands are composed of coarse crinoid and brachiopod skeletal debris that have interparticle porosity. The intertidal island zone found in the North Buckeye field is represented by a pelletal packstone that has abundant fenestral porosity.

Montgomery, E.L.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Documentation and review of Eastern gas shales technology. Annual report, April 1, 1985-February 28, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides coverage on a project (1) to provide technology-transfer support for the Eastern Gas Shales Project Area, promoting the awareness and application of the program products through periodic publication of Eastern Devonian Gas Shales Technology Review and (2) to quantify impacts of technology improvements on shale gas cost-supply relationships, in order to aid in guiding the thrust of GRI's research program.

Skrinak, V.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" "trillion cubic feet" ,,, 2010,, 2011,," Change 2011-2010" "Basin","Shale Play","State(s)","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves" "Fort Worth","Barnett","TX",1.9,31,2,32.6,0.1,1.6 "Appalachian","Marcellus","PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH",0.5,13.2,1.4,31.9,0.9,18.7 "Texas-Louisiana Salt","Haynesville/Bossier","TX, LA",1.5,24.5,2.5,29.5,1,5 "Arkoma","Fayetteville","AR",0.8,12.5,0.9,14.8,0.1,2.3

296

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natural gas Natural Gas natural gas Natural Gas exec summary Executive Summary Natural gas production increases throughout the projection period, allowing the United States to transition from a et importer to a net exporter of natural gas....Read full section Power generation from renewables and natural gas continues to increase ...Read full section Evolving Marcellus shale gas resource estimates....Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. reliance on imported natural gas from Canada declines as exports grow.... Read full section Trends in petroleum and other liquids markets are defined largely by the developing nations... Read full section Renewable energy sources lead rise in primary energy consumption... Read full section Reliance on natural gas and natural gas liquids rises as industrial

297

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2013 | Release Date: September 12, 1, 2013 | Release Date: September 12, 2013 | Next Release: September 19, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: REX gas deliveries to the Northeast fall as Appalachian production grows Data for this week show that deliveries of natural gas to northeastern consumers via the Rockies Express Pipeline (REX) continue to decline markedly from last year as Northeast customers procure more natural gas from the Appalachian Basin. This increased gas supply comes predominantly from the basin's Marcellus Shale play, where dry gas production through the first half of 2013 rose by 50% over year-ago levels, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) calculations based on LCI Energy

298

Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Impacts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Impacts from Shale Production Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Impacts from Shale Production April 28, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel water cleaning technology currently being tested in field demonstrations could help significantly reduce potential environmental impacts from producing natural gas from the Marcellus shale and other geologic formations, according to the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). ABSMaterial's Osorb® technology, which uses swelling glass to remove impurities, has been shown to clean flow back water and produced water from hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells. Produced waters are by far the

299

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2013 | Release Date: February 14, 13, 2013 | Release Date: February 14, 2013 | Next Release: February 21, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: U.S. natural gas production forecast relatively flat for the next two years The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) most recent monthly production data indicates that total U.S. average daily marketed production reached 70.4 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in November 2012, 0.4 Bcf/d above the previous month, with upticks in the federal Gulf of Mexico, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and the category for other states, which includes Pennsylvania. Production in the Marcellus Shale areas of Pennsylvania and West Virginia is expected to continue rising, as recently drilled wells

300

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2013 | Release Date: July 18, 7, 2013 | Release Date: July 18, 2013 | Next Release: July 25, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: FERC approves service on first segment of Northeast Supply Link Expansion project The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) last week approved the start of service on the first segment of the Transcontinental Gas Supply Co (Transco) Northeast Supply Link Expansion project. This project is designed to ease pipeline congestion out of the Marcellus shale play, increasing the diversity and reliability of natural gas supply to northeastern demand markets. The segment completed last week is known as the Palmerton Loop, and represents 3 of approximately 12 miles of loops - or pipelines

302

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 8040 of 26,764 results. 31 - 8040 of 26,764 results. Download Meeting regarding DOE Energy Conservations Standards for Battery Discussion points presented relating to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Conservation Standards for Battery Chargers. The DOE battery charger efficiency regulations cover only consumer... http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/meeting-regarding-doe-energy-conservations-standards-battery Download Fossil Energy Today- First Quarter, 2012 Here are just some of the stories featured in this issue: CT Scanners Give Energy Researchers a Core Understanding of Marcellus Shale; Large-Scale CO2 Injection Begins; SPR Completes Drawdown of 30 Million Barrels; and, Methane Hydrate Technology to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope. http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/fossil-energy-today-first-quarter-2012

303

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CSI Technologies, LLC CSI Technologies, LLC SCNGO 2012/ 24 months Gary Covatch Houston, TX Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Optimize zonal isolation through assessment of current operations, laboratory studies, analytical studies and field demonstrations. Gary Covatch Digitally signed by Gary Covatch DN: cn=Gary Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.01.09 10:45:44 -05'00' 01 09 2012 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=netl, ou=environmental compliance division, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.02.15 13:29:54 -05'00' 2 15 2012 This CX covers only lab activities conducted at the CSI Technologies Houston, TX location. No field activities are approved under this CX

304

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 9, 2013 | Release Date: January 10, January 9, 2013 | Release Date: January 10, 2013 | Next Release: January 17, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: EIA forecasts continued growth in Lower 48 onshore natural gas production through 2014. EIA's January Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), released on January 7, now includes EIA's forecast of energy consumption, supply, and prices through 2014. STEO expects continued growth in natural gas production, driven largely by onshore production in shale areas. In particular, production in the Marcellus Shale areas of Pennsylvania and West Virginia is expected to continue rising, as recently drilled wells become operational. Despite relatively low natural gas prices, Pennsylvania drilling continues at a

305

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 4220 of 9,640 results. 11 - 4220 of 9,640 results. Download CX-008518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008518-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008519: Categorical Exclusion Determination Qualification of Flexible Reinforced Pipe for 10,000 Foot Water (Phase One and Two) CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008519-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Qualification of Flexible Fiber Reinforced Pipe for 10,000 Foot Water

306

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

307

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

308

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

309

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 7670 of 28,905 results. 61 - 7670 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Mitigation and Clean Water Recovery from Marcellus Frac Water (Phases 1 and 2) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Niskayuna, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006993-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007004: Categorical Exclusion Determination Unique Lanthanide-Free Motor Construction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Ames, Iowa Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007004-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007006: Categorical Exclusion Determination

310

Hydraulic Fracturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Fracturing Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search More info on OpenEI Oil and Gas Gateway Federal Environmental Statues Federal Oil and Gas Statutes Oil and Gas Companies United States Oil and Gas Boards International Oil and Gas Boards Other Information Fracking Regulations by State Wells by State Fracking Chemicals Groundwater Protection Related Reports A Perspective on Health and Natural Gas Operations: A Report for Denton City Council Just the Fracking Facts The Politics of 'Fracking': Regulating Natural Gas Drilling Practices in Colorado and Texas Addressing the Environmental Risks from Shale Gas Development Water Management Technologies Used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers Methane contamination of drinking wateraccompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing

311

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

312

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Updated: November 25, 2013 For prior report data see Natural Gas Year-in-Review archives EIA's Natural Gas Issues and Trends highlights timely information and analyses on natural gas markets. Natural gas prices reflect decreasing seasonality. Today in Energy, November 20, 2013 Increased Northeast natural gas production reduces net inflow of supply from other areas. Today in Energy, November 19, 2013 Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices. Natural Gas Weekly Update, November 13, 2013 EIA projects lower natural gas use this winter. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 31, 2013 Northeast net imports from Canada plummet, driven by export growth at Niagara Falls. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 10, 2013

313

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

314

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

315

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets May 14, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to

316

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 1300 of 31,917 results. 91 - 1300 of 31,917 results. Download External Technical Review Report for Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download http://energy.gov/em/downloads/external-technical-review-report-small-column-ion-exchange-technology Download Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program The Office of Fossil Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (1986-1993) laid the foundation for effective technologies now in use that have helped significantly lower emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and airborne particulates (PM10). http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/clean-coal-technology-demonstration-program Article Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale

317

STEO September 2012 - natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

natural gas production at record high, inventories most natural gas production at record high, inventories most ever at start of heating season on Nov. 1 U.S. marketed natural gas production is expected to rise by 2.6 billion cubic feet per day this year to a record 68.9 billion cubic feet per day, said the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Katherine Teller explains: "This strong growth in production was driven in large part by production in Pennsylvania's Marcellus shale formation where drilling companies are using hydraulic fracturing to free the trapped gas." The increase in production, along with the large natural gas inventories left over from last winter because of warmer temperatures, will push U.S. gas inventories to a record high of nearly

318

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 12, 2012 July 12, 2012 CX-008583: Categorical Exclusion Determination California State Energy Program Annual Formula CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 12, 2012 CX-008518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 12, 2012 CX-008592: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hawaii State Energy Program Annual Formula CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 9, 2012 CX-008608: Categorical Exclusion Determination Virginia Program Year 2012 State Energy Program Formula Grant

319

Shared Intellect * Shared Laboratories * Shared Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2 E News is your monthly source for the latest information about NETL-RUA's research, activities, and other important news. If you have information that you would like to feature in future newsletters, send that information to julianne.klara@netl.doe.gov. What's in This Issue Strategic Growth Area Update- Seed Funding Available .........................p. 2 New CT Based Multi-Scale Imaging Capability ....................................................p. 2 NETL Building Powerful Computational Capability to Accelerate R&D ..............p. 3 Awards and Student Achievements ............................................p. 4 NETL-RUA Scientist Designs Novel Monitoring System for Marcellus Gas Wells One area of growth in the NETL-RUA research portfolio involves assessing the environmental

320

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 16, 2012 February 16, 2012 CX-007937: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B5.23 Date: 02/16/2012 Location(s): Kentucky, Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 15, 2012 CX-007940: Categorical Exclusion Determination Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/15/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 14, 2012 CX-007960: Categorical Exclusion Determination Use of Scanning Electron Microscopy to Characterize Electrochemically Active Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/14/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office February 14, 2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ii Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling and slickwater hydrofracturing have enabled shale gas to become a significant contributor to the United States ’ energy supply. Hydrofracturing typically requires 2MM – 6.5MM gallons of water per shale gas well. About 15-25 % of this water returns to the surface as “flowback ” within 30 days after hydrofracturing. “Produced water ” continues to flow at a much reduced rate, e.g. 2-10 bbl/day, for the life of the well. In addition to high salinity and hardness levels (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), much Marcellus produced water also contains significant levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), particularly radium. The near absence of disposal wells in Pennsylvania initially forced much of the produced water to be trucked into Ohio for disposal by deep-well injection (UIC). Currently up to 95 % of the

Principal Investigator; James M. Silva; James M. Silva; Hope Matis; William L. Kostedt Iv; Vicki Watkins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2012 | Release Date: August 9, 8, 2012 | Release Date: August 9, 2012 | Next Release: August 16, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Infrastructure constraints in the Northeast, particularly in Northern Pennsylvania, have led Marcellus prices to diverge from the Henry Hub since May 2012. Additionally, BENTEK Energy LLC (Bentek) reported that infrastructure constraints have led Northeast Pennsylvania production to flatten in recent weeks. Bentek estimates that more than 1,000 wells have been drilled but are not yet producing because of insufficient pipeline capacity. Several infrastructure projects have been proposed recently to help ease constraints in the region: Earlier this month, Williams Partners LP (Williams) announced plans

323

Changes in release cycles for EIA's  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy impacts of proposed CAFE standards for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017 to 2025 Fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions standards for heavy-duty vehicles Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: issues and incentives Nuclear power in AEO2012 Carbon capture and storage: economics and issues Potential impact of minimum pipeline throughput constraints on Alaska North Slope oil production Power sector environmental regulations on the horizon U.S. crude oil and natural gas resource uncertainty Evolving Marcellus Shale gas resource estimates

324

DE-FE0000833  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale DE-FE0000833 Final Scientific / Technical Report Report Date: June 30, 2011 Team Members: Altela, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory BLX, Inc. CWM Environmental, Inc. Point of Contact: Matthew Bruff Altela, Inc. Phone: 303-993-1951 Facsimile: 303-993-1955 Email: matthew.bruff@altelainc.com DISCLAIMER: "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereto, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

325

NETL: NEPA Categorical Exclusions - October 2013 to Present  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to December 2013 3 to December 2013 Archive (November 2009 - Present) ARRA Date Title Recipient Name Location DOE/NETL Sponsors N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: Houston Advanced Research Center Duncan, OK FE/SCNGO N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: TAMU - San Antonio - IRNR Duncan, OK FE/SCNGO N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: Ohio State University - CAR Columbus, OH FE/SCNGO N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: Ohio State University - CAR Duncan, OK FE/SCNGO N 12/18/2013 Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Prime: RPSEA Sub: CSI Technologies, LLC Multiple sites, PA FE/SCNGO N 12/18/2013 Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters Prime: RPSEA

326

New York | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 22, 2011 September 22, 2011 CX-007020: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Model City, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office September 22, 2011 CX-006993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Mitigation and Clean Water Recovery from Marcellus Frac Water (Phases 1 and 2) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Niskayuna, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, Savannah River Operations Office September 15, 2011 CX-006805: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York City Solar City - Remsen Avenue Yards CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/15/2011 Location(s): New York City, New York

327

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum & Other Liquids Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude Reserves and Production Refining and Processing Imports/Exports & Movements Stocks Consumption/Sales All Petroleum & Other Liquids Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports ‹ See All Petroleum Reports Drilling Productivity Report Release Date: December 9, 2013 | Next Release: January 13, 2014 | full report Previous Issue (pdf) month: December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 Go Contents Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Year-over-year summary Explanatory notes and sources Full report Report data (aggregated by region)

328

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

329

The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

Hartshorn, K.G. [Chevron Petroleum Company of Colombia, Santafe de Bogota (Colombia)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Synthetic fuels from US oil shales: a technical and economic verification of the HYTORT process. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to fully demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the HYTORT process concept as it applies to both Eocene and Devonian shales. Achievement of this objective will significantly widen the nation's synthetic fuels resource base by adding a new resource - Devonian shale - to the list of possible feedstocks for a synthetic fuels industry. It will also establish a high-efficiency alternative to conventional retorting of Western oil shales. Research at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has led to the development of the HYTORT process concept, which can be applied to the resources of Devonian shales of the Eastern United States as well as to Western shales, to produce oil or combustible gas at costs competitive with or less than those for retorting of Colorado shales. The HYTORT process concept has been successfully scaled up through small-scale laboratory equipment, a bench-scale unit capable of processing 100 pounds of shale per hour, and a Process Development Unit (PDU) with a shale capacity of 1 ton/hr. In addition, preliminary process design and economic analysis work shows that the HYTORT process exhibits attractive efficiency and economics.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Bioten Power and Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioten Power and Energy Group Bioten Power and Energy Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioten Power and Energy Group Address 2725 Russell Rd Place Utica, KY Zip 42376 Sector Biomass Product Gasification technology Year founded 2008 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 270-275-9164 Website http://www.biotenpower.com Coordinates 37.5931742°, -87.0240594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5931742,"lon":-87.0240594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

332

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion cubic feet (tcf). Appalachian Basin - The geological formations that roughly follow the Appalachian Mountain range and contain

333

Dawn of a new era for Richfield zone  

SciTech Connect

Production from the Richfield interval of Michigan's geologic column began in 1971 when Sun Oil Company drilled the No. 1 Bauman wildcat, SW NE section 29-24N-1W, Ausable (then Richfield) Township, Roscommon County. Originally programmed as a test of the Dundee (Michigan's then-primary producing zone), the well was dry; deepening to the Sylvania sand commenced. Completion included an acid stimulation treatment resulting in a well flowing 150 bopd from the lower sections of the Detroit River rock group of Devonian age. Subsequent development of the field through 1979 resulted in drilling 18 wells.

Bolton, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hunton Group core workshop and field trip  

SciTech Connect

The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

Johnson, K.S. [ed.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Technology's role in Alberta's Golden Spike miscible project  

SciTech Connect

A gravity-controlled gas-driven miscible bank is expected to recover 95% of the 320 million bbl of oil-in- place in Golden Spike, a Devonian pinnacle reef reservoir. Field application required both advanced technology to demonstrate feasibility, and an economic solution to the problem of obtaining the vast quantities of LPG required. The miscible bank is generated by stripping LPG from the reservoir oil which is cycled through surface facilities and returned to the reservoir. Technology's part included studies to resolve bank placement, size and composition, and to overcome plugging problems encountered in injecting the stripped crude.

Larson, V.C.; Peterson, R.B.; Lacey, J.W.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Pricaspian depression - the unique oil & gas-bearing basin of the World  

SciTech Connect

The Pricaspian depression is a unique oil and gas-bearing basin. The total sedimentary rock volume in the basin is about 8 million km{sup 3}. More than 100 oil and gas fields have been discovered in the basin including extremely large fields, such as Tengiz, Astrakhan, and Karachaganak. The basin is filled with Devonian to Neogene sediments, a very wide range in age for a single sedimentary basin. The range in age and composition of the rocks results in complex geology, complex conditions for producing oil and gas, and complex phase states of the hydrocarbons present. The basin fill comprises the Paleozoic section below the Kungurian salt, the Kungurian and Kungurian to Permian salt-bearing section, and the upper Permian to Paleogene and Neogene sedimentary complexes above the salt. The thick sedimentary succession and specific oil and gas productivity are what make the Pricaspian basin a unique sedimentary basin. The geologic structure and basin evolution during the Paleozoic, details of sedimentation in the Devonian to Early Permian, initial salt deposition and the dynamic evolution of salt domes, hydrocarbon generation and accumulation zones, various trap types, field types, hydrodynamic regimes, and hydrochemical content of groundwater are discussed in the paper.

Abdulin, A.A.; Daukeev, S.Z.; Votsalevsky, E.S. [Kazakh Academy of Sciences, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Paleomagnetic results from the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Range (ANWR), and other North Slope sites, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carboniferous through Triassic sedimentary units exposed in the Shublik and Sadlerochit Mountains were sampled in an attempt to obtain reliable primary magnetic components. Reliable pre-Cretaceous paleomagnetic poles from this area would greatly advance the understanding of the rotation and latitudinal displacement history of the North Slope. Carbonate rocks of the Carboniferous Lisburne Group were drilled in south-dipping units of Katakturuk Canyon, Sadlerochit Mountains, and in the north-dipping Fire Creek section, Shublik Mountains. Magnetic cleaning involved stepwise thermal demagnetization to 550/sup 0/C. Principal component analysis of the demagnetization results defines two major components of magnetization. The secondary component is steep and down (inc = 87/sup 0/), but the characteristic component (325/sup 0/C-500/sup 0/C) is reversed. The secondary magnetization postdates Cretaceous and younger folding, whereas the characteristic component was acquired before folding. The components may have recorded two phases of overprinting: a late Cretaceous into Cenozoic normal overprint and a predeformation remagnetization episode during a time of reverse polarity. However, the reverse component more likely is primary remanence. If so, it would suggest little latitudinal displacement but 40/sup 0/ of clockwise rotation with respect to North America. The Devonian Nanook Limestone, sampled in the Shublik Mountains, also reveals two major components of magnetization; however, the characteristic component is isolated at blocking temperatures greater than 500/sup 0/C and is shallower in inclination than expected from the Devonian reference pole for North America.

Plumley, P.W.; Tailleur, I.L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Recurrent faulting and petroleum accumulation, Cat Creek Anticline, central Montana  

SciTech Connect

The Cat Creek anticline, scene of central Montana's first significant oil discovery, is underlain by a south-dipping high-angle fault (Cat Creek fault) that has undergone several episodes of movement with opposite sense of displacement. Borehole data suggest that the Cat Creek fault originated as a normal fault during Proterozoic rifting concurrent with deposition of the Belt Supergroup. Reverse faulting took place in Late Cambrian time, and again near the end of the Devonian Period. The Devonian episode, coeval with the Antler orogeny, raised the southern block several hundred feet. The southern block remained high through Meramecian time, then began to subside. Post-Atokan, pre-Middle Jurassic normal faulting lowered the southern block as much as 1,500 ft. During the Laramide orogeny (latest Cretaceous-Eocene) the Cat Creek fault underwent as much as 4,000 ft of reverse displacement and a comparable amount of left-lateral displacement. The Cat Creek anticline is a fault-propagation fold; en echelon domes and listric normal faults developed along its crest in response to wrenching. Oil was generated mainly in organic-rich shales of the Heath Formation (upper Chesterian Series) and migrated upward along tectonic fractures into Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous reservoir rocks in structural traps in en echelon domes. Production has been achieved only from those domes where structural closure was retained from Jurassic through Holocene time.

Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation of the eastern gas shales in Pennsylvania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the potential of the Devonian shale as a source of natural gas, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP). The EGSP is designed not only to identify the resource, but also to test improved methods of inducing permeability to facilitate gas drainage, collection, and production. The ultimate goal of this project is to increase the production of gas from the eastern shales through advanced exploration and exploitation techniques. The purpose of this report is to inform the general public and interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Appalachian basin in Pennsylvania. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined. Because the data presented in this report are generalized and not suitable for evaluation of specific sites for exploration, the reader should consult the various reports cited for more detail and discussion of the data, concepts, and interpretations presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chesapeake Corporation Chesapeake Corporation SCNGO FY12/24 months Gary Covatch Bradford,Sullivan&Susquehanna Co,PA Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Collection of real time data during cement jobs through observation for the purpose of developing an integrated process to optimize zonal isolation. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.08.27 15:57:30 -04'00' 08 27 2012 Jesse Garcia Digitally signed by Jesse Garcia DN: cn=Jesse Garcia, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=Jesse.Garcia@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.08.29 09:29:41 -05'00' 08 29 2012 CX covers laboratory and engineering studies,development field analytical methods, and implement cementing improvement plan in the field at existing well sites

343

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GE Resources Conservation Company GE Resources Conservation Company SCNGO FY12/24 months Gary Covatch Bellevue, King County, WA NORM Mitigation and Clean Water Recovery from Marcellus Frac Water Test and develop a brine concentrator based on membrane distillation (MD) to recover distilled water and a concentrated salt solution from shale gas produced water. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.21 11:02:07 -04'00' 09 21 2012 Cliff Whyte Digitally signed by Cliff Whyte DN: cn=Cliff Whyte, o=US Dept of Energy, ou=NETL- OPFC, email=Cliff.Whyte@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.25 10:01:02 -04'00' 09 25 2012 This CX is limited to Phase II bench-scale work in Bellevue, WA. Separate CXs/EQs to be submitted for

344

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AC26-07NT42677 AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE Chesapeake Corporation SCNGO 2012; FY12/24 months Gary Covatch Bradford,Sullivan&Susquehanna Co,PA Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Collection of real time data during cement jobs through observation for the purpose of developing an integrated process to optimize zonal isolation. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.07.10 08:22:07 -04'00' 07 10 2012 Jesse Garcia Digitally signed by Jesse Garcia DN: cn=Jesse Garcia, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=Jesse.Garcia@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.07.12 14:03:15 -05'00' 07 12 2012 CX covers activities which include gathering data and information on current cementing operations,

345

Potential Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Shale to Aquifers. Ground Water. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.00933.x New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). 2010. “Well Development by Hydrofracturing.” http://des.nh.gov/o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential for various forms of water pollution. Two potential pathways—advective transport through bulk media and preferential flow through fractures—could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale to aquifers. There is substantial geologic evidence that natural vertical flow drives contaminants, mostly brine, to near the surface from deep evaporite sources. Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. Conductive faults or fracture zones, as found throughout the Marcellus shale region, could reduce the travel time further. Injection of up to 15,000,000 L of fluid into the shale generates high pressure at the well, which decreases with distance from the well and with time after injection as the fluid advects through the shale. The advection displaces native fluids, mostly brine, and fractures the bulk media widening existing fractures. Simulated pressure returns to pre-injection levels in about 300 d. The overall system requires from 3 to 6 years to reach a new equilibrium reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. The rapid expansion of hydraulic fracturing requires that monitoring systems be employed to track the movement of contaminants and that gas wells have a reasonable offset from faults.

Tom Myers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Society of Independent Professional Earth Scientists President’s Column  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Boom is on anywhere there is liquids-rich shale on private lands in the continental United States. Much as it was for gas from shale five years ago, there is a frenzy of Marc Maddox activity in oil from shale plays now. For those of us in the oil shale basins, it is a wild ride. For those of us in the gas shale plays the bust has come. Talk of a one-hundred year or more supply of natural gas, along with the continued development of associated gas from oil shale development, has glutted the market and left futures traders with the perception of a long-term oversupply of natural gas. Export facilities are years into the future, so the immediate outlook for natural gas is not encouraging. The oil and gas industry has done what it long promised with natural gas. Our industry has said that given the proper incentive (profit), enough natural resources can be developed domestically to drive prices down for the consumer. Good prices for natural gas drove technological innovation that resulted in the current glut of gas. In this case prices have gone a bit too low, and now drilling has slowed in the Barnett, Haynesville, Marcellus and other plays. The market at work: efficiency in action as capital is redeployed to more profitable ventures. Will shale oil follow this same path? That doesn’t seem likely, as the United States has required imports to satisfy its

Name See; How I Became An; Marc D. Maddox

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Eastern Gas Shales Project outgassing analysis. Special report  

SciTech Connect

Two methods are used on the Eastern Gas Shales Project to measure the gas volume of encapsulated shale samples. The direct method measures pressure and volume and is initiated almost immediately upon encapsulation of the sample. A second method measures pressure, volume, and composition, and is initiated after pressure is allowed to build up over several weeks. A combination of the two methods has been used on selected samples, and yields more data as it allows extrapolation to account for gas lost prior to encapsulation. The stratigraphic horizons, characterized by dark shales with high organic and high carbon content and a relatively high gamma ray intensity of 200+ API units also have high gas contents (relative to other units within the same well). The Lower Huron, Rhinestreet, and Marcellus Shales are high in gas content relative to other stratigraphic units at the same sites. The difference in gas content of the same stratigraphic horizon between well sites appears to be controlled by the thermal maturity. Kinetic studies have shown that, in some samples, significant amounts of gas are released after the time when the gas volume would be initially measured. Additional work needs to be performed to determine why the rates and volume of gas released vary between samples.

Streib, D.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A case study of ultralightweight cementing practices in the Northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect

Wells in the northeastern United States are generally drilled to a depth of from 3,000 to 6,000 ft. They are usually air drilled through several incompetent formations among which are the Marcellus and Coffee shales. Completions in this area are hampered by very low fracture gradients of 0.4 to 0.6 psi/ft, with most of the formations containing a large number of natural fractures. During cementing, pressures in excess of 1,100-psi hydrostatic can result in breakdown of the formation leading to incomplete fillup on the cement job. This paper will discuss the existing completion practices in this area, which include the use of multistage cementing, and the incorporation of cementing baskets and other downhole tools. The current cement systems in use and the problems encountered in using them will also be discussed. Several case histories of new cementing techniques, using ultralightweight foam-cementing systems, will be presented along with the job design used on these wells. Bond logging of the foam-cemented wells creates an array of special problems for the logging companies, due to the ultra-low densities and the high porosities of these special cementing systems. Newly developed techniques for logging these wells will be discussed, along with the bond logs from the case histories.

Edmondson, T.D.; Benge, O.G.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

350

Morocco  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

XIV. Morocco (Including Western Sahara and Mauritania) EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment XIV. Morocco (Including Western Sahara and Mauritania) EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 XIV-1 XIV. MOROCCO (INCLUDING WESTERN SAHARA AND MAURITANIA) SUMMARY In addition to large accumulations of Late-Cretaceous immature oil shale (kerogen) at depths suitable for surface mining 1 , Morocco and its two neighboring countries, Mauritania and Western Sahara, also possess organic-rich Silurian- and Devonian-age shale gas and shale oil potential in the Tindouf and Tadla basins, Figure XIV-1. Mapping and resource characterization of these shales is challenging because regional deformation, erosion and subsidence of the shale deposits have led to their discontinuous and complex present day distribution. Figure XIV-1. Shale Gas Basins of Morocco, Western Sahara and Mauritania

351

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Service Center Geology Overview Presented by: Paul J. Bembia May 16, 2013 http://seaborg.nmu.edu/earth. Western New York in the Middle Devonian Period 390 Million Years Ago Modified from Scotese, C.R., 2002, http://www.scotese.com, (PALEOMAP website). West Valley 2 Western New York Bedrock Geology The sediment from the shallow ocean that covered Western New York 350-400 million years ago is now sedimentary rock. Photo - http://www.earth.rochester.edu/ees207/18MileCreek/18milecreek.html 18 Mile Creek in Hamburg, New York 10,000 feet of sedimentary rock underlie the Western New York Nuclear Service Center 3 Bedrock Geology Cross Section - SE Pennsylvania to Western New York Bedrock in WNY is tilted slightly to the south from the continental

352

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

353

A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The first deep geothermal exploration borehole (995 m) to be drilled in the UK for over 20 years was completed at Eastgate (Weardale, Co. Durham) in December 2004. It penetrated 4 m of sandy till (Quaternary), 267.5 m of Lower Carboniferous strata (including the Whin Sill), and 723.5 m of the Weardale Granite (Devonian), with vein mineralization occurring to 913 m. Unlike previous geothermal investigations of UK radiothermal

354

Deep, water-free gas potential is upside to New Albany shale play  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of the Illinois basin contains major accumulations of Devonian shale gas, comparable both to the Antrim shale of the Michigan basin and the Ohio shale of the Appalachian basin. The size of the resource originally assessed at 61 tcf has recently been increased to between 323 tcf and 528 tcf. According to the 1995 US Geological Survey appraisal, New Albany shale gas represents 52% of the undiscovered oil and gas reserves of the Illinois basin, with another 45% attributed to coalbed methane. New Albany shale gas has been developed episodically for over 140 years, resulting in production from some 40 fields in western Kentucky, 20 fields in southern Indiana, and at least 1 field in southern Illinois. The paper describes two different plays identified by a GRI study and prospective areas.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Hamilton-Smith LLC, Lexington, KY (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

355

Safety research plan for gas-supply technologies. Final report, March 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop a multiyear research plan addressing the safety issues of the following gas supply technologies: conventional natural gas, including deep and sour gas wells; unconventional natural gas (Devonian shale, tight gas sands, coalbed methane, and geopressured methane); SNG from coal (surface and in situ), and SNG from biomass. A total of 51 safety issues were identified in the initial review. These safety issues were screened to eliminate those hazards which appeared to be relatively insignificant in terms of accident severity or frequency, or because the potential for resolving the problem through research was considered very low. Twenty-six remaining safety issues were prioritized, and of these, 9 were selected as priority research projects: two under conventional gas; one under unconventional natural gas; and six under SNG from coal. No safety research issues in the biomass area appear to warrant priority consideration.

Tipton, L.M.; Junkin, P.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Studies of New Albany shale in western Kentucky. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Albany (Upper Devonian) Shale in western Kentucky can be zoned by using correlative characteristics distinguishable on wire-line logs. Wells drilled through the shale which were logged by various methods provided a basis for zonation of the subsurface members and units of the Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and Blocher. Structure and isopach maps and cross sections were prepared. The Hannibal Shale and Rockford Limestone were found in limited areas; isopach maps were not made for these members. Samples of cuttings from selected wells were studied in order to identify the contact of the shale with underlying and overlying rock units. A well-site examination of cuttings through the shale section was conducted, and the presence of natural gas was observed in the field. The New Albany Shale has the potential for additional commercially marketable natural gas production. Exploratory drilling is needed to evaluate the reservoir characteristics of the New Albany Shale.

Schwalb, H.R.; Norris, R.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Soil chemical properties of the residuum of Callaway County, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil samples of Callaway County, Missouri, were analyzed for soil pH, clay mineralogy, free iron and manganese oxides, total organic carbon content (TOC), and cation exchange capacity (CEC). The soil samples represent Ordovician, Devonian, Mississippian and Pennsylvanian residuum. In addition, alluvium, loess, colluvium and glacial till samples were analyzed. The clay minerals consist of kaolinite, illite, smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers, iron and manganese oxide content ranges from 0.137 to 2.87% and 0.003 to 0.082% respectively, while TOC values range from 0.03 to 3.00%. The CEC values show a wide range from 5 to 89 milliequivalent/100 grams. The influence of the different soil constituents on the adsorption capacity of the soils is evaluated.

Biggs, T.C. (REACT Environmental Engineers, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Bolter, E. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration May 8-11, 2006 Alexandria, Virginia Poster 106: CO 2 Sequestration in Gas Shales of Kentucky Nuttall 1 , Brandon C. (presenter), bnuttall@uky.edu, Drahovzal 1 , James A., drahovzal@uky.edu, Eble 1 , Cortland F., eble@uky.edu, Bustin 2 , R. Marc, bustin@interchange.ubc.ca 1 Kentucky Geological Survey, 228 Mining and Mineral Resources Building, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0107, Phone: 859-257-5500, Fax: 859-257-1147 2 Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, 6339 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z4, Phone: 604-822-2449, Fax: 604-822-6088 ABSTRACT Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity

359

Projection of Favorable Gas-Producting Areas From Paleoenvironmental Data  

SciTech Connect

Paleoenvironmental biofacies analysis of recent wells in dark Devonian shales in the Applachian Basin has shown that these facies can be projected to areas with no control points. In particular, the facies distribution in Perry County, Kentucky, were found to be precisely those that were predicted earlier from biofacies and organic geochemical data from the VA-1 well in Wise County, Virginia, and the KY-2 well in Martin County, Kentucky. This demonstrates the importance of these data in assessing the volume of gas in the shale throughout the basin as well as in selecting future test sites. The recent biofacies and geochemical work together with a review of the tectonics of the basin have contributed to an evolving interpretation of the geologic control of the biofacies. While a marine environment persisted throughout the Upper Devonian over the Applachian and Illinois Basin (and probably the Michigan Basin), dynamic emergent areas controlled an intermittent introduction of large amounts of organic matter. Large amounts of non-marine organic matter were periodically transported in the basin from a dynamic source province to the Southeast; massive "blooms" of Tasmanites intermittently spread both east and west from the edges of the emerging Cincinnati Arch. At times one or the other of these organic types swept entirely across the basins; at other times a more normal open marine biota flourished and was deposited, probably under the influence of connections to the open seas to the south and northwest, the north being closed by the collision and suturing of continental plates and the east by the growing Applachian Mountains.

Zielinski, R.E.; Dixon, J. A.; McIver, R. D.; Reaugh, A. B.

1979-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Stimulation rationale for shale gas wells: a state-of-the-art report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the large quantities of gas contained in the Devonian Shales, only a small percentage can be produced commercially by current production methods. This limited production derives both from the unique reservoir properties of the Devonian Shales and the lack of stimulation technologies specifically designed for a shale reservoir. Since October 1978 Science Applications, Inc. has been conducting a review and evaluation of various shale well stimulation techniques with the objective of defining a rationale for selecting certain treatments given certain reservoir conditions. Although this review and evaluation is ongoing and much more data will be required before a definitive rationale can be presented, the studies to date do allow for many preliminary observations and recommendations. For the hydraulic type treatments the use of low-residual-fluid treatments is highly recommended. The excellent shale well production which is frequently observed with only moderate wellbore enlargement treatments indicates that attempts to extend fractures to greater distances with massive hydraulic treatments are not warranted. Immediate research efforts should be concentrated upon limiting production damage by fracturing fluids retained in the formation, and upon improving proppant transport and placement so as to maximize fracture conductivity. Recent laboratory, numerical modeling and field studies all indicate that the gas fracturing effects of explosive/propellant type treatments are the predominate production enhancement mechanism and that these effects can be controlled and optimized with properly designed charges. Future research efforts should be focused upon the understanding, prediction and control of wellbore fracturing with tailored-pulse-loading charges. 36 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Young, C.; Barbour, T.; Blanton, T.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Petroleum geology of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska has the potential for major petroleum accumulations. This area has many anticlinal structures, good oil-prone source rocks, and oil seeps and other surface indications of oil. The thickness and extent of reservoirs, however, are problematic, which places a wide range on estimated petroleum resources. In this remote area, resources must be very large to be economic. Sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Precambrian through Cenozoic and aggregate more than 20,000 ft in thickness. Post-Devonian strata generally are considered prospective for petroleum. In addition, underlying Precambrian to Devonian carbonate rocks, which are locally present in the Brooks Range to the south and in a few boreholes west of ANWR, are potential reservoirs in areas where they could be charged by overlying source rocks. The Mississippian through lowermost Cretaceous section consists of shelf carbonate rocks and shallow-marine and nonmarine sandstone and shale that were deposited along a slowly subsiding, south-facing continental margin bordering a northern (present-day orientation) land area. Known as the Ellesmerian sequence, these rocks are about 3,500 ft thick along the mountain front. The major reservoir rocks that are oil productive at Prudhoe Bay 75 mi to the west occur in this sequence. Early Cretaceous erosion related to Canada basin rifting, however, has removed much of this sequence in parts of the ANWR coastal plain. The overlying Brookian sequence, derived from an orogenic southern provenance, consists of at least 13,000 ft of Lower Cretaceous through Tertiary, northeasterly and northerly prograding basin, slope, and deltaic deposits. Excellent oil-prone source rocks occur at the base of this sequence, and overlying turbidites are potential reservoirs.

Molenaar, C.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Bird, K.J.; Magoon, L.B. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds, and possibly decreasing dependence on foreign oil and lower product prices for consumers. This fifth annual (and tenth of 12 semi-annual reports) contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the March 2003 through March 2004 period was directed toward completion of the Brushy Canyon FEE Tool and to Silurian-Devonian geology, and development of rules for the Devonian fuzzy system, and on-line software.

Robert Balch

2004-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

363

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-1011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 trillion cubic feet Basin Shale Play State(s) Production Reserves Production Reserves Production Reserves Fort Worth Barnett TX 1.9 31.0 2.0 32.6 0.1 1.6 Appalachian Marcellus PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH 0.5 13.2 1.4 31.9 0.9 18.7 Texas-Louisiana Salt Haynesville/Bossier TX, LA 1.5 24.5 2.5 29.5 1.0 5.0 Arkoma Fayetteville AR 0.8 12.5 0.9 14.8 0.1 2.3 Anadarko Woodford TX, OK 0.4 9.7 0.5 10.8 0.1 1.1 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 0.1 2.5 0.4 8.4 0.3 5.9 Sub-total 5.2 93.4 7.7 128.0 2.5 34.6 Other shale gas plays 0.2 4.0 0.3 3.6 0.1 -0.4 All U.S. Shale Plays 5.4 97.4 8.0 131.6 2.6 34.2 Change 2011-2010 2010 2011 Notes: Some columns may not add up to its subtotal because of independent rounding. Natural gas is wet after lease separation. The above table is

364

Phase I (Year 1) Summary of Research--Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report covers the first 12 months of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). Phase I tasks, including Developing a Reservoir Catalog for selected dolomite reservoirs in the Michigan Basin, Characterization of Dolomite Reservoirs in Representative Fields and Technology Transfer have all been initiated and progress is consistent with our original scheduling. The development of a reservoir catalog for the 3 subject formations in the Michigan Basin has been a primary focus of our efforts during Phase I. As part of this effort, we currently have scanned some 13,000 wireline logs, and compiled in excess of 940 key references and 275 reprints that cover reservoir aspects of the 3 intervals in the Michigan Basin. A summary evaluation of the data in these publications is currently ongoing, with the Silurian Niagara Group being handled as a first priority. In addition, full production and reservoir parameter data bases obtained from available data sources have been developed for the 3 intervals in Excel and Microsoft Access data bases. We currently have an excess of 25 million cells of data for wells in the Basin. All Task 2 objectives are on time and on target for Phase I per our original proposal. Our mapping efforts to date, which have focused in large part on the Devonian Dundee Formation, have important implications for both new exploration plays and improved enhanced recovery methods in the Dundee ''play'' in Michigan--i.e. the interpreted fracture-related dolomitization control on the distribution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. In an exploration context, high-resolution structure mapping using quality-controlled well data should provide leads to convergence zones of fault/fracture trends that are not necessarily related to structural elevation. Further work in Phase II will be focused on delineating the relative contribution to fracture-only dolomitization to that which occurs in conjunction with primary facies and/or sequence stratigraphic framework.

G. Michael Grammer

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Shale-Gas Experience as an Analog for Potential Wellbore Integrity Issues in CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shale-gas development in Pennsylvania since 2003 has resulted in about 19 documented cases of methane migration from the deep subsurface (7,0000) to drinking water aquifers, soils, domestic water wells, and buildings, including one explosion. In all documented cases, the methane leakage was due to inadequate wellbore integrity, possibly aggravated by hydrofracking. The leakage of methane is instructive on the potential for CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration operations. Although there are important differences between the two systems, both involve migrating, buoyant gas with wells being a primary leakage pathway. The shale-gas experience demonstrates that gas migration from faulty wells can be rapid and can have significant impacts on water quality and human health and safety. Approximately 1.4% of the 2,200 wells drilled into Pennsylvania's Marcellus Formation for shale gas have been implicated in methane leakage. These have resulted in damage to over 30 domestic water supplies and have required significant remediation via well repair and homeowner compensation. The majority of the wellbore integrity problems are a result of over-pressurization of the wells, meaning that high-pressure gas has migrated into an improperly protected wellbore annulus. The pressurized gas leaks from the wellbore into the shallow subsurface, contaminating drinking water or entering structures. The effects are localized to a few thousands of feet to perhaps two-three miles. The degree of mixing between the drinking water and methane is sufficient that significant chemical impacts are created in terms of elevated Fe and Mn and the formation of black precipitates (metal sulfides) as well as effervescing in tap water. Thus it appears likely that leaking CO{sub 2} could also result in deteriorated water quality by a similar mixing process. The problems in Pennsylvania highlight the critical importance of obtaining background data on water quality as well as on problems associated with previous (legacy) oil and gas operations. The great majority of the leakage issues in Pennsylvania are due to improperly abandoned wells, however in the media there is no clear distinction between past and present problems. In any case, significant analytical work is required to attribute differing sources of methane (or CO{sub 2} in the case of sequestration). In Pennsylvania, a relatively lax regulatory environment appears to have contributed to the problem with inadequate oversight of well design and testing to ensure well integrity. New rules were adopted at the end of 2010, and it will be interesting to observe whether methane leakage problems are significantly reduced.

Carey, James W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simpson, Wendy S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ziock, Hans-Joachim [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (â??target areaâ?), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

J. Daniel Arthur

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Gas sales starting from Indiana`s fractured New Albany shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas issued 138 drilling permits from Dec. 1, 1994, through July 31, 1996, in 17 counties in a growing play for gas in Devonian New Albany shale in southern Indiana. The permits are active in the form of locations, drilling wells, wells in the completion process, and wells producing gas in the dewatering stage. Geologically in southwestern Indiana the New Albany shale exploration play is found in three provinces. These are the Wabash platform, the Terre Haute reef bank, and the Vincennes basin. Exploration permits issued on each of these geologic provinces are as follows: Wabash platform 103, Terra Haute reef bank 33, and Vincennes basin two. The authors feel that the quantity and effectiveness of communication of fracturing in the shale will control gas production and water production. A rule of thumb in a desorption reservoir is that the more water a shale well makes in the beginning the more gas it will make when dewatered.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. [Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Geologists, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence  

SciTech Connect

Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Horizontal well taps bypassed Dundee oil in Crystal field, Mich.  

SciTech Connect

The Dundee formation (Middle Devonian) has yielded more oil than any other producing interval in Michigan. The Dundee trend, which forms an east-west band across the central Michigan basin, consists of 137 fields which together have yielded more than 350 million bbl of oil. The first commercial Dundee production was established at Mt. Pleasant field in 1928, and most Dundee fields were discovered and brought on production during the 1930s--40s. Wells in many of the fields had very high initial production (IP) rates. IPs in excess of 1,000 b/d of oil were common, with values as high as 9,000 b/d reported. These high flow rates, combined with a thin (10--30 ft) oil column and a strong water drive, resulted in water coning that left significant volumes of oil unrecovered in some fields. One such field, Crystal field in Montcalm County, is the focus of a US Department of energy (DOE) Class 2 Reservoir Demonstration Project designed to demonstrate that horizontal drilling can recover significant volumes of this bypassed oil. The paper describes the demonstration project, regional setting, and the history of the Crystal field.

Wood, J.R.; Allan, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Harrison, W.B. III [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Taylor, E.; Tester, C.J. [Cronus Development Corp., Traverse City, MI (United States)

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Microcrack technology. Progress report, 1 April 1979-29 February 1980  

SciTech Connect

Microcracks in samples of core from a 3000-foot hole in the Conway granite, near North Conway, New Hampshire, are abundant and most of them are sealed with siderite, chlorite, quartz, hematite, clay, or microbreccia. The sealed cracks are 1 to 100..mu.. wide, intersect many grain boundaries, often coincide with grain boundaries, and both intersect and contain minerals that are normally rich in U and Th. The abundances of U and Th in 100-gm-bulk samples range from 0.1 to 30 ppM and from 6 to 100 ppM, respectively. The working hypothesis that U and Th have migrated through the microcracks in CO/sub 2/-rich waters is proposed. In the Redstone Quarry core, the presently open microcracks are preferentially oriented; most open cracks have horizontal surfaces. Samples of Devonian shales have been obtained for the purpose of examining microcracks in relation to the production of natural gas. The problems of sample preparation for fissile shale have been largely solved. Samples from the NTS have been prepared for the examination of microcracks in relation to possible disposal sites for radioactive waste.

Simmons, G.; Caruso, L.; Padovani, E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Yankee Mine oil seep: New research yields additional evidence of thrusting; original oil volume in the seep was possibly two orders of magnitude greater than previously calculated  

SciTech Connect

Mesomic thrusting combined with subsequent Eocene hydrothermal activity have created a regime favorable to major accumulation of both oil and gold in the Long Valley - Buck Mountain - Maverick Springs Range area of northeastern Nevada. Discoveries from ongoing exploration include: Numerous economic accumulations of hydrocarbon associated gold; various thrust relationships from surface geologic mapping and drill holes identifying Devonian rocks faulted onto Permian, Pennsylvanian (?) and Mississippian age rocks; numerous small scale compressional folds and faults indicative of both cast vergent (expected) and west vergent (unexpected) structural elements. Seismic data indicates that oil source rocks, primarily Chainman Shale and Pilot Shale formations, are present to the west in a downdip, subthrust position where hydrocarbon generation and migration would provide large oil volumes to migrate easterly (updip) prior to the formation of the Basin and Range. The Eocene age hydothermal cell which emplaced gold and oil bearing fluids into the Yankee and associated gold mines probably initiated directly below or east of the Yankee area, but certainly not west of it since no hydrothermal mineralization is present in the Yankee Mine 27-23X Well drilled by Pioneer Oil and Gas west of the mines.

Pinnell, M.L. [Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States); Anderson, D.W. [Anderson Geological Corp., Westminster, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Converting Chattanooga oil shale to synthetic liquid fuel. Phase I. Final report. [Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Chattanooga Shale is widely distributed in Tennessee and has been known as a potential source of shale oil and strategic minerals, particularly uranium, for many years. It was studied in the late 1940's as a source of uranium. The shale varies in color from light gray to black. The shale is of the Devonian Age and occurs under the Maury formation and above the Leipers limestone. It exists as the Gassaway and Dowelltown members. Generally, the combined thickness of these two members in the seven-county study ranged in thickness from about 26 feet to greater than 34 feet. The overall intent of this study was to identify the extent of the Chattanooga shale in Tennessee, characterize its properties, review its potential as an oil producer in terms of present-day technologies, and to assess interest in the private sector for development and commercialization. This report contains the results of this six-month study. 28 figures, 58 tables.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Final report, June 1992--January 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in September 1987 by the US Department of Energy was to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation and upgrading, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program was divided into the following active tasks: Task 3 -- Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4 -- Beneficiation Research; Task 6 -- Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; and Task 9 -- Information Required for the National Environmental Policy Act. In order to accomplish all of the program objectives, tho Institute of Gas Technology (ICT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: The University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Alabama College of Engineering (UA), University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed by IGT from June 1, 1992 through January 31, 1993.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Erekson, E.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Schultz, C.W.; Hatcher, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States). Mineral Resources Inst.; Parekh, B.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Bonner, W.P. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Gas stimulation studies at LASL  

SciTech Connect

The studies include: (a) Dynamic Rock Response. Hugoniots, dynamic spall strengths, wave profiles on shock and release, and ultrasonic elastic constants have been determined as functions of material density and bedding orientation for Devonian shales. These data form the basis of predictive explosive stimulation technology. (b) Explosively Driven Jets. Weapons-developed shaped charges using heavy metal liners are being investigated for downhole use in order to produce a horizontal manifold system leading to a central borehole. Applications of the paths produced by these devices include intersection of the natural fracture patterns, explosive or chemical emplacement, or producing hydrofractures displaced from the borehole. (c) Laser Pyrolysis. Pulsed laser heating results in a rapid deposition of precise quantities of thermal energy into selected shale volumes. Such laser-induced pyrolysis forms the basis for a rapid assay technique which can be used at the wellhead or as a downhole logging tool. (d) Computer Simulation. A computational technique using a hybrid (analog and digital) computer is being developed with the ultimate objective of simulating proposed extraction technologies to establish optimum economic stimulation methods.

Carter, W.J.; Olinger, B.W.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales. Progress report, October--December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the 3-year program, initiated in October 1987 is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following eight tasks: Task 1, PFH Scoping Studies; Task 2, PFH Optimization Tests; Task 3, Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4, Beneficiation Research; Task 5, Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Task 6, Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Task 7, Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; Task 8, Project Management and Reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology, the prime contractor, is working with seven other institutions; the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan, the University of Nevada, Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Pittsburgh. This report presents the work performed during the fifth program quarter from October 1 through December 31, 1988.

Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Knowlton, T.M. [and others

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation and upgrading, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following active tasks: Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 8. project management and reporting; and Task 9. information required for the National Environmental Policy Act. In order to accomplish all of the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, is working with four other institutions: The University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Alabama College of Engineering (UA), University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program quarter from June 1, 1992 through August 31, 1992.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Progress report, July--September 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the 3-year program, is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following eight tasks: Task 1, PFH Scoping Studies; Task 2, PFH Optimization Tests; Task 3, Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4, Beneficiation Research; Task 5, Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Task 6, Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Task 7, Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; Task 8, Project Management and Reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology, the prime contractor, is working with six other institutions; the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan, Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Pittsburgh. This report presents the work performed during the fourth program quarter from July 1 through September 30, 1988.

Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Knowlton, T.M.; Akin, C.; Roberts, M.J.; Findlay, J.G.; Mensinger, M.C.; Chang, I.H.; Xiong, T.Y.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales. Progress report, July--September 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the 3-year program, initiated in October 1987 is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following eight tasks: Task 1, PFH Scoping Studies; Task 2, PFH Optimization Tests; Task 3, Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4, Beneficiation Research; Task 5, Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Task 6, Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Task 7, Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; Task 8, Project Management and Reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology, the prime contractor, is working with seven other institutions; the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan, the University of Nevada, Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Pittsburgh. This report presents the work performed during the eighth program quarter from July 1 through September 30, 1989.

Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Knowlton, T.M. [and others

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Progress report, June--August, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation and upgrading, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following active tasks: Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 8. project management and reporting; and Task 9. information required for the National Environmental Policy Act. In order to accomplish all of the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, is working with four other institutions: The University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Alabama College of Engineering (UA), University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program quarter from June 1, 1992 through August 31, 1992.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play  

SciTech Connect

While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Hill, D.G. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

383

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Study of gas evolution during oil shale pyrolysis by TQMS (triple quadrupole mass spectrometer)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Real-time gas evolution during pyrolysis of two Green River Formation (Colorado) oil shales, one eastern US Devonian shale, and two Chinese shales was monitored using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS). We calculated kinetic parameters for hydrocarbon generation. For water, carbon oxides, and sulfur gases, we compared evolution profiles and identified the organicinorganic precursors of each species. We also monitored nitrogen- and sulfur-containing naphtha components. Hydrocarbon gas profiles, except for CH/sub 4/, are similar for all shales, and their rates of evolution reach a maximum at around the temperatures of maximum oil evolutions. The evolution profiles for H/sub 2/, CH/sub 2/, CO, and CO/sub 2/, at high temperatures are affected by the amount of char remaining in shale, carbonate minerals, and the water-gas shift reaction. The water profile, in general, consists of waters from surface dehydration, kerogen pyrolysis, and mineral dehydration. Mineral dehydration was the dominant water source for all shales, but the temperature ranges for the major water peak varied because of widely different mineral composition. Chinese shales evolved much more water than U.S. shales. Major differences between shales were seen in the sulfur gases. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Oh, M.S.; Coburn, T.T.; Crawford, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Preparation of environmental analyses for synfuel and unconventional gas technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Government agencies that offer financial incentives to stimulate the commercialization of synfuel and unconventional gas technologies usually require an analysis of environmental impacts resulting from proposed projects. This report reviews potentially significant environmental issues associated with a selection of these technologies and presents guidance for developing information and preparing analyses to address these issues. The technologies considered are western oil shale, tar sand, coal liquefaction and gasification, peat, unconventional gas (western tight gas sands, eastern Devonian gas shales, methane from coal seams, and methane from geopressured aquifers), and fuel ethanol. Potentially significant issues are discussed under the general categories of land use, air quality, water use, water quality, biota, solid waste disposal, socioeconomics, and health and safety. The guidance provided in this report can be applied to preparation and/or review of proposals, environmental reports, environmental assessments, environmental impact statements, and other types of environmental analyses. The amount of detail required for any issue discussed must, by necessity, be determined on a case-by-case basis.

Reed, R.M. (ed.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Rupp, John A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Evaluation and targeting of geothermal energy resources in the southeastern United States. Progress report, November 1, 1976--March 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop and apply targeting procedures for the evaluation of low-temperature radiogenically-derived geothermal resources in the eastern United States utilizing geological, geochemical, and geophysical data. Detailed study of the Liberty Hill and Winnsboro plutons, South Carolina, is continuing in order to provide insight into the behavior of uranium and thorium in unmetamorphosed granitic plutons during periods of crystallization, deuteric alteration and weathering. The importance of the oxidation state of uranium has become apparent because the transition from U/sup 4 +/ to U/sup 6 +/ represents the division between immobile and labile uranium. Accessory uraninite has been found in the Liberty Hill pluton, and molybdenite mineralization occurs in both the Liberty Hill and Winnsboro plutons. The molybdenum mineralization is present in a number of 300 m.y. granitic plutons in the southeastern U.S. A steep metamorphic gradient across the Roxboro, North Carolina, metagranite, which was metamorphosed during Devonian time, should provide a good opportunity to study the effect of prograde metamorphism on the distribution of uranium and thorium. Three holes have been drilled into the Roxboro metagranite for the purpose of examining the effect of metamorphism on heat generation and heat flow. Preliminary modeling of negative gravity anomalies in the Coastal Plain supports the interpretation of a deep granitic pluton near Norfolk, Virginia, and probably at Georgetown, South Carolina.

Costain, J.K.; Glover, L. III; Sinha, A.K.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Possible hydrocarbon habitat of the bulge, Alaska and Yukon Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bedrock geology of the northernmost Bulge of the Rocky Mountain Cordillera consists of units ranging in age from the Proterozoic to the Recent. Concerted LANDSAT imagery, field mapping, and CDP seismic interpretation indicates that there are several thick, unconformity-bounded and areally distinct depositional mega-sequences in northern Alaska and Yukon Territory. Analyses of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), 1002 area, subsurface suggest the presence of several large structures. However, seismic resolution is insufficient to determine the stratigraphy with a high degree of confidence. The oldest sediments in the Bulge are the northerly derived Katakturuk dolomite and the southerly derived, predominantly clastic Neruokpuk Formation. Tests of these units immediately outside ANWR produced oil, gas, and water from vugs and fractures. Both the Katakturuk and Neruokpuk are overlain by dissimilar but thick and areally limited Cambrian-Devonian sediments with undetermined reservoir potential. Middle and Upper Ellesmerian crop out around the periphery of the coastal plain and are found in the subsurface. Their presence and reservoir development in the structures of the 1002 area depend upon the extent of Lower Cretaceous truncation. Two dissimilar locally derived breakup megasequence sandstones having limited lateral extends overlie older units. They have increasing regional importance as commercial oil and gas reservoirs. Very thick, southerly derived, Brookian clastics overstep this area. They contain the largest endowment of the in-place hydrocarbons in Alaska and the Yukon. Their commercial development is incipient.

Banet, A.C. Jr. (Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Stratigraphic and structural framework of ellesmerian and older sequences in Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed geological mapping (1:25,000 scale) and stratigraphic reconstructions in the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains of northeastern Alaska, immediately south of the ANWR coastal plain, indicate a compressive structural province dominated by major thrust-ramp-related anticlinal uplifts. The Katakturuk Dolomite, a Proterozoic sequence, has been subdivided into 15 lithostratigraphic units that can be traced the entire length of both the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains. Overlying the Katakturuk Dolomite in these ranges in the Middle Devonian to Cambrian or older Nanook Limestone. In the Early Mississippian a major erosional event produced the pre-Mississippian unconformity upon which a Mississippian through Triassic sequence was deposited: Kayak Shale; Lisburne Group carbonates; and Sadlerochit Group clastic rocks. In the northern Sadlerochit Mountains, basal units of the Mississippian Alapah Limestone lie on the pre-Mississippian unconformity with no intervening Kayak Shale. The basal Alapah contains lithologies derived from the rock units on which it rests, indicating that the contact between the Alapah and the underlying units is depositional.

Robinson, M.S.; Decker, J.; Clough, J.G.; Dillon, J.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Stratigraphic and structural framework of Ellesmerian and older sequences in Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), northeastern Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed geological mapping (1:25,000 scale) and stratigraphic reconstructions in the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains of northeastern Alaska, immediately south of the ANWR coastal plain, indicate a compressive structural province dominated by major thrust-ramp-related anticlinal uplifts. The Katakturuk Dolomite, a Proterozoic sequence, has been subdivided into 15 lithostratigraphic units that can be traced the entire length of both the Sadlerochit and Shublik Mountains. Overlying the Katakturuk Dolomite in these ranges is the Middle Devonian to Cambrian or older Nanook Limestone. In the Early Mississippian a major erosional event produced the pre-Mississippian unconformity upon which a Mississippian through Triassic sequence was deposited: (A) Kayak Shale; (B) Lisburne Group carbonates; and (C) Sadlerochit Group clastic rocks. In the northern Sadlerochit Mountains, basal units of the Mississippian Alapah Limestone lie on the pre-Mississippian unconformity with no intervening Kayak Shale. The basal Alapah contains lithologies derived from the rocks units on which it rests, indicating that the contact between the Alapah and the underlying units is depositional. A regional decollement, localized along the pre-Mississippian unconformity in the Kayak Shale, is not a significant detachment surface north of the Shublik Mountains because the Kayak Shale is depositionally discontinuous and thin in the Sadlerochit Mountains.

Robinson, M.S.; Decker, J.; Clough, J.G.; Dillon, J.T.; Wallace, W.K.; Crowder, K.; Watts, K. (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks (USA))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geological controls on natural gas production in the Antrim Shale of the Michigan basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antrim Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) is a prolific natural gas reservoir with distinctive source rock and reservoir characteristics. The Antrim is composed of two distinctive lithofacies: a black shale lithofacies having total organic carbon (TOC) values as high as 12% and a gray-green shale lithofacies having TOC values generally below 0.5 %. The black shale facies is the primary source bed and reservoir for natural gas. Based on Rock-Eval data the kerogen in the Antrim Shale is only marginally mature with respect to generation of liquid hydrocarbons. This in the range of 435{degree}C, vitrinite reflectance values are 0.41, and thermal alteration index (TAI) is 2. These data indicate a maximum burial temperature of approximately 60{degree}C in Otsego County, Michigan, the main play area. Although the thermal maturation level in this area is very low, the gas produced from the Antrim is internally sourced and thermogenic; this interpretation is based on the presence of trace amounts of high-gravity oil and a thermogenic isotopic signature of produced gas samples. The black shale facies in the Antrim contains significant authigenic silica and is more susceptible to fracturing compared to the carbonate-cemented gray-green shales facies. Extremely low gas permeability values (0.1 md) indicates that fractures serve as conduits for delivery of gas to the borehole. Most of the gas must be stored in the shale matrix porosity because total gas volume produced far exceeds fracture reservoir volume.

Dellapenna, T.M. (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R. E.; McIver, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Background The use of horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing has greatly expanded the ability of producers to profitably produce natural gas from low permeability geologic formations, particularly shale formations. Application of fracturing techniques to stimulate oil and gas production began to grow rapidly in the 1950s, although experimentation dates back to the 19 th century. Starting in the mid-1970s, a partnership of private operators, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) endeavored to develop technologies for the commercial production of natural gas from the relatively shallow Devonian (Huron) shale in the Eastern United States. This partnership helped foster technologies that eventually became crucial to producing natural gas from shale rock, including horizontal wells, multi-stage fracturing, and slick-water fracturing. 1 Practical application of horizontal drilling to oil production began in the early 1980s, by which time the advent of improved downhole drilling motors and the invention of other necessary supporting equipment, materials, and technologies, particularly downhole telemetry equipment, had brought some applications within the realm of

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of the effects of section 29 tax credits on reserve additions and production of gas from unconventional resources  

SciTech Connect

Federal tax credits for production of natural gas from unconventional resources can stimulate drilling and reserves additions at a relatively low cost to the Treasury. This report presents the results of an analysis of the effects of a proposed extension of the Section 29 alternative fuels production credit specifically for unconventional gas. ICF Resources estimated the net effect of the extension of the credit (the difference between development activity expected with the extension of the credit and that expected if the credit expires in December 1990 as scheduled). The analysis addressed the effect of tax credits on project economics and capital formation, drilling and reserve additions, production, impact on the US and regional economies, and the net public sector costs and incremental revenues. The analysis was based on explicit modeling of the three dominant unconventional gas resources: Tight sands, coalbed methane, and Devonian shales. It incorporated the most current data on resource size, typical well recoveries and economics, and anticipated activity of the major producers. Each resource was further disaggregated for analysis based on distinct resource characteristics, development practices, regional economics, and historical development patterns.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy Programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Quarterly report, October-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, under contracts with several agencies of the federal government and an agency of the State of Maryland, is engaged in developing energy resources, utilization concepts, and storage methods. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1979. The Energy Quarterly Report is divided into five sections. The first, Geothermal Energy Development Planning and Technical Assistance, supported by the Department of Energy/Resource Applications (DOE/RA), contains reports on the progress of those geothermal-related tasks where effort was concentrated during the quarter. The second section, Operational Research, Hydroelectric Power Development, also supported by DOE/RA, contains reports on small-scale hydroelectric investigations in the southeastern states. The third section, Seismotectonic Studies, supported by the Reactor Safety Research Division of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, reports on neotectonic investigations in Connecticut. The fourth section, Energy Conversion and Storage Techniques, contains two articles, the first on OTEC core unit testing supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Central Solar Technology (DOE/CST), and the second on recovery of landfill methane, supported by the Argonne National Laboratory. The fifth section, New Energy Technologies, reports on Laboratory studies of an unconventional gas source--Eastern Devonian shales.

None

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geothermal resource assessment for North Dakota. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Temperatures in four geothermal aquifers, inyan Kara (Cretaceous), Mission Canyon (Mississippian), Duperow (Devonian), and Red River (Ordovician) are in the range for low and moderate temperature geothermal resources within an area of about 130,000 km{sup 2} in North Dakota. The accessible resource base is 13,500 x 10{sup 18} J., which, assuming a recovery factor of 0.001, may represent a greater quantity of recoverable energy than is present in the basin in the form of petroleum. A synthesis of heat flow, thermal conductivity, and stratigraphic data was found to be significantly more accurate in determining formation temperatures than the use of linear temperature gradients derived from bottom hole temperature data. The thermal structure of the Williston Basin is determined by the thermal conductivities of four principal lithologies: Tertiary silts and sands (1.6 W/m/K), Mesozoic shales (1.2 W/m/K), Paleozoic limestones (3.2 W/m/K), and Paleozoic dolomites (3.5 W/m/K). The stratigraphic placement of these lithologies leads to a complex, multi-component geothermal gradient which precludes use of any single component gradient for accurate determination of subsurface temperatures.

Gosnold, William D. Jr.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Geothermal resource assessment for North Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Temperatures in four geothermal aquifers, Inyan Kara (Cretaceous), Mission Canyon (Mississippian), Duperow (Devonian), and Red River (Ordovician) are in the range for low and moderate temperature geothermal resources within an area of about 130,000 km/sup 2/ in North Dakota. The accessible resource base is 13,500 x 10/sup 18/ J., which, assuming a recovery factor of 0.001, may represent a greater quantity of recoverable energy than is present in the basin in the form of petroleum. A synthesis of heat flow, thermal conductivity, and stratigraphic data was found to be significantly more accurate in determining formation temperatures than the use of linear temperature gradients derived from bottom hole temperature data. The thermal structure of the Williston Basin is determined by the thermal conductivities of four principal lithologies: Tertiary silts and sands (1.6 W/m/K), Mesozoic shales (1.2 W/m/K), Paleozoic limestones (3.2 W/m/K), and Paleozoic dolomites (3.5 W/m/K). The stratigraphic placement of these lithologies leads to a complex, multicomponent geothermal gradient which precludes use of any single component gradient for accurate determination of subsurface temperatures.

Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geothermal resource assessment, South Dakota: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Seven geothermal aquifers in South Dakota contain an accessible resource base of about 11,207 x 10/sup 18/ J. The potentially productive geothermal aquifers are: Deadwood Formation (Cambrian), Winnipeg Formation + Red River Formation + Englewood Limestone (Ordovician through Devonian), Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Minnelusa Formation (Mississippian-Permian), Inyan Kara Group (Cretaceous), and Newcastle Sandstone (Cretaceous). The resource estimate was obtained by first using heat flow, thermal conductivity, temperature gradient, and stratigraphic data to estimate aquifer temperatures. The heat content of each aquifer was determined from the product of the volumetric heat capacity, aquifer volume, and temperature difference between the aquifer and the mean annual temperature for a 14 x 14 grid of 240 km/sup 2/ cells. Geothermal fluid temperatures range from about 120/sup 0/C in the Deadwood Formation in the Williston Basin to about 30/sup 0/C for the Newcastle Sandstone in south-central South Dakota. The area containing the resource lies largely west of the Missouri River. About 10,000 km/sup 2/ of the resource area is characterized by anomalously high heat flow values greater than 100 mW m/sup -2/.

Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that results will be exportable throughout the basin. Ten petrophysically significant facies have been described in the northern reef trend, providing significantly more resolution than the standard 4-6 that are used most often in the basin (e.g. Gill, 1977). Initial petrophysical characterization (sonic velocity analysis under confining pressures) shows a clear pattern that is dependent upon facies and resulting pore architecture. Primary facies is a key factor in the ultimate diagenetic modification of the rock and the resulting pore architecture. Facies with good porosity and permeability clearly show relatively slow velocity values as would be expected, and low porosity and permeability samples exhibit fast sonic velocity values, again as expected. What is significant is that some facies that have high porosity values, either measured directly or from wireline logs, also have very fast sonic velocity values. This is due to these facies having a pore architecture characterized by more localized pores (vugs, molds or fractures) that are not in communication.

G. Michael Grammer

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NETL: Computer Software & Databases -E & P Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E & P Tools E & P Tools CO2 Prophet: Water and CO2 Flood Prediction Software. CO2 Prophet, conceived by Texaco Exploration and Production Technology Department (EPTD), was partially developed as part of the DOE Class I cost share program "Post Waterflood, CO2 Flood in a Light Oil, Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoir" under DOE Contract No. DE-FC22-93BC14960. Windows XP compatiable version has been updated, see historical READ ME FIRST file and READ ME SECOND file before operation. The DOE does not provide technical support for this application. Download 973 KB User's Manual and Readme files included Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool (Fee): Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. "Expert" systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration "expert" tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of "fuzzy" logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated "Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool." The Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool will eventually be generalized so that users in any part of the world will be able to add their own knowledge and data and make rapid evaluations of a large number of potential drilling sites in a systematic and consistent manner via the internet. Below are links to install standalone systems for the Delaware Basin specific FEE Tool and the Devonian specific FEE Tool. More information can also be found at: http://ford.nmt.edu

402

Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

James Wood; William Quinlan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

PRODUCTION VERIFICATION TESTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the demonstration of 14 stages (in 10 wells) of a unique liquid-free stimulation process which employs carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as the working fluid in ten Candidate Wells. Three were situated in Perry County and seven in Pike County of eastern kentucky's Big Sandy gas field. These activities included four individual efforts which have previously been described in detail in four submitted Final Reports, and are herein summarized. These ten Candidate wells produce from the Devonian Shale which is well known to be damaged by liquid based stimulation processes. They were treated with a total of fourteen stages; four as a single stage, and the others in two stages per well all containing approximately 120 tons of CO{sub 2} per stage. These liquid free stimulations also contained proppant quantities on the order of 45,000 lbs per stage. The results show in the three Perry Co Candidate wells that the stimulations were not as effective as the best conventional technology, and resulted in a stimulation cost for produced gas of $0.69 per Mcf vs $0.43 for N{sub 2} gas stimulations. The results in the Pike County Candidates, where the shale section is thicker--1,025 vs. 350 feet, indicated a superior response from the wells stimulated with the CO{sub 2}/sand process. A five year production benefit of 67.7 MMcf per stage, or 135.4 MMcf per well over that from the closest competing technology which results in a 3.41 benefit ratio and a stimulation cost for produced gas of $0.47 per Mcf vs $1.14 for N{sub 2} gas.

Raymond L. Mazza

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Structural geology of Shawneetown fault zone, Southeastern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Vertical movements of crustal blocks along the narrow east-west-trending Shawneetown fault zone in southeastern Illinois occurred between Early Permian and Late Cretaceous. The main blocks moved vertically and retured to roughly their orignal positions so that strata now show little relative offset across the fault zone. However, individual faults with displacements up to 3,500 ft (1,070 m) bound narrow slices of steeply tilted or overturned strata resulting in a juxtaposition of Kinderhookian (Lower Mississippian) and Upper Devonian strata with Lower Pennsylvanina strata. The bedrock is intensely fractured, commonly brecciated, and cemented with either silica or calcite. Slickensides and mullion display various orientations within the zone and on individual outcrops. The dominant movement, however, appears to be vertical with no evidence for significant strike-slip movements. Pleistocene deposits do not exhibit offsets across the fault zone, indicating that no tectonic activity has occurred since the beginning of that epoch. The trend of the fault zone changes abruptly from east-west in southern Gallatin and easternmost Saline Counties to south-southwest in southern Saline and northeastern Pope Counties, where it joins the Fluorspar area fault complex. Here the zone widens and develops a braided pattern as the amount of displacement along individual faults decreases. The Shawneetown fault zone and Flourspar area fault complex in part are younger than the Cottage Grove fault system to the northwest and the Wabash Valley fault system to the north. The hope of finding structural traps near the junctions of the fuel systems has spurred recent oil exploration in the area.

Lumm, D.K.; Nelson, W.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Characterization of the Dundee formation, Winterfield Field, Clare County, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Devonian Dundee Formation of the Winterfield field was originally developed in the late 1930`s and early 1940`s and rapid production helped support the U.S. war effort. Poor completion and production practices may have caused the field to have been inefficiently developed, and wells prematurely watered out due to water coning. Production occurs in porous dolomitized {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} where they extend above the oil-water contact within the otherwise {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. Cross plots of the PEF (Photoelectric) log and the LLD (deep lateral) log separate the porous, oil-saturated dolomite from water-saturated dolomites and the {open_quotes}tight{close_quotes} limestone. The PEF distinguishes the lithologies (dolomite and limestone) and the LLD separates the fluids (water and oil); other useful logs are the CNL and GR to indicate porous and shale zones respectively. The dolomite {open_quotes}chimneys{close_quotes} are small in scale, less than 60` high and can be laterally discontinuous between wells on 40 acres spacing. The dolomite zones tend to have good porosity and permeability; the API gravity of the oil is 44.2 and the reservoir is produced by a strong, constant water drive. Initial production tests on some wells indicate the ability to produce up to nearly 2000 barrels per day (BOPD). Wells drilled in the 1980`s to the deeper Richfield intercepted and isolated oil pocket in the Dundee off structure, prompting further drilling activity; subsequent production has significantly added to the cumulative production in the field. Due to the heterogeneity of the reservoir, the strong water drive, the low density of the oil and the relatively high permeabilities, the reservoir and others like it are ideal candidates for horizontal drain technology. The horizontal wells could link {open_quotes}chimney`s{close_quotes} that have previously been untapped, significantly adding to the total production of these Dundee fields.

Chittick, S.; Salotti, C.; Wood, J.R. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Improved recovery using horizontal drilling in the Dundee Formation Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to demonstrate that oil production from selected fields in the Dundee Formation (Dev.) of Michigan can be substantially increased, perhaps restored to near--original production levels in some fields in Michigan, by utilizing horizontal drain wells. Devonian rocks have been the most prolific hydrocarbon producers of any system in the Michigan Basin. The Traverse, Dundee, and Lucas Formations have produced nearly all of the 525 Mbbls of oil and 150 Bcf of gas since the late 1920`s, 50% of the state`s oil and 7% of the state`s natural gas production. The Dundee Formation is Michigan`s all-time leader with 352 million barrels of oil and 42 billion cubic feet of gas. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI, selected as a field trial for this project is such a field. Analysis of production data for Crystal Field suggests that an additional 200,000 bbls of oil can be produced using 1 strategically located horizontal well. Total addition production from the Crystal Field could be as much as 6-8 Mbbls. Spin-offs from the technology developed in this project to other fields has the potential to increase Dundee production in Michigan by 35%, adding 80-100 Mbbls to the cumulative production. The approach combines proven, cost-effective horizontal drilling technology with modern reservoir characterization and management. A total of 30 Dundee fields will be characterized including the Crystal Field. Well logs, other well data, drilling, and production data and rock samples from the Dundee Fm. will be obtained, assembled, and input into digital databases designed for this project. Computer models describing the diagenetic, stratigraphic and thermal evolution of the Michigan Basin will be developed and applied to the Crystal Field reservoir. A post-mortem study is scheduled to monitor the effect of the horizontal well on Crystal Field production.

Harrison, W.B. III; Wood, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.; Tester, C.; Taylor, E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reflection seismic profiling in Wabash Valley fault system in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1988 common-depth-point (CDP) reflection seismic profiling was initiated by ARPEX in southwestern Indiana in the Wabash Valley fault system. A 2.2-im (1.4-mi) east-west profile was shot across the Mt. Vernon graben in Posey County. Minihole shooting in 21-m (68.9-ft) patterns using 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) of seismic explosives distributed in five 3-m (10-ft) holes provided the energy source. Most shotholes were made with a reversible air-driven penetrating tool that was effective in dense clays. The 12-geophone array length was 43 m (141 ft), and the nominal far-trace offset was 2.1 km (7,000 ft). A 48-channel recording yielded 24-CDP coverage at 11-m (36-ft) intervals. Data were enhanced by gapped deconvolution, bandpass filtering, and CDP stack. The strongest and most continuous reflections at 0.75 and 1.6 sec are associated with the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) and Eau Claire Formation (Cambrian), respectively. Within the Mt. Vernon graben and east of the Spenser Consolidated oil field, the depth to Eau Claire Formation apparently increases by approximately 60 m (197 ft) over a horizontal distance of 1.4 km (0.9 mi). Minor faulting east of the Spencer Consolidated field appears to be synthetic to the Hovey lake fault, which bounds the eastern side of the Mt. Vernon graben. Tentative interpretations of faulting and weak reflections from depths greater than 4.5 km (15,000 ft) may be clarified by additional data processing and by additional seismic profiling planned by ARPEX.

Rene, R.M.; Hester, N.C.; Stanonis, F.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal springs of the appalachians  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal springs in nine areas in the Appalachians from Georgia to New York were studied in 1975 and 1976 using satellite imagery, local well and spring data, and results of current and early studies by other investigators. All the springs investigated discharge from folded and faulted sandstone or carbonate rocks in valley areas. Where geologic structure is relatively uncomplicated, ground water discharging from thermal springs probably has circulated to great depths roughly parallel to the strike of the bedding and has moved upward rapidly where a fault or faults cross the bedding. Hydrologic and chemical data suggest that most of the water discharging from warm springs in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone is derived from recharge entering and circulating through that formation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates very little is primarily water from deep circulation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates widely is warm water mixed with variable proportions of shallow-circulating cool water. Observed temperatures of the warm springs range from 18/sup 0/ to 41/sup 0/C; the highest chemical thermometer temperature is 84/sup 0/C. Agreement among observed, chalcedony, and cation temperatures of the warmest springs suggests reservoir temperatures of 30/sup 0/ to 50/sup 0/C. Dissolved helium, arsenic, potassium, and delta/sup 18/O are considered as geothermal indicators. Tritium analyses are used to calculate fractions of old and modern components of mixed waters. Computer calculations of carbonate saturation indices show (1) considerable undersaturation in silica-rock warm spring waters and (2) carbonate equilibrium in the limestone and dolomite thermal waters. Better values of saturation indices are obtained when analyzed carbon dioxide rather than field pH is used in the computer input data. A method is described for adjusting delta/sup 13/C to correct for carbon dioxide outgassing from water samples.

Hobba, W.A. Jr.; Fisher, D.W.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Chemerys, J.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Results of deep exploratory drilling between long and Newark Valleys, White Pine County, Nevada - implications for oil migration in the nearby Yankee gold mine paleohydrothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In mid-1992, a consortium headed by Pioneer Oil and Gas (Midvale, Utah) drilled a deep (6700 ft) exploratory well in the southern Ruby Mountains-Buck Mountain are near the Alligator Ridge mining district in White Pine County, Nevada. The test well is located 1.5 mi southwest of USMX, Inc.'s, Yankee gold mine, an open-pit operation centered on a Carlin-type, sediment-hosted gold orebody noteworthy for containing abundant, fracture-controlled live oil. The Pioneer well as dry, but intersected much of the same stratigraphic section hosting gold at Yankee, thereby providing valuable clues to mechanisms of oil migration at this unusual, oil-bearing precious-metal deposit. Most of the gold at Yankee is hosted by the Devonian Pilot Shale, with a basal argillaceous limestone containing the bulk of the deposit's live oil. The equivalent section in the Pioneer wildcat well is a silty calcareous dolomite. Whereas the basal Pilot limestone at Yankee is rich in thick, locally gold- and arsenic-anomalous calcite veins and modules hosting abundant oil-bearing fluid inclusion, the basal Pilot dolomite in the Pioneer well contains only a few thin calcite-pyrite veinlets devoid of fluid inclusions. Moreover, the Yankee calcite veins have the same light-stable-isotope signatures as hydrothermal carbonate veins near or elsewhere in the Alligator Ridge district. These relationships imply that oil at Yankee migrated in the same hydrothermal system responsible for gold mineralization. Such systems elsewhere in the eastern Basin and Range, given favorable source rocks, traps, seals, and migratory pathways, might well have formed not only gold deposits, but also rich, spatially coincident oil reservoirs.

Pinnell, M.L. (Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (United States)); Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Cox, J.W. (USMX, Reno, NV (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Schultz, C.W. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States)); Parekh, B.K. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)); Misra, M. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States)); Bonner, W.P. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Annual report, June 1991--May 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Schultz, C.W. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Parekh, B.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States); Misra, M. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States); Bonner, W.P. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL  

SciTech Connect

Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds, and possibly decreasing dependence on foreign oil and lower product prices for consumers. This ninth of ten semi-annual reports contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the March 2003 through September 2003 period was directed toward Silurian-Devonian geology, development of rules for the fuzzy system, and on-line software.

Robert Balch

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Completion Report for Well ER-12-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Stratigraphic controls on lateral variations in the structural style of northeastern Brooks range, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural style of the range-front region of the northeastern Brooks Range in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is strongly controlled by (1) the existence of detachment horizons in both pre-Mississippian rocks and the unconformably overlying Mississippian to Lower Cretaceous cover sequence, and (2) lithology and structural competency of the pre-Mississippian rocks. These variables strongly influence lateral changes in structural style. The Brooks Range of northwestern ANWR is dominated by a series of narrow linear anticlinoria, whereas in northeastern ANWR the Brooks Range is characterized by only two broad and strongly arcuate anticlinoria. In both areas, the anticlinoria are controlled by the geometry of a duplex bounded by a floor thrust in pre-Mississippian rocks and a roof thrust in the Kayak Shale, near the base of the cover sequence. In the west, where the pre-Mississippian partially consists of structurally competent carbonates, each anticlinorium marks a single horse in the duplex. However, in the east, pre-Mississippian rocks are relatively incompetent and each anticlinorium is cored by multiple horses. In the west, shortening above the roof thrust is by detachment folding, except where the shale detachment horizon is depositionally absent. In contrast, in eastern ANWR shortening above the roof thrust is by major thrust duplication of the entire cover sequence, perhaps due to lithology and thickness changes within the detachment horizon. A Devonian batholith marks the boundary between the eastern and western structural provinces. The thrust-controlled range front of eastern ANWR extends north of the batholith, suggesting that the batholith itself may be underlain by a thrust fault.

Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Preliminary investigation of two areas in New York State in terms of possible potential for hot dry rock geothermal energy. [Adirondack Mountains and Catskill Mountains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two areas in New York State were studied in terms of possible long range potential for geothermal energy: the Adirondack Mountains which are undergoing contemporary doming, and an anomalous circular feature centered on Panther Mountain in the Catskill Mountains. The Adirondack Mountains constitute an anomalously large, domical uplift on the Appalachian foreland. The domical configuration of the area undergoing uplift, combined with subsidence at the northeastern perimeter of the dome, argues for a geothermal rather than glacioisostatic origin. A contemporary hot spot near the crust-mantle boundary is proposed as the mechanism of doming, based on analogy with uplifts of similar dimensions elsewhere in the world, some of which have associated Tertiary volcanics. The lack of thermal springs in the area, or high heat flow in drill holes up to 370 m deep, indicates that the front of the inferred thermal pulse must be at some depth greater than 1 km. From isopach maps by Rickard (1969, 1973), it is clear that the present Adirondack dome did not come into existence until sometime after Late Devonian time. Strata younger than this are not present to provide further time stratigraphic refinement of this lower limit. However, the consequent radial drainage pattern in the Adirondacks suggests that the dome is a relatively young tectonic feature. Using arguments based on fixed hot spots in central Africa, and the movement of North American plate, Kevin Burke (Appendix I) suggests that the uplift may be less than 4 m.y. old.The other area of interest, the Panther Mountain circular feature in the Catskill Mountains, was studied using photogeology, gravity and magnetic profiling, gravity modeling, conventional field methods, and local shallow seismic refraction profiling.

Isachsen, Y.W.

1978-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

Detrital zircon provenance link of the Chinle Formation and the Auld Lang Syne Group in Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous workers have interpreted the Upper Triassic Auld Lang Syne Group of northwest Nevada as (a) part of a suspect terrane displaced with respect to the craton, or (b) the deltaic terminus of the Chinle depositional system of the Colorado Plateau. U-Pb ages for detrital zircons (air-abraded and analyzed as individual crystals), from sandstones in basal Chinle Fm near Currie and the Osobb Fm (basal Auld Lang Syne Gp) in Dixie Valley, set constraints on the provenance of the two units as follows: (a) Chinle grains (n = 40): 225--235 (n = 2), 505--525 (n = 19), 1,410--1,440 (n = 9), 1,700--1,740 (n = 4); (b) Osobb grains (n = 40): [approximately]235 (n = 1), [approximately]265 (n = 1), 355--415 (n = 3), 510--530 (n = 5), 1,010--1,080 (n = 11), [approximately]1,160 (n = 1), 1,430--1,450 (n = 7), 1,705--1,730 (n = 3). Proterozoic grains were likely shed from basement rocks in the SW US, whereas Triassic grains in both samples and Silurian-Devonian and Permian grains in the Osobb sample may have come from arc terranes to the south (Chinle) or west (Osobb). The Chinle sand is quartzose with only rare chert-quartzite grains, whereas the Osobb sand is subarkosic with chert-argillite and feldspar grains that presumably reflect the admixture of Grenville-age detritus (1,010--1,160 Ma) of uncertain provenance. The most likely source for Cambrian grains (505--530 Ma) is the rift-related igneous province stretching from southern Colorado to SW Oklahoma (Wichita Mtns). Regardless of origin, the unexpected occurrence of Cambrian grains in both Nevada samples supports the suggestion of Lupe and Silberling (1985) that the Auld Lang Syne Gp was deposited as a linked facies equivalent of the Chinle Fm.

Gehrels, G.E.; Dickinson, W.R. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept of Geosciences); Riggs, N. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept of Geology)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

ER-12-1 completion report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL  

SciTech Connect

Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The pool of experts is much reduced today. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds, and possibly decreasing dependence on foreign oil and lower product prices for consumers. This fourth of five annual reports contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the April 2002 through March 2003 period was directed toward Silurian-Devonian geology, development of rules for the fuzzy system, and on-line software.

Robert Balch

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

High energy gas fracture experiments in liquid-filled boreholes: potential geothermal application  

SciTech Connect

High Energy Gas Fracturing is a tailored pulse fracturing technique which uses propellants to obtain controlled fracture initiation and extension. Borehole pressurization rates can be tailored, by suitable choice of propellants, to produce four or eight fractures radiating from the wellbore. High Energy Gas Fracture (HEGF) research is conducted at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) in a tunnel complex where experiments can be done under realistic in situ stress conditions (1400 psi (9.7 MPa) overburden stress). Pressure measurements are made in the test borehole during all fracturing experiments. Experiments are mined back to provide direct observation of fracturing obtained. The initial objective of HEGF research was to develop multiple fracturing technology for application in gas well stimulation. HEGF research at NTS and in Devonian shale demonstration tests has resulted in a completed technology for multiple fracturing in uncased, liquid-free wellbores. Current resarch is directed toward extending the technique to liquid-filled boreholes for application in geothermal in addition to gas and oil wells. For liquid-free boreholes, multiple fracturing is specified in terms of pressure risetime required for a given borehole diameter. Propellants are mixed to achieve the desired risetime using a semiempirical mixing equation. The same techniques were successfully applied to fracturing in liquid-filled wellbores. However, the addition of liquid in the borehole results in a significantly more complicated fracturing behavior. Hydrodynamic effects are significant. Multiple fractures are initiated but only some propagated. Multiple- and hydraulic-type fracturing and wellbore crushing have been observed in the same experiment. The potential of using HEGB for geothermal well stimulation has been demonstrated through the present experiments. 18 refs., 40 figs., 4 tabs.

Cuderman, J.F.; Chu, T.Y.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work focused on the occurrences of geopressures in Appalachia and selected California basins. In the former region, where geopressures have been observed, the pressure gradients for the most part were only slightly above normal as in the case of the Oriskany formation of Devonian age; this unit was also characterized by extremely high salinity. The one notable exception was in the Rome trough of West Virginia where Cambrian beds at depths below 10,000 feet display very high geopressures, approaching the lithostatic gradient, and the waters are only moderately saline. Though the geothermal gradient throughout Appalachian is relatively low, even in the Rome trough, the pressure, temperature and salinity values in this area indicate that the methane content of the Cambrian formation waters is in the range of 30 to 35 SCF/barrel. The two California areas researched included the contiguous Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. In the first, geopressures have been principally encountered in the Forbes formation of Cretaceous age, often at very shallow depths. Further waters are invariably characterized by very low salinity, far below the salinity of normal sea water, while the geothermal gradient in apparently higher in geopressured than in normally pressured zones. In the San Joaquin Valley, geopressures are particularly noteworthy in at least two formations of Miocene age at depths generally greater than those of the Forbes. The formation waters are likewise low in salinity; however, the geothemal gradient, especially in the geopressured zones on the west side of the valley, can be extremely high, up to twice as much as the normal temperature gradient. In view of these conditions, it is estimated that in the western San Joaquin Valley the methane content of geopressured formation waters will range from 30 to 40 SCF/barrel while in the Sacramento Valley, the methane content is estimated to be 20 to 25 SCF/barrel.

Strongin, O.

1981-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane and other higher order hydrocarbons, through C4, with interest in further developing reactions important to methane- and ethane-related chemistry. With the increased demand for energy and the declining conventional hydrocarbons worldwide, energy companies, both majors and independents, are turning to unconventional resources to produce the hydrocarbons required to meet market demand. From coalbed methane to low permeability (tight) gas reservoirs and gas shales, energy companies are making substantial progress in developing the technologies required to bring these unconventional reserves to the market. A common misconception is that there are not enough domestic oil and gas reserves to fuel our economy. The United States imports most of the oil used for transportation fuel and several TCF of natural gas annually. However, there is a very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of gas in place in just the gas shale formations that have been identified in the energy arena (Navigant Study 2008). There are still major gas shale plays and basins that have not been explored and are waiting to be evaluated and developed. The natural gas in shales and other unconventional reservoirs can be used to generate electricity, or it can be turned into liquids and used by the transportation industry. It is also misconstrued that gas shales are relatively new in our industry and something of the future. The first commercially viable gas shale well was drilled in the early 1920s in Pennsylvania, before the famous oil well drilled by Colonel Drake. The objectives of this study are to (1) complete literature review to establish which geologic parameters affect completion techniques in five emerging gas shales: the Antrium, the Barnett, the Haynesville, the Marcellus, and the Woodford; (2) identify the different completion methods; (3) create an economic model for the completion techniques discussed; (4) develop a sensitivity analysis on various economic parameters to determine optimal completion strategy; and (5) create completion flowcharts. Based on the literature review I have done for several gas shale basins, I have identified seven pertinent geologic parameters that influence completion practices. These are depositional environment, total organic content (TOC), average gas content, shale mineralogy, shale thickness, and reservoir pressure. Next, I identified different completion and simulation trends in the industry for the different shale plays. The results from this study show that although there are some stark differences between depths (i.e. the Antrim Shale and the Haynesville Shale), shale plays are very similar in all other geologic properties. Interestingly, even with a large range for the different geological parameters, the completion methods did not drastically differ indicating that even if the properties do not fall within the range presented in this paper does not automatically rule them out for further evaluation in other plays. In addition to the evaluation of geologic properties, this study looked at drilling cost and the production profile for each play. Due to the volatility of the energy industry, economic sensitivity was completed on the price, capital, and operating cost to see what affect it would have on the play. From the analysis done, it is concluded that horizontal drilling in almost any economic environment is economic except for one scenario for the Woodford Shale. Therefore, gas shales plays should still be invested in even in lower price environments and companies should try to take advantage of the lower cost environments that occur during these times. With continual development of new drilling and completion techniques, these plays will become more competitive and can light the path for exploration of new shale plays worldwide.

Agrawal, Archna

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

G. Grammer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to evaluate the opportunity for Letterkenny Army Depot (LEAD or the Depot) to utilize biogenic methane, which may be available in shale formations under the Depot, to provide a supplemental source of natural gas that could allow the Depot to increase energy independence. Both the Director and Deputy of Public Works at the Depot are supportive in general of a methane production project, but wanted to better understand the challenges prior to embarking on such a project. This report will cover many of these issues. A similar project has been successfully developed by the U. S. Army at Ft. Knox, KY, which will be explained and referred to throughout this report as a backdrop to discussing the challenges and opportunities at LEAD, because the geologic formations and possibilities at both sites are similar. Prior to discussing the opportunity at LEAD, it is important to briefly discuss the successful methane recovery operation at Ft. Knox, because it is applicable to the projected approach for the LEAD methane system. The Ft. Knox project is an excellent example of how the U. S. Army can use an onsite renewable resource to provide a secure energy source that is not dependent on regional energy networks and foreign oil. At Ft. Knox, the U. S. Army contracted (through a utility co-op) with an energy production company to drill wells, establish a distribution infrastructure, and provide the equipment needed to prepare and compress the produced methane gas for use by base operations. The energy production company agreed to conduct the exploratory investigation at Ft. Knox with no cost to the government, as long as they could be granted a long-term contract if a reliable energy resource was established. The Depot is located, in part, over an Ordovician Age shale formation that may have the potential for producing biogenic methane, similar to the Devonian Age shale found beneath Ft. Knox. However, the Ordovician Age Shale beneath the Letterkenny Depot is not known to have any currently producing gas wells.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Thomas R. Wood

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now interpreted as a large negative anomaly associated with the entire field. The results of the State Smock horizontal well and the Bowers 4-25 well confirmed the lack of additional recoverable hydrocarbons in the Vernon Field. (4) The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach, Burke County, North Dakota area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the geological and geophysical data; the microbial values here were the highest we have observed. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling, however, a pipeline has not yet been completed that would allow the wells to be placed into production. We also present in this annual report the results of recent efforts to map carbonate facies tracts in the middle Devonian Dundee and Rogers City Limestones using gamma ray, bulk density, and photoelectric effect geophysical well log amplitudes. This work was undertaken to identify fairways for exploration in the Dundee and Rogers City where surface geochemical techniques could then be used to screen potential leads.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

Neeraj Gupta

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, and an immiscible CO{sub 2} flood pilot was conducted in the Jackson sandstone (Mississippian System Big Clifty Sandstone Member) at the Sugar Creek Field in Hopkins County, western Kentucky. Up to 12% incremental oil recovery was estimated based on these pilots. A CO{sub 2} huff â??nâ?? puff (HNP) pilot project was conducted in the Cypress Sandstone in the Loudon Field. This pilot was designed to measure and record data that could be used to calibrate a reservoir simulation model. A pilot project at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois, tested the potential storage of CO{sub 2} in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} storage and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot results from all four sites showed that CO{sub 2} could be injected into the subsurface without adversely affecting groundwater. Additionally, hydrocarbon production was enhanced, giving further evidence that CO{sub 2} storage in oil reservoirs and coal beds offers an economic advantage. Results from the MVA program at each site indicated that injected CO{sub 2} did not leave the injection zone. Topical reports were completed on the Middle and Late Devonian New Albany Shale and Basin CO{sub 2} emissions. The efficacy of the New Albany Shale as a storage sink could be substantial if low injectivity concerns can be alleviated. CO{sub 2} emissions in the Illinois Basin were projected to be dominated by coal-fired power plants.

Robert Finley

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z