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1

A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparative Study of the A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin DOE/NETL-2011/1478 Cover. Top left: The Barnett Shale exposed on the Llano uplift near San Saba, Texas. Top right: The Marcellus Shale exposed in the Valley and Ridge Province near Keyser, West Virginia. Photographs by Kathy R. Bruner, U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Bottom: Horizontal Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, Pennsylvania producing gas at 10 million cubic feet per day at about 3,000 pounds per square inch. Photograph by Tom Mroz, USDOE, NETL, February 2010. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors greatly thank Daniel J. Soeder (U.S. Department of Energy) who kindly reviewed the manuscript. His criticisms,

2

Modular CHP System for Utica College: Design Specification, March...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modular CHP System for Utica College: Design Specification, March 2007 Modular CHP System for Utica College: Design Specification, March 2007 This paper describes Utica College's...

3

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utica Drop Forge and Tool...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Name: None Location: Utica , New York NY.39-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NY.39-2 Site Operations: Interest expressed by Utica Drop Forge & Tool Corporation to Conduct Uranium...

4

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) Place Oshkosh, Wisconsin Product Utica Energy, founded by 5 investing farmers built an ethanol plant west of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. References Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) is a company located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utica_Energy_LLC_formerly_Algoma_Ethanol&oldid=352687" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

5

Utica, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utica, Kentucky: Energy Resources Utica, Kentucky: Energy Resources (Redirected from Utica, KY) Jump to: navigation, search GeoNames ID 4311915 Coordinates 37.60227°, -87.11305° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.60227,"lon":-87.11305,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

UTICA 4, NEW YORK COFIPOR~TION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DROf fORGE & TOOL DROf fORGE & TOOL UTICA 4, NEW YORK COFIPOR~TION PHONE 3- 2331 July 5, 1955 ?:r. E. J. Block Director of Production Division United Staton Atomic ::norgy Commission Yiashington, D. C. Dear Xr. 1310~1~: Xe had a visit last Thursday from Kr. R. C. Sale11 of the: Atomic Energy Commission who inspected our vacuum melting facilities. EIz suggested that we should get in touch with you and that you r+ht be interested in the use of our facilities for the i>roduction of uranium fuel elements. Xe have at the present time the largest coxnercial vacuum installation in the country and m have been producin; high tc~poraturc alloys for the aircraft industry for over txro 'years. ;Is have produced to date Over 400,000 pounds of mtal. Our present rate of production is of the order

7

MARCELLUS SHALE APRIL 2011 EDITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wells (213111); Support Activities for Oil & Gas Operations (213112); Oil & Gas Pipeline & Related Structures Construction (237120); and Pipeline Transportation of Natural Gas (486210). Marcellus Shale (541620); Remediation Services (562910); Commercial & Industrial Machinery & Equipment Repair

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

8

Spores from Devonian Deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN a well-illustrated paper on "Spores from Devonian Deposits, Mimerdalen, Spitsbergen" (Norsk. Polarinstitutt Skrifter, No. 132, 1964), Jorunn Os Vigran deals with the dispersed ...

1965-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

Focus on the Marcellus Shale By Lisa Sumi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas: Focus on the Marcellus Shale By Lisa Sumi FOR THE OIL & GAS ACCOUNTABILITY PROJECT on potential oil and gas development in the Marcellus Shale formation in northeastern Pennsylvania and gas development. We hope that this report will help address many questions about the Marcellus Shale

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

10

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

11

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utica Street Warehouse - NY 0-23  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Street Warehouse - NY 0-23 Street Warehouse - NY 0-23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UTICA STREET WAREHOUSE (NY.0-23) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 240 West Utica Street , Buffalo , New York NY.0-23-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-23-1 Site Operations: Stored and rebarrelled uranium process residues from operations at Linde. NY.0-23-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Original building demolished. Current land use - Parking facility. Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote. NY.0-23-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes NY.0-23-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Natural Uranium Process Residues NY.0-23-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated NY.0-23-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP NY.0-23-1

12

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

13

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

14

Methane adsorption on Devonian shales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important regional source of natural gas. In addition to the free gas which is located in the pore space and the natural fractures of the shales, the natural gas is also stored iu the shale matrix as an adsorbed state; therefore, these shales... are considered an uuconvcsstional gas us(. rvo(r. 8('hfle it is estimated tlrat, the adsorbed phas( may account, I'or morc thau half of the total gas content of th(. Devonian shales, very I'ew studi( s hav( been done on this topic, arrcl few measured data...

Li, Fan-Chang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Drilling Operators' Choice of Wastewater Disposal Method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale region moves forward, the issue of wastewater disposal has risen to the forefront. In 2010, the Pennsylvania (more)

Edmundson, Caitlyn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Municipal officials decisions to lease watershed lands for Marcellus shale gas exploration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides insight into municipalities decisions to lease watershed lands for Marcellus shale gas exploration in Pennsylvania. The focus was on...

Charles Abdalla; Renata Rimsaite

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information 1. GHG Emissions Estimation for Production of Marcellus Shale Gas 1.1 Preparation of Well Pad The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions resulting from the preparation of well pad consist of two parts: the carbon

Jaramillo, Paulina

18

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Freshwater Consumption of Marcellus Shale Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Freshwater Consumption of Marcellus Shale Gas ... We present results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of Marcellus shale gas used for power generation. ... The analysis employs the most extensive data set of any LCA of shale gas to date, encompassing data from actual gas production and power generation operations. ...

Ian J. Laurenzi; Gilbert R. Jersey

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Framing of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling Issues in Pennsylvania Newspapers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thousands of articles on Marcellus Shale gas drilling and development were written in Pennsylvania newspapers from 2008-2012 (NewsBank, 2013). These stories can have an influence (more)

Brown, Elise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Extracting the economic benefits of natural resources in the Marcellus Shale Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My thesis seeks to explore the challenge of value capture from natural resources using the case of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia and Pennsylvania as an exemplar. I examine the mechanisms in place to capture the ...

Hess, Sara Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Middle Huron) in Ohio is estimated to range from 6.2 to 22.5 Tcf, depending on the stimulation method and pattern size selected. This estimate of recovery is based on the integration of the most recent data and research on the Devonian Age gas-bearing shales of Ohio. This includes: (1) a compilation of the latest geologic and reservoir data for the gas in-place; (2) analysis of the key productive mechanisms; and, (3) examination of alternative stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering this gas. Beyond a comprehensive assembly of the data and calculation of the technically recoverable gas, the key findings of this report are as follows: a substantial volume of gas is technically recoverable, although advanced (larger scale) stimulation technology will be required to reach economically attractive gas production rates in much of the state; well spacing in certain of the areas can be reduced by half from the traditional 150 to 160 acres per well without severely impairing per-well gas recovery; and, due to the relatively high degree of permeability anisotropy in the Devonian shales, a rectangular, generally 3 by 1 well pattern leads to optimum recovery. Finally, although a consistent geological interpretation and model have been constructed for the Lower and Middle Huron intervals of the Ohio Devonian shale, this interpretation is founded on limited data currently available, along with numerous technical assumptions that need further verification. 11 references, 21 figures, 32 tables.

Kuushraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.; Sawyer, W.K.; Esposito, P.R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Technically recoverable Devonian shale gas in Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the natural gas potential of the Devonian Age shales of Kentucky. For this, the study: (1) compiles the latest geologic and reservoir data to establish the gas in-place; (2) analyzes and models the dominant gas production mechanisms; and (3) examines alternative well stimulation and production strategies for most efficiently recovering the in-place gas. The major findings of the study include the following: (1) The technically recoverable gas from Devonian shale (Lower and Upper Huron, Rhinestreet, and Cleveland intervals) in Kentucky is estimated to range from 9 to 23 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). (2) The gas in-place for the Devonian shales in eastern Kentucky is 82 Tcf. About one half of this amount is found in the Big Sandy gas field and its immediate extensions. The remainder is located in the less naturally fractured, but organically rich area to the west of the Big Sandy. (3) The highly fractured shales in the Big Sandy area in southeast Kentucky and the more shallow shales of eastern Kentucky respond well to small-scale stimulation. New, larger-scale stimulation technology will be required for the less fractured, anisotropic Devonian shales in the rest of the state. 44 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Sedwick, K.B.; Thompson, K.B.; Wicks, D.E.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores  

SciTech Connect

Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

none,

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Stratigraphic distribution of paleozoic nonmarine ostracoda devonian  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Ostracoda of Leperditicopida-type have been reported to occur in nonmarine, probably fluvial, deposits in the Upper Devonian Catskill redbed magnafacies of New York. Ostracodes generally considered to be nonmarine were recorded in the Devonian of southern Chinathat is, Carbonita lentiforma Shi, 1964; and of the Russian Platformthat is, Carbonita lipetzkensis Zannina, 1960. Nonmarine Ostracoda were recorded from the Bramwell member of the Bluestone Formation in West Virginia and Virginia by Sohn. The upper part of the Humboldt Formation in northeastern Nevada is represented by Pactolocypris laevis; the middle Humboldt by Cypricercus toanoensis, C. hunterensis, Pactolocypris suborbicularis attenuatus, Eucypris ornatoides elongata, E. microreticulata, and Heterocypris blairensis; the lower Humboldt by Pactolocypris suborbicularis and Cypricercus palisadensis. Both the Esmeralda Formation of west-central Nevada and the Humboldt are dated as Miocene, but only three ostracode species occur in both formations based on present knowledge. About 35 ostracode species have been recorded from the Esmeralda Formation and its equivalents in Esmeralda, Mineral, and Nye Counties, western Nevada.

Devonian Catskill Magnafacies

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Natural Gas Plays in the Marcellus Shale: Challenges and Potential Opportunities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic surveys have been used to produce 3-D images of the subsurface (Figure 2) including images of very productive natural shale gas reservoirs. ... Recently, about 12 ML (3 million gal) of treated AMD was obtained from the Blue Valley Fish Culture Station and used in a Marcellus completion hydrofracture process (29). ...

David M. Kargbo; Ron G. Wilhelm; David J. Campbell

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364 ): 271...13 Boyer EW ( 2012 ) The Impact of Marcellus Gas Drilling on Rural Drinking Water Supplies...the Nicholas School of the Environment and Center on Global Change...derived from depositional environments that ranged from proposed...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Civil society research and Marcellus Shale natural gas development: results of a survey of volunteer water monitoring organizations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of a survey of civil society organizations that are monitoring surface water for impacts of Marcellus Shale development in Pennsylvania and New York. We ... of surface water quali...

Kirk Jalbert; Abby J. Kinchy

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A New York or Pennsylvania state of mind: social representations in newspaper coverage of gas development in the Marcellus Shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

What first comes to mind when you think of natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale region? The information and ideas we hold about shale gas development can strongly influence our discussion of ... environ...

Darrick T. Evensen; Christopher E. Clarke

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pennsylvania, Texas, and North Dakota. In addition to predrilling...Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Middle Devonian of eastern North America . Palaeogeogr Palaeoclimatol...Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Unconventional natural gas resources in Pennsylvania: The backstory of the modern Marcellus Shale play  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...it supplied several users in the area with enough gas for lighting purposes. In 1850, Hart's well was deepened to 50 ft...glaciations driving eustasy in the Early-Middle Devonian greenhouse world: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology...

Kristin M. Carter; John A. Harper; Katherine W. Schmid; Jaime Kostelnik

31

Biomarker and Paleontological Investigations of the Late Devonian Extinctions, Woodford Shale, Southern Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Late Devonian extinctions at the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) boundary and the Devonian-Carboniferous (D-C) boundary were investigated in the Woodford Shale of southcentral Oklahoma with organic geochemical, bulk geochemical, petrographic...

Nowaczewski, Vincent Stephen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Five-year summary and evaluation of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in 2004-2009.  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews the performance of the groundwater (and wetlands) restoration program implemented by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the first five years (2004-2009) of this initiative. The report summarizes treatment system operational data and regulatory compliance monitoring results for the site during this period, together with the results of the targeted groundwater sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) conducted in early 2010 (following completion of the fifth year of systems operation), to assess the initial five years of progress of the Utica remediation effort. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing 4 extraction wells (GWEX1-GWEX4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies (Table 1.1). The principal components of the system are shown in Figure 1.3 and are briefly described in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division) [Environmental Science Division

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

36

Comment on Modeling and prediction of natural gas fracking pad landscapes in the Marcellus Shale region, USA by Qingming Meng  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In modeling and prediction of natural gas fracking pad landscapes in the Marcellus Shale region, USA, the author asserts that landscape and environmental characteristics are the driving factors behind the siting of natural gas pads in the southwestern area of the Marcellus Shale, Pennsylvania, USA. In the article, the author largely dismisses the importance of geology for site prediction. Although the study is useful for understanding landscape characteristics in a small area of the Marcellus Shale, his premise that the key variables for natural gas fracking can be landscape and environmental variables rather than geological variables is flawed and thus could lead to erroneous assumptions when creating land use plans. A more reasonable assumption is that the surface siting of natural gas wells is secondary to geologic considerations, as the current topography bears little influence on the geology.

Wendy A. Klein; Alex K. Manda

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

THE FAUNA OF THE MIDDLE DEVONIAN BEAUVAIS SANDSTONE OF MISSOURI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Peach Tree Ridge almost directly north of the Boarman School; a second...equivalents in the Devonian of the North American interior, although...ZYGADENUS GRAMINEUS, "DEATH CAMAS" MORE than a quarter of a century...Zygadenus gramineus or "death camas," one of the most noxious...

Carey Croneis; Arnold D. Hoffman

1931-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Material properties of Devonian shale for stimulation-technology development  

SciTech Connect

Material properties are used in the design of hydraulic fracturing treatments to establish a relation between the volume of fluid used in a job and the expected extent of the fracture. In Devonian shales this is important in determining the volume of fluid necessary to intersect the natural fracture system. In an attempt to provide a consistent and self-contained data base on the physical properties of Devonian shale, Science Applications has reviewed and collected previously generated data from numerous sources and has performed additional experiments so as to define the applicability of some of the quasi-static data to the evaluation of dynamic treatments. The review, experiments and evaluation which have been conducted on Devonian shale physical properties have resulted in the following principle conclusions: the elastic properties and yield surfaces defined by triaxial tests on Devonian shale may be significantly dependent upon shale type and organic richness, but a more systematic approach to core selection and testing will be required to establish correlations. Sufficient material property data for modeling and stimulation design exist only on a very site-specific basis, and more testing is required for identifying generic and regional trends. Dynamic experiments employing modified split-Hopkinson-bar techniques were so controlled by anisotropic sample failure that quantitative data on dynamic yield strength could not be obtained. There is a strong need for the development of experimental techniques and the generation of concordant data on the dynamic yield characteristics of Devonian shale at strain rates representative of explosive and tailored-pulse-loading. 9 figures, 17 tables.

Blanton, T.L.; Young, C.; Patti, N.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Capillary tension and imbibition sequester frack fluid in Marcellus gas shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gone. Introducing 10 4 m 3 of fracking fluid per horizontal well...sequester the remaining charge of fracking fluid in a matrix porosity of...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad...rocks Devonian drilling muds fracking fluids gas shale ground water...

Terry Engelder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Impact of Sorption Isotherms on the Simulation of CO2-Enhanced Gas Recovery and Storage Process in Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reservoirs, natural gas occurs as free gas in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay Continuous, low-permeability, fractured, organic-rich gas shale units are widespread and are possible geologic storage targets .The Marcellus could act as a storage reservoir for captured CO2. In this scenario

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;CONTENTS Shale we look for gas?............................................................................. 1 The Marcellus shale--An old "new" gas reservoir in Pennsylvania ............ 2 Meet the staff, the contour interval should be 6 inches. #12;STATE GEOLOGIST'S EDITORIAL Shale We Look For Gas? Recently, you

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

42

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...two previously normal wells that displayed increased...tectonic (e.g., geothermal springs) or microbial...subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale...Domestic and Municipal Water Wells for Dissolved Gas Analysis...nitrate flux to the Gulf of Mexico. Ground Water 42...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Evaluation of Devonian shale potential in Eastern Kentucky/Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the potential of the Devonian shale as a source of natural gas, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP). The EGSP is designed not only to identify the resource, but also to test improved methods of inducing permeability to facilitate gas drainage, collection, and production. The ultimate goal of this project is to increase the production of gas from the eastern shales through advanced exploration and exploitation techniques. The purpose of this report is to inform the general public and interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Appalachian basin in eastern Kentucky and Tennessee. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized, and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evaluation of Devonian shale potential in New York  

SciTech Connect

This report is a brief overview of preliminary geologic interpretations developed from the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) and related data concerning the deposition of the black shale facies and generation of natural gas in the Devonian shale sequence. The intent is to suggest areas of potential shale gas accumulation that would be of interest to the producer as either a primary target or a dual completion possibility. In New York, historical stratigraphic as well as current EGSP work has established the Devonian clastic facies as the type section for eastern North America. The initial documented shale-gas well was drilled in 1821 near Fredonia, New York. Since then, numerous shale-gas wells and/or deeper wells with gas shows in the shale section have been reported in western and central New York. The EGSP has focused on documenting and more closely defining organic-rich, black shale facies to project potential favorable trends. The purpose of this report is to inform the general public and interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Appalachian basin in New York. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized, and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined. Because the data presented in this report are generalized and not suitable for evaluation of specific sites for exploration, the reader should consult the various reports cited for more detail and discussion of the data, concepts, and interpretations presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Subsurface Facies Analysis of the Devonian Berea Sandstone in Southeastern Ohio.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??James Evans, AdvisorThe Devonian Berea Sandstone is an internally complex, heterogeneous unit that appears prominently both in outcrop and subsurface in Ohio. While the unit (more)

Garnes, William Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Reservoir Characterization and Enhanced Oil Recovery Potential in Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone Reservoirs, Michigan Basin, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Middle Devonian Rogers City and subjacent Dundee Limestone formations have combined oil production in excess of 375 MMBO. In general, hydrocarbon production occurs in (more)

Abduslam, Abrahim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Correlation of the subsurface Lower and Middle Devonian of the Lake Erie region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Borehole geophysical-log con-elation network for the Devonian shales in eastern Ohio: U.S. Department of Energy METC/EGSP Series 304-309. Mesolella, K. J., 1978, Paleogeography of some Silurian and Devonian reef trends, central Appalachian...

48

Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping  

SciTech Connect

Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Reactive gases evolved during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Computer modeling of oil shale pyrolysis is an important part of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Oil Shale Program. Models containing detailed chemistry have been derived from an investigation of Colorado oil shale. We are currently attempting to use models to treat more completely reactions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in the retort to better understand emissions. Batch retorting work on Devonian oil shale is proving particularly useful for this study of nitrogen/sulfur chemistry. Improved analytical methods have been developed to quantitatively determine reactive volatiles at the parts-per-million level. For example, the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS) is used in the chemical ionization (CI) mode to provide real-time analytical data on ammonia evolution as the shale is pyrolyzed. A heated transfer line and inlet ensure rapid and complete introduction of ammonia to the instrument by preventing water condensation. Ammonia and water release data suitable for calculating kinetic parameters have been obtained from a New Albany Shale sample. An MS/MS technique with the TQMS in the electron ionization (EI) mode allows hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and certain trace organic sulfur compounds to be monitored during oil shale pyrolysis. Sensitivity and selectivity for these compounds have been increased by applying artificial intelligence techniques to tuning of the spectrometer. Gas evolution profiles (100 to 900/sup 0/C) are reported for hydrogen sulfide, water, ammonia, and trace sulfur species formed during pyrolysis of Devonian oil shale. Implications for retorting chemistry are discussed. 18 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Coburn, T.T.; Crawford, R.W.; Gregg, H.R.; Oh, M.S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evaluation of Devonian shale potential in the Michigan basin  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to inform interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Michigan basin. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized, and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined. Because the data presented in this report are generalized and not suitable for evaluation of specific sites for exploration, the reader should consult the various reports cited for more detail and discussion of the data, concepts, and interpretations presented. However, a conservative estimate of in place resource for the Michigan basin is 76 TCF (Zielinski and McTver 1980. How much of this resource can be recovered using present technology has not been estimated. 27 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Depositional Model of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia Based on Facies Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A lithologic analysis of well exposed Marcellus outcrops has identified six different facies in West Virginia and neighboring states: (1) light gray calcareous shale, (2) fossiliferous limestone, (3) black calcareous shale, (4) black noncalcareous shale, (5) dark gray noncalcareous shale, and (6) K-bentonite. Close interbedding of these rock types attests to a complex, ever-changing environment on the eastern foreland ramp of the Appalachian Basin. The environmental setting was clearly not a deep trough, permanently anoxic, salinity stratified, sediment starved, and populated exclusively by phytoplanktonthe traditional depositional model. To the contrary, our sedimentary data suggest a rather shallow water depth, intermittent anoxia, normal-marine salinity, a fluctuating input of siliciclastic mud, and faunal communities of low and moderate diversity. Interbedding of the shale and limestone lithofacies as well as the vertical stacking of facies associations is explained most simply by fluctuations in water depth coupled with fluctuations in sediment supply. The sea floor was, at times, immediately below wave base (Facies 1 and 2), around the depth of the thermocline (Facies 2 and 3), or below the thermocline (Facies 4 and 5), relative sea level changing through two sequences of lowstand, transgression, and highstand. Simultaneously the supply of siliciclastic mud was greater at times of lowstand (increased erosion) and highstand (prograding shoreline), and the supply smaller during transgression (sediment stored in distant coastal plain).

Bruner, Kathy

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

Palaeomagnetic and rock magnetic study of Lower Devonian sediments from Podolia, SW Ukraine: remagnetization problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......study of Lower Devonian sediments from Podolia, SW Ukraine: remagnetization problems M. Jelenska 1 M. Kadzialko-Hofmokl...Institute of Geophysics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine 3 Faculty of Geology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw......

M. Jele?ska; M. K?dzia?ko-Hofmokl; V. Bakhmutov; I. Poliachenko; P. Zi?kowski

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A study of the effects of stimulation on Devonian Shale gas well performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF STIMULATION ON DEVONIAN SHALE GAS WELL PERFORMANCE A Thesis by MICHAEL DEAN ZUBER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December l985 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineerinq A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF STIMULATION ON DEVONIAN SHALE GAS WELL PERFORMANCE A Thesis by MICHAEL DEAN ZUBER Approved as to style and content by: John Lee (Chair of Committee) Stephen A...

Zuber, Michael Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

55

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

56

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have, that using natural gas for electricity generation is better than coal for the long-term healthSpeaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

57

Devonian Novaculites as source of oil in Marathon-Ouachita thrust system  

SciTech Connect

The Arkansas Novaculite of southern Oklahoma and the Caballos Novaculite of west Texas (both Devonian) form fractured reservoirs in the Marathon-Ouachita thrust system. These formations were examined to ascertain their petroleum potential. Findings include the following. (1) The thermal maturity of the thrust system conforms to the maturity of the sequence that it has overthrust, suggesting that this allochthonous facies is not anomalously mature. (2) Shale units within the novaculites contain oil-prone organic matter in sufficient concentrations to constitute source rocks. (3) The composition of oils from Isom Springs field in southern Oklahoma and from McKay Creek field in west Texas is virtually identical and generally resembles Devonian oils in Oklahoma and west Texas. The authors concluded that the Devonian novaculites of the Marathon-Ouachita thrust system are self sourcing and do not require a fortuitous juxtaposition of source rocks of a different age to produce a commercial deposit.

Zemmels, I.; Grizzle, P.L.; Walters, C.C.; Haney, F.R.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Plants of Devonian-Mississippian black shales, eastern interior, USA  

SciTech Connect

Macrofossils of the New Albany shale and equivalents of Late Devonian of Early Mississippian age in the east-central United States are known from three main floras or assemblages. One flora is almost entirely composed of Callixylon logs, slabs, and slivers, presumed to be driftwood permineralized after burial. Callixylon fossils are most abundant in the upper part of the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany shale (Famennian) and equivalent strata in western New York, Ohio, and contiguous areas, perhaps because these Propymnosperms reached the zenith of their development at that time. A second, and later, flora consists principally of permineralized wood pieces (phosphatized free-wood or concretions) of stems, rachises, petioles, and possibly even mid-veins of pinnules of diverse members of the Lycopsida, Sphenopsida, Cladoxylales, Coenopteridales, Progymnospermae, and Pteridospermae. The principal concentration of these stem and petiolar segments is in the Falling Run Member of Sanderson Formation of the New Albany shale on the west side of the Cincinnati arch in southern Indiana and Kentucky, and in central Kentucky in the low saddle between the Cincinnati arch proper and its southward extension as the Nashville dome. The third type of macrofossil plant assemblage is consituted of Foerstia. These plants are considered to be algal in origin and indicate no clear relationship either to distance from shore or depth of water. The main concentration is in middle and lower New Albany shale and equivalents. It is also found sparingly in West Virginia and Michigan and much farther west (one specimen from the Exshaw shale of Montana).

Cross, A.T.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of Devonian shale reservoir using multi-well pressure transient testing data  

SciTech Connect

A multi-well test program designed to study the gas production mechanisms of the eastern Devonian shale reservoirs was completed. Two offset wells were drilled as observation wells in Meigs County, OH. The results indicated a complete anisotropic, layered reservoir system which implies directional gas flow and orientation of natural fractures. This study has provided an insight into the production behavior of reservoirs. It will aid future development of shale gas by optimizing well spacing and understanding of the gas release mechanisms of the Devonian shalings. 33 refs.

Lee, B.O.; Alam, J.; Sawyer, W.K.; Horan, K.; Frohne, K.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Eduardo S. Brondizio,¹ Anthony Cak,² Marcellus M. Caldas,³ Carlos Mena,⁴  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 a 143 7 a 143 Pequenos Produtores e o Desmatamento na Amazônia Eduardo S. Brondizio,¹ Anthony Cak,² Marcellus M. Caldas,³ Carlos Mena,⁴ , ⁵ Richard Bilsborrow,⁶ Celia Futemma,⁷ Thomas Ludewigs,⁸ Emilio F. Moran,¹ e Mateus Batistella⁹ Este capítulo discute a relação entre o uso da terra por pequenos agricultores e o desmatamento, com uma atenção especial aos últimos 30 anos da colonização amazônica no Brasil e Equador. Nossa análise chama a atenção para aspectos comuns que unem diferentes grupos sociais, como os pequenos produtores (ex. identidade social, acesso à terra e recursos, tecnologia, mercado e crédito), assim como para a variabilidade entre pequenos produtores em termos de tempo de permanência na

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling and prediction of natural gas fracking pad landscapes in the Marcellus Shale region, USA. A rejoinder to Klein and Manda's commentary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a comment on my early article (Meng, 2014) published in this journal, Klein and Manda (2015) critiqued some of my discussion points. Most significantly, they posited that it is [therefore] erroneous to state that [in the Marcellus Shale region] land use characteristics are driving factors in well site/pad determination because my speculation that in the Marcellus Shale region the key variables for natural gas fracking can be landscape and environmental variables rather than geological variables is flawed. In this rejoinder, I demonstrate that not only are their criticisms based on limited geological understanding of fracking, but they are also on an incorrect analysis. Therefore, my original results and conclusions on the driving force of landscape and environmental variables and on the implications to environment management and ecosystem administration and conservation remain stable and valid.

Qingmin Meng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

MID-LATE DEVONIAN CALCIFIED MARINE ALGAE AND CYANOBACTERIA, SOUTH CHINA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MID-LATE DEVONIAN CALCIFIED MARINE ALGAE AND CYANOBACTERIA, SOUTH CHINA QI FENG,1 YI-MING GONG,1 contain microfossils generally regarded as calcified algae and cyanobacteria. These are present in 61 out with differing degrees of confidence, and placed in algae, cyanobacteria or microproblematica. Algae: Halysis

Riding, Robert

63

2006 Nature Publishing Group A Devonian tetrapod-like fish and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2006 Nature Publishing Group A Devonian tetrapod-like fish and the evolution of the tetrapod body vertebrates (tetrapods) to lobe-finned fish (sarcopterygians) is well established, but the origin of major changes. Here we report the discovery of a well-preserved species of fossil sarcopterygian fish from

Bechtold, Jill

64

Terrestrial-marine teleconnections in the Devonian: links between the evolution of land plants, weathering processes, and marine anoxic events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Vir- ginia Center for Coal and Energy Research...weathering processes and global geochemical uxes during...of atmospheric CO2 and global greenhouse warming? Geology 21, 1059...Walliser, O. H. 1996 Global events in the Devonian...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Natural gas potential of the New Albany shale group (Devonian-Mississippian) in southeastern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Data from geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany shale group indicate that a 19-country area of southeastern Illinois is a favorable area to explore for gas in Devonian shale. Although gas shows in the shales have been encountered in several wells drilled in this area, no attempts were made to complete or evaluate a shale gas well until 1979. It is found that conventional rotary drilling with mud base drilling fluids likely causes extensive formation damage and may account for the paucity of gas shows and completion attempts in the Devonian shales; therefore, commercial production of shale gas in Illinois probably will require novel drilling completion techniques not commonly used by local operators. 16 refs.

Cluff, R.M.; Dickerson, D.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Eastern mineback: study of advanced stimulation/production in the Devonian shales  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Gas Shale Mineback Program has evolved from an assessment of the state-of-the-art problems of gas recovery from the eastern Devonian shales. After 10 years of Devonian shale research conducted under the direction of the Eastern Gas Shale Project (EGSP) Office at the U.S. DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), the remaining major issues for developing the shale resource have been defined, and this program has been formulated to address those specific recovery problems. Numerous field, laboratory, and theoretical stimulation studies have been conducted. However, the large number of reservoir pre-existing, unmeasureable conditions and the numerous post-stimulation effects that cannot be measured or observed have virtually stagnated further stimulation technology development through the normal indirect engineering research and development approach.

Shuck, L.Z.; Komar, C.A.; Zielinski, R.E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effects of stimulation/completion practices on Eastern Devonian Shale well productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Berg for sharing his geological knowledge of Shale reservoir morphology and his participation on my thesis committee. The Holditch organization and the Gas Research Institute for their financial support during the project. Mr. Lorin Pruett... part of the Appalachian basin, have produced over 2. 7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. ~ Currently, there are over 9, 600 producing Devonian shale wells in this part of the basin. ' The economical development of this resource often depends...

Nearing, Timothy Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian conodont zones in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shale of the Sappington Member of the Three Forks Formation at another locality in the Bridger Range. The taxonomic section includes a discussion of 34 species, which are referred to 11 genera. Two new species of Dinodus and Siphonodella are described. 2...," Hannibal, and Chouteau Formations). Related to the problem of the Kinderhookian is that of the Chattanooga Shale of Tennessee and adjacent states. HASS (51, 52) by comparison with the New York Upper Devonian conodont se- quence, firmly dated the Chattanooga...

Klapper, G.

1966-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

The use of Devonian oil shales in the production of portland cement  

SciTech Connect

The Lafarge Corporation operates a cement plant at Alpena, Michigan in which Antrim shale, a Devonian oil shale, is used as part of the raw material mix. Using this precedent the authors examine the conditions and extent to which spent shale might be utilized in cement production. They conclude that the potential is limited in size and location but could provide substantial benefit to an oil shale operation meeting these criteria.

Schultz, C.W.; Lamont, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States); Daniel, J. [Lafarge Corp., Alpena, MI (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Characterization of an Eastern Kentucky Devonian Shales well using a naturally fractured, layered reservoir description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Berea Sandstone to form a better understanding of the physical properties controlling well performance. Research conducted on the well discussed in this thesis, the COOP 1 well, concentrated on the Devonian Shales. Previous research has shown...-directions. The ultimate result has been the development of an 11-layer reservoir model for the COOP 1 well that accurately describes the short-term pre- and post-fracture production and pressure transient data. Once this was accomplished, confidence in the performance...

Jochen, John Edward

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Copyright 2013 by The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. DOI: 10.1306/13391711M1023589  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale and late Devonian New Albany Shale samples were argon- ion milled be a significant contributor to the overall porosity of shale intervals. METHODS Samples of the Devonian New Albany1023589 13 SEM Observations on Ion-milled Samples of Devonian Black Shales from Indiana and New York

Polly, David

73

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost is the second largest producing on-shore domestic natural gas field in the United States after the San Juan and opportunities faced by landowners navigating the legal and practical issues of leasing their land for natural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

74

Northeastern Geology & Environmental Sciences, v. 30, no. 4, 2008, p. 330-343. STABLE ISOTOPE SIGNATURE OF MIDDLE DEVONIAN SEAWATER FROM HAMILTON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIGNATURE OF MIDDLE DEVONIAN SEAWATER FROM HAMILTON GROUP BRACHIOPODS, CENTRAL NEW YORK STATE Bruce Selleck and Drew Koff Department of Geology, 13 Oak Drive, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY 13346; bselleck the Middle Devonian Hamilton Group of Central New York State. The sample set includes multiple specimens

Soja, Constance M.

75

Studies of the New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) and equivalent strata in Indiana  

SciTech Connect

A formation of black carbonaceous shale, later named the New Albany Shale, was first recognized in 1837 and reported in 1839 by David D. Owen. Since then, the New Albany has been the subject of numerous investigations by individuals affiliated with the Indiana Geological Survey and others. The present comprehensive investigation, involves petrology, mineralogy, stratigraphy, geomorphology, organic and inorganic geochemistry, and physical properties. The lower part of the New Albany Shale is late Middle Devonian in age, and the upper part is Early Mississippian in age.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Woodard, G.S. (eds.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Brine inclusions in halite and the origin of the Middle Devonian Prairie evaporites of Western Canada  

SciTech Connect

Brines were extracted from fluid inclusions in Lower Salt halite of the Middle Devonian Prairie Formation in Saskatchewan, Canada. The brines were analyzed by ion chromatography and were found to be of the Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl type. They do not fall along a simple evaporation trend. Brines from clear, diagenetic halite are significantly lower in Na{sup +} and higher in Mg{sup 2+}, and Cl{sup {minus}} than brines from cloudy, subaqueously formed halite with chevron structures. The isotopic composition of strontium and sulfur in anhydrite associated with the halites was found to be the same as that of Middle Devonian seawater. The composition of the inclusion brines can be derived from that of modern seawater by evaporation, extensive dolomitization of limestone, and albitization of clay minerals. Other evolution paths are, however, also feasible, and it is impossible to rule out effects due to the addition of nonmarine waters (hydrothermal solutions, surface runoff, and groundwater), or dissolutional recycling of existing evaporites within the Prairie evaporite basin. These analyses and published data on brine inclusions in halite from a number of Phanerozoid evaporite deposits show that the Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl type brine is more common than the Na-K-Mg-Cl-SO{sub 4} type, which is expected from evaporation of modern seawater.

Horita, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.; Weinberg, A.; Das, N.; Holland, H.D. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Shale characterization and resource appraisal of Devonian black shales of the Appalachian basin. Quarterly report for October to December 1981  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to characterize the Devonian shales of the Appalachian basins. Status of each of the following projects are briefly presented for the month of December; stratigraphy; geophysics; geochemistry; structure study; conodont maturation-paleontology; geochemistry-trace element study; data systems; clay mineralogy; and resource appraisal. (ATT)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Demonstration projects for coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas: Final report. [None  

SciTech Connect

In 1979, the US Department of Energy provided the American Public Gas Association (APGA) with a grant to demonstrate the feasibility of bringing unconventional gas such as methane produced from coalbeds or Devonian Shale directly into publicly owned utility system distribution lines. In conjunction with this grant, a seven-year program was initiated where a total of sixteen wells were drilled for the purpose of providing this untapped resource to communities who distribute natural gas. While coalbed degasification ahead of coal mining was already a reality in several parts of the country, the APGA demonstration program was aimed at actual consumer use of the gas. Emphasis was therefore placed on degasification of coals with high methane gas content and on utilization of conventional oil field techniques. 13 figs.

Verrips, A.M.; Gustavson, J.B.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analysis of Devonian shale multiwell interference tests in Meigs County, Ohio. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Offset Well Test Program completed in 1981 was undertaken in order to investigate the production characteristics of Devonian shale reservoirs. The investigation involved a study of gas flow through natural fractures, the orientation and distribution of these fractures, and the gas storage/release mechanism and its effect on production. An experiment was designed to test the reservoir under strictly controlled conditions. Interference tests were conducted in Meigs County, Ohio on two wells drilled in the expected maximum and minimum permeability directions from a producing well with known completion and production history. Analysis of the test results indicate that the Devonian shale formation in the Meigs County, Ohio, area is an anisotropic, layered reservoir system. Flow characteristics indicate that the Meigs County reservoir is naturally fractured, may be represented as a dual porosity system, and may be modeled using pseudo-steady-state gas transfer from the matrix to the fracture system. The orientation of the natural fracture system was established through core observation and well test analysis as S65/sup 0/W. The maximum to minimum permeability ratio in the direction of the natural fracture system was calculated to be 8.3. Three distinct zones with independent flow characteristics were identified. The bottom zone, with permeability values significantly higher than the upper two zones, is highly fractured and is a major contributor to the gas production of Well 10056. The pressure profiles of the bottom zones relative to the upper zones were significantly different, indicating minimal communication between the layers. The knowledge of these parameters should have a significant impact on future development of shale reservoirs, through optimization of well spacing and choice of stimulation treatment to enhance gas production.

Alam, J.; Horan, K.; Lee, B.; Sawyer, W.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Devonian oil shale of the eastern United States: a major American energy resource  

SciTech Connect

The eastern Devonian oil shale resource can yield 400 billion (400 X 10/sup 9/) bbl of synthetic oil, if all surface and near-surface shales were strip or deep mined for above-ground hydroretorting. Experimental work, in equipment capable of processing up to 1 ton/h of shale, has confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of aboveground hydroretorting of oil shales. Work done to date on nearly 500 samples from 12 states indicates that the HYTORT Process can give organic carbon recoveries from 2 to 2.5 times those of conventional retorting of the Devonian shales, so that the HYTORT Process yields 25 to 30 gallons per ton on syncrude at many localities, compared with 10 to 15 gallons per ton using Fischer Assay retort methods. Criteria for inclusion of shale in estimates of recoverable resources for the HYTORT Process are: (1) organic carbon of at least 10% by weight; (2) overburden of less than 200 feet (59 meters); (3) volumetric stripping ratios of less than 2.5 to 1; and (4) stratigraphic thickness of 10 feet (3 meters) or more. Resource estimates include: Kentucky (Ohio, New Albany, and Sunbury shales), 190 billion (190 X 10/sup 9/) barrels (bbl); Ohio (Ohio and Sunbury shales), 140 billion bbl; Tennessee (Chattanooga shale), 44 billion bbl; Indiana (New Albany shale), 40 billion bbl; Michigan (Antrim shale), 5 billion bbl; and Alabama (Chattanooga shale), 4 billion bbl. Recoverable resources have not been identified in West Virginia, Georgia, Oklahoma, Illinois, Arkansas, or Missouri outcrops. Co-production of uranium and metals is a possibility in the areas favorable for syncrude production.

Matthews, R.D.; Janka, J.C.; Dennison, J.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Secondary recovery from a stromatoporoid buildup: Devonian Duperow Formation, Ridgelawn field, Montana  

SciTech Connect

Ridgelawn field is located in Richland County, Montana, in the western part of the Williston basin. It is a multiple-pay field, with production from ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian carbonates. Discovered in 1980, the field was recently unitized in the Devonian Duperow Formation for purposes of secondary recovery by waterflood. In this part of the Williston, the Duperow consists of a repetitive succession of shoaling-upward carbonate cycles, each deposited under increasingly restricted conditions on a shallow marine shelf. Production at Ridgelaw occurs from dolomites within one of these cycles, cycle IIIa. Three separate, laterally continuous porosity zones (here termed a, b, and c, from lowest to highest) are recognized and mapped individually in the field. The reservoir has a lensoidal geometry; porous dolomite thins and grades laterally into tight carbonate. The Duperow pool at Ridgelawn is a solution gas drive reservoir. Computer log analysis of the Duperow pay interval indicates an average true porosity of 11.8% and an average initial water saturation of 17.7%. Net pay, defined as greater than 5% crossplot porosity, averages 16.6 ft across the field. Petrographic analysis and log calibration suggests that different facies in each of the three porosity zones were preferentially dolomitized to create reservoir-quality rock; each is now a sucrosic dolomite with intercrystalline porosity. Porosity can be occluded (most often in the upper two zones b and c) by both calcite and anhydrite cements. The lowermost zone, a, is related to a stromatoporoid/coralline bank, and has excellent but highly variable porosity and permeability. The two upper zones, b and c, are more finely crystalline dolomite and represent shallower water depositional facies. Maps for each zone, including porosity, porosity-feet, net pay, and water saturation were constructed and used for equity determination in the unit.

Little, L.D. (Conoco Inc., Casper, WY (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fragment of the chemical structure of type II and II-S kerogen in the Upper Jurassic and Upper Devonian formations of the East European Platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model is proposed for a fragment of the chemical structures of the geopolymers based on elemental ... Jurassic and Devonian formations in the East European Platform. The Sorg/C ratio in kerogen from oil shales ...

N. S. Burdelnaya; D. A. Bushev

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect

The executive study presents the results and progress of efforts toward understanding shale gas production from the Devonian shale in Appalachia. A correlation was found between the geochemical parameters of the shale in eastern Kentucky and shale gas production there. Tasks on resource inventory tasks and shale characterization include regional structure studies, production studies, geophysical studies, structure studies, fracture density and orientation, and fracture studies. (DLC)

Negus-de Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Tectonic and flexural significance of Middle Devonian graben-fill sequence in new Albany shale, central Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The third tectonic phase of the Acadian orogeny began in the late Middle Devonian, and the sedimentary record of that event is largely restricted to the deeper, more proximal portions of the Appalachian foreland and Illinois intercratonic basins. Much of the intervening area, on and near the Cincinnati arch, was uplifted and subjected to erosion by movement on the peripheral bulge accompanying the initiation of the third tectonic phase. However, bulge movement also reactivated basement fault systems in Kentucky and created a series of grabens that were filled with eroded sediments and debris flows from adjacent horsts. Although rarely preserved, a buried Devonian graben along Carpenter Fork in Boyle County, central Kentucky, reveals such a sequence. The graben is bounded by upthrown blocks of Middle Devonian Boyle Dolomite, which also floors the graben. Within the graben a black-shale unit, apparently absent elsewhere, conformably overlies the Boyle and grades upward into debris-flow deposits represented by the Duffin breccia facies of the New Albany Shale. The Duffin contains clasts of the shale, as well as of chert, silicified fossils, and fine to boulder-size dolostone clasts eroded from the Boyle high on the flanks of the graben. The underlying shale also exhibits evidence of penecontemporaneous soft-sediment deformation related to the debris-flow emplacement of Boyle residue in the graben and due to later loading by the Duffin.

Barnett, S.F.; Ettensohn, F.R.; Mellon, C. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Utica, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

42313°, -82.4512699° 42313°, -82.4512699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2342313,"lon":-82.4512699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Utica, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

095975°, -90.6234323° 095975°, -90.6234323° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.1095975,"lon":-90.6234323,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Utica, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55569°, -89.1220579° 55569°, -89.1220579° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9655569,"lon":-89.1220579,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Sequence stratigraphy, depositional environments, and regional mapping of the late Devonian interval, upper Three Forks Formation, Sanish Member, and lower Bakken Shale, U.S. portion of the Williston Basin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cores of the Late Devonian upper Three Forks, Sanish, and lower Bakken units from eight wells were examined and described at the North Dakota core (more)

Sesack, Steven A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fractured gas reservoirs in the Devonian shale of the Illinois and Appalachian basins  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian and Lower Mississippian black shale sequence of Kentucky includes the New Albany Shale of Illinois basin and the Ohio Shale of the Appalachian basin. Fractured reservoirs in the Ohio Shale contain a major gas resource, but have not been so prolific in the New Albany Shale. The authors propose two models of fractured shale reservoirs in both the Illinois and the Appalachian basins, to be tested with gas production data. (1) Where reactivated basement faults have propagated to the surface, the lack of an effective seal has prevented the development of overpressure. The resulting fracture system is entirely tectonic is origin, and served mainly as a conduit for gas migration from the basin to the surface. Gas accumulations in such reservoirs typically are small and underpressured. (2) Where basement faults have been reactivated but have not reached the surface, a seal on the fractured reservoir is preserved. In areas where thermal maturity has been adequate, overpressuring due to gas generation resulted in a major extension of the fracture system, as well as enhanced gas compression and adsorption. Such gas accumulations are relatively large. Original overpressuring has been largely lost, due both to natural depletion and to uncontrolled production. The relative thermal immaturity of the Illinois basin accounts for the scarcity of the second type of fractured reservoir and the small magnitude of the New Albany Shale gas resource.

Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, D.; Nuttall, B. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Inorganic geochemistry of Devonian shales in southern West Virginia: geographic and stratigraphic trends  

SciTech Connect

Samples of cuttings from twenty-one wells and a core from a single well in southern West Virginia were analyzed for major and minor elements: silicon, aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, titanium, phosphorus, manganese, sulfur, zinc, and strontium. Stratigraphic and geographic controls on elemental abundances were studied through canonical correlations, factor analyses, and trend surface analyses. The most abundant elements, silicon and aluminum, show gradual trends through the stratigraphic column of most wells, with silicon increasing and aluminum decreasing up-section. Other elements such as calcium, sulfur, and titanium change abruptly in abundance at certain stratigraphic boundaries. Important geographic trends run east-west: for instance, one can see an increase in sulfur and a decrease in titanium to the west; and a decrease in silicon from the east to the central part of the study area, then an increase further west. Although observed vertical trends in detrital minerals and geographic patterns in elemental abundances agree with the accepted view of a prograding delta complex during Late Devonian time, geographically-local, time restricted depositional processes influenced elemental percentages in subsets of the wells and the stratigraphic intervals studied. The black shales of lower Huron age do not represent simply a return of depositional conditions present in the earlier Rhinestreet time; nor do the gray shales of the Ohio Shale represent the same environmental conditions as the Big White Slate.

Hohn, M.E.; Neal, D.W.; Renton, J.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Late-Middle to Late Devonian (Givetian-Famennian) tectonic and stratigraphic history of central Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Earliest Givetian deposition in central Kentucky is represented in upper parts of the Boyle and Sellersburg formations and reflects marginal-marine to shallow-marine carbonate deposition at the end of the second tectophase of the Acadian orogeny. Inception of the third tectophase of the Acadian orogeny in the area is reflected by a disconformity or angular unconformity between the Boyle and New Albany formations, by reactivation of faults on the Kentucky river and related fault zones, and by concurrent graben formation. Succeeding late Givetian deposition is represented by the equivalent Portwood and Blocher members of the New Albany. The Portwood represents localized deposition of dolomitic breccias and black shales in grabens and half grabens, paleogeographically manifest as a series of restricted coastal lagoons and estuaries in central and east-central Kentucky. In contrast, dolomitic, Blocher black shales in west-central kentucky, beyond the effects of faulting, reflect more open, platform-lagoonal conditions. Both units are carbonate rick, contain a sparse benthic fauna, and had local sources of sediment. By latest Givetian or earliest Frasnian, local basins were largely filed, and when local sediment sources were inundated by transgression, sediment starvation, represented by a major lag zone or bone bed, ensued throughout central Kentucky, while black- and gray-shale deposition continued in deeper parts of the Illinois and Appalachian basins. During the Frasnian and early Famennian, as subsidence and transgression continued, deeper water gray- and black-shale units from the Appalachian and Illinois basins slowly onlapped the Cincinnati Arch area of central Kentucky; black shales in these units are fissile and lack both carbonates and benthic fauna. At the Devonian-Mississippian transition, however, a locally developed unconformity and structurally related erosion probably reflect inception of the fourth and final tectophase of the Acadian orogeny.

Ettensohn, F.R. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Barnett, S.F. (Bryan Coll., Dayton, TN (United States)); Norby, R.D. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Organic-matter preservation in Chattanooga Shale: revised Late Devonian correlations, Kentucky and Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Continued interest in the carbon-rich shale of Devonian and Mississippian age in Kentucky is reflected by intensive leasing and drilling to evaluate the potential reserves of oil shale. Thicker accumulations of shale suitable for surface extraction lie along the flanks of the Cincinnati arch in both the Illinois and Appalachian basins. The shale tends to thin across the Cincinnati arch by an order of magnitude (100 versus 10 m, 330 versus 33 ft), and individual units disappear entirely. Key beds have been used with mixed success in tracing these changes. Recognition of these key beds in cores provided by a recently completed 70-core drilling program in and near the outcrop is the basis for revising earlier suggested correlations. One key bed, marked by the occurrence of the alga. Foerstia (Protosalvinia), occurs in the lower part of the lower (Huron) member of the Ohio Shale in the Appalachian basin. The Huron Member is overlain by a lithostratigraphic marker, the Three Lick Bed. The Foerstia Zone has been traced in core and outcrop to the upper part of the uppermost (Clegg Creek) member of the New Albany Shale in the Illinois basin. Discovery in this widespread continuous biostratigraphic marker at the top of the upper (Gassaway) member of the Chattanooga Shale near the designated reference section in Dekalb County, Tennessee, suggests that the Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shales does not correlate with the unit of the Gassaway Member of the Chattanooga Shale as thought. Field relations indicate that the Three Lick Bed is absent by nondeposition, and starved-basin conditions prevailed into Early Mississippian time in this part of Tennessee.

Kepferle, R.C.; Pollock, J.D.; Barron, L.S.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Detailed gravity survey over a known carbonate reef (Devonian) in Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

A detailed gravity study, conducted over the Shell Golden carbonate reef located in the Winnipegosis Formation (Devonian) of the Williston basin in north-central North Dakota, indicates a massive carbonate platform with several interconnected vertical accumulations, perhaps pinnacle in nature, from this platform. This reef is found at a depth of about 2400 m (8000 ft). Because elevations and north-south positions were surveyed to /+-/3 cm (0.1 ft) and /+-/ 1 (3.3 ft), respectively, an accuracy of 0.01 mgal was obtained. Five profiles were made: three lines running east-west and two lines running north-south, forming a grid pattern over the reef. The distance between each line was 1.6 km (1.0 mi) with gravity-station spacing along each line being 0.4 km (0.25 mi). The Golden reef and most reefs of this nature throughout the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin have been interpreted to be isolated pinnacles with physical dimensions about 60-75 m (200-250 ft) thick and 0.8 km (0.5 mi) in basal diameter. However, analysis of the residual Bouguer gravity anomalies (0.2-0.5 mgal) obtained from this study indicates this reef is more complex than previously thought. The maximum thicknesses of the complex are on the order of 120-185 m (400-600 ft) with compaction anticlines also contributing to the total gravity anomaly. The modeled reef complex extends in a northeast-southwest direction and probably extends beyond the study area along that line.

Braun, S.M.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Coordinated study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin: Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the resource potential of the Devonian shales, called the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) was begun. A study of the stratigraphy, structure, composition, and gas content of the Devonian shale in the Illinois Basin was undertaken by the State Geological Surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, under contract to the U.S. DOE as a part of the EGSP. Certain additional data were also developed by other research organizations (including Monsanto Research Corporation-Mound Facility and Battelle-Columbus Laboratory) on cores taken from the Illinois Basin. This report, an overview of geological data on the Illinois basin and interpretations of this data resulting from the EGSP, highlights areas of potential interest as exploration targets for possible natural gas resources in the Devonian shale of the basin. The information in this report was compiled during the EGSP from open file data available at the three State Geological surveys and from new data developed on cores taken by the DOE from the basin specifically for the EGSP. The organically richest shale is found in southeastern Illinois and in most of the Indiana and Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky. Natural fractures in the shale may aid in collecting gas from a large volume of shale. These fractures may be more abundant and interconnected to a greater degree in the vicinity of major faults. Major faults along the Rough Creek Lineament and Wabash Valley Fault System cross the deeper part of the basin.

Lineback, J.A.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Bakken and other Devonian-Mississippian petroleum source rocks, northern Rocky Mtns.-Williston basin: Depositional and burial history and maturity estimations  

SciTech Connect

The three-member Devonian-Mississippian Bakken-Exshaw organic-rich shaly facies is widely distributed in the northern U.S. and southern Canadian Cordillera. Equivalent facies are also present as far south as Utah and Nevada. Paleogeographically, these rocks thin markedly or pinchout to the west approximately along the Devonian-Mississippian carbonate reef-mound belt of the Cordilleran shelf margin. Although these rocks reach maximum organic richness approximately at the Devonian-Carboniferous transition, similar but somewhat less organic-rich Bakken-like beds are also present in underlying Upper Devonian and overlying Lower Carboniferous carbonate depositional cycles. At least ten cycles are identified in the underlying Duperow and Jefferson Formations, characterized by basal organic-rich Bakken-like shale or shaly carbonate that grades upward into carbonate mound or reefal beds, overlain by evaporite or solution breccia. Cycles in the overlying Lodgepole and Mission Canyon Formations, as many as 10-12 in number, are similar except that the carbonates are composed of algal-oolith, crinoid, or mixed skeletal beds, and end-cycle evaporitic units are less prevalent in the lower cycles. These dark shaly beds are the most important source of hydrocarbon reserves in Montana and the Williston basin. Maximum net thickness of the Devonian-Mississippian organic-rich facies is in the Williston basin. However, variable thicknesses of these potential source rocks is present in parts of Montana as far west as the thrust belt. Burial history studies suggest that in some areas these rocks are probably thermally immature. However, in much of the area original burial depths are sufficient for them to reach the thermally mature stage, and therefore are of importance to further exploration efforts in the Devonian-Mississippian Madison-Duperow-Jefferson Formations.

Peterson, J.A. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The air pollutants associated with shale gas development include greenhouse gases (primarily methane), ozone precursors (volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides), air toxics, and particulate matter from flaring, compressors, and engines. ... Kiviat, E.Risks to biodiversity from hydraulic fracturing for natural gas in the Marcellus and Utica shales Annu. ...

Mitchell J. Small; Paul C. Stern; Elizabeth Bomberg; Susan M. Christopherson; Bernard D. Goldstein; Andrei L. Israel; Robert B. Jackson; Alan Krupnick; Meagan S. Mauter; Jennifer Nash; D. Warner North; Sheila M. Olmstead; Aseem Prakash; Barry Rabe; Nathan Richardson; Susan Tierney; Thomas Webler; Gabrielle Wong-Parodi; Barbara Zielinska

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library are being sampled to collect CO{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples have been acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log has been acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 4.62 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 19 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 86 scf/ton in the Lower Huron Member of the shale. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Stratigraphy and organic petrography of Mississippian and Devonian oil shale at the Means Project, East-Central Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The Means Oil Shale Project is under consideration for financial assistance by the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation. The project site is located in southern Montgomery County, about 45 miles east of Lexington, Kentucky. In the site area the Devonian Ohio Shale and the Mississippian Sunbury Shale are under study; these oil shales were deposited in the Appalachian Basin. The objective of the Means Project is to mine, using open pit methods, an ore zone which includes the Sunbury and upper Cleveland and which excludes the Bedford interburden. The thick lower grade oil shale below this ore zone renders the higher grade shale at the base of the Huron commercially unattractive. The oil shale at Means has been classified as a marinite, an oil shale containing abundant alginite of marine origin. Lamalginite is the dominant liptinite and comprises small, unicellular alginite with weak to moderate fluorescence at low rank and a distinctive lamellar form. Telalginite, derived from large colonial or thick-walled, unicellular algae, is common in several stratigraphic intervals.

Solomon, B.J.; Hutton, A.C.; Henstridge, D.A.; Ivanac, J.F.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in eastern Kentucky with an atlas of some common fossils  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence of eastern North America is a distinctive stratigraphic interval generally characterized by low clastic influx, high organic production in the water column, anaerobic bottom conditions, and the relative absence of fossil evidence for biologic activity. The laminated black shales which constitute most of the black-shale sequence are broken by two major sequences of interbedded greenish-gray, clayey shales which contain bioturbation and pyritized micromorph invertebrates. The black shales contain abundant evidence of life from upper parts of the water column such as fish fossils, conodonts, algae and other phytoplankton; however, there is a lack of evidence of benthic life. The rare brachiopods, crinoids, and molluscs that occur in the black shales were probably epiplanktic. A significant physical distinction between the environment in which the black sediments were deposited and that in which the greenish-gray sediments were deposited was the level of dissolved oxygen. The laminated black shales point to anaerobic conditions and the bioturbated greenish-gray shales suggest dysaerobic to marginally aerobic-dysaerobic conditions. A paleoenvironmental model in which quasi-estuarine circulation compliments and enhances the effect of a stratified water column can account for both depletion of dissolved oxygen in the bottom environments and the absence of oxygen replenishment during black-shale deposition. Periods of abundant clastic influx from fluvial environments to the east probably account for the abundance of clays in the greenish-gray shale as well as the small amounts of oxygen necessary to support the depauparate, opportunistic, benthic faunas found there. These pulses of greenish-gray clastics were short-lived and eventually were replaced by anaerobic conditions and low rates of clastic sedimentation which characterized most of black-shale deposition.

Barron, L.S.; Ettensohn, F.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Orientation of tectonic stresses in central Kentucky during U. Devonian/L. Mississippian times: Evidence from quartz veins (after gypsum) in NE-trending, systematic joints in shales  

SciTech Connect

Quartz replacing fibrous gypsum and anhydrite pseudomorphically (QAS; quartz after sulfate''), and preserving characteristic crack-seal'' and chickenwire'' textures, occurs in extensional veins at four locations in central KY. The veins occupy a systematic set of NE-SW-trending, vertical joints within the essentially flat-lying shales of the Renfro Member of the Mississippian Borden Formation and the Late Devonian New Albany Shale. The four QAS occurrences discovered to date are located northeast of the Borden Front. At one site in the New Albany Shale, QAS veins show clear evidence of penecontemporaneous deformation. It is proposed that at all QAS locations, gypsum precipitated in incipient joints before complete lithification of the sediment, and grew perpendicular to the fractures to form extensional veins in the soft but firm muds. The orientations of the joints now marked by QAS veins are broadly consistent with regional patterns of NE-SW-trending systematic joints and lineaments in southern IN and in central and eastern KY. These systematic fracture patterns do not correspond directly to known basement faults or rift systems, although they are consistent with modern stress directions in eastern and western KY, measured in situ in wells and by earthquake fault-plane solutions. It is proposed that this systematic trend marks the regional tectonic stress pattern characteristic of southern IN and central and eastern KY at, and since the Late Devonian. The evidence of penecontemporaneous sedimentary deformation in joints of U. Devonian age, marked and preserved by quartz replacement of early gypsum, is sufficient to show that while the systematic NE-trending joint set in KY may also be modern it is not uniquely so.

Grover, J.; Dupuis-Nouille, E.M. (Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

CO2 hardage cover_January2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to to Evaluation of Fracture Systems and Stress Fields Within the Marcellus Shale and Utica Shale and Characterization of Associated Water-Disposal Reservoirs: Appalachian Basin. 08122-55.Final January 2013 Principal Investigator: Bob A. Hardage Co-Authors: Engin Alkin, Milo M. Backus, Michael V. DeAngelo, Diana Sava, Donald Wagner, and Robert J. Graebner Subcontractor: Bureau of Economic Geology Subcontractor: The University of Texas at Austin Telephone: 512-471-0300 http://www.beg.utexas.edu/ Email: bob.hardage@beg.utexas.edu Evaluation of Fracture Systems and Stress Fields Within the Marcellus Shale and Utica Shale and Characterization of Associated Water-Disposal Reservoirs: Appalachian Basin RPSEA Subcontract: 08122-55 QAd9239 0.9 1.2 1.3 1.4

113

Geological controls on matrix permeability of Devonian Gas Shales in the Horn River and Liard basins, northeastern British Columbia, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controls of matrix permeability are investigated for Devonian Gas Shales from the Horn River and Liard basins in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. Mineralogy is varied with high carbonate, high quartz and moderate quartz, carbonate and clay rich strata. Quartz content varies between 2 and 73%, carbonate varies between 1 and 93% and clay varies between 3 and 33%. The TOC content ranges between 0.3 and 6wt.% and porosity varies between about 1 and 7%. For Horn River basin samples, quartz is mainly biogenic in origin derived from radiolarians. TOC content increases with the quartz content suggesting the TOC and quartz both are derived from siliceous phytoplankton. A positive relationship between porosity and quartz content is due to the positive relationship between quartz and TOC. Matrix permeability parallel to bedding varies between 7.5E?02 and 7.1E?07mD at an effective stress of 15MPa. Variation in permeability is due to a complex combination of factors that includes origin and distribution of minerals, pore?size distribution and fabric. Mercury intrusion capillary curves indicate that the higher matrix permeability values (>2E?03mD) occurs in samples that contain interconnected pore apertures greater than 16?m even when these samples may contain less macropores than low permeability samples. The fabric of high permeability samples can be either isotropic or anisotropic; however permeability of anisotropic samples is more sensitive to changes in effective stress than isotropic samples. More highly anisotropic samples contain moderate amounts of quartz, carbonate and in some, clay. High permeability samples that contain a more balanced ratio between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would not only have faster flow rates but also greater access to sorbed gas within the microporosity compared to samples that lack mesopores. Several Muskwa samples compared to Evie and Besa River samples contain higher quartz, moderate clay and high TOC content coupled with high permeability, less sensitivity to effective stress and balanced ratios between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would be a lower exploration risk due a greater propensity to fracture, the ability to produce and store hydrocarbons due to higher TOC contents and greater communication between macropores and micropores in the organic and clay fractions.

Gareth R.L. Chalmers; Daniel J.K. Ross; R. Marc Bustin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modular CHP System for Utica College: Design Specification, March 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report describes a system specification for purchasing the modularized components of a cogeneration facility for assembly, shipping, and onsite operation.

115

Gas Research Institute improved fracturing. Unconventional natural gas program, eastern devonian shales diagnostic program: Black No. 1 well experiment results. Third quarterly report, October 1979-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

During the last quarter of 1979, Sandia National Laboratories participated in an experiment with Thurlow Weed and Associates and the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. This Devonian Shale gas stimulation experiment was conducted in an area north of Columbus, Ohio. One purpose of the experiment was to apply the diagnostic instrumentation that is available for fracture mapping and characterization to increase our understanding of the stimulation technique. The induced fracture apparently followed a pre-existing fracture vertically from the borehole with an orientation of the N 62/sup 0/ E and in the latter stages of the stimulation turned into a shallower horizontal fracture. This fracture behavior was confirmed by several diagnostic analyses and demonstrates the insight that can be gained by fully instrumented stimulation experiments.

Schuster, C.L. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Machel, H.G., Buschkuehle, B.E. and Michael, K., 2001, Squeegee flow in Devonian carbonate aquifers in Alberta, Canada. In: Cidu, R. (ed.), Water-Rock Interaction, Vol. 1. Proceedings of the Tenth International Symposium on Water-Rock-Interaction WRI-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in thickness. Across much of the basin the four Devonian aquifers, which contain oil, sweet and sour gas reservoirs, are interbedded with marly and evaporitic aquitards, and are confined by tight evaporites

Machel, Hans

118

Rock-eval data relating to oil-source potential of shales of New Albany group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

Only limited data on petroleum source rock potential of New Albany Group (Devonian-Mississippian) shales have been reported, with the exception of vitrinite reflectance and some petrographic analyses. The New Albany Group contains the thickest and most widespread continuous black shale beds in the Illinois basin. The New Albany extends from northwestern Illinois to southwestern Indiana and western Kentucky and is thought to have played a major role in petroleum generation throughout the basin. In this study, Rock-Eval pyrolysis was used to measure the petroleum-generative potential and production index of the shale. Seven geochemical logs, based on 143 core samples from across the basin, and a production index map, based on a total of 252 samples (cuttings and cores) in Illinois, were generated. Systematic variations of petroleum-generative potential of the shale were observed. The variations are related to the differences in shale lithofacies, depth, and geographic location. The upper portion of the New Albany - the Hannibal and Saverton Shales - has the lowest oil-generative potential. The Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and other stratigraphically lower shales of the New Albany Group generally have good oil-generative potential. However, samples from the Hicks dome area of extreme southern Illinois are overmature and have no oil-generative potential. Source rocks that have both good oil-generative potential (> 6 kg hydrocarbons per ton of rock) and a higher production index (> 0.09) are generally located at depths of 2,500-5,300 ft.

Chou, Mei-In M.; Dickerson, D.R.; Sargent, M.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

By Terry Engelder and Gary G. Lash UNIVERSITY PARK, PA.The shale gas rush is on. Excitement over natural gas production from a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas production from a number of Devonian-Mississippian black shales such as the Barnett of fracture generation during the burial history of the Marcellus Shale. Source Of Stress The primary source to- ward a central point. Gravity acts normal to the earth's surface, generating the vertical

Engelder, Terry

120

Potential Ecological Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Timber · Agriculture · Oil & Gas · Iron · Limestone · Water #12;Conceptual Model with Fresh water usage, management, recycling · Air fugitive emissions, diesel engines, gas is cleaner as fuel compared to coal & oil · Offgasing from · condensate and · storage tanks · Vs. oil and coal #12;Ecological Impacts ­ Chemical Use

Jiang, Huiqiang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

January 20, 2011 Marcellus Shale 101  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Will oil shale be viable as well? Oil shale will not be economically viable anytime in the near future

Hardy, Christopher R.

122

Life Cycle Carbon Footprint of Shale Gas: Review of Evidence and Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Carbon Footprint of Shale Gas: Review of Evidence and Implications ... Most of the studies utilize US EPAs Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reporting Background Technical Support Document (TSD) for their assumptions regarding the amount of gas released per completion and the flaring rate for completions, the two critical parameters that describe the amount of greenhouse gases released per completion. ... These ?13C-CH4 data, coupled with the ratios of methane-to-higher-chain hydrocarbons, and ?2H-CH4 values, are consistent with deeper thermogenic methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochem. ...

Christopher L. Weber; Christopher Clavin

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Review Meeting Mudrock Systems Research Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:10 ­ 9:40 AM Devonian mudrock pore systems: Bakken, Woodford, New Albany; Reed 9:40 ­ 10:10 AM and Future: Ruppel Paleozoic Mudrock Systems 8:40 ­ 9:10 AM Natural fractures in the Marcellus Shale; Gale 9 properties from 3D seismic data; Zeng 2:30 ­ 3:00 PM Preliminary characterization of the Tuscaloosa shale; Lu

Texas at Austin, University of

124

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in (more)

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the author(s). The material does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers of hydrocarbons from the reservoirs, notably shale, is attributed to realizing the key fundamentals of reservoir

Mohaghegh, Shahab

127

A study of natural gas extraction in Marcellus shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the dramatic increases in crude oil prices there has been a need to find reliable energy substitutions. One substitution that has been used in the United States is natural gas. However, with the increased use of natural ...

Boswell, Zachary (Zachary Karol)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Marcellus Shale Drilling and Hydraulic Fracturing; Technicalities and  

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Pipe · Air Rotary Drilling Rig · Hydraulic Rotary Drilling Rig ­ Barite/Bentonite infused drilling muds A "Thumper Truck" #12;Rigging Up #12;Drilling · The Drill String ­ Diesel Powered ­ Drilling Bit ­ Drilling

Jiang, Huiqiang

129

Microsoft Word - 201309_Fuels_Industry_Newsletter_September_2013.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

opens bidding for ethane at proposed Beaver County cracker plant" opens bidding for ethane at proposed Beaver County cracker plant" By Anya Litvak, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 27, 2013 Royal Dutch Shell hasn't decided if it will build an ethane cracker in Beaver County, but it's taking bids from oil and gas companies in the Marcellus and Utica shales to gauge how much ethane would be available if it pulls the trigger. Shell began a two-month bidding period Tuesday to supplement commitments it already has secured with Consol Energy Inc., Noble Energy Inc., Seneca Resources Corp., and Hilcorp Energy Co. Shell's own exploration and production company also would feed ethane into a potential cracker. Absent from that list are some of the region's largest so-called wet gas producers, including Range Resources, Chevron Corp., Chesapeake Energy Corp. and EQT Corp.

130

Fossils of Uncertain Affinity from the Upper Devonian of Iowa  

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...4. T. A. Jones, J. Sediment. Petrol. 39, 1622 (1969); level of significance 0.05. 5. J. B. Hayes, Marathon Oil Co.. Littleton, 253 -.-7,.. Colorado, gave advice on interpretation of x-ray patterns (including those...

Richard Arnold Davis; Holmes A. Semken Jr.

1975-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modern Devonian shale gas search starting in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The New Albany shale of southwestern Indiana is a worthwhile exploration and exploitation objective. The technical ability to enhance natural fractures is available, the drilling depths are shallow, long term gas reserves are attractive, markets are available, drilling costs are reasonable, risks are very low, multiple drilling objectives are available, and the return on investment is good. Indiana Geological Survey records are well organized, accessible, and easy to use. The paper describes the New Albany shale play, play size, early exploration, geologic setting, completion techniques, and locating prime areas.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. (Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Firm, Fort Worth, TX (United States))

1995-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Devonian-Mississippian oil shale resources of Kentucky: a summary  

SciTech Connect

Assessment of the oil shale resources in Kentucky has continued with 75 NX cores available where the oil shale crops out or is overlain by relatively thin cover in the area from Estill County westward to Bullitt County. In this 14 county area, the total black shale section thins across the crest of the Cincinnati arch and changes stratigraphically from that characteristic of the Ohio Shale in Estill County to that of the New Albany Shale in Bullitt County. Despite this stratigraphic transition the two high-carbon zones (greater than 8.0% carbon) can be traced across the arch. As the traverse is followed from the east, the intervening low-carbon zones thin such that at the crest of the arch, there are areas where the entire section of black shale contains more than 8% carbon. Then upon leaving the crest the two high-carbon zones separate again with one remaining at the very top of the section and one in the lower part. In the 14 county area, there are approximately 3.8 x 10/sup 5/ acres of oil shale outcrop and approximately 7.8 x 10/sup 5/ acres underlain by oil shale at relatively shallow depths.

Barron, L.S.; Robl, T.L.; Kung, J.; Obley, J.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Diagenesis in halite-cemented source rocks, Middle Devonian, Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect

Porosity in Dawson Bay carbonates is halite plugged and the formation is sandwiched between thick units of bedded halite. The presence of displacive halite crystals within fine-grained carbonates (implying sediment plasticity during halite emplacement) and uncompacted organic-rich, carbonate-poor stromatolites indicate halite cementation occurred at an early stage. Also, halite cementation must have been completed prior to porosity loss in overlying bedded halites. By comparison with Holocene/Pleistocene bedded halites, this cementation occurred with only tens of meters of overburden. Early complete halite cementation should have converted Dawson Bay carbonates into virtually a closed system and greatly curtailed or inhibited organic-matter maturation within them Organic-rich carbonates occur immediately below Dawson Bay evaporites as rocks containing an anomalously abundant benthos (stromatoporoids, brachiopods) or as a more restricted facies, lacking megafossils or containing gastropods. Some restricted carbonates contain more than 2% extractable organic carbon. The n-alkane, pentacyclic triterpane, nonrearranged sterane and disterane distributions suggest two distinct populations of samples are present. Biomarker distributions are difficult to interpret in terms of estimating organic maturity because of source rock environmental factors (hypersalinity), but appear to be inconsistent with the geological prognosis that these source rocks would have been isolated early in their diagenesis. The problem of how kerogens can be altered in an apparently closed system has yet to be resolved.

Kendall, A.C. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (England)); Abbott, G.D.; D'Elia, V.A.A. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (England))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/w) - Distillates, petroleum, hydrotreated light 10.0 - 30.0% - Propylene Glycol 1.0 - 5.0% - Organic sulfonic acid

Sibille, Etienne

135

Questions Citizens and Local Leaders Should ment and extraction of Marcellus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be transient crews skilled in specific stages of exploration or drilling (including drilling, hydraulic/motels, trailer parks, camp- grounds and RV parks, and rental units? Are there sufficient perma- nent housing

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

136

Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well  

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The relative importance of water consumption was analyzed by integrating the method into the Eco-indicator-99 LCIA method. ...

Mohan Jiang; Chris T. Hendrickson; Jeanne M. VanBriesen

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Unconventional natural gas resources in Pennsylvania: The backstory of the modern Marcellus Shale play  

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...natural resources and the public estate in article 1, section 27: The...address matters of water budget, sustainable usage, and future water resource...environmental regulations: Fundamentals of real estate practice: Pennsylvania Bar Institute...

Kristin M. Carter; John A. Harper; Katherine W. Schmid; Jaime Kostelnik

138

Treatment of shale gas wastewater in the Marcellus : a comparative analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This analysis focused primarily on three main treatment methods which were re-use, recycle, and disposal wells. The re-use treatment option is when wastewater is mixed (more)

Yisa, Junaid Ololade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania  

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...opportunities . Environ Sci Technol 44 : 5679 5684 . 3 Howarth RW Ingraffea A Engelder T ( 2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 : 271 275 . 4 Osborn SG Vengosh A Warner NR Jackson RB ( 2011 ) Methane contamination of drinking water...

Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert B. Jackson; Thomas H. Darrah; Stephen G. Osborn; Adrian Down; Kaiguang Zhao; Alissa White; Avner Vengosh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 ( 30...hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers . Ground Water 50...constitute the two primary aquifer li- thologies in northeastern...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kerr RA ( 2010 ) Energy. Natural gas from...1626 . 3 US Energy Information Administration...March 2013 (US Energy Information Administration...Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk...isotopes in Icelandic geothermal systems. 1. He-3...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable resources for selected shale gas plays as of January 1, 2010 5. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable resources for selected shale gas plays as of January 1, 2010 Basin/Play Area (square miles) Average well spacing (wells per square mile) Percent of area untested Percent of area with potential Average EUR (billion cubic feet per well) Number of potential wells TRR (billion cubic feet) Appalachian Marcellus 104,067 5 99 18 1.56 90,216 140,565 Utica 16,590 4 100 21 1.13 13,936 15,712 Arkoma Woodford 3,000 8 98 23 1.97 5,428 10,678 Fayetteville 5,853 8 93 23 1.30 10,181 13,240 Chattanooga 696 8 100 29 0.99 1,633 1,617 Caney 2,890 4 100 29 0.34 3,369 1,135 TX-LA-MS Salt Haynesville/Bossier 9,320 8 98 34 2.67 24,627 65,860

143

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) 7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) AEO2010 AEO2011 AEO2012 Basin/Play Range Average Range Average Range Average Appalachian Marcellus 0.25-0.74 0.49 0.86-4.66 1.62 0.02-7.80 1.56 Utica -- -- -- -- 0.10-2.75 1.13 Arkoma Woodford 1.43-4.28 2.85 3.00-5.32 4.06 0.40-4.22 1.97 Fayetteville 0.91-2.73 1.82 0.86-2.99 2.03 0.19-3.22 1.30 Chattanooga -- -- -- -- 0.14-1.94 0.99 Caney -- -- -- -- 0.05-0.66 0.34 TX-LA-MS Salt Haynesville/Boosier 2.30-6.89 4.59 1.13-8.65 3.58 0.08-5.76 2.67 Western Gulf Eagle Ford 1.10-3.29 2.19 1.73-7.32 2.63 0.41-4.93 2.36 Pearsall -- -- -- -- 0.12-2.91 1.22

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancillary service rate Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute of Technology (MIT) Collection: Engineering ; Geosciences 15 MARCELLUS SHALE APRIL 2011 EDITION Summary: to 2011 Q1): 48,000 new hires within the Marcellus...

145

Economic viability of shale gas production in the Marcellus Shale; indicated by production rates, costs and current natural gas prices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The U.S. natural gas industry has changed because of the recent ability to produce natural gas from unconventional shale deposits. One of the largest (more)

Duman, Ryan J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Temporal Changes in Microbial Ecology and Geochemistry in Produced Water from Hydraulically Fractured Marcellus Shale Gas Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These results provide insight into the temporal trajectory of subsurface microbial communities after fracking and have important implications for the enrichment of microbes potentially detrimental to well infrastructure and natural gas fouling during this process. ... Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. ... reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. ...

Maryam A. Cluff; Angela Hartsock; Jean D. MacRae; Kimberly Carter; Paula J. Mouser

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

OPTIMIZATION OF THE TRANSPORT OF CO2 GENERATED FROM THE PRODUCTION OF THE MARCELLUS SHALE GAS IN PENNSYLVANIA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The trapping of radiant heat from the sun in the Earths atmosphere, a natural occurring process known as greenhouse effect, is brought about by the (more)

Madu, Christian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...United States . Environ Sci Technol 48 ( 15 ): 8334 8348 . 11 Jackson RB ( 2014 ) The environmental costs and benefits of fracking . Annu Rev Environ Resour , 10.1146/annurev-environ-031113-144051 . 12 Brantley SL ( 2014 ) Water resource impacts...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environmental costs and benefits of fracking . Annu Rev Environ Resour...SL ( 2014 ) Water resource impacts during unconventional shale gas development: The...the Nicholas School of the Environment. The authors declare no conflict...in marine and fresh-water environments- CO2 reduction vs acetate...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

Karapataki, Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Petrology of the Devonian gas-bearing shale along Lake Erie helps explain gas shows  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive petrologic study of 136 thin sections of the Ohio Shale along Lake Erie, when combined with detailed stratigraphic study, helps explain the occurrence of its gas shows, most of which occur in the silty, greenish-gray, organic poor Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed. Both have thicker siltstone laminae and more siltstone beds than other members of the Ohio Shale and both units also contain more clayshales. The source of the gas in the Chagrin Shale and Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale is believed to be the bituminous-rich shales of the middle and lower parts of the underlying Huron Member of the Ohio Shale. Eleven petrographic types were recognized and extended descriptions are provided of the major ones - claystones, clayshales, mudshales, and bituminous shales plus laminated and unlaminated siltstones and very minor marlstones and sandstones. In addition three major types of lamination were identified and studied. Thirty-two shale samples were analyzed for organic carbon, whole rock hydrogen and whole rock nitrogen with a Perkin-Elmer 240 Elemental Analyzer and provided the data base for source rock evaluation of the Ohio Shale.

Broadhead, R.F.; Potter, P.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reservoir characteristics of the Devonian Jauf Formation in Shedgum area, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Porosity generally increases as mean grain size increases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 26 Correlation of permeability with porosity from core analysis of the Jauf Formation in Shedgum S-ll. 61 27 Plots of log porosity... Dead + LUT o ? I RAG o~ BLOCK '' SINAI JORDAN c n D v Z ct ct I- ID J 0 Q Q $ " ocr:. . ro ++ ct Lrnere ~ a SAUDI ARABIA pipE J tt D BI nknna Mnenrnnrcy mr Arookon Sco Ar/en oak/ a/ 30' 40 50' 60' Figure 2 - Index map showing...

Al-Duaiji, Abdulaziz Abdullah

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

SciTech Connect: Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

shales contain abundant evidence of life from upper parts of the water column such as fish fossils, conodonts, algae and other phytoplankton; however, there is a lack of evidence...

154

Gas potential of new Albany shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

A study to update and evaluate publicly available data relating to present and potential gas production from New Albany Shale in the Illinois basin was conducted cooperatively by the Indiana. Illinois, and Kentucky geological surveys (Illinois Basin Consortium), and was partially funded by the Gas Research Institute. Deliverables included a plate of stratigraphic cross sections and six basin-wide maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The New Albany Shale is an organic-rich brownish black shale present throughout the Illinois basin. Gas potential of the New Albany Shale may be great because it contains an estimated 86 tcf of natural gas and has produced modest volumes since 1858 from more than 60 fields, mostly in the southeastern part of the basin. Reservoir beds include organic-rich shales of the Grassy Creek (Shale), Clegg Creek, and Blocher (Shale) members. Limited geologic and carbon isotope data indicate that the gas is indigenous and thermogenic. T[sub max] data suggest that the gas generation begins at R[sub o] values of 0.53% and may begin at R[sub 0] values as low as 0.41% in some beds. New Albany Shale reservoirs contain both free gas in open-pore space and gas adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. Natural fracturing is essential for effective reservoir permeability. Fractures are most common near structures such as faults, flexures, and buried carbonate banks. Based on limited data, fractures and joints have preferred orientations of 45-225[degrees] and 135-315[degrees]. Commercial production requires well stimulation to connect the well bore with the natural fracture system and to prop open pressure-sensitive near-borehole fractures. Current stimulations employ hydraulic fracture treatments using nitrogen and foam, with sand as a propping agent.

Comer, J.B.; Hasenmueller, N.R. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Frankie, W.T. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Evaluation of Devonian shale potential in Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Potential natural gas resources in the New Albany Shale of the Illinois basin may be related to five key factors: relative organic content of the shale; relative thickness of the organically-rich shale; thermal maturity as related to depth of burial; presence of natural fractures; and type of organic matter. The shale that is organically richest is in southeastern Illinois and in most of the Indiana and Kentucky portions of the Illinois basin. The shales are thickest (about 400 feet) near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky. The area is deeply buried by younger rocks, and the organic matter has the highest thermal maturity. In addition, natural fault-induced fractures in the shale, which may aid in collecting gas from a larger volume of shale, may be present, since major faults along the Rough Creek Lineament and Wabash Valley Fault System cross the deeper part of the basin. Thus, this area near the basin center where the shale is thickest and rich organically and where fault-induced fractures may be present has the greatest potential for natural-gas resources. The eastern side of the basin, where the shale is organic-rich but thin, may have poor to moderate potential for additional discoveries of small gas fields similar to those found in the past. In western Illinois and the northern part of the basin, the potential is poor, because the organic content of the dominantly greenish-gray shale in this area is low. More exploration will be required to properly evaluate potential resources of natural gas that may exist in the New Albany Shale.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evaluation of massive hydraulic fracturing experiments in the Devonian Shales in Lincoln County, West Virginia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

perfor- mance. The type curves that have been generated have qualitatively shown that the fractured wells are clear'ly more stimulated than the surrounding shot wells, Fracture treatment simulation indicates that treatments pumped in the MHF wells... Optimal Stimulation Design Per Zone Simulated Reservoir Properties Economic Production Forecasts 64 68 70 15 Economic Analysis Results Reservoir Case 72 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURES 10 12 13 15 16 17 MHF Well Location In Lincoln County, WV MHF...

Holgate, Karen Elaine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Evidence for detrital remanent magnetization carried by hematite in Devonian red beds from Spitsbergen; palaeomagnetic implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Regional bedding of the Wood say Formation red beds (136/8) and...composed of disintegrated red sandstones from Dicksonfjorden...titanomaghemite withm red bed deposits indicates...emphasized that the Wood Bay Forma- tion sandstone...Digico balanced flux-gate spinner, a single......

R. Lvlie; T. Torsvik; M. Jelenska; M. Levandowski

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Different styles of remagnetization in Devonian sediments from the north-western Sahara (Algeria)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......complexes from the Bayuda Desert, Sudan-new constraints on the apparent...specimens were cleaned by stepwise thermal demagnetization up to 600 C...ring complex, Red Sea Hills, Sudan, Geophys. J. lnt., 99...complexes from the Bayuda Desert, Sudan- new constraints o n the apparent......

Tahar Afa

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Palaeomagnetic investigation of Middle Devonian limestones of Algeria and the Gondwana reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......particularly when a combined thermal and AF treatment is applied...behaviour of the samples upon thermal and AF demagnetization, the...initial susceptibility upon thermal treatment, hysteresis cycles...igneous complex. Red Sea Hills, Sudan, Geophys. J. Int., 99......

Brigitte Smith; Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine; Ali At Kaci Ahmed

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Siluro-Devonian palaeomagnetism, terrane emplacement and rotation in the Caledonides of western Ireland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......59 78 1 0 ( 4 1 7 . 8 8 19 ?79 29 1 3 1 1 3 ) 1 2 . 4 8 0 267 7 1 R I 8 ) 7 . 2 R 19 2 5 6 ? ? 7 ! 5 ) 4.65 Z d 264 5 7 7 ? inis) 8 . 8 6 7 ?68 3 A 6 1 7 1 1..gq - 2 9 4 7 5 815) 4 . 5 7 ?R 21R ? @ 1 4 ) 5.77 15 320 'I 5 ' lanprnphyre dyke. t......

J. D. A. Piper

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effects of reservoir geometry and permeability anisotropy on ultimate gas recovery in Devonian Shale reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for assistance and guidance during the course of my thesis research: L Dr. WL Lee for his wisdom, understanding, and technical expertise and for his insistence on striving for excellence as well as accuracy; 2. David Lancaster for his direction and his ability... Econotnic Projections for Selected Stimulated Cases, Fracture Parallel to k ?, L, =100 ft, 160-acre Well Spacing, 50-year Well Life . . 156 Economic Projections for Selected Stimulated Cases, Fracture Perpendicular to k ?, L, =100 ft, 160-acre Well...

Starnes, Lee McKennon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Shale Gas, Nuraral Gas, Coal,Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas, ENvr_. Ries. LTRs. , Aug.acknowledge, "Marcellus shale gas production is still in its

Hagan, Colin R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Renew Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin Zip: 53549 Product: Sister company of Utica Energy, operates a 130m gallon ethanol plant in Jefferson, Wisconsin. References: Renew Energy LLC1 This article is a...

164

index | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Field Laboratories Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0024292 Hydraulic Fracturing Test Site Gas Technology Institute DE-FE0024357 Utica Shale Energy...

165

The U.S. DOE Exploration & Production R&D Program DOE Sponsored...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 Sustainable Management of Flowback Water during Hydraulic Fracturing of Marcellus Shale for Natural Gas Production (DE-FE0000975) ......

166

Searching for life in the deep shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Marcellus Shale, where fracking could affect microbes. PHOTO...various kinds of wells and aquifers, looking for clues that would...sources. While studying a fracking well in Pennsylvania's Marcellus...water from another Marcellus fracking well for microbial DNA. The...

Elizabeth Pennisi

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Utica Region 0 50 100 150 200 250 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrelsday Utica Region 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 Nov 44 Mbbld Production from new wells...

169

Marine transgressions and regressions recorded in Middle Devonian shore-zone deposits of the Catskill clastic wedge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Member overlies Portland Point Member) Panther Mountain Formation (Upper) Base defined...November 1994 1443 BRIDGE AND WILLIS B1 CORE PANTHER MTN FM NYCity Water Intake Manorkill Falls...over a few hundred meters in the upper Panther Mountain Format ion (see also Duke and...

170

REGIONAL DEPOSITIONAL TRENDS IN THE DEVONIAN GENESEO/BURKET BLACK SHALE BASED ON GAMMA RAY-DENSITY TRENDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACTGas shales are becoming increasingly important as new technologies are applied to enhance their production of natural gas. The Barnett, the Fayetteville, and the Haynesville (more)

Arnold, LaMichelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Architecture of an Alluvial Suite: Rocks Between the Townsend Tuff and Pickard Bay Tuff Beds (Early Devonian), Southwest Wales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...over an area measuring about 35 km from west to east by 12 km from south to north...relatively deep depressions, probably incised valleys, which they fill to a height less than...muddy sediments, and the shifting and valley-building activities of mixed tidal and...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Tectonic and Eustatic Signals in the Sequence Stratigraphy of the Upper Devonian Canadaway Group, New York State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...global sea level curve bears little resem-blance to the relative sea level curve for Allegany...final report: Albany, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, 2106...1970, Geologic map of New York, Niagara sheet; New York State Museum and Science Service...

Gerald J. Smith; Robert D. Jacobi

173

Sulfide, phosphate, and minor element enrichment in the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) of southern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The upper part of the New Albany Shale is divided into three members, which in ascending order are: (1) the Morgan Trail Member, a laminated brownish-black shale; (2) the Camp Run Member, an interbedded brownish-black and greenish-gray shale; and (3) the Clegg Creek Member, also a laminated brownish-black shale. The Morgan Trail and Camp Run Members contain 5 to 6% total organic carbon (TOC) and 2% sulfide sulfur. Isotopic composition of sulfide in these members ranges from -5.0 to -20.0%. C/S plots indicate linear relationships between abundances of these elements characteristic of sediments deposited in a noneuxinic marine environment. The Clegg Creek Member contains 10 to 15% TOC and 2 to 6% sulfide sulfur. Isotopic composition of sulfide ranges from -5.0 to -40.0%. The most negative values are characteristic of syngenetic pyrite formed within an anoxic water column. Abundances of carbon and sulfur are higher and uncorrelated in this member, consistent with deposition in an euxinic environment. Further, DOP (degree of pyritization) values suggest that pyrite formation was generally iron limited throughout Clegg Creek deposition, but sulfur isotopes indicate that syngenetic (water column) pyrite becomes an important component in the sediment only in the upper part of the member. At the top of the Clegg Creek Member a zone of phosphate nodules and trace metal enrichment coincides with maximal TOC values. During euxinic deposition, phosphate and trace metals accumulated below the chemocline due to limited vertical circulation in the water column. Phosphate and trace metals released for organic matter during early diagenesis resulted in precipitation of metal-rich phosphate nodules.

Beier, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Stratigraphic cross section (I) of the Upper Devonian Perrysburg and Java Formations and their equivalents, Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

This map covers various Java, Perrysburg, and Ohio Shale Formations in the Erie, Crawford, Warren, Forest, and Clarion counties of Pennsylvania. (DLC)

Harper, J.A.; Abel, K.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Stratigraphic cross section (G) of the Upper Devonian Perrysburg and Java Formations and their equivalents, Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

The cross sections are of the Girard D92, Girard G129, Linesville B15, Linesville I59, Stoneboro D7, Mercer A4, Mercer G3, Zelienople A9, and Zelienople F10 locations in Erie, Crawford, Mercer, Lawrence, and Butler counties in Pennsylvania. (DLC)

Harper, J.A.; Abel, K.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Stratigraphic cross section (B) of the Upper Devonian Perrysburg and Java Formations and their equivalents, Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

These cross section maps cover six locations in Crawford and Erie counties in Pennsylvania, two locations in Ashtabula County in Ohio, and one location in Chantauqua County in New York. (DLC)

Harper, J.A.; Abel, K.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tectonic and Eustatic Signals in the Sequence Stratigraphy of the Upper Devonian Canadaway Group, New York State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Survey-Alfred Oil and Gas Office, METC/EGSP series 111, 1 map. Van Tyne...Survey-Alfred Oil and Gas Office, METC/EGSP series 112, 1 map. Van Tyne...Survey-Alfred Oil and Gas Office, METC/EGSP series 113, 2 maps. Van Tyne...

Gerald J. Smith; Robert D. Jacobi

179

Stratigraphic cross section (J) of the Upper Devonian Perrysburg and Java Formations and their equivalents, Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

This map covers various Java, Perrysburg, and Ohio Shale Formations in Erie, Warren, and McKean counties in Pennsylvania, and in Chautauqua County in New York. (DLC)

Harper, J.A.; Abel, K.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Stratigraphic cross section (H) of the Upper Devonian Perrysburg and Java Formations and their equivalents, Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

The cross section maps cover eight locations in Erie, Crawford, Venango, and Clarion counties in Pennsylvania. (DLC)

Harper, J.A.; Abel, K.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

fe0024297-WVU | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources - Field Laboratories Unconventional Resources Enhanced Oil Recovery Deepwater Tech Methane Hydrate Marcellus Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory (MSEEL) Last Reviewed...

182

Technical Publications in Refereed Journals, Invited Contributions in Edited Technical Books and extended juried  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shear wave polarization corrections across multiple offsets and anisotropic in the productive zone for the Marcellus Shale, WV -- Expanded Abstracts, Vol. 33, 84th

Yang, Zong-Liang

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - abu dhabi emirate Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Day Graduate Student Association Caf Film Series A Breakdown of the Marcellus... Shale Issues 12;Table of Contents United Arab Emirates National Day 2010 Source: Lee,...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - arab emirates uae Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Day Graduate Student Association Caf Film Series A Breakdown of the Marcellus... Shale Issues 12;Table of Contents United ... Source: Lee, Dongwon - College of Information...

185

Netlognews-April 2014-issue 33  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 Cover image: Clusters of pyrite crystals in the Marcellus shale before gas production. After injection, the shale will be analyzed to evaluate any...

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancillary service details Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Materials Science 18 MARCELLUS SHALE APRIL 2011 EDITION Summary: reflects data on a group of six industries identified as...

187

The drill down.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The town of Millerton, Pa., has always been a small, rural farming community. Settled atop of the famed Marcellus Shale in the foothills of the (more)

Friel, Katherine Dailey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

1Prepared by BG Rahm & SJ Riha (NYS Water Resources Institute), D Yoxtheimer (Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davis & S Belmecheri (Penn State University) Environmental water Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center sessions: 1. What data sources are currently available for collecting information on water and air systems

189

To: CCSF Directors From: Terry Jordan and Drew Harvell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production "situation" is an example of a category of complex energy- environmental challenge to be faced C. To get to the bottom of the short-term issues involved in the Marcellus shale gas developmentTo: CCSF Directors From: Terry Jordan and Drew Harvell Re: Review of CCSF's Marcellus Topical Lunch

Angenent, Lars T.

190

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas in the Marcellus shale natural gas industry in the Mid-Atlantic region. Using publicly available information, we

Lee, Dongwon

191

A Political Ecology of Hydraulic Fracturing for Natural Gas in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environments, both in terms of perception and in terms of physical space. (Robbins 2004) #12;Outline ! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study Corbett #12;PA's Marcellus Shale Country is constructed as a Neoliberal Environment · Residents

Scott, Christopher

192

Conrad (Dan) Volz, DrPH, MPH Department of Environmental and Occupational Health,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, cdv5@pitt.edu Director- Center for Healthy Environments://fractracker.org http://data.fractracker.org Marcellus Shale Gas Extraction; Public Health Impacts and Visualizations Associated with Intense Marcellus Shale Gas Production 1. Community and behavioral health impacts. 2

Sibille, Etienne

193

Shale and the Environment Critical Need for a Government-University-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water and produces wastewater 1. Protecting surface waters from spills of chemicals or wastewater. 2 and Public Policy Center for Atmospheric Particle Studies #12;Drill Rigs Frac pumps Completion http://www.marcellus-shale.us Completion http://www.marcellus-shale.us Compressor stations Flaring Drilling Condensate Tanks Fracing

McGaughey, Alan

194

Stratigraphic and structural configuration of the Navajo (Jurassic) through Ouray (Mississippian-Devonian) formations in the vicinity of Davis and Lavender Canyons, southeastern Utah  

SciTech Connect

This study developed a three-dimensional computer model of stratigraphic and structural relationships within a 3497-km/sup 2/ (1350-mi/sup 2/) study area centered on the proposed site for a high-level nuclear waste repository in southeastern Utah. The model consists of a sequence of internally reconciled isopach and structure contour maps horizontally registered and stored in stratigraphic order. This model can be used to display cross sections, perspective block diagrams, or fence diagrams at any orientation; estimate depth of formation contacts and thicknesses for any new stratigraphic or hydrologic boreholes; facilitate ground-water modeling studies; and evaluate the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the study area. This study also includes limited evaluations of aquifer continuity in the Elephant Canyon and Honaker Trail Formations, and of salt dissolution and flowage features as interpreted from geophysical logs. The study identified a long history of movement in the fault system in the north-central part of the study area and a major salt flowage feature in the northeastern part. It describes the Elephant Canyon Formation aquifer as laterally limited, the Honaker Trail Formation aquifer as fairly continuous over the area, and Beef Basin in the southern part of the area as a probable dissolution feature. It also concludes that the Shay-Bridger Jack-Salt Creek Graben system is apparently a vertically continuous feature between the basement and ground surface. No stratigraphic or structural discontinuities were detected in the vicinity of Davis Canyon that appear to be detrimental to the siting of a waste repository.

McCleary, J.R.; Romie, J.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Palaeomagnetism of Devonian ring complexes from the Bayuda Desert, Sudannew constraints on the apparent polar wander path for Gondwanaland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Sabaloka ring complex, Sudan (Soffel et al. 1990...results from Mauritania and Sudan and the proximity of...more soundly based, on thermal and AF demagnetization...up to 90 per cent upon thermal demagnetization to 400...from the Gilif Hills, Sudan (17.83'N, 32......

V. Bachtadse; J. C. Briden

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Maps showing location of stratigraphic cross sections and cored drill holes used in the study of the Devonian black shales in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

Maps were prepared showing the location of drill holes used in the stratigraphic study of black shale deposits in the Appalachian Basin. (DC)

Roen, J.B.; Wallace, L.G.; Kepferle, R.C.; Potter, P.E.; Pryor, W.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Southern tie section: a stratigraphic section through the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia  

SciTech Connect

The map of the Southern Tie Section is a sequel to the Preliminary Stratigraphic Cross Section of Kepferle, Wilson, and Ettensohn (1978) and uses many of the datum points of that publication. Sample descriptions and other geophysical log curves in addition to the gamma ray (natural radioactivity) curve are used for correlation; and the geology of the substrates of the shale sequence is examined for its relation to that of the sequence itself. The section uses the Base of the Sunbury shale (rather than the base of the shale sequence) as the stratigraphic datum in order better to visualize syndepositional and earlier tectonism which affect the distribution and internal constitution of the sequence. This convention shows elegantly the onlap of the sequence upon the Cincinnati Arch, but does not so readily point out the meaning of the Wildcat Valley Sandstone in the Greendale Syncline at the southeast end of the section.

Wilson, E.N.; Zafar, J.S.; Ettensohn, F.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Depositional and dissolutional processes and their resulting thinning patterns within the Middle Devonian Prairie Formation, Williston basin, North Dakota and Montana  

SciTech Connect

Within the Williston basin, thickness variations of the Prairie Formation are common and are interpreted to originate by two processes: differential accumulation of salt during deposition and differential removal of salt by dissolution. Unambiguous evidence for each process is rare because the Prairie/Winnipegosis interval is seldom cored within the US portion of the basin. Therefore, indirect methods, using well logs, provide the principal method for identifying characteristics of the two processes. The results of this study indicate that the two processes can be distinguished using correlations within the Prairie Formation. Several regionally correlative brining-upward and probably shoaling-upward sequences occur within the Prairie Formation. Near the basin center, the lowermost sequence is transitional with the underlying Winnipegosis Formation. This transition is characterized by thinly laminated basal carbonates that become increasingly interbedded with anhydrites of the basin-centered Ratner member. The remainder of the sequence progresses up through halite and culminates in the halite-dominated Esterhazy potash beds. Two overlying sequences also brine upward; however, these sequences lack the basal anhydrite and instead begin with halite and culminate in the Belle Plaine and Mountrail potash members, respectively. A fourth sequence is indicated by several feet of halite capping the Mountrail member in some parts of the basin. Subsequent erosion or dissolution prior to burial may have removed the upper portion of this sequence. Cross sections show that the lower Prairie gradually decreases in thickness from the basin to its margins. This thickens variation is most simply explained by decreasing accommodation potential due to decreased basin topography away from the basin depocenter and by depositional onlap of the Prairie toward the basin margins.

Oglesby, C.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of eastern Devonian gas shale: Society of PetroleumShale Disposal Reference Case August 2014 Borehole activity: Oil and gas

Zheng, Liange

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Dr. Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wm. E. Mott, Director Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div. 0f.f ice of Environment (EU- 14) Dept. of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Dr. Mott: MED Warehousing Location The sites listed in your letter of Febru; to determine present utilization and ownershi] the information available at this time: 1. Utica Street Warehouse 240 W. Utica Street Buffalo, ?pI The area of 240 and 242 W. Utica St, drive to a 4-story parking garage for Ch The ramp is about 4 years old and previol there was a paved parking lot on the sit 1960' s. The warehouse structure was denI unknown previous date. 2. West Genesee Street Warehouse Buffalo, NY The W. Genesee area is currently abc in .length. About half of the streets prc eliminated to make way for the Niagara E: the remaining streets there is one old bl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

202

Texas Consortium for Computational Seismology Fifth Bi-Annual Research Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Karimi Predictive coherence Mehdi Far AVOAz inversion ­ Marcellus shale example 12:00­1:00 Lunch 1 integral operators Jack Poulson (Stanford) Parallel butterfly algorithm Jingwei Hu Fast anisotropic

Texas at Austin, University of

203

Popular Epidemiology and Fracking: Citizens Concerns Regarding the Economic, Environmental, Health and Social Impacts of Unconventional Natural Gas Drilling Operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pennsylvania sits atop the Marcellus Shale, a reservoir of natural gas that was untapped until the 2004 introduction of unconventional natural gas drilling operations (UNGDO) in the state. Colloquially known as fracking

Martha Powers; Poune Saberi; Richard Pepino; Emily Strupp

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

02-2012 | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marcellus shale-one of the nation's top-producing natural gas sites in recent years-uses hydraulic fracturing, which requires a large amount of water. After the shale is fractured...

205

Microsoft Word - EPAct_TRS_Greene Co Site_final_20140915.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R; Blaushild, D.; Sams, J.; and Veloski, G An Evaluation of Fracture Growth and GasFluid Migration as Horizontal Marcellus Shale Gas Wells are...

206

Risk assessment of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing fluid spills in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast-paced growth in natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale has fueled intense debate over the risk of groundwater contamination from hydraulic fracturing and the shale gas extraction process at large. While several ...

Fletcher, Sarah Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Ap  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

use (1) generators (1) geothermal (1) greenhouse gases (1) hydroelectric (1) Iraq (1) light-duty vehicles (1) Marcellus (1) No Sunset Case (1) nuclear (1) oil prices (1) policy...

208

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marcellus Marcellus 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Marcellus 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 Dec 39 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 41 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Marcellus +4 -2 +2 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 200 400 600 Dec 13,303 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 13,721 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Marcellus +612 -193 +419 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Marcellus Rig count rigs (3) (2) (1) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change

209

Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The USA is embarking upon tackling the serious environmental challenges posed to the world by greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). The dimension of the problem is daunting. In fact, according to the Energy Information Agency, nearly 6 billion metric tons of CO2 were produced in the USA in 2007 with coal-burning power plants contributing about 2 billion metric tons. To mitigate the concerns associated with CO2 emission, geological sequestration holds promise. Among the potential geological storage sites, unmineable coal seams and shale formations in particular show promise because of the probability of methane recovery while sequestering the CO2. However. the success of large-scale sequestration of CO2 in coal and shale would hinge on a thorough understanding of CO2's interactions with host reservoirs. An important parameter for successful storage of CO2 reservoirs would be whether the pressurized CO2 would remain invariant in coal and shale formations under reasonable internal and/or external perturbations. Recent research has brought to the fore the potential of induced seismicity, which may result in caprock compromise. Therefore, to evaluate the potential risks involved in sequestering CO2 in Illinois bituminous coal seams and shale, we studied: (i) the mechanical behavior of Murphysboro (Illinois) and Houchin Creek (Illinois) coals, (ii) thermodynamic behavior of Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, (iii) how high pressure CO2 (up to 20.7 MPa) modifies the viscosity of the host, (iv) the rate of emission of CO2 from Illinois bituminous coal and shale cores if the cores, which were pressurized with high pressure (? 20.7 MPa) CO2, were exposed to an atmospheric pressure, simulating the development of leakage pathways, (v) whether there are any fractions of CO2 stored in these hosts which are resistance to emission by simply exposing the cores to atmospheric pressure, and (vi) how compressive shockwaves applied to the coal and shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ? T ? 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ? P ? 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

Malhotra, Vivak

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Lawrence Head Volcanics and Dunnage Melange, Newfoundland Appalachians: Ordovician ridge subduction or back arc rift? William S.F. Kidd1, Adam Schoonmaker2, Stephen E. DeLong1, John F. Bender3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University at Albany, Albany NY 12222 2 Department of Geology, Utica Abstract We review the geological setting and report new geochemical trace element data from the Ordovician Exploits Group in the same stratigraphic position just below the mid-Ordovician cherts and black shales

Kidd, William S. F.

211

FEDERAL LOAN SERVICERS A loan servicer is a company that handles the billing and other services on your federal student loan. The loan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Correspondence) PO Box 7060 Utica, NY 13504-7060 1-800-826-4470 Web site: www.acs-education.com/ Aspire Resources Inc. PO Box 65970 West Des Moines, IA 50265-0970 1-855-475-3335 Web site: www-800-663-1662 Web site: www.MyCornerStoneLoan.org Direct Consolidation Loan Program US Department of Education Loan

Goldman, Steven A.

212

Forthcoming Events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Iess than haif 3RANGE the cost ofother (UV-VISIBLE...at less than half the cost of other recording spectrophotometers...Co., Utica) 3-5. Nuclear Science, 7th annual...Oak Ridge Inst. of Nuclear Stuidies. Oak Ridge...Bell Tele-phone La-bs.. INlirrav Hill. N...

1960-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

(Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Germanium production in the United States comes from either the refining of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

owing to declining market conditions, resumed operations under new ownership in 2010. There was no indication that any germanium had been recovered from these concentrates in 2010. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Quapaw, OK

214

(Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Germanium production in the United States comes from either the refining of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

owing to declining market conditions, resumed operations under new ownership in 2010. There was no indication that any germanium had been recovered from these concentrates in 2011. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Quapaw, OK

215

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Group (Devonian Black Shale) in Illinois to evaluate its characteristics as a source of hydrocarbons. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This project is a detailed analysis of the lithology, stratigraphy, and structure of the New Albany Group in Illinois to determine those characteristics of lithology, thickness, regional distribution, vertical and lateral variability, and deformation that are most relevant to the occurrence of hydrocarbons. The mineralogic and petrographic properties of the New Albany Shale in Illinois are characterized. This includes the quantitative and qualitative characterization, by optical and x-ray techniques, of the inorganic mineral constituents, the dispersed organic matter, and the fabric of the shale. Not less than 49 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in 300 to 500 shale samples, which are representative cross sections of the cores taken. Organic and mineral carbon are included; total hydrogen; total sulfur and when that exceeds 0.5%, pyritic and sulfate sulfur. Also, other elements observed during normal routine analysis are reported. The character of off-gases from approximately 10-foot intervals in cores collected in the Illinois Basin is determined. In addition, the relative distribution of hydrocarbons is determined in ten specially prepared core samples, which are the same as those in previous unit. The carbon isotopic composition of methane in off-gases is determined from core samples whenever sufficient methane can be collected. This data is compared to other pertinent data such as gas composition and vitrinite reflectance for the purpose of making interpretations as to the origin and maturity of the gas. Laboratory experiments are performed to study the relative effects and significance of chemical and isotopic fractionation that occurs as gas is released from core samples. Data accumulated can be evaluated to gain a better understanding of the origin, migration, and location of natural gas associated with the shales.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

400 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Natural gas production million cubic feet/day 0 250 500 750 1,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well oil production per rig barrels/day 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feet/day (450) (400) (350) (300) (250) (200) (150) (100) (50) 0 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Legacy gas production change million cubic feet/day

217

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Marcellus unproved technically recoverable resources: AEO2011, USGS 2011, and AEO2012 1. Marcellus unproved technically recoverable resources: AEO2011, USGS 2011, and AEO2012 Well spacing Estimate Area (square miles) Acres Wells per square mile Percent of area untested Percent of area with potential Average EUR (billion cubic feet per well) TRR (billion cubic feet) AEO2011 (as of 1/1/2009) Marcellus 94,893 80 8 99% 34% 1.62 410,374 USGS (2011 assessment) Marcellus 104,067 132 4.9 99% 18% 0.93 84,198 Foldbelt 19,063 149 4.3 100% 5% 0.21 765 Interior 45,156 149 4.3 99% 37% 1.15 81,374 Western 39,844 117 5.5 99% 7% 0.13 2,059 AEO2012 (as of 1/1/2010) Marcellus 104,067 132 4.9 99% 18% 1.56 140,541 Foldbelt 19,063 149 4.3 100% 5% 0.21 757 Interior 45,161 149 4.3 99% 37% 1.95 137,677

218

Sedimentology: Tectonic Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... scientific disciplines is as successful as that demonstrated by Friend and Moody-Stuart (Skr. Norsk Polarinst., 157 ; 1972) in their intricate analysis of Devonian palaeogeography in Spitsbergen. ...

Our Structural Geology Correspondent

1973-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

Subsurface horizontal microfracture propagation within the middle member of the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Devonian-Mississippian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin does not outcrop. All rock samples are obtained by coring. Open, uncemented, horizontal mode I (joints, with (more)

Warner, Travis Blackburn.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Sensitivity of seismic reflections to variations in anisotropy in the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper DevonianLower Mississippian Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin is estimated to have significant amount of technically recoverable oil and gas. The objective of (more)

Ye, Fang, geophysicist.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2012 0, 2012 Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site System to Monitor Environmental Conditions Developed with Department of Energy Funding Washington, D.C. - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley has NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley has developed a technology to remotely monitor the environment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University. The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently

222

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2013 | Release Date: November 14, 13, 2013 | Release Date: November 14, 2013 | Next Release: November 21, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices As reported in October, natural gas pipeline expansions were slated to add nearly 1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of capacity to flow gas to markets in New York and New Jersey on November 1. These expansions happened on schedule, increasing access for consumers in the New York City metropolitan area to natural gas produced in the Appalachian Basin's Marcellus Shale play. This has resulted in lower gas prices for New York consumers, and has eased supply backup in the Marcellus Basin.

223

Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The six regions analyzed in this report accounted for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-12. December 2013 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken 3 Eagle Ford 4 Haynesville 5 Marcellus 6 Niobrara 7 Permian 8 Explanatory notes 9 Sources 10 Bakken Marcellus Niobrara Haynesville Eagle Ford Permian U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville

224

TO UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 18% MT. HEALTHY WATION CINCINNATI 51. OHIO December 9, 1955 FROM Herbert Davis REFERENCE OBJECTIVEOFlRIF This visit was made to observe the physical equipment and the personnel at Utica Metals Division as a possible source for development work i'n vacuum melting and casting. CONCLU!3IOZG AND RECOMMENDATIOlYS The prime business of this Division of the Utica Drop Forge & Tool Corp. is the production of ingots and fabricated shapes from hia temperature alloys for the aircraft, automotive and electronics industries. This company has no apparent interest In development work but would be interested in providing facilities for a long range production program.

225

2004 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; April 2004; v. 32; no. 4; p. 305308; doi: 10.1130/G20202.1; 5 figures. 305  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Tennessee and Kentucky show extensive erosion surfaces within the Chattanooga and New Albany Shales that al. 305 Pyrite ooids in Devonian black shales record intermittent sea-level drop and shallow 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6365, USA ABSTRACT Upper Devonian black shales of the eastern United

Polly, David

226

ILLINOIS STATE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Interior Cratonic Basins, 1991, edited by M. W. Leighton, D. R. Kalata, D. F. Oltz,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

basin and the extent of facies of the Devonian- Mississippian New Albany Group Shale that are thermally to source beds of the Devonian-Mississippian New Albany Group in the deep basin. The New Albany Group In this section, we define the migration that has occurred in the Illinois basin on the basis of shale

Bethke, Craig

227

Author's personal copy Fossil brines preserved in the St-Lawrence Lowlands,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

halite disso- lution. 87 Sr/86 Sr ratios and Ca excess indicate prolonged interactions with silicate degassing, are identical to their production ratios in rocks. The source of salinity (halite dissolution during Devonian­Silurian time. Brines might result from infiltration of Devonian water leaching halite

Long, Bernard

228

Kentucky, Tennessee: corniferous potential may be worth exploring  

SciTech Connect

The driller's term, corniferous, refers to all carbonate and clastic strata, regardless of geologic age, underlying the regional unconformity below the late Devonian-early Mississippian New Albany shale and overlying the middle Silurian Clinton shale in the study area. From oldest to youngest, the formations that constitute the corniferous are the middle Silurian Keefer formation, the middle Silurian Lockport dolomite, the upper Silurian Salina formation, the lower Devonian Helderberg limestone, the lower Devonian Oriskanysandstone, the lower Devonian Onondaga limestone, and in the extreme western portion of the study area, the middle Devonian Boyle dolomite. The overlying New Albany shale also is termed Ohio shale or Chattanooga shale in the Appalachian Basin. To drillers, it is known simply as the black shale. The study area is located in E. Kentucky on the western flank of the Appalachian Basin and covers all or parts of 32 counties.

Currie, M.T.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Statement of David P. Russ Regional Executive for the Northeast, U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geologicallybased energy resources, including unconventional resources such as shale gas and shale oil. USGS a new assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Marcellus Shale. Results from Subcommittee To Examine Shale Gas Production and Water Resources in the Eastern United States October 20

Torgersen, Christian

230

Hydraulic Fracturing and Horizontal Gas Well Drilling Reference List This list is in no way exhaustive. Rather, it attempts to provide a set of primary references that offer key pieces of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development Impact Assessment of Natural Gas Production in the New York City Water Supply Watershed (2009). NYCDEP http://home2.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/news/natural_gas_drilling.shtml Review of water related and infiltration events Short Scholarly Features Natural Gas Plays in the Marcellus Shale: Challenges & Potential

Wang, Z. Jane

231

Top-Down Modeling; Practical, Fast-Track, Reservoir Modeling for Shale Formations AAPG/SEG/SPE/SPWLA Hedberg Conference, Austin, TX December 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for New Albany, Lower Huron and Marcellus Shales. Top-Down Modeling technology integrates reservoir1 Top-Down Modeling; Practical, Fast-Track, Reservoir Modeling for Shale Formations AAPG OF SHALE RESOURCE PLAYS" DECEMBER 5-10, 2010 ­ AUSTIN, TEXAS Top-Down Modeling; Practical, Fast Track

Mohaghegh, Shahab

232

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal efficiency, fuel heating value, power plant...natural gas as a bridge fuel . Clim Change 118 : 609...emissions and freshwater consumption of Marcellus shale gas...following Fig. S1) for the fuel cycle of shale gas...water, and/or oil) Vessel and pipeline blowdowns...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick ODonoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Margaret A. Ormsby Oral History Project Compiled by Christopher Hives (1999)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Margaret A. Ormsby Oral History Project fonds Compiled by Christopher Hives (1999) University Alphabetically by Interviewee 1-6 #1 John Bovey (April 9, 1999) - 2 tapes 1-7 #2 Keith Ralston (May 4, 1999) 1 Marcellus (May 11, 1999) 1-10 #5 Lewis G. Thomas (May 12, 1999) 1-11 #6 Keith Ralston (May 12, 1999) 1-12 #7

Handy, Todd C.

234

Beyond Population and Environment: Household Demographic Life Cycles and Land Use Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with different economic and ecological implications. We estimate a system of structural equations that accounts Small Farms in the Amazon Stephen G. Perz & Robert T. Walker & Marcellus M. Caldas Published online: 6 in human-environment interactions, demo- graphic environmental research needs to move beyond

Walker, Robert T.

235

Economic Incentives and Regulatory Framework for Shale Gas Well Site Reclamation in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic Incentives and Regulatory Framework for Shale Gas Well Site Reclamation in Pennsylvania ... They also noted that economies of scale exist when more than one well is on each well pad, which is the norm for wells in the Marcellus Shale. ... Pennsylvanias experience with bonding of coal mining sites may be indicative of what to expect. ...

Austin L. Mitchell; Elizabeth A. Casman

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Elastic constants and velocity surfaces of indurated anisotropic shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The velocities of two Devonian-Mississippian shales have been measured to confining pressures of 200 MPa in a laboratory study of anisotropy and wave propagation. Both samples were found to be transversely iso...

Joel E. Johnston; Nikolas I. Christensen

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

RESPONSES OF SHEEP TO ZYGADENUS GRAMINEUS, "DEATH CAMAS"  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Zygadenus gramineus, "death camas," from which most of the...ZYGADENUS GRAMINEUS, "DEATH CAMAS". | An extract of Zygadenus gramineus, "death camas," from which most of the...equivalents in the Devonian of the North American interior, although...

Alvah R. Mclaughlin

1931-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Wave-influenced deltaic sandstone bodies and offshore deposits in the Viking Formation, Hamilton Lake area, south-central Alberta, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Nevis Avalon Reservoirs, Jeanne dArc Basin. Geological Association of Canada...sedimentation in the Devonian Bokkeveld Basin of South Africa. Journal of Sedimentary...Cretaceous San Miguel Formation, Maverick Basin, South Texas. Transactions - Gulf...

Lynn T. Dafoe; Murray K. Gingras; S. George Pemberton

239

A Further Investigation of Local Nonparametric Estimation Techniques in Shale Gas Resource Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Local nonparametric prediction models are used to develop drill site selection strategies for the Devonian Antrim Shale (Michigan Basin) and the Mississippian Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin). The presentation il...

Emil D. Attanasi; Timothy C. Coburn; Philip A. Freeman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Synchrotron X-ray Applications Toward an Understanding of Elastic Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.M. (2008) Coalbed- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs. J. Petrol.Sachsenhofer, R.F. (2010) Shale gas in Europe: a regionalstudy from a Devonian shale gas play, Michigan basin. AAPG

Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

J. Paleont., 83(1), 2009, pp. 7079 Copyright 2009, The Paleontological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foerstia White, 1923, are the remains of an enigmatic Late Devonian plant-like organism of possible terres organic remains are known from numerous localities in the eastern United States, largely from offshore

Schieber, Juergen

242

Chemostratigraphy And Geochemical Constraints On The Deposition Of The Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Eastern Montana And Western North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rowe, Harold The late Devonian-early Mississippian Bakken Formation was deposited in a structural-sedimentary intracratonic basin that extends across a large part of modern day North (more)

Maldonado, David Nyrup

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chemostratigraphy And Geochemical Constraints On The Deposition Of The Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Eastern Montana And Western North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rowe, Harold The late Devonian-early Mississippian Bakken Formation was deposited in a structural-sedimentary intracratonic basin that extends across a large part of modern day North (more)

Maldonado, David Nyrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

245

Deformation of shale: mechanical properties and indicators of mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basins, shales of Devonian age are commonly considered reservoir rocks I' or natural gas [Woodward, 1958; Lockett, 1968; Long, 1979; Gonzales and Johnson, 1985], Economic gas production from the Devonian shales of these basins is associated..., 1967; Chang et al. , 1979; Smith and Cheatham, 1980; Jordan and Nuesch, 1989; Nuesch, 1991]. Shales deform by fracture and friction-controlled slip at low mean stresses (& 200 MPa), while semi-brittle cataclasis and kinking are observed at high...

Ibanez, William Dayan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Supplement to Echinodermata Articles 8-10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Michigan, Laudon coll., Esso Prod. Research Co. Ddx Wanakah Shale Member, Ludlowtalle Formation, Hamilton Group, Erian, Middle Devonian; on 18-mile Creek near bridge on old Lakeshore Road near Lake Erie southwest of Buffalo, Erie County, New York. Jeffords..., New York. W. F. Berry coll., Univ. Kansas Paleont. Inst. Dib Wanakah Shale Member (upper part), Ludlotvville Formation, Hamilton Group,Erian,Middle Devonian; cut on N.Y. 63 about 2 miles southeast of East Bethany, Genessee County, New York. W. F. Berry...

Moore, R. C.; Jeffords, Russell M.; Miller, T. H.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Workshop on gas potential of New Albany shale held in conjunction with the 1995 Ioga meeting in Evansville, Indiana on March 1, 1995. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

This workshop is intended to provide an overview of the organic lithofacies, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, and gas potential of the Devonian and Mississippian New Albany Shale in the Illinois Basin. In addition, the reservoir characteristics and completion technology for productive organic-rich Devonian shales in the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are also reviewed. Emphasis is being placed on how proven technologies together with appropriate geologic and geochemical information can be used to explore for gas in the New Albany Shale.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Simulator for unconventional gas resources multi-dimensional model SUGAR-MD. Volume I. Reservoir model analysis and validation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are: (1) To develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales. (2) To determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales. (3) To recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales. (4) To analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance. (5) To study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. The flow equations that are the mathematical basis of the two-dimensional model are presented. It is assumed that gas transport to producing wells in Devonian shale reservoirs occurs through a natural fracture system into which matrix blocks of contrasting physical properties deliver contained gas. That is, the matrix acts as a uniformly distributed gas source in a fracture medium. Gas desorption from pore walls is treated as a uniformly distributed source within the matrix blocks. 24 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 8, 2013 | Release Date: September 19, 2013 | Next Release: September 26, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Marcellus gas pipe capacity seen rising 0.5 Bcf/d by month's end; additional expansions expected this winter Initial service could begin by the end of September for two projects that would increase natural gas takeaway capacity from the Marcellus Shale formation by a combined 0.5 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). These two projects are a 7.9 mile, 0.23 Bcf/d looping pipeline added to Kinder Morgan's Tennessee Gas Pipeline (TGP) (known as the MPP Project's "313 Loop") and a 2.5 mile, 0.22 Bcf/d pipeline connecting NiSource's Columbia Gas Transmission (TCO) pipeline to a 1,329-megawatt gas-fired

250

Shale Reservoir Characterization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Characterization Shale Reservoir Characterization Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Gas-producing shales are predominantly composed of consolidated clay-sized particles with a high organic content. High subsurface pressures and temperatures convert the organic matter to oil and gas, which may migrate to conventional petroleum traps and also remains within the shale. However, the clay content severely limits gas and fluid flow within the shales. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the mineral and organic content, occurrence of natural fractures, thermal maturity, shale volumes, porosity

251

File:EIA-shaleusa5.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

shaleusa5.pdf shaleusa5.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Marcellus Shale Play, Appalachian Basin Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 4.37 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Marcellus Shale Play, Appalachian Basin Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-17 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:42, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:42, 20 December 2010 1,275 × 1,650 (4.37 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

252

NETL: LabNotes -April 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2011 April 2011 Unconventional Oil and Gas Unconventional fossil energy resources consist of petroleum and natural gas that are either difficult to reach or challenging to extract. Examples include fine-grainedformations that contain oil and/or natural gas. These fine-grained source rocks generally have very low permeability, which for a long time made extraction uneconomical. Advances in directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, to which NETL R&D contributed, were required before the resources could be recovered economically in commercial quantities (Figure 1). Figure 1. Gas from a Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, PA is flared prior to a workover in the winter of 2010 (photo by Tom Mroz, DOE). Figure 1. Gas from a Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, PA is flared prior to a workover in the winter of 2010 (photo by Tom Mroz, DOE).

253

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ See All Petroleum Reports ‹ See All Petroleum Reports Drilling Productivity Report Release Date: December 9, 2013 | Next Release: January 13, 2014 | full report Previous Issue (pdf) month: December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 Go Contents Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Year-over-year summary Explanatory notes and sources Full report Report data (aggregated by region) Frequently Asked Questions Related Today in Energy articles Marcellus region to provide 18% of total U.S. natural gas production this month Bakken oil production forecast to top 1 million barrels per day next month Production, depletion trends are keys to predicting natural gas and oil production Drilling efficiency is a key driver of oil and natural gas production Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production

254

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2013 | Release Date: October 24, 23, 2013 | Release Date: October 24, 2013 | Next Release: October 31, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: FERC approves service on projects providing almost 1 Bcf/d of gas to New York/New Jersey consumers Last week, on October 17, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved the start of service on November 1 of two related projects that would provide almost 1.0 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of natural gas from the Appalachian Basin's Marcellus Shale play to consumers in the New York/New Jersey region. The projects would take advantage of the significant rise in Marcellus gas production that has taken place over the past two years to increase gas supply to the New York area, where pipeline

255

EPNews 2010 Summer.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges Facing Developers ...1 Challenges Facing Developers ...1 Commentary ...................................2 Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use..... 10 Test Use for Mine Drainage Water ........................... 14 Tool for Water Management .....17 E&P Snapshots ............................ 20 Upcoming Meetings and Presentations ............................... 23 CONTACTS Roy Long Technology Manager- Ultra-Deepwater, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 281-494-2520 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Albert Yost Technology Manager- Exploration & Production, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4479 albert.yost@netl.doe.gov Oil & Natural Gas Program Newsletter Summer 2010 1 Challenges Facing Developers of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin Development of the Marcellus Shale play will result in 1000s to 10,000s of

256

Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.  

SciTech Connect

Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chattan  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chattan Chattan ooga Eag le For d Devo nian (Ohi o) Mar cellu s Utica He rm osa Nio bra ra* Bak ken *** Nio bra ra* Mo nte rey Mo nte rey - Tem blo r Ava lon Heath ** Tuscaloosa Mow ry Ant rim Bar net t Ben d New Alban y Wo odf ord Ba rn ett - Wo od for d Le wis Hilli ard- Ba xter - Man cos -Nio bra ra Exc e llo- Mul ky Fay ette ville Floyd- Neal Gam m on Cody Hayn esvil le- Boss ier Ma nco s Pie rre- Nio bra ra Conasauga Colo rado Grou p Utica Doig Phosphate Montney Muskwa- Otter Park Muskwa-Otter Park, Evie-Klua Lower Besa River Frederick Brook Horton Bluff Pimienta Eagle Ford, Tithonian Maltrata Eagle Ford, La Casita Pimienta, Tamaulipas North American shale plays 0 400 800 200 600 Miles ± Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies. Canada and Mexico plays from ARI. Updated: May 9, 2011 (as of May 2011) * Mixed shale & chalk play

258

NETL: Features - May 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 NETL Technologies Turn Shale Gas into a Reliable, Domestic Star Energy Resource The Setting: Devonian Period swamps, 360 - 415 million years ago, a warm, humid climate. The Players: Flourishing marine life. Testing out their new lungs, some of the first creatures to crawl out of the water and the beginnings of great forests colonize the land. The Action: Exploration, survival, and finally death. As these primitive land dwellers died, their remains ended up in the water and were pressed down within the forming rock layers. And why is NETL so interested in this never-to-be-Hollywood-blockbuster? Geologists believe the land looked like this during the Middle Devonian period when shale gas was forming. Today's states are shown in outline. Geologists believe the land looked like this during the Middle Devonian period when shale gas was forming. Today's states are shown in outline. (Photo courtesy of Prof. Ron Blakey, Northern Arizona University)

259

Project 281  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALE IN ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALE IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION Background Global climate change is an area of increasing concern, and many scientists believe the cause is due, at least in part, to increased emissions of CO 2 , especially from the combustion of fossil fuels. These concerns are driving initiatives to develop carbon management technologies. One promising approach is geologic sequestration of CO 2 . Options being investigated include sequestration in saline aquifers, oil and gas reservoirs, and unminable coal seams In analogy with sequestration in coal seams, another option may be sequestration in Devonian black shales, organic-rich rocks that serve as both a source and trap for natural gas. Most of the natural gas is

260

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Revision of suborder Cyathocrinina (class Crinoidea)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0000 0 C7 O Clistocrinus innnanuuuuu 9 _i Lageniocrinus 6 0 6.00 ODU Dichostreblocrinus Mississippian Devonian of10,,oronon OVoroV&9 L ampadosocrinus AAA() 0 0 0 0U 0U Pentececrinus Ann,nn 0 0\\1 0 Q Streblocrinus oanon 17.R z Tytthocrmus Silurian... 0000 0 C7 O Clistocrinus innnanuuuuu 9 _i Lageniocrinus 6 0 6.00 ODU Dichostreblocrinus Mississippian Devonian of10,,oronon OVoroV&9 L ampadosocrinus AAA() 0 0 0 0U 0U Pentececrinus Ann,nn 0 0\\1 0 Q Streblocrinus oanon 17.R z Tytthocrmus Silurian...

Lane, N. G.

1967-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Wrench faulting and cavity concentration ; Dollarhide Field, Andrews County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Evaluation and implementation of CO2 injection at the Dollarhide Devonian Unit: SPE 17277, 9- 18. Reblin, M. T. , Chapel, G. G. , Roche, S. L. , and Keller, C. , 1991, A 3-D reflection seismic survey over the Dollarhide field, Andrews County, Texas..., Evaluation and implementation of CO2 injection at the Dollarhide Devonian Unit: SPE 17277, 9- 18. Reblin, M. T. , Chapel, G. G. , Roche, S. L. , and Keller, C. , 1991, A 3-D reflection seismic survey over the Dollarhide field, Andrews County, Texas...

Dygert, Todd Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jan. 4, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 5, Jan. 4, 2012 | Release Date: Jan. 5, 2012 | Next Release: Jan. 12, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Shale Prospects Attract Foreign Companies This week, two major shale joint ventures were announced between foreign energy companies and U.S.-based production companies: Total S.A. (France) will partner with Chesapeake Energy Corporation and EnerVest, Ltd. at the cost of $2.3 billion to Total. Total will get a 25 percent stake of the joint venture in acreage in the liquids rich area of the Utica Shale in Ohio. Total has partnered with Chesapeake previously, in a 2010 $2.3 billion joint venture in the Barnett Shale. For $2.2 billion, Sinopec International Petroleum Exploration and

264

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Authors: Ruppel, Stephen C. and Robert G. Loucks, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of GeoSciences, University of Texas at Austin Venue: West Texas Geological Society Symposium, in Midland, Texas September 10-12, 2008. http://www.wtgs.org [external site] Abstract: The Devonian Woodford and Mississippian Barnett formations document a long (approximately 70-80 million year) period of clay-rich sedimentation along the southern margin of the Laurentian paleocraton during the middle Paleozoic. As might be expected, these rocks display many general similarities, for example in thickness, mineralogy, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, organic matter type, etc. Both also display conspicuous and systematic changes in composition from more proximal to more distal areas. However, our studies of more than 75 cores across the Permian and Ft. Worth Basins demonstrate that dissimilarities between the two systems are perhaps even more common than similarities. Many of the differences can be related to paleogeography, basin hydrography, and global sea level.

265

Hummingbird structure in southeastern Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect

Saskatchewan's first Devonian oil pool was discovered September 1966, at Hummingbird, 45 mi (72 km) southwest of Weyburn, Saskatchewan. The Hummingbird structure, located on the northwest flank of the Williston basin, is domal is nature and covers approximately 1 mi/sup 2/ (2.6 km/sup 2/). Oil production is from two zones. The Ratcliffe Member of the Mississippian Charles Formation produces from an algal and bioclastic limestone averaging 49 ft (15 m) thick. The Devonian Birdbear Formation produces from a finely crystalline vuggy dolomite averaging 56 ft (17 m) thick. The Hummingbird structure is a sedimentary structure resulting from multiple-stage salt solution and collapse. Recurring local solution of Middle Devonian Prairie Evaporite during Late Devonian and Early Mississippian time resulted in collapse of overlying strata and deposition of compensating thicknesses of Souris River, Duperow, and Bakken sediments. Between Mississippian and Cretaceous time, solution of Prairie Evaporite in the surrounding area caused collapse of all super-Prairie evaporite beds. The extra Souris River, Duperow, and Bakken strata at Hummingbird created the structure. Vertical migration of formation waters along a high-angle fault is suggested as the cause of the local salt solution at Hummingbird.

Smith, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Deep-Sea Research II 54 (2007) 13121326 Oxidation of detrital pyrite as a cause for Marcasite Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale of New York State and three examples from sequence boundaries in the New Albany Shale of Kentucky 10 July 2007 Abstract Late Devonian black shale successions in the eastern US contain numerous; Black shale 1. Introduction Flooding surfaces and sequence boundaries in marine mudstone successions

Polly, David

267

Synthetic fuels from US oil shales: a technical and economic verification of the HYTORT Process. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the HYTORT process for both Eocene and Devonian shales. The program is divided into five major task areas: laboratory program, bench-scale program, process development unit tests, process environmental assessment, and process design and economics. (DLC)

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evolution of leaf-form in land plants linked to atmospheric CO2 decline in the Late Palaeozoic era  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... a planate leaf with the same stomatal characteristics indicate that it would have suffered lethal overheating, because of greater interception of ... , because of greater interception of solar energy and low transpiration. When planate leaves first appeared in the Late Devonian and ...

D. J. Beerling; C. P. Osborne; W. G. Chaloner

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Correlation and Stratigraphic Analysis of the Bakken and Sappington Formations in Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian (Late Fammenian-Tournaisian) Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin is one of the largest continuous oil fields in the U.S. The upper and the lower shale members are organic rich source rocks that supplied oil...

Adiguzel, Zeynep 1986-

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Pressure-transient test design in tight gas formations  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines a procedure for pre- and postfracture pressure-transient test design in low-permeability (tight) gas formations. The procedures proposed are based on many years' experience in evaluating low-permeability formations, and particularly on recent experience with Gas Research Inst. (GRI) programs in eastern Devonian gas shales and in western tight-gas formations.

Lee, W.J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks  

SciTech Connect

This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geology of the Pontotoc Northwest area, San Saba and Mason Counties, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deformation. . . , ~. . . . ~ Faulting. Folding CFOIQQIC HI. "&TORY o . . ~ Page 67 ~ ~ ~ o s ~ ~ ~ ~ 71 Precarbrian . Ceplbr M, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Ordovician. 71 ~ ~ ~ * ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 78 Devonian. Carbonif erous ~ \\ Permian, Triassic... of Poirt Peak Shale. . . . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ ~ 55 XV. Vegetation on San Saba Limestone Member . Figure Locat1on Map of Pontotoc Horthuest Area . ~ 2 A C K N 0 W L F D G M E I T S Appreciation is expressed to Dr. K. J. Koenig, Dr. H. R. Blanks...

Jennings, Albert Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Fossil Record of the Peronosporomycetes (Oomycota)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identified as a parasite. Key words: antheridium, Carboniferous, chert, coal ball, Devonian, fossil water mold, oogonium INTRODUCTION The Peronosporomycetes (also called Peronosporo- mycota, Oomycota or Oomycetes; David 2002) are heterotrophic eukaryotes... that thrive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments where they are effective as saprotrophs and disease-causative agents in plants and animals including humans (Margulis and Schwartz 1998). Within the group are economically important phytopathogens...

Krings, Michael; Taylor, Thomas N.; Dotzler, Nora

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Paleozoic paleotectonics and sedimentation in southern Rocky Mountain region  

SciTech Connect

During the Paleozoic, the southern Rocky Mountain region included most of New Mexico and Arizona and at least the northern parts of adjacent Chihuahua and Sonora. It was particularly stable part of the North American craton during the Cambrian through Middle Devonian. Slow deposition of shelf clastics and dolomitic carbonates was interrupted by several long erosional hiatuses. Major recognizable tectonism first appeared in the Devonian with at least one depositional basin formed west of the Defiance-Zuni uplift. Thin Early Mississippian shelf carbonates and evaporites covered nearly the entire region. The most significant tectonic activities started in the late Chesterian and extended with increasing magnitude until the end of Wolfcampian time. Local basins and uplifts date from this interval and occurred in two belts. One belt was about 80 mi (130 km) wide along the western sides of the Hueco and Pedernal uplifts and along both sides of the Uncompahgre uplift. Another belt extended northwest from the Pedresoga basin into southeastern Arizona. Major tectonic events initiated the Morrowan, Atokan, and Missourian Epochs and occurred twice within the Wolfcampian Epoch. Leonardian, Guadalupian, and Ochoan Epochs were times of tectonic stability. During the Leonardian, sediments from the Uncompahgre uplift gradually covered all the other uplifts. The timing of these paleozoic tectonic events suggests a cause-effect relationship with plate-tectonic histories that brought North American and northern Europe together in the Late Devonian (Acadian orogeny) and Euramerica and northwestern Gondwana together in the Late Mississippian through Early Permian (Appalachian orogeny).

Ross, C.A.; Ross, J.R.P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Williston Basin subsidence and sea level history: Chronological and lithofacies constraints  

SciTech Connect

The intent is to use lithofacies information to identify the top-driven components of sediment accumulation-depositional environments, sediments supply, compaction, sediment and water load. Physical carbonate stratigraphy is used to determine sediment accumulation corrections. Physical stratigraphic geometric patterns are used to estimate the original thicknesses of dissolved salts and to determine absolute water depth. Seawater strontium chronostratigraphy constrains the ages and paleo-oceanographic setting of Devonian-Mississippian strata. The measured strontium stratigraphy can be used for correlation, age assignment and diagentic study. Removing sediment compaction, sediment/water load effects and using the newly derived Devonian-Mississippian chronostratigraphy to examine the behavior of the Williston Basin reveals a number of facts. (1) Temporal and spatial variation in the surficial components of sediment accumulation is significant and, unless removed, obscures tectonic subsidence and sea-level change patterns. (2) Both the corrected tectonic subsidence/sea level record and lithofacies patterns of the Devonian Williston Basin show flexural or in-plane stress interference reflecting plate boundary reorganization along the near edge of the Paleozoic North American craton, culminating the Antler orogeny. (3) The tectonic subsidence and sea level change record of the Williston Basin which has been corrected for sediment compaction, water and sediment load, has extremely linear subsidence through time. This is interrupted by changes in global sea level of 100-140 m over 25-35 my and apparent sea level change of 35-60 m over 2-4 my.

Lee Roark, C.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Winnipegosis case history: Tableland Saskatchewan  

SciTech Connect

The geology and history of exploration in the Tableland area of southeast Saskatchewan will be reviewed in relation to a major Middle Devonian Winnipegosis oil discovery made in 1986 by Home Oil. Southern Saskatchewan is underlain by the northern third of the Williston basin. Although rich oil deposits have been found in the Devonian of the basin on the American side, dry holes have been the rule in Saskatchewan except for the Hummingbird Upper Devonian Birdbear discovery in 1966. The long history of failures in the Winnipegosis Formation had led to a general reluctance in the industry to drill deep wells especially with today's lower crude prices. Based on geology, seismic data, and modeling, Home Oil drilled Tableland 08-22-002-09W2M in february 1986 and encountered an oil-bearing Winnipegosis reef. This well has the highest production rate of any well in Saskatchewan and is the first commercially significant Winnipegosis well in a basinal setting within the Williston basin. A state-of-the-art pseudo 3-D processing of all the existing 2-D seismic data was performed to aid in choosing development well locations. As a result of this discovery, deep exploration plays in southeast Saskatchewan are now being pursued aggressively by many companies.

Orr, N.E.; Martindale, W.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011" "trillion cubic feet" ,,, 2010,, 2011,," Change 2011-2010" "Basin","Shale Play","State(s)","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves","Production","Reserves" "Fort Worth","Barnett","TX",1.9,31,2,32.6,0.1,1.6 "Appalachian","Marcellus","PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH",0.5,13.2,1.4,31.9,0.9,18.7 "Texas-Louisiana Salt","Haynesville/Bossier","TX, LA",1.5,24.5,2.5,29.5,1,5 "Arkoma","Fayetteville","AR",0.8,12.5,0.9,14.8,0.1,2.3

278

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natural gas Natural Gas natural gas Natural Gas exec summary Executive Summary Natural gas production increases throughout the projection period, allowing the United States to transition from a et importer to a net exporter of natural gas....Read full section Power generation from renewables and natural gas continues to increase ...Read full section Evolving Marcellus shale gas resource estimates....Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. reliance on imported natural gas from Canada declines as exports grow.... Read full section Trends in petroleum and other liquids markets are defined largely by the developing nations... Read full section Renewable energy sources lead rise in primary energy consumption... Read full section Reliance on natural gas and natural gas liquids rises as industrial

279

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2013 | Release Date: September 12, 1, 2013 | Release Date: September 12, 2013 | Next Release: September 19, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: REX gas deliveries to the Northeast fall as Appalachian production grows Data for this week show that deliveries of natural gas to northeastern consumers via the Rockies Express Pipeline (REX) continue to decline markedly from last year as Northeast customers procure more natural gas from the Appalachian Basin. This increased gas supply comes predominantly from the basin's Marcellus Shale play, where dry gas production through the first half of 2013 rose by 50% over year-ago levels, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) calculations based on LCI Energy

280

Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Impacts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Impacts from Shale Production Breakthrough Water Cleaning Technology Could Lessen Environmental Impacts from Shale Production April 28, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel water cleaning technology currently being tested in field demonstrations could help significantly reduce potential environmental impacts from producing natural gas from the Marcellus shale and other geologic formations, according to the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). ABSMaterial's Osorb® technology, which uses swelling glass to remove impurities, has been shown to clean flow back water and produced water from hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells. Produced waters are by far the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2013 | Release Date: February 14, 13, 2013 | Release Date: February 14, 2013 | Next Release: February 21, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: U.S. natural gas production forecast relatively flat for the next two years The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) most recent monthly production data indicates that total U.S. average daily marketed production reached 70.4 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in November 2012, 0.4 Bcf/d above the previous month, with upticks in the federal Gulf of Mexico, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and the category for other states, which includes Pennsylvania. Production in the Marcellus Shale areas of Pennsylvania and West Virginia is expected to continue rising, as recently drilled wells

282

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

283

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2013 | Release Date: July 18, 7, 2013 | Release Date: July 18, 2013 | Next Release: July 25, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: FERC approves service on first segment of Northeast Supply Link Expansion project The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) last week approved the start of service on the first segment of the Transcontinental Gas Supply Co (Transco) Northeast Supply Link Expansion project. This project is designed to ease pipeline congestion out of the Marcellus shale play, increasing the diversity and reliability of natural gas supply to northeastern demand markets. The segment completed last week is known as the Palmerton Loop, and represents 3 of approximately 12 miles of loops - or pipelines

284

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 8040 of 26,764 results. 31 - 8040 of 26,764 results. Download Meeting regarding DOE Energy Conservations Standards for Battery Discussion points presented relating to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Conservation Standards for Battery Chargers. The DOE battery charger efficiency regulations cover only consumer... http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/meeting-regarding-doe-energy-conservations-standards-battery Download Fossil Energy Today- First Quarter, 2012 Here are just some of the stories featured in this issue: CT Scanners Give Energy Researchers a Core Understanding of Marcellus Shale; Large-Scale CO2 Injection Begins; SPR Completes Drawdown of 30 Million Barrels; and, Methane Hydrate Technology to be Tested on Alaska's North Slope. http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/fossil-energy-today-first-quarter-2012

285

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CSI Technologies, LLC CSI Technologies, LLC SCNGO 2012/ 24 months Gary Covatch Houston, TX Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Optimize zonal isolation through assessment of current operations, laboratory studies, analytical studies and field demonstrations. Gary Covatch Digitally signed by Gary Covatch DN: cn=Gary Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.01.09 10:45:44 -05'00' 01 09 2012 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=netl, ou=environmental compliance division, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.02.15 13:29:54 -05'00' 2 15 2012 This CX covers only lab activities conducted at the CSI Technologies Houston, TX location. No field activities are approved under this CX

286

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 9, 2013 | Release Date: January 10, January 9, 2013 | Release Date: January 10, 2013 | Next Release: January 17, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: EIA forecasts continued growth in Lower 48 onshore natural gas production through 2014. EIA's January Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), released on January 7, now includes EIA's forecast of energy consumption, supply, and prices through 2014. STEO expects continued growth in natural gas production, driven largely by onshore production in shale areas. In particular, production in the Marcellus Shale areas of Pennsylvania and West Virginia is expected to continue rising, as recently drilled wells become operational. Despite relatively low natural gas prices, Pennsylvania drilling continues at a

287

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2012 | Release Date: August 9, 8, 2012 | Release Date: August 9, 2012 | Next Release: August 16, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 01/19/2014 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Infrastructure constraints in the Northeast, particularly in Northern Pennsylvania, have led Marcellus prices to diverge from the Henry Hub since May 2012. Additionally, BENTEK Energy LLC (Bentek) reported that infrastructure constraints have led Northeast Pennsylvania production to flatten in recent weeks. Bentek estimates that more than 1,000 wells have been drilled but are not yet producing because of insufficient pipeline capacity. Several infrastructure projects have been proposed recently to help ease constraints in the region: Earlier this month, Williams Partners LP (Williams) announced plans

288

Changes in release cycles for EIA's  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Potential efficiency improvements and their impacts on end-use energy demand Increasing light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for model years 2017 to 2025 Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy impacts of proposed CAFE standards for light-duty vehicles, model years 2017 to 2025 Fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions standards for heavy-duty vehicles Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: issues and incentives Nuclear power in AEO2012 Carbon capture and storage: economics and issues Potential impact of minimum pipeline throughput constraints on Alaska North Slope oil production Power sector environmental regulations on the horizon U.S. crude oil and natural gas resource uncertainty Evolving Marcellus Shale gas resource estimates

289

DE-FE0000833  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for An Integrated Water Treatment Technology Solution for Sustainable Water Resource Management in the Marcellus Shale DE-FE0000833 Final Scientific / Technical Report Report Date: June 30, 2011 Team Members: Altela, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory BLX, Inc. CWM Environmental, Inc. Point of Contact: Matthew Bruff Altela, Inc. Phone: 303-993-1951 Facsimile: 303-993-1955 Email: matthew.bruff@altelainc.com DISCLAIMER: "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereto, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

290

NETL: NEPA Categorical Exclusions - October 2013 to Present  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to December 2013 3 to December 2013 Archive (November 2009 - Present) ARRA Date Title Recipient Name Location DOE/NETL Sponsors N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: Houston Advanced Research Center Duncan, OK FE/SCNGO N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: TAMU - San Antonio - IRNR Duncan, OK FE/SCNGO N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: Ohio State University - CAR Columbus, OH FE/SCNGO N 12/19/2013 Technology Integration Program Prime: RPSEA Sub: Ohio State University - CAR Duncan, OK FE/SCNGO N 12/18/2013 Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Prime: RPSEA Sub: CSI Technologies, LLC Multiple sites, PA FE/SCNGO N 12/18/2013 Vortex Induced Vibration Study for Deep Draft Column Stabilized Floaters Prime: RPSEA

291

New York | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 22, 2011 September 22, 2011 CX-007020: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York State Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Deployment CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Model City, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office September 22, 2011 CX-006993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Mitigation and Clean Water Recovery from Marcellus Frac Water (Phases 1 and 2) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Niskayuna, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, Savannah River Operations Office September 15, 2011 CX-006805: Categorical Exclusion Determination New York City Solar City - Remsen Avenue Yards CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/15/2011 Location(s): New York City, New York

292

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 4220 of 9,640 results. 11 - 4220 of 9,640 results. Download CX-008518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008518-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008519: Categorical Exclusion Determination Qualification of Flexible Reinforced Pipe for 10,000 Foot Water (Phase One and Two) CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Multiple Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008519-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008520: Categorical Exclusion Determination Qualification of Flexible Fiber Reinforced Pipe for 10,000 Foot Water

293

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

294

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

295

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

296

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 7670 of 28,905 results. 61 - 7670 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006993: Categorical Exclusion Determination Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Mitigation and Clean Water Recovery from Marcellus Frac Water (Phases 1 and 2) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Niskayuna, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006993-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007004: Categorical Exclusion Determination Unique Lanthanide-Free Motor Construction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/22/2011 Location(s): Ames, Iowa Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007004-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007006: Categorical Exclusion Determination

297

Hydraulic Fracturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Fracturing Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search More info on OpenEI Oil and Gas Gateway Federal Environmental Statues Federal Oil and Gas Statutes Oil and Gas Companies United States Oil and Gas Boards International Oil and Gas Boards Other Information Fracking Regulations by State Wells by State Fracking Chemicals Groundwater Protection Related Reports A Perspective on Health and Natural Gas Operations: A Report for Denton City Council Just the Fracking Facts The Politics of 'Fracking': Regulating Natural Gas Drilling Practices in Colorado and Texas Addressing the Environmental Risks from Shale Gas Development Water Management Technologies Used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers Methane contamination of drinking wateraccompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing

298

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

299

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Issues and Trends: Natural Gas Updated: November 25, 2013 For prior report data see Natural Gas Year-in-Review archives EIA's Natural Gas Issues and Trends highlights timely information and analyses on natural gas markets. Natural gas prices reflect decreasing seasonality. Today in Energy, November 20, 2013 Increased Northeast natural gas production reduces net inflow of supply from other areas. Today in Energy, November 19, 2013 Gas pipeline expansions reduce Marcellus backup, New York gas prices. Natural Gas Weekly Update, November 13, 2013 EIA projects lower natural gas use this winter. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 31, 2013 Northeast net imports from Canada plummet, driven by export growth at Niagara Falls. Natural Gas Weekly Update, October 10, 2013

300

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

302

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets May 14, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to

303

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 1300 of 31,917 results. 91 - 1300 of 31,917 results. Download External Technical Review Report for Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download http://energy.gov/em/downloads/external-technical-review-report-small-column-ion-exchange-technology Download Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program The Office of Fossil Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (1986-1993) laid the foundation for effective technologies now in use that have helped significantly lower emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and airborne particulates (PM10). http://energy.gov/fe/downloads/clean-coal-technology-demonstration-program Article Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale

304

STEO September 2012 - natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

natural gas production at record high, inventories most natural gas production at record high, inventories most ever at start of heating season on Nov. 1 U.S. marketed natural gas production is expected to rise by 2.6 billion cubic feet per day this year to a record 68.9 billion cubic feet per day, said the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Katherine Teller explains: "This strong growth in production was driven in large part by production in Pennsylvania's Marcellus shale formation where drilling companies are using hydraulic fracturing to free the trapped gas." The increase in production, along with the large natural gas inventories left over from last winter because of warmer temperatures, will push U.S. gas inventories to a record high of nearly

305

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 12, 2012 July 12, 2012 CX-008583: Categorical Exclusion Determination California State Energy Program Annual Formula CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 12, 2012 CX-008518: Categorical Exclusion Determination Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory July 12, 2012 CX-008592: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hawaii State Energy Program Annual Formula CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/12/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 9, 2012 CX-008608: Categorical Exclusion Determination Virginia Program Year 2012 State Energy Program Formula Grant

306

Shared Intellect * Shared Laboratories * Shared Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2 E News is your monthly source for the latest information about NETL-RUA's research, activities, and other important news. If you have information that you would like to feature in future newsletters, send that information to julianne.klara@netl.doe.gov. What's in This Issue Strategic Growth Area Update- Seed Funding Available .........................p. 2 New CT Based Multi-Scale Imaging Capability ....................................................p. 2 NETL Building Powerful Computational Capability to Accelerate R&D ..............p. 3 Awards and Student Achievements ............................................p. 4 NETL-RUA Scientist Designs Novel Monitoring System for Marcellus Gas Wells One area of growth in the NETL-RUA research portfolio involves assessing the environmental

307

Cr3+Co0.054Ni0.018Mg0.93O Solid-Solution Catalysts for High-Pressure Syngas Production: Effect of Chromium on the Reduction and Catalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cr3+Co0.054Ni0.018Mg0.93O Solid-Solution Catalysts for High-Pressure Syngas Production: Effect of Chromium on the Reduction and Catalysis ... (1) Reforming CH4 with CO2 (CH4 + CO2 ? 2H2 + 2CO) or H2O (CH4 + H2O ? 3H2 + CO) to produce syngas (CO + H2) is attracting renewed attention because advances in shale gas technology have increased the global supply of recoverable CH4(2-6) and because the process consumes CO2, a global warming gas. ... US natural gas emissions produced in the year 2008, prior to any significant Marcellus shale development. ...

Katsutoshi Nagaoka; Yosuke Abe; Yusaku Hashimoto; Takahiro Ishikawa; Katsutoshi Sato; Yusaku Takita; Toshiya Wakatsuki; Masahiro Kunisu; Eri Suda; Shin Inamoto

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 16, 2012 February 16, 2012 CX-007937: Categorical Exclusion Determination Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B5.23 Date: 02/16/2012 Location(s): Kentucky, Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 15, 2012 CX-007940: Categorical Exclusion Determination Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/15/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 14, 2012 CX-007960: Categorical Exclusion Determination Use of Scanning Electron Microscopy to Characterize Electrochemically Active Samples CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/14/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office February 14, 2012

309

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum & Other Liquids Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude Reserves and Production Refining and Processing Imports/Exports & Movements Stocks Consumption/Sales All Petroleum & Other Liquids Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Consumption & Sales Crude Reserves & Production Imports/Exports & Movements Prices Projections Refining & Processing Stocks All Reports ‹ See All Petroleum Reports Drilling Productivity Report Release Date: December 9, 2013 | Next Release: January 13, 2014 | full report Previous Issue (pdf) month: December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 Go Contents Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Year-over-year summary Explanatory notes and sources Full report Report data (aggregated by region)

310

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

311

ReOs depositional ages and seawater Os estimates for the FrasnianFamennian boundary: Implications for weathering rates, land plant evolution, and extinction mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four TOC-rich shale intervals spanning the FrasnianFamennian (FF) boundary were recovered in a drillcore (West Valley NX-1) from western New York (USA) and radiometrically dated using ReOs. Two of the black shale intervals (WVC785 from ?2.9m below, and WVC754 from ?6.4m above the FF boundary, respectively) yielded statistically overlapping ages with uncertainties of <1.1%. An interpolated age and associated graphically determined uncertainty of 372.43.8Ma provides new absolute age constraints on the FF boundary. This date is ?4.1Ma younger than the latest proposed FF boundary age of 376.1Ma obtained by interpolation of UPb dates from volcanic zircon [Kaufmann, B., 2006. Calibrating the Devonian Time Scale: A synthesis of UPb ID-TIMS ages and conodont stratigraphy. Earth-Science Reviews 76, 175190], and within uncertainty of the International Commission on Stratigraphy accepted date of 374.52.6Ma. A third date (from sample WVC802, ?8.2m beneath the FF boundary) yielded an imprecise age of 35723Ma, owing in part to a limited Re/Os range. The initial 187Os/188Os (0.45 to 0.47), reflecting contemporaneous seawater Os values, are low but similar to the value of 0.42 reported for the Exshaw Fm (Canada) at the DevonianMississippian boundary (ca. 361Ma) [Selby D., Creaser R.A., 2005. Direct radiometric dating of the DevonianMississippian time-scale boundary using the ReOs black shale geochronometer. Geology 33, 545548]. This may suggest fairly constant and low global continental weathering rates during the Late Devonian, although in view of the short residence time of Os in seawater (?14נ104yr), further measurements are needed to assess potential short-term variation in seawater Os ratios. Owing to low Os and Re abundances at the FF boundary, our data are inconsistent with long-term volcanism and bolide impact as potential Late Devonian mass extinction mechanisms. In addition, the FrasnianFamennian ocean appears to have been depleted with respect to Re, possibly indicating an exhaustion of the Re seawater reservoir owing to high burial rates of redox-sensitive elements under dysoxic/anoxic conditions leading up to the FF boundary.

Steven C. Turgeon; Robert A. Creaser; Thomas J. Algeo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Bioten Power and Energy Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioten Power and Energy Group Bioten Power and Energy Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioten Power and Energy Group Address 2725 Russell Rd Place Utica, KY Zip 42376 Sector Biomass Product Gasification technology Year founded 2008 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 270-275-9164 Website http://www.biotenpower.com Coordinates 37.5931742°, -87.0240594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5931742,"lon":-87.0240594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Oil and gas developments in western Canada in 1987  

SciTech Connect

Exploratory drilling in western Canada increased by 21% in 1987 whereas total drilling increased by 32%. The seismic crew count increased 4% to 671 crew-months, and land expenditures increased 166% to $793 million. No major plays broke during 1987 in western Canada. The 2 major plays resulting from 1986 activity - Caroline, Alberta, and Tableland, Saskatchewan - continued to expand in 1987. By year end at Caroline, industry drilled 14 wells, which included 6 Swan Hills gas wells, 3 uphole gas wells, 3 wells standing or suspended, and 2 dry holes. The reserves for this field now are 17 billion m/sup 3/ of sales gas, 32 million m/sup 3/ of condensate, and 20 million MT of sulfur. At Tableland and surrounding areas, industry has drilled 11 oil wells and 16 dry holes. No overall reserve figures have been published for this play. In Alberta, operators had their best exploratory oil success in the Cretaceous Second White Specks and in the Devonian Nisku, Leduc, Gilwood, and Keg River; the best exploratory gas success was in the Cretaceous Viking and Paddy, and Devonian Nisku and Leduc. In British Columbia, gas drilling was successful in the Cretaceous of the Deep Basin, as well as in the Mississippian Kiskatinaw and the Triassic Halfway. In Saskatchewan, both the shallow Cretaceous gas play and the deep Devonian Winnipegosis oil play continued to expand, whereas in Manitoba the main exploration target was the Mississippian carbonates and Bakken Formation. The Northwest Territories, Beaufort Sea, and Arctic Islands had a poor year, with only 4 exploratory wells drilled - all dry holes. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Portigal, M.H.; Creed, R.M.; Hogg, J.R.; Hewitt, M.D.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The character and reactivation history of the southern extension of the seismically active ClarendonLinden Fault System, western New York State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration of 11 types of data sets enabled us to determine the location, character and fault history of the southern extension of the ClarendonLinden Fault System (CLF) in southwestern New York State. The data sets utilized include detailed stratigraphic and fracture measurements at more than 1000 sites, soil gas anomalies, seismic reflection profiles, well logs and lineaments on air photos, topographic maps, Landsat and SLAR images. The seismically active CLF consists of as many as 10 parallel, segmented faults across the fault system. The fault segments are truncated by NW-striking cross-strike discontinuities (CSDs). The faults of the CLF and intersecting \\{CSDs\\} form fault blocks that have semi-independent subsidence and uplift histories. East-dipping reflectors in the Precambrian basement indicate the southward continuation of thrusts of the intra-Grenvillian ElzevirFrontenac Boundary Zone. These thrusts were reactivated during Iapetan rifting as normal (listric) growth faults. In Ordovician Black River to Trenton time, the southern CLF segments experienced a second phase of growth fault activity, with faults displaying a cumulative stratigraphic throw of as much as ?170 m. Thrusting on the same east-dipping Precambrian reflectors typified the CLF in Taconic (post-Trenton) times. Detailed comparisons among the fault segments show that the fault activity in Silurian and Devonian times generally alternated between the western and central main faults. In Late Devonian time, the fault motion reversed from down-on-the-east to down-on-the-west about the time the Appalachian Basin axis passed across the CLF in its westward migration. The deep Precambrian faults of the CLF were thus reactivated as the Appalachian Basin developed in Acadian times. Finally, the CLF thrust fault imaged on seismic line CLF-1 offsets all bedrock (Devonian) units; thus, significant motion occurred along this fault during Late Acadian, or more likely, Alleghanian time.

Robert D. Jacobi; John Fountain

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Petroleum potential of lower and middle Paleozoic rocks in Nebraska portion of Mid-Continent  

SciTech Connect

Central North America during the Paleozoic was characterized by northern (Williston) and southern (Anadarko) depositional regimes separated by a stable Transcontinental arch. Nebraska lies on the southern flank of this arch and contains the northern zero edges of the lower and middle Paleozoic rocks of the southern regime. Most of these rocks are secondary dolomites with zones of excellent intercrystalline porosity. The Reagan-LaMotte Sandstones and the overlying Arbuckle dolomites are overlapped by Middle Ordovician rocks toward the Transcontinental arch. Rocks equivalent to the Simpson consist of a basal sand (St. Peter) and overlying interbedded gray-green shales and dolomitic limestones. An uppermost shale facies is present in the Upper Ordovician (Viola-Maquoketa) eastward and southward across Nebraska. The dolomite facies extends northward into the Williston basin. The Silurian dolomites, originally more widely deposited, are overlapped by Devonian dolomites in southeastern Nebraska. Upper Devonian rocks exhibit a regional facies change from carbonate to green-gray shale to black shale southeastward across the Mid-Continent. Mississippian carbonates overlap the Devonian westward and northward across the Transcontinental arch. Pennsylvanian uplift and erosion were widespread, producing numerous stratigraphic traps. Sands related to the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity produce along the Cambridge arch. Arbuckle, Simpson, Viola, and Hunton production is present in the Forest City basin and along the Central Kansas uplift. Although source rocks are scarce and the maturation is marginal, current theories of long-distance oil migration encourage exploration in the extensive lower and middle Paleozoic reservoirs in this portion of the Mid-Continent.

Carlson, M.P. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Grain shape variation and sedimentary processes of the Neogene-Quaternary sediments in Baffin Bay and Labrador Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Labrador and Baffin Islands of Canada to the west (Fig. 1). Most of the two basins have water depths between 2000 to 3000 meters. The two basins are separated by the Davis Strait Sill which is only 700 meters at its deepest point (Srivastava et al... + . lo 9 s lg Te r I i a r y ? L a l e Cretaceous Early Crolacoous? Jurassic Tr assic Permian ? Devonian EIIIIII S i 1 u r i a n ? C s m 0 r i a rl l T Precambrian Paleocene basalls L. S:Lancaster Sound N. S: Nares Slrail 0 160 320 460 640...

Shan, Yongtang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

Eastern Gas Shales Project: Ohio No. 5 well, Lorain County. Phase III report, summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results  

SciTech Connect

This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Ohio No. 5 well. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. The data presented was obtained from the study of approximately 881 feet of core retrieved from a well drilled in Lorain County of north-central Ohio.

none,

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Echinoderm Faunas from the Bromide Formation (Middle Ordovician) of Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for clay and wind-blown silt) into the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen, and shales and limestones of the middle Fig. 2. Paleogeographic reconstruction of Okla- homa and northern Texas at the beginning of Bro- mide deposition. The aulacogen was submerged... that lasted from the Late Cambrian to the Mississippian. Sediments de- posited during this stage are about 3,000 m thick. Toward the end of this stage the rate of subsi- dence decreased and during the Late Silurian and Devonian only 355 m of shale, limestone...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Application of the HYTORT process to oil shales throughout the world  

SciTech Connect

The HYTORT /sup R/ process is a unique oil shale retorting process which uses an atmosphere of hydrogen gas at elevated pressure to produce higher yields of oil than are possible using conventional thermal retorting techniques. In the U.S., HYTORT process development efforts have played a key role in recognition of the significance of the Devonian oil shales as a major fossil energy resource. The results presented in this paper show that application of the HYTORT process to oil shales of countries such as Sweden, Italy, Jordan, and Canada may yield equally significant results.

Janaka, J.C.; Rex, R.C.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hunton Group core workshop and field trip  

SciTech Connect

The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

Johnson, K.S. [ed.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Gravity interpretation of the northern Overthrust Belt, Idaho and Wyoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sequence thickness westward from about 15 miles (2a. l km) east of the Idaho-Wyoming State line, to a site of maximum deposition somewhere in the west (Armstrong and Oriel, 1965). In western Wyoming, Drdovic-ian rocks are represented by the Upper... 1n southeastern Idaho by the Laketown Dolomite. The lim1ted geoqraph1c extent of the Silurian is considered to be the result of subsequent erosion rather than non-deposition (Armstrong and Oriel, 1965). In western Wyoming, the Devonian age rocks...

Silver, Wendy Ilene

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Life Cycle Water Consumption for Shale Gas and Conventional Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The average shale gas well EUR is 100 million cubic meters (3.5 billion cubic feet (BCF)) for bulk gas, which is a mixture containing methane, in addition to other gases such as ethane, propane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. ... Overbey, W. K.; Carden, R. S.; Locke, C. D.; Salamy, S. P.; Reeves, T. K.; Johnson, H. R.; Site Selection, Drilling, and Completion of Two Horizontal Wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia, DOE/MC/251153116; Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy, 1992. ...

Corrie E. Clark; Robert M. Horner; Christopher B. Harto

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ecology of scaled quail in West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in human cultures that it is doubtful that an entirely original method could now be conceived. Of those methods that have been found most productive in quail investigations0 two gneral types exists 1) the box?type? or Stoddard-type trap0 in its various..., ,vflintM ridges composed mainly of a Devonian formation called the Cavallos novaculite. The extensive flats between these ridges have well^drained gravelly soils derived largely from Pennsylvanian limestones. 22 The two springs in the study area were...

Wallmo, Olof Charles

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

325

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion cubic feet (tcf). Appalachian Basin - The geological formations that roughly follow the Appalachian Mountain range and contain

326

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 14mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 5 well - Lorain County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. The program's objectives are as follows: (1) to evaluate recoverable reserves of gas contained in the shales; (2) to enhanced recovery technology for production from shale gas reservoirs; and (3) to stimulate interest among commercial gas suppliers in the concept of producing large quantities of gas from low-yield, shallow Devonian Shale wells. The EGSP-Ohio No. 5 well was cored under a cooperative cost-sharing agreement between the Department of Energy (METC) and Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation. Detailed characterization of the core was performed at the Eastern Gas Shale Project's Core Laboratory. At the well site, suites of wet and dry hole geophysical logs were run. Characterization work performed at the Laboratory included photographic logs, lithologic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition samples were tested for physical properties by Michigan Technological University. Physical properties data obtained were for: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength; strength in point load; and trends of microfractures.

none,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Petrographic, geochemical, and paleohydrologic evidence of nature of petroleum migration in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

Detailed studies of the petrography and geochemistry of petroleum source rocks, the geochemistry of petroleum accumulations, and the paleohydrology of the Illinois basin suggest an episode of long-range migration of Devonian-sourced petroleum during a period of regional ground water flow. Petrographic analyses of samples of the New Albany Shale group (Devonian/Mississippian) were used to define lateral and vertical variation in composition and thermal maturity of organic matter within the basin. These data delineate likely New Albany Shale group petroleum source areas. GC, GCMS, and carbon isotopic analyses of thermally mature New Albany Shale in southeastern Illinois and Silurian-reservoired petroleum samples from central Illinois were used in making oil-oil and oil-source rock correlations. These correlations indicate long-range lateral and downward cross-stratigraphic net migration. Compaction-driven and elevation head-driven ground-water flows within the basin were numerically modeled using available stratigraphic, structural, and hydrologic data. Calculations based on compaction-driven flow show the possibility of down-stratigraphic migration. Compaction-driven flow, however, cannot explain the amount of lateral transport inferred. Regional ground-water flow due to the uplift of the Pascola arch could explain the long-range lateral migration. Calculations of the effects of advective heat transport by elevation head-driven flow agree with estimates of temperatures made from fluid inclusions in basin mineralization.

Bethke, C.M.; Pruitt, J.D.; Barrows, M.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fluorescence analysis can identify movable oil in self-sourcing reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The recent surge of activity involving self-sourcing reservoirs and horizontal drilling recognizes a little tapped niche in the domestic energy mix. Such prolific pays as the Cretaceous Bakken and Austin Chalk have drawn research interest and large amounts of investment capital. Fluorescence analysis can discern movable oil--as opposed to exhausted source rock--in such reservoirs with an inexpensive test. Other potential targets are the Cretaceous Mesaverde in the Piceance basin, Devonian New Albany shale in Kentucky, Devonian Antrim shale in the Michigan basin, and the Cretaceous Niobrara, Mancos, and Pierre formations in Colorado and New Mexico. To insure success in this niche this key question must be answered positively: Is movable oil present in the reservoir? Even if tectonic studies verify a system of open fractures, sonic logs confirm overpressuring in the zone, and resistivity logs document the maturity of the source, the ultimate question remains: Is movable oil in the fractures available to flow to the borehole? The paper explains a technique that will answer these questions.

Calhoun, G.G. [Calhoun (Gerry G.), Midland, TX (United States)

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Exploration model for shallow Silurian (Kankakee) carbonate reservoirs in western Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Reservoirs in shallow (600-650 ft deep) basal Silurian Kankakee carbonates at Buckhorn consolidated, Siloam, and Kellerville oil fields in western Illinois have produced nearly 2 million bbl of oil, but were developed essentially by random drilling. A new exploration model that combines lithologic studies and isopach mapping has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. Isopach mapping of Silurian and Devonian rocks between an organic facies in the Mississippian-Devonian New Albany Shale and the top of the Ordovician Maquoketa Shale reveals thickened sequences that coincide with most of the oil fields. These thickened intervals apparently reflect subtle paleovalleys eroded into the Maquoketa shale during the Ordovician-Silurian hiatus. During the initial Silurian marine transgression, these paleovalleys at the base of the Kankakee were filled with carbonates to form the thickened sequences. Differential erosion at the top of the Kankakee does not satisfactorily explain the locally thickened sequences in the Kankakee. Lithologic studies suggest that subsurface fluid flows concentrated along these paleovalleys contributed to subsequent diagenesis of valleyfill carbonates. Diagenetic alteration of these carbonates resulted in development of basal Kankakee reservoirs within the paleovalleys. This concept of Kankakee reservoirs occurring within paleovalleys at the Ordovician-Silurian unconformity is a new exploration model that can aid in the search for similar traps in western Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Seyler, B.J.; Whitaker, S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Deposition and diagenesis of a cratonic Silurian platform reef, Pipe Creek Jr. , Indiana  

SciTech Connect

Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Pipe Creek Jr. paragenesis record the stratigraphic and burial evolution of the cratonic Silurian platform of Indiana during Late Silurian to Pennsylvanian. A variety of several diagenetic fluids acting over geological time affected the reef. The paragenetic sequence is as follows: (1) precipitation of turbid, fibrous, blotchy cathodoluminescent (CL) cement; (2) dolomitization of mud-rich facies; (3) precipitation of clear, zoned CL equant calcite cements; (4) fracturing and karst formation, partially filled by geopetal silt and sandstone; (5) precipitation of clear, dull CL, ferroan to nonferroan equant calcite cement, ferroan dolomite overgrowth and equant dolomite cement in moldic porosity, caves and fractures; (6) microdissolution and hydrocarbon emplacement; and (7) stylolitization. Carbonate grew and fibrous cements precipitated in an open marine environment. During Late Silurian an increasingly restricted environment stopped reef growth and dolomite replaced mud-rich faces. The reefs were then subaerially exposed and two meteoric cement sequences, non-luminescent to bright luminescent, precipitated prior to Mid-Devonian fracture-controlled karsting. Caves and fractures crosscut former cement stages and were filled by sandstones. Later, the platform was buried by the late Mid-Devonian organic-rich New Albany Shale, and clear, dull CL calcite cement and ferroan dolomite precipitated. Hydrocarbon migration postdates all cements and created minor moldic porosity and predates stylolitization.

Simo, A.; Lehmann, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Williston basin oil exploration: Past, present, and future  

SciTech Connect

Past: In 1951, modern oil exploration came to the Williston basin with the discovery of Paleozoic oil on the large Nesson anticline. This was quickly followed by similar discoveries on Cedar Creek and Poplar anticlines. To the north, the Canadians, lacking large structures, concentrated on Paleozoic stratigraphic traps and were highly successful. US explorationists quickly followed, finding similar traps on the basin's northeastern flank and center. The 1960s saw multiple Devonian salt dissolution structures produce on the western flank. To the northwest, shallow Mississippian and deeper Ordovician pays were found on small structural closures. These later were combined with pays in the Devonian and Silurian to give multiple pay potential. In the basin center large buried structures, visible only to seismic, were located. The 1970s revealed an Ordovician subcrop trap on the southeast flank. Centrally, a Jurassic astrobleme with Mississippian oil caused a flurry of leasing and deep drilling. The 1982 collapse of oil prices essentially halted exploration. 1987 saw a revival when horizontal drilling for the Mississippian Bakken fractured shale promised viable economics. Present: Today, emphasis is on Bakken horizontal drilling in the deeper portion of the basin. Next in importance is shallow drilling such as on the northeastern flank. Future: An estimated on billion barrels of new oil awaits discovery in the Williston basin. Additional exploration in already established production trends will find some of this oil. Most of this oil, however, will almost certainly be found by following up the numerous geological leads hinted at by past drilling.

Jennings, A.H.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A two-dimensional regional basin model of Williston basin hydrocarbon systems  

SciTech Connect

Institut Francais du Petrole`s two-dimensional model, TEMISPACK, is used to discuss the functioning of petroleum systems in the Williston basin along a 330-km-long section, focusing on four regional source intervals: Ordovician Yeoman formation, Lower Devonian Winnipegosis Formation, Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, and Mississippian Lodgepole formation. Thermal history calibration against present temperature and source rock maturity profiles suggests that the Williston basin can be divided into a region of constant heat flow of about 55 mW/m{sup 2} away from the Nesson anticline, and a region of higher heat flow and enhanced thermal maturity in the vicinity of the Nesson anticline. Original kinetic parameters used in the calibration were derived for each of the four source rocks from Rock-Eval yield curves. Bakken overpressures are entirely due to oil generation, not compaction disequilibrium. Very low Bakken vertical permeabilities range from 0.01 to 0.001 and are matched against observed overpressures, whereas Bakken porosities based on the model and confirmed by measurements are inferred to be also unusually low, around 3%.

Burrus, J.; Wolf, S.; Doligez, B. [Institut Francais due Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)] [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chesapeake Corporation Chesapeake Corporation SCNGO FY12/24 months Gary Covatch Bradford,Sullivan&Susquehanna Co,PA Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Collection of real time data during cement jobs through observation for the purpose of developing an integrated process to optimize zonal isolation. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.08.27 15:57:30 -04'00' 08 27 2012 Jesse Garcia Digitally signed by Jesse Garcia DN: cn=Jesse Garcia, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=Jesse.Garcia@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.08.29 09:29:41 -05'00' 08 29 2012 CX covers laboratory and engineering studies,development field analytical methods, and implement cementing improvement plan in the field at existing well sites

336

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GE Resources Conservation Company GE Resources Conservation Company SCNGO FY12/24 months Gary Covatch Bellevue, King County, WA NORM Mitigation and Clean Water Recovery from Marcellus Frac Water Test and develop a brine concentrator based on membrane distillation (MD) to recover distilled water and a concentrated salt solution from shale gas produced water. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.21 11:02:07 -04'00' 09 21 2012 Cliff Whyte Digitally signed by Cliff Whyte DN: cn=Cliff Whyte, o=US Dept of Energy, ou=NETL- OPFC, email=Cliff.Whyte@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.25 10:01:02 -04'00' 09 25 2012 This CX is limited to Phase II bench-scale work in Bellevue, WA. Separate CXs/EQs to be submitted for

337

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AC26-07NT42677 AC26-07NT42677 RPSEA FE Chesapeake Corporation SCNGO 2012; FY12/24 months Gary Covatch Bradford,Sullivan&Susquehanna Co,PA Zonal Isolation Improvement for Horizontal Wells Drilling in the Marcellus Shale Collection of real time data during cement jobs through observation for the purpose of developing an integrated process to optimize zonal isolation. Gary L. Covatch Digitally signed by Gary L. Covatch DN: cn=Gary L. Covatch, o=NETL, ou=SCNGO, email=gary.covatch@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.07.10 08:22:07 -04'00' 07 10 2012 Jesse Garcia Digitally signed by Jesse Garcia DN: cn=Jesse Garcia, o=NETL, ou=ECD, email=Jesse.Garcia@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.07.12 14:03:15 -05'00' 07 12 2012 CX covers activities which include gathering data and information on current cementing operations,

338

Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide on gas shale and pure mineral samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have measured methane and carbon dioxide adsorption isotherms at 40C on gas shale samples from the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Marcellus and Montney reservoirs. Carbon dioxide isotherms were included to assess its potential for preferential adsorption, with implications for its use as a fracturing fluid and/or storage in depleted shale reservoirs. To better understand how the individual mineral constituents that comprise shales contribute to adsorption, measurements were made on samples of pure carbon, illite and kaolinite as well. We were able to successfully fit all adsorption data for both gases in accordance with a Langmuir isotherm model. Our results show carbon dioxide to have approximately 23 times the adsorptive capacity of methane in both the pure mineral constituents and actual shale samples. In addition to obvious microstructural and compositional differences between real rocks and pure minerals, we hypothesize that water adsorption plays an important role in regulating surface area availability for other molecules to adsorb. The resultant volumetric swelling strain was also measured as a function of pressure/adsorption. We observe both clay and pure carbon to swell an amount that is approximately linearly proportional to the amount of adsorption.

Robert Heller; Mark Zoback

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Morocco  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

XIV. Morocco (Including Western Sahara and Mauritania) EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment XIV. Morocco (Including Western Sahara and Mauritania) EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May 17, 2013 XIV-1 XIV. MOROCCO (INCLUDING WESTERN SAHARA AND MAURITANIA) SUMMARY In addition to large accumulations of Late-Cretaceous immature oil shale (kerogen) at depths suitable for surface mining 1 , Morocco and its two neighboring countries, Mauritania and Western Sahara, also possess organic-rich Silurian- and Devonian-age shale gas and shale oil potential in the Tindouf and Tadla basins, Figure XIV-1. Mapping and resource characterization of these shales is challenging because regional deformation, erosion and subsidence of the shale deposits have led to their discontinuous and complex present day distribution. Figure XIV-1. Shale Gas Basins of Morocco, Western Sahara and Mauritania

342

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

th th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration May 8-11, 2006 Alexandria, Virginia Poster 106: CO 2 Sequestration in Gas Shales of Kentucky Nuttall 1 , Brandon C. (presenter), bnuttall@uky.edu, Drahovzal 1 , James A., drahovzal@uky.edu, Eble 1 , Cortland F., eble@uky.edu, Bustin 2 , R. Marc, bustin@interchange.ubc.ca 1 Kentucky Geological Survey, 228 Mining and Mineral Resources Building, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0107, Phone: 859-257-5500, Fax: 859-257-1147 2 Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, 6339 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z4, Phone: 604-822-2449, Fax: 604-822-6088 ABSTRACT Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity

343

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Service Center Geology Overview Presented by: Paul J. Bembia May 16, 2013 http://seaborg.nmu.edu/earth. Western New York in the Middle Devonian Period 390 Million Years Ago Modified from Scotese, C.R., 2002, http://www.scotese.com, (PALEOMAP website). West Valley 2 Western New York Bedrock Geology The sediment from the shallow ocean that covered Western New York 350-400 million years ago is now sedimentary rock. Photo - http://www.earth.rochester.edu/ees207/18MileCreek/18milecreek.html 18 Mile Creek in Hamburg, New York 10,000 feet of sedimentary rock underlie the Western New York Nuclear Service Center 3 Bedrock Geology Cross Section - SE Pennsylvania to Western New York Bedrock in WNY is tilted slightly to the south from the continental

344

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

345

Evaluation of naturally fractured gas shale production utilizing multiwell transient tests: A field study  

SciTech Connect

A series of multiple well transient tests were conducted in a Devonian shale gas field in Meigs County, Ohio. Production parameters were quantified and it was determined that the reservoir is highly anisotropic, which is a significant factor in calculating half-fracture length from pressure transient data. Three stimulation treatments, including conventional explosive shooting, nitrogen foam frac, and high energy gas frac (HEGF), were compared on the basis of overall effectiveness and performance. Based on the evaluation of results, the nitrogen foam frac provided the most improved productivity. The study provided new type curves and analytical solutions for the mathematical representation of naturally fractured reservoirs and confirmed that the shale reservoir in Meigs County can be modeled as a dual porosity system using pseudosteady-state gas transfer from the matrix to the fracture system.

Chen, C.C.; Alam, J.; Blanton, T.L.; Vozniak, J.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Geochemistry and origin of regional dolomites: Annual progress report, July 26, 1987-March 15, 1988  

SciTech Connect

This progress report covers accomplishments over the past year. Over the past year we have continued to maintain a group of excellent graduate students working on petrology of dolomites and closely allied topics. The research topics include: (1) U-Th-Pb systematics in Burlington-Keokuk carbonates;(2) solid inclusions and non-carbonate phases in dolomites of the Burlington-Keokuk FMS;(3) Porosity and permeability in dolomites of Burlington-Keokuk FMS;(4) X-ray microprobe analysis of trace elements using synchroton radiation;(5) Dolomitization of Devonian reef complexes Canning basin western Australia;(6) Quantitative modeling of major and trace elements and isotopes during carbonate diagenesis;(7) Modeling of regional fluid flow;and (8) Stable isotope geochemistry and cathode luminescence of crinoids from the Burlington-Keokuk FMS.

Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Deep, water-free gas potential is upside to New Albany shale play  

SciTech Connect

The New Albany shale of the Illinois basin contains major accumulations of Devonian shale gas, comparable both to the Antrim shale of the Michigan basin and the Ohio shale of the Appalachian basin. The size of the resource originally assessed at 61 tcf has recently been increased to between 323 tcf and 528 tcf. According to the 1995 US Geological Survey appraisal, New Albany shale gas represents 52% of the undiscovered oil and gas reserves of the Illinois basin, with another 45% attributed to coalbed methane. New Albany shale gas has been developed episodically for over 140 years, resulting in production from some 40 fields in western Kentucky, 20 fields in southern Indiana, and at least 1 field in southern Illinois. The paper describes two different plays identified by a GRI study and prospective areas.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Hamilton-Smith LLC, Lexington, KY (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

348

New Albany shale group of Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois basin's New Albany shale group consists of nine formations, with the brownish-black laminated shales being the predominant lithology in southeastern Illinois and nearby parts of Kentucky where the group reaches its maximum thickness of 460 ft. A second depositional center lies in west-central Illinois and southeastern Iowa, where the group is about 300 ft thick and the predominant lithology is bioturbated olive-gray to greenish-gray shale. A northeast-trending area of thin strata (mostly interfingering gray and black shales) separates these two depocenters. The distribution and types of lithofacies in the New Albany suggest that the shale was deposited across a shelf-slope-basin transition in a marine, stratified anoxic basin. The record of depositional events in the shale group could serve as a baseline for interpreting the history of tectonically more complex sequences such as the Appalachian basin's Devonian shales.

Cluff, R.M.; Reinbold, M.L.; Lineback, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Organic geochemistry and correlation of Paleozoic source rocks and Trenton crude oils, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

Shale samples from four cores of the New Albany and Antrim Shales (Devonian) and from six cores of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician), representing a broad geographic area of Indiana, have been analyzed for total organic carbon, total sulfur, pyrolysis yield (Rock-Eval), bitumen content, and illite crystallinity data. These data indicate that the New Albany, Antrim, and Maquoketa shales contain a sufficient quantity and quality of organic matter to be good petroleum source rocks. Bitumen ratios, Rock-Eval yields, gas chromatography of saturated hydrocarbons, and illite crystallinity data show that the Maquoketa shales have reached a higher level of thermal maturity than the New Albany and Antrim shales. The level of thermal maturity of the Maquoketa shales suggested a maximum burial depth considerably greater than the present depth.

Guthrie, J. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Studies of New Albany shale in western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Albany (Upper Devonian) Shale in western Kentucky can be zoned by using correlative characteristics distinguishable on wire-line logs. Wells drilled through the shale which were logged by various methods provided a basis for zonation of the subsurface members and units of the Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and Blocher. Structure and isopach maps and cross sections were prepared. The Hannibal Shale and Rockford Limestone were found in limited areas; isopach maps were not made for these members. Samples of cuttings from selected wells were studied in order to identify the contact of the shale with underlying and overlying rock units. A well-site examination of cuttings through the shale section was conducted, and the presence of natural gas was observed in the field. The New Albany Shale has the potential for additional commercially marketable natural gas production. Exploratory drilling is needed to evaluate the reservoir characteristics of the New Albany Shale.

Schwalb, H.R.; Norris, R.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydraulic fracturing in a naturally fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing of wells in naturally fractured reservoirs can differ dramatically from fracturing wells in conventional isotropic reservoirs. Fluid leakoff is the primary difference. In conventional reservoirs, fluid leakoff is controlled by reservoir matrix and fracture fluid parameters. The fluid leakoff rate in naturally fractured reservoirs is typically excessive and completely dominated by the natural fractures. This paper presents several field examples of a fracture stimulation program performed on the naturally fractured Devonia carbonate of West Texas. Qualitative pressure decline analysis and net treating pressure interpretation techniques were utilized to evaluate the existence of natural fractures in the Devonian Formation. Quantitative techniques were utilized to assess the importance of the natural fractures to the fracturing process. This paper demonstrates that bottomhole pressure monitoring of fracture stimulations has benefits over conducting minifrac treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs. Finally, the results of this evaluation were used to redesign fracture treatments to ensure maximum productivity and minimize costs.

Britt, L.K.; Hager, C.J.; Thompson, J.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

A lodgepole play in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Lodgepole formation has been the major producing horizon in the Manitoba portion of the Williston basin, but it has not been a target in North Dakota except for limited interest along the northeast flank in early exploration. Completion of the Conoco-Dickenson State well 74, located in SW NW, Sec. 32, T140N, R96W, on February 3, 1993, for an IP of 2,045 bbl of oil, 164 mcf gas/day from the Lodgepole formation startled explorationists and requires a reexamination of Lodgepole stratigraphic concepts. Lineback and Davidson (1982) proposed that the Illinois and Williston basins were sediment-starved basins during the Late Devonian through the middle Mississippian. Cross sections of the Lodgepole formation from basin margins to the central basin area are consistent with that model. Facies changes within the Lodgepole formation indicate that the recent discovery is in clinoform carbonates basinward from persistent argillaceous beds.

Carlson, C.G. (NDIC, Bismark, ND (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Correlation cross sections along the international border  

SciTech Connect

The Manitoba-North Dakota (Canada-US) stratigraphic correlation project is a joint study between the Petroleum Branch of Manitoba Energy and Mines and the North Dakota Geological Survey. It is an attempt to correlate the differing stratigraphic terminologies established in the two jurisdictions by providing a reference cross section across the international boundary. The study involves the subsurface correlation of logs of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences in the Manitoba and North Dakota portions of the Williston basin. The Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences are subdivided for presentation into the following stratigraphic intervals: (a) Cambrian-Ordovician-Silurian, (b) Devonian, (c) Mississippian, (d) Jurassic, and (e) Cretaceous. Wireline logs show the actual stratigraphic correlations. A nomenclature chart is also presented from each sequence. In addition, the sections include a generalized description of lithologies, thicknesses, environments of deposition, and petroleum potential for each geographic area.

Martiniuk, C.D. (Manitoba Energy and Mines, Winnipeg (Canada)); Le Fever, J.A.; Anderson, S.B. (North Dakota Geological Survey, Grand Forks (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Economic appraisal of oil potential of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

An economic appraisal was made of the potential of more than 80 producing fields in the Williston basin of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The major oil producing formations investigated were in the Mississippian, Devonian, Silurian and Ordovician. Data for the study came from field production and drilling statistics. An extrapolated oil production decline curve for a theoretical average producing well first was made for each field. The value of the total extrapolated amount of producible oil for the average well was then calculated, discounted for royalty, taxes, etc., and divided by the estimated cost for a completed producing well. This gave an estimate of the return per dollar invested. No considerations were given for exploration and land acquisition costs. The estimated return per dollar values, after posting on Williston basin geologic maps, show relative economic comparisons of producing formations and where within the basin the best economic returns can be expected.

Jennings, A.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Deep Geothermal Exploration Well At Eastgate, Weardale, Uk- A Novel Exploration Concept For Low-Enthalpy Resources Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The first deep geothermal exploration borehole (995 m) to be drilled in the UK for over 20 years was completed at Eastgate (Weardale, Co. Durham) in December 2004. It penetrated 4 m of sandy till (Quaternary), 267.5 m of Lower Carboniferous strata (including the Whin Sill), and 723.5 m of the Weardale Granite (Devonian), with vein mineralization occurring to 913 m. Unlike previous geothermal investigations of UK radiothermal

356

Petroleum geochemistry of Texas and Oklahoma oils along the MarathonOuachita fold-thrust belt, south-central U.S.A.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Marathon uplifit of west Texas and the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas comprise the surface expressions of a Paleozoic orogenic belt extending across the south-central U.S.A. A century of petroleum exploration in the Marathons and Ouachitas has yielded several oil discoveries. In this study, detailed molecular, elemental and isotopic data are presented for 9 Texas oils, 5 Oklahoma oils and 4 Oklahoma solid bitumens, all associated with thrust belt rocks of west Texas and southeast Oklahoma. Oil-oil correlations are proposed, and the character of the organic matter in the source rock(s) is inferred from knowledge of the oil chemistry. At least 16 of the 18 Marathon-Ouachita fold-thrust belt oils/solid bitumens originate from the same (or very similar) organic facies, despite a geographic separation along the fold-thrust belt of > 700 mi (? 1125 km). Many of the chemical differences in these samples derive from secondary effects, including biodegradation (e.g., solid bitumens) and differing levels of thermal maturity. The occurrence of unusual chemical compounds (e.g., 25,28,30-trisnorhopane) in some samples indicates the presence of anaerobic bacteria in isolated locales during deposition. Isotopic variability, when interpreted in light of near-constant molecular composition in the oils and an extensive period of early Paleozoic starved trough source-rock deposition, implies that these oils originate from rocks of similar organic facies, with source-rock ages ranging from Devonian through Ordovician. Previous literature suggests either a Devonian or an Ordovician source for these oils; molecular and isotopic data of the present study do not allow a distinction to be made. These results, when interpreted in terms of depositional patterns during early Paleozoic time, suggest that oil source rocks and the Marathon-Ouachita fold-thrust belt oil type may be present in the subsurface of central and east-central Texas.

Joseph A. Curiale

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Formation waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs, Illinois basin, USA: Chemical and isotopic constraints on evolution and migration  

SciTech Connect

We have analyzed a suite of seventy-four formation-water samples from Mississippian and Pennsylvanian carbonate and siliciclastic strata in the Illinois basin for major, minor, and trace element concentrations and for strontium isotopic composition. A subset of these samples was also analyzed for boron isotopic composition. Data are used to interpret origin of salinity and chemical and Sr isotopic evolution of the brines and in comparison with a similar data set from an earlier study of basin formation waters from Silurian-Devonian reservoirs. Systematics of Cl-Br-Na show that present Mississippian-Pennsylvanian brine salinity can be explained by a combination of subaerial seawater evaporation short of halite saturation and subsurface dissolution of halite from an evaporite zone in the middle Mississippian St. Louis Limestone, along with extensive dilution by mixing with meteoric waters. Additional diagenetic modifications in the subsurface interpreted from cation/Br ratios include K depletion through interaction with clay minerals, Ca enrichment, and Mg depletion by dolomitization, and Sr enrichment through CaCO[sub 3] recrystallization and dolomitization. Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) formation waters show [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios in the range 0.70782-0.70900, whereas waters from the siliciclastic reservoirs are in the rante 0.70900-0.71052. Inverse correlations between [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr and B,Li, and Mg concentrations suggest that the brines acquired radiogenic [sup 87]Sr through interaction with siliciclastic minerals. Completely unsystematic relations between [sup 87]Fr/[sup 86]Sr and 1/Sr are observed; Sr concentrations in Ste. Genevieve and Aux Vases (middle Mississippian) waters appear to be buffered by equilibrium with respect to SrSo[sub 4]. These formation waters are distinguished from Silurian-Devonian brines in the basin by elevated Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios and by unsystematic Sr isotope relationships.

Stueber, A.M. (Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville (United States)); Walter, L.M.; Huston, T.J. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Pushkar, P. (Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Characterization of the Wymark CO2 Reservoir: A Natural Analog to Long-Term CO2 Storage at Weyburn  

SciTech Connect

Natural accumulations of CO{sub 2} occur in the Duperow and other Devonian strata on the western flank of the Williston Basin in lithologies very similar to those into which anthropogenic CO{sub 2} is being injected as part of an EOR program in the Weyburn-Midale pool. Previous workers have established the stratgraphic and petrographic similarities between the Duperow and Midale beds (Lake and Whittaker, 2004 and 2006). As the CO{sub 2} accumulations in the Devonian strata may be as old as 50 Ma, this similarity provides confidence in the efficacy of long-term geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the Midale-Weyburn pool. Here we attempt to extend this comparison with whole rock and mineral chemistry using the same sample suite used by Lake and Whittaker. We provide XRD, XRF, and electron microprobe analysis of major constituent minerals along with extensive backscattered electron and x-ray imaging to identify trace phases and silicate minerals. LPNORM analysis is used to quantify modal concentrations of minerals species. Samples from depth intervals where CO{sub 2} has been observed are compared to those where CO{sub 2} was absent, with no systematic differences in mineral composition observed. Gas accumulation can be correlated with sample porosity. In particular gas-bearing samples from the Eastend region are more porous than the overlying gas-free samples. Silicate minerals are rare in the Duperow carbonates, never exceeding 3 wt%. As such, mineral trapping is precluded in these lithologies. The geochemical data presented here will be used for comparison with a similar geochemical-mineralogical study of the Midale (Durocher et al., 2003) in a subsequent report.

Ryerson, F; Johnson, J

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

359

Horizontal drilling the Bakken Formation, Williston basin: A new approach  

SciTech Connect

Horizontal drilling is an attractive new approach to exploration and development of the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken Formation in the southwestern part of North Dakota. This drilling technique increases the probability of success, the profit potential, the effective drainage area maximizing recoverable reserves, and the productivity by encountering more natural occurring fractures. The target formation, the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken, consists of three members in an overlapping relationship, a lower organic-rich black shale, a middle siltstone/limestone, and an upper organic-rich black shale. It attains a maximum thickness of 145 ft and thins to a feather edge along its depositional limit. Considered to be a major source rock for the Williston basin, the Bakken is usually overpressured where productive. Overpressuring is attributed to intense hydrocarbon generation. Reservoir properties are poor with core fluid porosities being generally 5% or less and permeabilities ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 md. The presence of natural fractures in the shale are necessary for production. Two types of fractures are associated with Bakken reservoirs: large vertical fractures (of tectonic origin) and microfractures (probably related to hydrocarbon generation). An economic comparison between horizontal and vertical wells show that well completion costs are approximately two times higher (average costs; $1,500,000 for a horizontal to $850,000 for a vertical) with average payout for horizontal wells projected to occur in half the time (1.5 yr instead of 3.4 yr). Projected production and reserves are considered to be 2 to 4 times greater from a horizontal well.

Lefever, J.A. (North Dakota Geological Survey, Grand Forks (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-1011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 trillion cubic feet Basin Shale Play State(s) Production Reserves Production Reserves Production Reserves Fort Worth Barnett TX 1.9 31.0 2.0 32.6 0.1 1.6 Appalachian Marcellus PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH 0.5 13.2 1.4 31.9 0.9 18.7 Texas-Louisiana Salt Haynesville/Bossier TX, LA 1.5 24.5 2.5 29.5 1.0 5.0 Arkoma Fayetteville AR 0.8 12.5 0.9 14.8 0.1 2.3 Anadarko Woodford TX, OK 0.4 9.7 0.5 10.8 0.1 1.1 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 0.1 2.5 0.4 8.4 0.3 5.9 Sub-total 5.2 93.4 7.7 128.0 2.5 34.6 Other shale gas plays 0.2 4.0 0.3 3.6 0.1 -0.4 All U.S. Shale Plays 5.4 97.4 8.0 131.6 2.6 34.2 Change 2011-2010 2010 2011 Notes: Some columns may not add up to its subtotal because of independent rounding. Natural gas is wet after lease separation. The above table is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Final report, June 1992--January 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in September 1987 by the US Department of Energy was to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation and upgrading, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program was divided into the following active tasks: Task 3 -- Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4 -- Beneficiation Research; Task 6 -- Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; and Task 9 -- Information Required for the National Environmental Policy Act. In order to accomplish all of the program objectives, tho Institute of Gas Technology (ICT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: The University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Alabama College of Engineering (UA), University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed by IGT from June 1, 1992 through January 31, 1993.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Erekson, E.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Schultz, C.W.; Hatcher, W.E. [Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States). Mineral Resources Inst.; Parekh, B.K. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Bonner, W.P. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau  

SciTech Connect

Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Focusing future exploration in mature basin: Maturation and migration models integrated with timing of major structural events in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Exploration risk can be decreased by highgrading areas where the timing of structural events and maturation of source rocks are nearly coincident. Knowledge of migration fairways further aids in focusing exploration. Four burial-history models have been constructed to accommodate (1) a rift-fill sequence in excess of 24,000 ft, (2) a hypothetical Fairfield basin model, (3) a model using a deep well, and (4) a model on the Sparta shelf. These complex models, which use several variables including compaction, thermal conductivity, kerogen kinetics, and multiple unconformities, indicate a possibility for multiple hydrocarbon-generative events and show that linear geothermal gradients are ineffective in explaining maturation in Illinois. Periods of oil generation determined from the models can be compared with known timing of structural events to predict trapping potential. Depths to the oil phase-out zone are also significant. Exploration risk can be reduced in Illinois by using a simple migration model that uses the basal Upper Devonian Sylamore Sandstone in central and western Illinois as a migration conduit and the New Albany Group as a source. Other migration conduits in the basin are discussed including faults associated with structures and fracture systems such as the Wabash Valley fault system.

Oltz, D.F.; Crockett, J.E. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

North Dakota`s Dickinson Lodgepole discovery: A Preliminary exploration model  

SciTech Connect

Interest in the Mississippian Lodgepole formation of North Dakota has intensified since the successful completion of the Duncan Oil Inc. 1-11 Knopik flowing 2,707 b/d of oil and 1.55 MMcfd of gas 430 cu m of oil and 43,891 cu m of gas. The play began when Conoco drilled an in-field wildcat in an attempt to establish deeper production in Dickinson oil field. The discovery well, 74 Dickinson State, was completed in a clean lower Lodgepole limestone section that is thought to represent a Waulsortian mound. The most important questions asked concerning the Lodgepole play are whether or not it will step out of the Dickinson area, what are the factors that control the development of these mounds, what controlled the development of the reservoir and trap, and how it was charged with oil. Other than the reservoir section, the most significant feature observed from wireline logs of the area is the anomalously thick Bakken formation (Mississippian-Devonian). This observation is important to understanding the Lodgepole play and can be used to help explore for similar features elsewhere in the basin. The paper describes the regional setting, the Lodgepole stratigraphy, deposition, regional equivalents, and a salt collapse model that can readily explain the features observed at the Dickinson field.

LeFever, J.A. [North Dakota Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Halabura, S.P. [North Rim Exploration Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Martiniuk, C.D. [Manitoba Energy and Mines, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Fischer, D.W.

1995-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geothermal resource assessment, South Dakota: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Seven geothermal aquifers in South Dakota contain an accessible resource base of about 11,207 x 10/sup 18/ J. The potentially productive geothermal aquifers are: Deadwood Formation (Cambrian), Winnipeg Formation + Red River Formation + Englewood Limestone (Ordovician through Devonian), Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Minnelusa Formation (Mississippian-Permian), Inyan Kara Group (Cretaceous), and Newcastle Sandstone (Cretaceous). The resource estimate was obtained by first using heat flow, thermal conductivity, temperature gradient, and stratigraphic data to estimate aquifer temperatures. The heat content of each aquifer was determined from the product of the volumetric heat capacity, aquifer volume, and temperature difference between the aquifer and the mean annual temperature for a 14 x 14 grid of 240 km/sup 2/ cells. Geothermal fluid temperatures range from about 120/sup 0/C in the Deadwood Formation in the Williston Basin to about 30/sup 0/C for the Newcastle Sandstone in south-central South Dakota. The area containing the resource lies largely west of the Missouri River. About 10,000 km/sup 2/ of the resource area is characterized by anomalously high heat flow values greater than 100 mW m/sup -2/.

Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Gas sales starting from Indiana`s fractured New Albany shale  

SciTech Connect

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas issued 138 drilling permits from Dec. 1, 1994, through July 31, 1996, in 17 counties in a growing play for gas in Devonian New Albany shale in southern Indiana. The permits are active in the form of locations, drilling wells, wells in the completion process, and wells producing gas in the dewatering stage. Geologically in southwestern Indiana the New Albany shale exploration play is found in three provinces. These are the Wabash platform, the Terre Haute reef bank, and the Vincennes basin. Exploration permits issued on each of these geologic provinces are as follows: Wabash platform 103, Terra Haute reef bank 33, and Vincennes basin two. The authors feel that the quantity and effectiveness of communication of fracturing in the shale will control gas production and water production. A rule of thumb in a desorption reservoir is that the more water a shale well makes in the beginning the more gas it will make when dewatered.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. [Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Geologists, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence  

SciTech Connect

Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Clarification of C-S relationships of marine black shales using stable isotopic composition of reduced sulfur  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-sulfur relationships are compared for the Miocene Monterey Formation (Santa Maria Basin, California) and the Upper Devonian New Albany Shale (Illinois Basin, Indiana). In both formations, C-S concentrations covary for samples with the lower to more intermediate organic carbon concentrations and become invariant at higher organic carbon concentrations. While the similarity of these relationships in Monterey and New Albany suggest sulfur diagenesis occurred in similar depositional environments, sulfur isotopic data clearly indicate differences in the depositional environments. In the Monterey, the most organic-rich laminated shales are characterized by isotopic enrichment of reduced S and low S ratios and indicate that sulfate reduction occurred under sulfate-limited conditions within the sediments. In the New Albany, organic-rich laminated shales exhibit isotopic depletion of reduced S coupled with low S[sub reduced]/C[sub org] and suggest sulfur diagenesis occurred under euxinic conditions. These data show that in the absence of sulfur isotopic data, misleading conclusions concerning depositional environments can be made when using C-S plots and the traditional interpretations that are associated with these types of plots.

Zaback, D.A.; Pratt, L.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Petroleum potential of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois: A coordinated geological and geochemical study  

SciTech Connect

The Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois, predominantly composed of shale, calcareous shale, and carbonates, has long been considered a potential source for Illinois basin hydrocarbons. Methods used to better define the petroleum potential of the Maquoketa in the Illinois basin were lithostratigraphic study, Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) analyses, comparison of molecular markers from whole-rock extracts and produced oil, and construction of burial history models. Organic-rich submature Maquoketa potential source rocks are present in western Illinois at shallow depths on the basin flank. Deeper in the basin in southern Illinois, Rock-Eval analyses indicate that the Maquoketa shale is within the oil window. Solvent extracts of the Maquoketa from western Illinois closely resemble the Devonian New Albany Shale, suggesting that past studies may have erroneously attributed Maquoketa-generated petroleum to a New Albany source or failed to identify mixed source oils. Subtle differences between Maquoketa and New Albany solvent extracts include differences in pristane/phytane ratios, proportions of steroids, and distribution of dimethyldibenzothiophene isomers. Maquoketa solvent extracts show little resemblance to Middle Ordovician oils from the Illinois or Michigan basins. Lithostratigraphic studies identified localized thick carbonate facies in the Maquoketa, suggesting depositional response to upper Ordovician paleostructures. Sandstone facies in the Maquoketa in southwestern Illinois offer a potential source/trap play, as well as serving as potential carrier beds for hydrocarbon migration. Maquoketa source and carrier beds may feed older Ordovician rocks in faulted areas along and south of the Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Kruge, M.A. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Transport and reduction of sulfate and immobilization of sulfide in marine black shales  

SciTech Connect

In fine-grained sediments in which the amount of reduced sulfur retained in stable phases substantially exceeds that present initially in pore waters, rates of sulfate reduction may have equaled or exceeded rates of sulfate transport, resulting in enrichment of [sup 34]S in pore waters and reduction products. Abundance and isotopic compositions of reduced sulfur compounds can be used to calculate the extent of sulfide retention and improve reconstructions of carbon-sulfur oxidation-reduction (redox) budgets. The Miocene Monterey Formation and Upper Devonian New Albany Shale represent distinct types of black shales that accumulated under different conditions of sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that the rate of sulfate reduction was controlled largely by mass transport in the Monterey and by the reduction process itself in the New Albany. Sulfide was more efficiently retained in the Monterey; thus each mole of sulfide in the New Albany represents a greater amount of sedimented organic carbon removed during sulfate reduction. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Zaback, D.A.; Pratt, L.M.; Hayes, J.M. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Maintenance of high TDS in pore waters above the New Albany Shale of the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect

The TDS content of interstitial waters above the Upper Devonian New Albany Shale of the Illinois Basin, mostly sodium and chloride, increases at an average rate of 15 wt%km[sup [minus]1]. Roughly 200 My have elapsed since the youngest marine rocks of wide horizontal extent [Pennsylvania] were deposited. Regardless of the original brine-forming mechanism, the maintenance of high TDS for such a long time span is problematic because upward diffusion above the New Albany Shale should have lowered TDS if no salt dissolved above the New Albany Shale. Groundwater flow at even small rates would have lowered TDS faster than the process of diffusion alone. Calculations which take into account the effects of vertical diffusion show that the present-day salinity gradient of waters above the New Albany Shale can be explained if: (1) the salinity gradient 200 My b.p. was at least thrice as high as at the present, or (2) salt dissolved above the New Albany Shale at an average rate of about 12 m of halite column over 200 My. The code PORFLOW was used to simulate flushing of brines in a generic basin 500 km wide, 1.5 km deep [the maximum depth of the New Albany Shale], with a low basin-wide topographic gradient of 0.06%.

Ranganathan, V. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comparison of organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age in Indiana with New Albany Shale  

SciTech Connect

Abundant black organic-rich shales occur in rocks of Pennsylvanian age in southwestern Indiana. They have not been well characterized except for a few thin intervals in small areas, the best example being at the abandoned Mecca Quarry in west-central Indiana. Although these shales are thinner and less widespread than the organic-rich shales of the New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian age) they warrant characterization because of their accessibility during strip mining of underlying coals. Organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age contain up to 44% organic carbon and might be considered potential oil shales. Carbon to hydrogen ratios in these shales are similar to those in the New Albany. Relatively high concentrations of certain metals occur in shales of both ages, especially where phosphate is abundant, and sulfur values for both shales range from < 1 to 6%. Sulfur values are much higher for thin pyrite-rich units. Siderite nodules are common in Pennsylvania shales, but little siderite if found in the New Albany. Dolomite, commonly ferroan, and calcite in a variety of forms are the dominant carbonates in the New Albany. Some Pennsylvanian shales may contain large fossils or mica flakes, but such coarse-grained features are uncommon in the New Albany Shale.

Shaffer, N.R.; Leininger, R.K.; Ennis, M.V.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Effects of scale-up on oil and gas yields in a solid-recycle bed oil shale retorting process  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized bed pyrolysis of oil shale in a non-hydrogen atmosphere has been shown to significantly increase oil yield in laboratory-scale reactors compared to the Fischer assay by many workers. The enhancement in oil yield by this relatively simple and efficient thermal technique has led to the development of several oil shale retorting processes based on fluidized bed and related technologies over the past fifteen years. Since 1986, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) has been developing one such process, KENTORT II, which is mainly tailored for the Devonian oil shales that occur in the eastern U.S. The process contains three main fluidized bed zones to pyrolyze, gasify, and combust the oil shale. A fourth fluidized bed zone serves to cool the spent shale prior to exiting the system. The autothermal process utilizes processed shale recirculation to transfer heat from the combustion to the gasification and pyrolysis zones. The CAER is currently testing the KENTORT II process in a 22.7-kg/hr process-development unit (PDU).

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Vego, A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Calcium pumping and anhydrite/halite relationships in Silurian A unit of Michigan basin  

SciTech Connect

Observed relationships between anhydrite and halite in the A unit of the Michigan basin are not easily explained by classical evaporite depositional models. Within the Northern Reef trend, productive Niagaran pinnacle reefs are surrounded by A unit halite, which commonly exceeds 100 m in total thickness. However, A unit evaporites consist of thick anhydrite deposits on reef flanks and above reefs in the A-1 and A-2, respectively, Stratigraphic data suggest that the anhydrites surrounding reefs are contemporaneous with off-reef halite deposits. This reef-evaporite relationship poses three problems. (1) Why would gypsum precipitate from a halite-saturated brine (2) Why are anhydrites associated with the reefs (3) Why are anhydrites significantly thicker than predicted by evaporation models In a normal marine evaporation sequence (Hardie-Eugster model), gypsum is deposited from a brine until calcium is depleted. Upon further evaporation, the resultant halite-saturated brine would precipitate gypsum only in contact with a calcium source. The authors propose a calcium pumping mechanism whereby calcium-rich water associated with pinnacle reefs is responsible for gypsum precipitation around these reefs contemporaneous with off-reef halite. The additional supply of calcium also explains the anomalous thickness of these anhydrite deposits. Similar anhydrite halos around pinnacle reefs have been observed in the Devonian Elk Point basin.

Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Br-Cl-Na systematics in Illinois basin fluids: Constraints on fluid origin and evolution  

SciTech Connect

The authors present here bromide, chloride, and sodium data for fluids from reservoirs of Ordovician through Pennsylvania age in the Illinois basic which suggest that remnant marine fluids contribute significantly to fluid Cl budgets. Cl/Br and NaBr ratios for Ordovician through Devonian formation fluids are relatively uniform and near those for seawater, despite greater than a factor of ten range in Cl concentration. In contrast, fluids from Mississippian and Pennsylvanian reservoirs, separated from older reservoirs by the New Albany Shale Group, have more variable fluid Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios, most of which are significantly greater then those of seawater. The 1:1 stoichiometry of Cl and Na increases for Mississippian and Pennsylvanian formation fluids is consistent with halite dissolution. Nevertheless, Br systematics and mass-balance considerations indicate that he overall Cl budget of Illinois basin formation fluids appears to be more significantly influenced by the contribution from subaerially evaporated seawater than by halite dissolution.

Walter, L.M.; Huston, T.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, Missouri (USA)); Stueber, A.M. (Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales. Progress report, July--September 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the 3-year program, initiated in October 1987 is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following eight tasks: Task 1, PFH Scoping Studies; Task 2, PFH Optimization Tests; Task 3, Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4, Beneficiation Research; Task 5, Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Task 6, Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Task 7, Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; Task 8, Project Management and Reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology, the prime contractor, is working with seven other institutions; the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan, the University of Nevada, Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Pittsburgh. This report presents the work performed during the eighth program quarter from July 1 through September 30, 1989.

Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Knowlton, T.M. [and others

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Preliminary assessment of hydrocarbon potential in southern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon exploration has been sparse south of the Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois. Over 240,000 ac in this area are within the Shawnee National Forest (SNF). Upcoming review of mineral exploration policy on SNF land and a recent amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act (1987) will result in release of portions of the SNF for competitive and potentially noncompetitive bidding for mineral exploration tracts in the near future. Preliminary assessment of hydrocarbon potential has been carried out in southern Illinois. Numerous oil shows occur in Paleozoic strata south of the Cottage Grove fault system, which, at present, describes the southern boundary of most oil production in Illinois. Only Mitchellsville oil field in southern Saline County lies south of the Cottage Grove fault system. The Upper Devonian New Albany Shale, though to be the primary source rock for Illinois basin hydrocarbons, underlies most of the area. Older potential source rocks may be present. Depositional trends of prolific oil-productive Mississippian strata in Illinois continue southward through the area. Few drill holes have tested strata older than Mississippian in the area. Complex faulting in the Rough Creek-Shawneetown fault system may have improved the potential for hydrocarbon emplacement and entrapment in this region. Preliminary assessment of hydrocarbon potential indicates that this wildcat region deserves further tests.

Crockett, J.E.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales. Progress report, October--December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the 3-year program, initiated in October 1987 is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following eight tasks: Task 1, PFH Scoping Studies; Task 2, PFH Optimization Tests; Task 3, Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Task 4, Beneficiation Research; Task 5, Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Task 6, Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Task 7, Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; Task 8, Project Management and Reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology, the prime contractor, is working with seven other institutions; the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute, Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan, the University of Nevada, Ohio State University, Tennessee Technological University and the University of Pittsburgh. This report presents the work performed during the fifth program quarter from October 1 through December 31, 1988.

Punwani, D.V.; Lau, F.S.; Knowlton, T.M. [and others

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Strontium isotopic study of subsurface brines from Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

The abundance of the radiogenic isotope /sup 87/Sr in a subsurface brine can be used as a tracer of brine origin, evolution, and diagenetic effects. The authors have determined the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of over 60 oil-field waters from the Illinois basin, where brine origin is perplexing because of the absence of any significant evaporite strata. Initially, they analyzed brines from 15 petroleum-producing sandstone and carbonate units; waters from Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian strata have /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios in the range 0.7079-0.7108. All but those from the Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) are more radiogenic in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr than seawater values for this interval of geologic time. The detrital source of the more radiogenic /sup 87/Sr may be the New Albany Shale group, considered to be a major petroleum source rock in the basin. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of Ste. Genevieve brines apparently evolved without a contribution from fluid-shale interaction.

hetherington, E.A.; Stueber, A.M.; Pushkar, P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Chapter 2 - The Application of the Concepts of Sequence Stratigraphy to Carbonate Rock Sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sequence stratigraphic principals can be applied to carbonate rock sequences. Typical tropical shallow-water carbonate shelves lead to sequence boundary exposure across carbonate platforms, and carbonate deep water deposits during highstands. Rapid carbonate sedimentation across a shelf leads to vertical accretion during the TST and progradation during the HST. Reef-bound shelf margins tend to evolve into escarpment margins with megabreccia development on the slope. Examples are the Devonian of the Canning Basin and the Cretaceous of Mexico. Carbonate ramps typically develop lowstand prograding complexes. Cool-water carbonates develop ramp morphology, independent of light with no framework reefs, and parallel the sequence stratigraphic framework of siliciclastics. The cool water sediments of the Great Australian Bight is an example Mud mound sequences as seen in Morocco are generally independent of sea-level changes, so most sequence stratigraphic concepts are not applicable. In mixed carbonate-siliciclastic situations reciprocal sedimentation results with HST carbonates dominating in the basin and LST clastics dominating in the basin. Sequence stratigraphic concepts are generally not applicable to lacustrine carbonates, but lake dessication cycles present a similar stratigraphic framework as seen in the Tertiary Green River of the Western United States.

Clyde H. Moore; William J. Wade

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Application of horizontal drilling to tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Vertical fractures and lithologic heterogeneity are extremely important factors controlling gas flow rates and total gas recovery from tight (very low permeability) reservoirs. These reservoirs generally have in situ matrix permeabilities to gas of less than 0.1 md. Enhanced gas recovery methods have usually involved hydraulic fracturing; however, the induced vertical hydraulic fractures almost always parallel the natural fracture and may not be an efficient method to establish a good conduit to the wellbore. Horizontal drilling appears to be an optimum method to cut across many open vertical fractures. Horizontal holes will provide an efficient method to drain heterogeneous tight reservoirs even in unfractured rocks. Although many horizontal wells have now been completed in coalbed methane and oil reservoirs, very few have been drilled to exclusively evaluate tight gas reservoirs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded some horizontal and slanthole drilling in order to demonstrate the applicability of these techniques for gas development. Four DOE holes have been drilled in Devonian gas shales in the Appalachian basin, and one hole has been drilled in Upper Cretaceous tight sandstones in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The Colorado field experiment has provided valuable information on the abundance and openness of deeply buried vertical fractures in tight sandstones. These studies, plus higher gas prices, should help encourage industry to begin to further utilize horizontal drilling as a new exploitation method for tight gas reservoirs.

Spencer, C.W. (U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States)); Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Brown, C.A. (Synder Oil Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thermal modeling of Bakken Formation of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

Organic geochemical analyses provide a quantitative basis on which conceptual models of thermal maturation may be built. Contour maps of maturation indices of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin show anomalous patterns that are not dependent on burial depth. One such area is on the western side of the Nesson anticline. One-dimensional modeling incorporating a uniform, constant heat flow, lithology-dependent thermal conductivities, and decompaction factors indicates that these areas are less mature than surrounding regions. This is due primarily to decreasing burial depth and thinning of low-thermal-conductivity Tertiary and Cretaceous shales. Additional heat transfer to these regions may be due in part to heat transfer by fluid movement through aquifers or vertical fractures. The influence of these fluid systems is simulated through the use of a two-dimensional finite difference program. Basic assumptions are made concerning heat flow, thermal properties, and ground-water flow rates through time. Modeling of the time-temperature history is simplified by restricting the study to the time of greatest maturation, the post-Jurassic.

Anderson, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Fracture-enhanced porosity and permeability trends in Bakken Formation, Williston basin, western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Fractures play a critical role in oil production from the Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The Bakken Formation in the study area is known for its low matrix porosity and permeability, high organic content, thermal maturity, and relative lateral homogeneity. Core analysis has shown the effective porosity and permeability development within the Bakken Formation to be related primarily to fracturing. In theory, lineaments mapped on the surface reflect the geometry of basement blocks and the zones of fracturing propagated upward from them. Fracturing in the Williston basin is thought to have occurred along reactivated basement-block boundaries in response to varying tectonic stresses and crustal flexure throughout the Phanerozoic. Landsat-derived lineament maps were examined for the area between 47/degrees/ and 48/degrees/ north lat. and 103/degrees/ and 104/degrees/ west long. (northern Billings and Golden Valley Counties, and western McKenzie County, North Dakota) in an attempt to identify large-scale fracture trends. In the absence of major tectonic deformation in the craton, a subtle pattern of fracturing has propagated upward through the sedimentary cover and emerged as linear topographic features visible on these large-scale, remote-sensed images.

Freisatz, W.B.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques  

SciTech Connect

Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (<2 nm) size distribution. Micropore and mesopore volumes correlate with organic matter content in the samples. Accessibility of pores in coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Rupp, John A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Disposal of produced waters: Undergrown injection option in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of large volumes of water produced simultaneously with coal-bed methane is a costly, environmentally sensitive problem. Underground injection into deeper, naturally fractured, low-porosity formations is feasible provided that the total dissolved solids level of these formation waters comply with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Greater fracture density in proximity to structures formed by Appalachian and Ouachita tectonism, along with a higher total dissolved solids level in both the production and injection formation waters, occurs in the eastern, southern, and northern margins of the coal-bed methane (CBM) area of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. Injection permeability is developed where fractures intersect formations with suitable lithologies and thickness. Initial results indicate that the lower Pottsville sands, which thicken to the south, have the highest initial injection potential, although these sands appear dirty and tight on the logs. Normal faulting and matrix porosity, in addition to fracturing, may increase permeability in this formation. In the shallower, northern edge of the CBM area, thin-bedded Mississippian sands with high porosity, such as the Hartzelle, may be present. Injection potential also occurs in the fractured Devonian chert and silecous carbonate lithologies in the Upper Silurian where they thicken to the southwest, and in sandy carbonate lithologies in the undifferentiated Silurian and Ordovician at the eastern margin of the overthrust. The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Formation has injection potential in a 6-mi wide zone at the eastern margin of the basin, where the upper Knox is dolomitized below the unconformity.

Ortiz, I.; Weller, T.F.; Anthony, R.V. (United Energy Development Consultants, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Dziewulski, D. (BioIndustrial Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Lorenzen, J. (ResTech, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Frantz, J.H. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Pyrophyllite and pyrophyllite raw materials in the sulfide-bearing areas of the Urals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrophyllite, Al2(Si4O10) (OH)2, was discovered for the first time in the Urals, in 1829, occurring in quartz veins of the Berezovsk gold-beresite deposit. At present, 6 types of pyrophyllite mineralization occurrences are known in the region. Pyrophyllite-containing metasomatites in areas with massive sulfide mineralization are the most interesting for practical purposes. They are confined to Devonian palaeo-island arcs formed on the margin of the Urals palaeo-ocean. While studying the Gay and Kul-Yurt-Tau deposits, it was discovered that productive metasomatites occur in the flanks and roofs of rhyolite-dacite domes. Depending on the ratio of pyrophyllite, diaspore, sericite, kaolinite and quartz, several types of pyrophyllite raw material can be distinguished. Quartz-sericite-pyrophyllitic rocks are the most suitable for ceramic production. They have an elevated content of alkalis that promote sintering in the range of 1100 to 1200C. Pyrophyllitic, pyrophyllite-diasporic, and pyrophyllite-quartz varieties can be used for production of fireproof materials. Sometimes, besides ordinary pyrophyllite of the 2M + 1Tc polytype, chromiferous pyrophyllite of the 1Tc polytype is present. Processes like synvolcanic metasomatism, dynamometamorphism and atmospheric weathering have played an important role in the formation of pyrophyllite ore bodies.

V.V. Zaykov; V.N. Udachin

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geology, isotope geochemistry and ore genesis of the Shanshulin carbonate-hosted PbZn deposit, southwest China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Shanshulin PbZn deposit occurs in Upper Carboniferous Huanglong Formation dolomitic limestone and dolostone, and is located in the western Yangtze Block, about 270km west of Guiyang city in southwest China. Ore bodies occur along high angle thrust faults affiliated to the Weishui regional fault zone and within the northwestern part of the Guanyinshan anticline. Sulfide ores are composed of sphalerite, pyrite, and galena that are accompanied by calcite and subordinate dolomite. Twenty-two ore bodies have been found in the Shanshulin deposit area, with a combined 2.7milliontonnes of sulfide ores grading 0.54 to 8.94wt.% Pb and 1.09 to 26.64wt.% Zn. Calcite samples have ?13CPDB and ?18OSMOW values ranging from ?3.1 to +2.5 and +18.8 to +26.5, respectively. These values are higher than mantle and sedimentary organic matter, but are similar to marine carbonate rocks in a ?13CPDB vs. ?18OSMOW diagram, suggesting that carbon in the hydrothermal fluid was most likely derived from the carbonate country rocks. The ?34SCDT values of sphalerite and galena samples range from +18.9 to +20.3 and +15.6 to +17.1, respectively. These values suggest that evaporites are the most probable source of sulfur. The ?34SCDT values of symbiotic sphaleritegalena mineral pairs indicate that deposition of sulfides took place under chemical equilibrium conditions. Calculated temperatures of S isotope thermodynamic equilibrium fractionation based on sphaleritegalena mineral pairs range from 135 to 292C, consistent with previous fluid inclusion studies. Temperatures above 100C preclude derivation of sulfur through bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) and suggest that reduced sulfur in the hydrothermal fluid was most likely supplied through thermo-chemical sulfate reduction (TSR). Twelve sphalerite samples have ?66Zn values ranging from 0.00 to +0.55 (mean +0.25) relative to the JMC 3-0749L zinc isotope standard. Stages I to III sphalerite samples have ?66Zn values ranging from 0.00 to +0.07, +0.12 to +0.23, and +0.29 to +0.55, respectively, showing the relatively heavier Zn isotopic compositions in later versus earlier sphalerite. The variations of Zn isotope values are likely due to kinetic Raleigh fractional crystallization. The 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios of the sulfide samples fall in the range of 18.362 to 18.573, 15.505 to 15.769 and 38.302 to 39.223, respectively. The Pb isotopic ratios of the studied deposit plot in the field that covers the upper crust, orogenic belt and mantle Pb evolution curves and overlaps with the age-corrected Proterozoic folded basement rocks, Devonian to Lower Permian sedimentary rocks and Middle Permian Emeishan flood basalts in a 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb diagram. This observation points to the derivation of Pb metal from mixed sources. Sphalerite samples have 87Sr/86Sr200Ma ratios ranging from 0.7107 to 0.7115 similar to the age-corrected Devonian to Lower Permian sedimentary rocks (0.7073 to 0.7111), higher than the age-corrected Middle Permian basalts (0.7039 to 0.7078), and lower than the age-corrected Proterozoic folded basement (0.7243 to 0.7288). Therefore, the Sr isotope data support a mixed source. Studies on the geology and isotope geochemistry suggest that the Shanshulin deposit is a carbonate-hosted, thrust fault-controlled, strata-bound, epigenetic, high grade deposit formed by fluids and metals of mixed origin.

Jia-Xi Zhou; Zhi-Long Huang; Zhi-Cheng Lv; Xiang-Kun Zhu; Jian-Guo Gao; Hassan Mirnejad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

NETL: Computer Software & Databases -E & P Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E & P Tools E & P Tools CO2 Prophet: Water and CO2 Flood Prediction Software. CO2 Prophet, conceived by Texaco Exploration and Production Technology Department (EPTD), was partially developed as part of the DOE Class I cost share program "Post Waterflood, CO2 Flood in a Light Oil, Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoir" under DOE Contract No. DE-FC22-93BC14960. Windows XP compatiable version has been updated, see historical READ ME FIRST file and READ ME SECOND file before operation. The DOE does not provide technical support for this application. Download 973 KB User's Manual and Readme files included Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool (Fee): Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. "Expert" systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration "expert" tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of "fuzzy" logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated "Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool." The Fuzzy Expert Exploration Tool will eventually be generalized so that users in any part of the world will be able to add their own knowledge and data and make rapid evaluations of a large number of potential drilling sites in a systematic and consistent manner via the internet. Below are links to install standalone systems for the Delaware Basin specific FEE Tool and the Devonian specific FEE Tool. More information can also be found at: http://ford.nmt.edu

394

Structural style and tectonic evolution of the marathon thrust belt, west Texas  

SciTech Connect

A balanced cross section indicates that the basal Dugout Creek thrust is strongly folded and that the Marathon facies rocks overlie a folded and thrusted sequence of late Paleozoic strata. Shortening in the allochthonous sequence is >80%. Extreme shortening across anticlinoria requires upper level detachments. These appear to have been duplex zones connected to the basal fault by steep imbricates. Progressive deformation folded the imbricates and the roof thrusts of these zones. Individual units have distinct deformational styles. Folds in the Caballos Fm. are tight, high-amplitude concentric folds with wave-lengths of 0.5 to 1.7 km. Pre-Caballos units are characterized by smaller wavelength box and chevron folds and imbricate faults. The overlying Tesnus Fm. is exposed in broad synclines. High strain within the cores of the synclines was accommodated by development of cleavage and axial-parallel pencil lineation. The pre-Mississippian part of the Marathon sequence represents slope deposits developed along a divergent continental margin. The Mississippian was marked by flysch sedimentation (Tesnus Fm.) which heralded the beginning of collision of Gondwanaland. Much of this sediment was derived from Devonian and older strata of Gondwanaland. The Tesnus Fm. was deposited on the slope sequence and is entirely allochthonous. By Atokan-Virgilian times, the slope/Tesnus sequence overrode the miogeoclinal sequence of North America. Permian foreland and taphrogenic basins formed within shelf areas north of the Marathon region during continued compression. Deformation progressed from SE to NW during a period of about 70 million years.

Hickman, R.G.; Varga, R.J.; Altany, R.M.; Witmer, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

PRODUCTION VERIFICATION TESTS  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the demonstration of 14 stages (in 10 wells) of a unique liquid-free stimulation process which employs carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as the working fluid in ten Candidate Wells. Three were situated in Perry County and seven in Pike County of eastern kentucky's Big Sandy gas field. These activities included four individual efforts which have previously been described in detail in four submitted Final Reports, and are herein summarized. These ten Candidate wells produce from the Devonian Shale which is well known to be damaged by liquid based stimulation processes. They were treated with a total of fourteen stages; four as a single stage, and the others in two stages per well all containing approximately 120 tons of CO{sub 2} per stage. These liquid free stimulations also contained proppant quantities on the order of 45,000 lbs per stage. The results show in the three Perry Co Candidate wells that the stimulations were not as effective as the best conventional technology, and resulted in a stimulation cost for produced gas of $0.69 per Mcf vs $0.43 for N{sub 2} gas stimulations. The results in the Pike County Candidates, where the shale section is thicker--1,025 vs. 350 feet, indicated a superior response from the wells stimulated with the CO{sub 2}/sand process. A five year production benefit of 67.7 MMcf per stage, or 135.4 MMcf per well over that from the closest competing technology which results in a 3.41 benefit ratio and a stimulation cost for produced gas of $0.47 per Mcf vs $1.14 for N{sub 2} gas.

Raymond L. Mazza

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

James Wood; William Quinlan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

RISK REDUCTION WITH A FUZZY EXPERT EXPLORATION TOOL  

SciTech Connect

Incomplete or sparse information on types of data such as geologic or formation characteristics introduces a high level of risk for oil exploration and development projects. ''Expert'' systems developed and used in several disciplines and industries have demonstrated beneficial results. A state-of-the-art exploration ''expert'' tool, relying on a computerized database and computer maps generated by neural networks, is being developed through the use of ''fuzzy'' logic, a relatively new mathematical treatment of imprecise or non-explicit parameters and values. Oil prospecting risk can be reduced with the use of a properly developed and validated ''Fuzzy Expert Exploration (FEE) Tool.'' This FEE Tool can be beneficial in many regions of the U.S. by enabling risk reduction in oil and gas prospecting as well as decreased prospecting and development costs. In the 1998-1999 oil industry environment, many smaller exploration companies lacked the resources of a pool of expert exploration personnel. Downsizing, low oil prices, and scarcity of exploration funds have also affected larger companies, and will, with time, affect the end users of oil industry products in the U.S. as reserves are depleted. The pool of experts is much reduced today. The FEE Tool will benefit a diverse group in the U.S., leading to a more efficient use of scarce funds, and possibly decreasing dependence on foreign oil and lower product prices for consumers. This fourth of five annual reports contains a summary of progress to date, problems encountered, plans for the next year, and an assessment of the prospects for future progress. The emphasis during the April 2002 through March 2003 period was directed toward Silurian-Devonian geology, development of rules for the fuzzy system, and on-line software.

Robert Balch

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Pennsylvanian history of the Chautauqua Arch  

SciTech Connect

Westward extension of the Ozark Uplift known as the Chautauqua Arch is concealed by a Pennsylvanian cover. This cover provides an insight into its later tectonic history subsequent to its major Late Devonian uplift and truncation. Part of this arch was episodically uplifted during Pennsylvanian time in an area extending west from southwestern Missouri along the Kansas-Oklahoma border to western Montgomery County. Recent stratigraphic mapping in that county indicates moderate Late Desmoinesian to Missourian tectonism. Some strata present on both flanks of the arch are either comparatively thin or missing owing to unconformity truncation or non-deposition. Stratal loss involves the Lenapah Limestone, the Hepler and Lost Branch formations, the Cherryvale Shale and the Hertha, Drum, Dewey, Stanton and Wyandotte Limestones. Earlier movements also account for the truncation of Morrowan, Atokan and possibly some Early Desmoinesian beds over the arch. Between tectonic episodes along the arch there were periods of relative tectonic quiescence accompanied by shelf-edge carbonate banks, condensed sequences and siliciclastic sedimentation. West of Montgomery County in Chautauqua County, the widespread Late Pennsylvanian Virgilian outcrops show practically no tectonism. Therefore, the name Chautauqua Arch seems inappropriate for this Pennsylvanian arch, and the name Tri-State Arch is proposed. This arch is bounded on the north by the Cherokee Basin and on the south by the northern rise of the Arkoma Basin. Although this arch is commonly omitted on many tectonic maps, it is a stronger gravity feature than the Bourbon Arch about 50 miles northward. Both tectonic and sedimentary structures have produced much oil and gas entrapment along this arch. For example, an east-west fault south of Independence, aligned with buried Proterozoic hills, has been specially productive.

Bennison, A.P.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [Kentort II process  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of April 1, 1992 through June 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The raw oil shale sample for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored this quarter. The shale that was chosen was from the high-grade zone of the Devonian Cleveland Member of the Ohio Shale in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The shale was mined and then transported to the contractor's crushing facility where it was crushed, double-screened, and loaded into 85 55-gal barrels. The barrels, containing a total of 25-30 tons of shale, were transported to the (CAER) Center for Applied Energy Research where the shale was double-screened, analyzed and stored. A major objective of the program is the study of solid-induced secondary coking and cracking reactions. A valved fluidized bed reactor has been the primary apparatus used for this study prior to this quarter, but two additional techniques have been initiated this quarter for the study of other aspects of this issue. First, the two-stage hydropyrolysis reactor at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, was used to study the coking tendency of shale oil vapors under a wide range of pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis conditions. This work enabled us to examine secondary reactions under high pressure conditions (up to 150 bar) which were previously unavailable. Second, the development of a fixed bed reactor system was initiated at the CAER to study the coking and cracking characteristics of model compounds. A fixed bed apparatus was necessary because the conversion of model compounds was too low in the fluidized bed apparatus.

Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Robl, T.L.; Hower, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ER-12-1 completion report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "utica marcellus devonian" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reflection seismic profiling in Wabash Valley fault system in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1988 common-depth-point (CDP) reflection seismic profiling was initiated by ARPEX in southwestern Indiana in the Wabash Valley fault system. A 2.2-im (1.4-mi) east-west profile was shot across the Mt. Vernon graben in Posey County. Minihole shooting in 21-m (68.9-ft) patterns using 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) of seismic explosives distributed in five 3-m (10-ft) holes provided the energy source. Most shotholes were made with a reversible air-driven penetrating tool that was effective in dense clays. The 12-geophone array length was 43 m (141 ft), and the nominal far-trace offset was 2.1 km (7,000 ft). A 48-channel recording yielded 24-CDP coverage at 11-m (36-ft) intervals. Data were enhanced by gapped deconvolution, bandpass filtering, and CDP stack. The strongest and most continuous reflections at 0.75 and 1.6 sec are associated with the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) and Eau Claire Formation (Cambrian), respectively. Within the Mt. Vernon graben and east of the Spenser Consolidated oil field, the depth to Eau Claire Formation apparently increases by approximately 60 m (197 ft) over a horizontal distance of 1.4 km (0.9 mi). Minor faulting east of the Spencer Consolidated field appears to be synthetic to the Hovey lake fault, which bounds the eastern side of the Mt. Vernon graben. Tentative interpretations of faulting and weak reflections from depths greater than 4.5 km (15,000 ft) may be clarified by additional data processing and by additional seismic profiling planned by ARPEX.

Rene, R.M.; Hester, N.C.; Stanonis, F.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Sedimentology, diagenesis, and trapping style, Chesterian Tar Springs sandstone at Inman Field, Gallatin County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Tar Springs Sandstone in southern Illinois is often over-looked as a pay, yet it can be a prolific producer. The Inman Field, discovered in 1940, produces from several cyclic Chesterian sandstones from structural-stratigraphic traps in the Wabash Valley Fault System of southeastern Illinois. The oil was sourced from the Devonian New Albany Shale and apparently migrated vertically along the Wabash Valley faults to its present location, thus charging many of the Chesterian and lower Pennsylvanian sands in the field. The Tar Springs Sandstone produces from stacked distributary channel sand reservoirs up to 125 feet thick which have cut up to 40 feet into laterally equivalent non-reservoir, delta-fringe facies and the underlying Glen Dean Limestone. The reservoir sands are well-sorted, fine- to medium-grained quartz arenites with less than 5% feldspar and chert. Quartz grains have quartz overgrowths. Feldspar grains are clouded in thin-section and show pronounced etching and dissolution in SEM. Diagenetic kaolinite and small amounts of illite and magnesium-rich chlorite occur in intergranular pores. Sparry, iron-rich dolomite or ankerite that fills pores in irregular millimeter-size patches, occupies up to 10% of the reservoir rock. Typical reservoir porosity ranges from 16 to 19 percent and permeability ranges from 60 to 700 md. By contrast non-reservoir delta-fringe sands typically have porosities of 6 to 12 percent and permeabilities of 1 to 20 md. Delta-fringe Tar Springs shales act as impermeable lateral and vertical seals, aiding in stratigraphic trapping.

Morse, D.G. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Structure and morphology of the top of Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Illinois Basin region  

SciTech Connect

New basement tests and seismic-reflection profiles in the Rough Creek Graben, Wabash Valley Fault System, and other parts of the Illinois Basin have significantly advanced the authors understanding of basement morphology and tectonics. Few details of the paleotopographic component of basement morphology are known, but 100 m or more of local paleotopographic relief is documented in a few places and more than 300 m of relief is known in the western part of the basin. Based on fewer than 50 wells in the Illinois Basin that penetrate Precambrian crystalline basement, it is composed principally of granite and rhyolite porphyry with small amounts of basalt/diabase or andesite. Most of the regional morphology must be projected from structure maps of key Paleozoic horizons, including the top of Middle Ordovician Trenton (Galena), the top of Middle Devonian carbonate (base of New Albany Shale), and other horizons where data are available. The shallowest Precambrian crystalline basement within the Illinois Basin occurs in north-central Illinois where it is [minus]1,000 m MSL. Paleozoic sedimentary fill thickens southward to over 7,000 m in deeper parts of the Rough Creek Graben where crystalline basement has been depressed tectonically and by sediment loading to below [minus]7,000 m MSL. Although trends in Paleozoic strata show continued thickening in the area of the Mississippi Embayment, maximum sediment fill is preserved in the Rough Creek Graben. The general shape of the basin at the level of Precambrian crystalline basement is largely inferred from structure mapped on Paleozoic strata. Half-grabens and other block-faulted features in basement rocks are manifest in small-scale structures near the surface or have no expression in younger strata.

Sargent, M.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Rupp, J.A. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Noger, M.C. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ordovician carbonate formation waters in the Illinois Basin: Chemical and isotopic evolution beneath a regional aquitard  

SciTech Connect

Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the upper Ordovician Galena Group of the Illinois Basin have been analyzed geochemically to study origin of salinity, chemical and isotopic evolution, and relation to paleohydrologic flow systems. These carbonate reservoirs underlie the Maquoketa Shale Group of Cincinnatian age, which forms a regional aquitard. Cl-Br relations and Na/Br-Cl/Br systematics indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater to a point not significantly beyond halite saturation. Subsequent dilution in the subsurface by meteoric waters is supported by delta D-delta O-18 covariance. Systematic relations between Sr-87/Sr-86 and 1/Sr suggest two distinct mixing events: introduction of a Sr-87 enriched fluid from a siliciclastic source, and a later event which only affected reservoir waters from the western shelf of the basin. The second mixing event is supported by covariance between Sr-87/Sr-86 and concentrations of cations and anions; covariance between Sr and O-D isotopes suggests that the event is related to meteoric water influx. Systematic geochemical relations in ordovician Galena Group formation waters have been preserved by the overlying Maquoketa shale aquitard. Comparison with results from previous studies indicates that waters from Silurian-Devonian carbonate strata evolved in a manner similar to yet distinct from that of the Ordovician carbonate waters, whereas waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian strata that overlie the New Albany Shale Group regional aquitard are marked by fundamentally different Cl-Br-Na and Sr isotope systematics. Evolution of these geochemical formation-water regimes apparently has been influenced significantly by paleohydrologic flow systems.

Stueber, A.M. (Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL (United States)); Walter, L.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Mars Hill Terrane: An enigmatic southern Appalachian terrane  

SciTech Connect

The Mars Hill Terrane (MHT) in the Appalachian Blue Ride Belt is bordered by complex, locally reactivated thrust and strike-slip faults. On the east, the MHT is bounded by the allochthonous, ensimatic Toe Terrane (TT) across the diachronous, ductile Holland Mountain-Soque River Fault System. The MHT is separated on the northwest from ensialic Laurentian basement (LB), by the Fries-Hayesville Fault System. On the south, the MHT is truncated by the Shope Fork Fault. The MHT is characterized by migmatitic biotite-pyroxene-hornblende gneiss, but contains 1--1.8 b.y. old quartz-feldspar gneisses, plus ultramafic rocks, calc-silicate rocks, mica schists and gneisses, and Neoproterozoic Bakersville gabbros. This rock assemblage contrasts with that of the adjoining terranes. The only correlative units between the MHT and adjoining terranes are Neoproterozoic gabbro, Ordovician-Devonian granitoid plutons, and ultramafic rocks. Gabbro links the MHT with LB rocks. Apparently similar calc-silicate rocks differ petrographically among terranes. During Taconic or Acadian events, both the TT and MHT reached amphibolite to granulite metamorphic grade, but the LB did not exceed greenschist grade. The data conflict. The O-D plutons, ultramafic rocks, and metamorphic histories suggest that the TT had docked with the MHT by Ordovician time. The premetamorphic character of the Holland Mtn.-Soque River Fault System supports that chronology. Neoproterozoic gabbros suggest a MHT-LB link by Cambrian time, but the LB experienced neither O-D plutonism nor Paleozoic amphibolite-granulite facies metamorphism.

Raymond, L.A.; Johnson, P.A. (Appalachian State Univ., Boone, NC (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogeologic investigation of the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site, Fleming County, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Part of a hilltop named Maxey Flats was used as a commercial radioactive waste burial site from 1963 to 1977. The hill is about 9 miles from the city of Morehead. The climate of the area is humid, with normal annual precipitation 44.30 in. for the period 1941 through 1970. Most of the 47 burial trenches on the site are completed in weathered shale. They are covered with clay and crushed shale, but water infiltrates the covers and accumulates in the waste. The contaminated trench water is later removed and evaporated. Assuming water in trenches would not overflow onto the ground surface, flow through fractured rocks would be the principal means of contaminated-water transport if trench water were to move from the burial site. The bases of most trenches consist of a 1.5-ft-thick sandstone bed, at a depth of about 25 ft below ground level. Radionuclides have moved laterally through fractures in the bed as much as 270 feet from the nearest burial trench. Rocks underlying the burial site are of Mississippian, Devonian, and Silurian age, about 80% of which are shale. The bedrock has poor water-transmitting capability, and virtually all flow is through fractures. The spacing between most fractures is several feet, although it ranges from a few inches to more than 100 ft. Most fractures terminate, or are offset, at bedding planes. The ground-water system is therefore very nonuniform, and more permeable in the horizontal direction. At least eight hydrologic units underlie the burial site.

Zehner, H.H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Regional-scale flow of formation waters in the Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

The Williston basin is a structurally simple intracratonic sedimentary basin that straddles the United States-Canada border east of the Rocky Mountains and that contains an almost continuous stratigraphic record since the Middle Cambrian. Based on the wealth of data generated by the oil industry, the regional-scale characteristics of the flow of formation waters were analyzed for the Canadian side of the basin, and integrated with previous studies performed on the American side. Several aquifers and aquifer systems identified in the basin were separated by intervening aquitards and aquicludes. The Basal, Devonian, and Mannville (Dakota) aquifers are open systems, being exposed at the land surface in both recharge and discharge areas. Recharge takes place in the west-southwest at relatively high altitude in the Bighorn and Big Snowy mountains and at the Black Hills and Central Montana uplifts, whereas discharge takes place in the east and northeast at outcrop along the Canadian Precambrian shield in Manitoba and the Dakotas. The Mississippian and Pennsylvanian aquifer systems are semi-open, cropping out only in the west-southwest where they recharge, but discharging in the northeast into adjacent aquifers through confining aquitards. On regional and geological scales, the entire system seems to be at steady-state, although locally transient flow is present in places due to water use and hydrocarbon exploitation, and to some erosional rebound in the uppermost confining shales. On the western flank of the basin, the interplay between the northeastward structural downdip direction and the northeastward flow of formation waters creates conditions favorable for hydrodynamic oil entrapment.

Bachu, S. [Alberta Department of Energy, Edmonton (Canada); Hitchon, B. [Hitchion Geochemical Services Ltd., Alberta (Canada)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Numerical modeling of deep groundwater flow and heat transport in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

A numerical modeling approach has been used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluid flow on contemporary heat flow in an intracratonic basin. The authors have selected the Williston basin for this hydrodynamic study because of the opportunity it presents to assess the relation of deep groundwater flow to basin geothermics and the associated features of diagenesis and petroleum accumulation. The finite element method is used to solve the coupled equations of fluid flow and heat transport in two-dimensional sections of the basin. Both the fluid- and heat-flow regime are assumed to be at steady state, and the fluid flow is driven primarily by the water-table relief which is taken to be a subdued replica of land-surface topography. Buoyancy forces may also affect flow through fluid density gradients created by temperature and salinity effects. Three southwest-northwest oriented sections across the basin were modeled using available and estimated parameter data. The predicted flow patterns are most strongly affected by the topography, but the Devonian salt unit and Cretaceous shale unit exert some control. Cross-formational flow is especially important near the downdip, solution edge of the salt beds. Flow rates rarely exceed 0.5 m/year in the deep-central part of the basin, yet there does exist a marked effect on heat flow, albeit subdued by the blanket effect of the low-permeability Cretaceous shales. The regional effect of the topography-driven flow system is reflected in present-day salinity patterns and heat-flow data.

Garven, G.; Vigrass, L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Petroleum exploration of Winnipegosis Formation in north-central North Dakota (Williston basin)  

SciTech Connect

The Winnipegosis Formation (Middle Devonian) in north-central Dakota has the greatest potential for large oil reserves in the Williston basin. The Winnipegosis carbonate (50 to 325 ft thick) was deposited in the southeast end of the Elk Point restricted sea. During Winnipegosis deposition, the Williston basin could be divided into two distinct environments: (1) a deep starved basin with accompanying pinnacle reefs separated by interreef, laminated limestone and (2) a surrounding carbonate shelf. Within the carbonate shelf are patch reefs, banks, and tidal flats. Overlying the Winnipegosis carbonate is the Prairie Formation, which has a basal anhydrite (0 to 70 ft thick) and an overlying salt (0 to 650 ft thick). These were deposited in a regressive phase of the Elk Point sea and act as seals for Winnipegosis oil entrapment. Currently, oil production from the Winnipegosis in the Williston basin is from stratigraphic traps and from small structures on the carbonate shelf. The most significant accumulation to date is Temple field, in which 11 wells produce from +/- 20 ft of Winnipegosis dolomite. The pinnacle reef environment has potential for significant oil reserves from 250-ft thick reefs covering 160 ac or less. Two pinnacle reefs have had free-oil recoveries from thin pay zones. The Rainbow/Zama fields in northwest Alberta have an ultimate reserve of more than 1 billion bbl of oil from Keg River reefs, which are correlative and similar to the Winnipegosis reefs in North Dakota. The strong seismic reflection that originates from the Winnipegosis-Prairie evaporite interface provides an excellent means of detecting Winnipegosis reefs. Amplitude of the Winnipegosis reflection is reduced dramatically over the reefs. The resulting dim spot is one criteria used in identifying reefs.

Guy, W.J. Jr.; Braden, K.W.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Occurrence of pore-filling halite in carbonate rocks, Nesson Anticline, Williston basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Clear, colorless pore-filling halite of late diagenetic origin occurs locally in the Devonian Dawson Bay, Winnipegosis, and Ashern Formations, the Silurian Interlake Formation, and the Ordovician Red River Formation. The halite occludes a variety of pore types and individual pores are filled with single crystals or aggregates of only a few crystals. This halite is present in quantities ranging from a trace to approximately 12%. Cores from McGregor field, Williams County, show the Winnipegosis Formation consists of mixed-skeletal lime wackestones and mudstones. These contain vugs up to 4 in. (10 cm) in size, intraparticle pores, and shelter porosity within pelecypod shells, up to 4 in. (10 cm) in size, which are occluded with halite. Halite also fills common small discontinuous vertical fractures. The upper 200 ft (61 m) of the Interlake Formation locally exhibits the most striking occurrences of pore-filling halite. These dolostones consist predominantly of intraclast-peloid mudstones, wackestones, packstones, occasional grainstones, algal boundstones, and solution-collapse breccias containing vug, fenestral, interparticle, shelter, intercrystalline, moldic, channel, breccia, and fracture porosity types. All porosity types, except intercrystalline, can be halite filled. A rare occurrence of pore-filling halite exists in Red River cores from Blue Buttes field, McKenzie County, where a dolomitic, mixed-skeletal, lime mudstone and wackestone lithofacies contains vugs, discontinuous vertical fractures, and intraparticle porosity types occluded with halite. In most occurrences, the pore systems were noneffective prior to halite infilling and had no potential as hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, it has been demonstrated that halite plugging in the Interlake Formation has locally formed updip seals to hydrocarbon migration.

Bucher, E.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation from the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin. The modeling incorporates kinetic methods to simulate chemical reactions and 1-dimensional conductive heat flow models to simulate thermal histories of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation source rock. We developed thermal histories of the source rock for 53 wells in the basin using stratigraphic and heat flow data obtained by the University of North Dakota. Chemical kinetics for hydrocarbon generation, determined from Pyromat pyrolysis, were, then used with the diennal histories to calculate the present day value of the Rock-Eval T{sub max} for each well. The calculated Rock-Eval T{sub max} values agreed with measured values within amounts attributable to uncertainties in the chemical kinetics and the heat flow. These optimized thermal histories were then used with a more detailed chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion, modified from a model developed for the Cretaceous La Luna shale, to simulate pore pressure development and detailed aspects of the hydrocarbon chemistry. When compared to values estimated from sonic logs, the pore pressure calculation underestimates the role of hydrocarbon generation and overestimates the role of compaction disequilibrium, but it matches well the general areal extent of pore pressures of 0.7 times lithostatic and higher. The simulated chemistry agrees very well with measured values of HI, PI, H/C atomic ratio of the kerogen, and Rock-Eval S1. The model is not as successful in simulating the amount of extracted bitumen and its saturate content, suggesting that detailed hydrous pyrolysis experiments will probably be needed to further refine the chemical model.

Sweeney, J.J.; Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gosnold, W.D. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Big Stick/Four Eyes fields: structural, stratigraphic, and hydrodynamic trapping within Mission Canyon Formation, Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

The Mississippian Mission Canyon formation of the Williston basin is the region's most prolific oil producing horizon. Big Stick/Four Eyes is among the most prolific of the Mission Canyon fields. Primary production from 87 wells is projected to reach 47 million bbl of oil. An additional 10-20 million bbl may be recovered through waterflooding. The complex was discovered in 1977 by the Tenneco 1-29 BN, a wildcat with primary objectives in the Devonian Duperow and Ordovician Red River Formations. A series of Mission Canyon discoveries followed in the Big Stick, Treetop, T-R, and Mystery Creek fields. Early pressure studies showed that these fields were part of an extensive common reservoir covering 44.75 mi/sup 2/ (115.91 km/sup 2/). The reservoir matrix is formed from restricted marine dolostones deposited on a low-relief ramp. Landward are algal-laminated peritidal limestones and saline and supratidal evaporites of a sabkhalike shoreline system. Open-marine limestones, rich in crinoids, brachiopods, and corals, mark the seaward limit of reservoir facies. Regressive deposition placed a blanket of anhydrite over the carbonate sequence providing a seal for the reservoir. Lateral trapping is accomplished through a combination of processes. Upper reservoir zones form belts of porosity that parallel the northeasterly trending shoreline. The trend is cut by the northward plunging Billings anticline, which provides structural closure to the north. Facies changes pinch out porosity to the south and east. Trapping along depositional strike to the southwest is only partially controlled by stratigraphic or structural factors. A gentle tilt of 25 ft per mi (5 m per km) occurs in the oil-water contact to the east-northeast, due to freshwater influx from Mississippian outcrop on the southern and southwestern basin margins.

Breig, J.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Williston basin Seislog study  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of Seislog (trade name) processing and interpretation of an east-west line in the North Dakota region of the Williston basin. Seislog processing involves inversion of the seismic trace data to produce a set of synthetic sonic logs. These resulting traces, which incorporate low-frequency velocity information, are displayed in terms of depth and isotransit times. These values are contoured and colored, based on a standard stratigraphic color scheme. The section studied is located just north of a dual producing oil pool from zones in the Ordovician Red River and Devonian Duperow Formations. A sonic log from the Long Creek 1 discovery well was digitized and filtered to match the frequency content of the original seismic data. This allows direct comparison between units in the well and the pseudosonic log (Seislog) trace nearest the well. Porosity development and lithologic units within the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section can be correlated readily between the well and Seislog traces. Anomalous velocity zones within the Duperow and Red River Formations can be observed and correlated to producing intervals in the nearby wells. These results emphasize the importance of displaying inversion products that incorporate low-frequency data in the search for hydrocarbons in the Williston basin. The accumulations in this region are local in extent and are difficult to pinpoint by using conventional seismic data or displays. Seislog processing and displays provide a tested method for identification and delineation of interval velocity anomalies in the Red River and Duperow stratigraphic sections. These techniques can significantly reduce risks in both exploration and delineation drilling of these types of targets.

Mummery, R.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Recognition of hydrocarbon expulsion using well logs: Bakken Formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Mississippian-Lower Devonian Bakken Formation forms a source/carrier/reservoir system in the Williston basin. Hydrocarbon expulsion within the Bakken has been identified by overlaying sonic and resistivity logs. Typically, these curves track in organically lean, water-saturated mudrocks because both respond mainly to porosity; however, in thermally mature organic-rich rocks and hydrocarbon reservoirs or carrier beds, the curves separate due to the anomalously high resistivity associated with replacement of pore water by hydrocarbons. Sonic/resistivity-log overlays for wells throughout the Montana and North Dakota parts of the Williston basin reveal significant increases and maximum in-curve separation within the middle siltstone member of the Bakken at subsurface temperatures of about 170 and 200{degree}F, respectively. Sequence-stratigraphic characteristics of the Bakken define the framework within which the expulsion process operates. The organic-rich upper and lower shale members represent the transgressive and early highstand systems tracts of two adjacent depositional sequences. A sequence boundary within the intervening middle siltstone member separates nearshore siltstone and sandstone of the late highstand systems tract in the lower sequence from cross-bedded subtidal to intertidal sandstones of the lowstand systems tract in the upper sequence. Reservoir properties vary across this sequence boundary. The authors attribute the log separation in the siltstone member to hydrocarbons expelled from the adjacent shales. Abrupt shifts in several geochemical properties of the shale members, indicative of hydrocarbon generation occur over the same subsurface temperature range as the rapid increase in log separation in the middle siltstone, thus indicating the contemporaneity of generation and expulsion.

Cunningham, R.; Zelt, F.B.; Morgan, S.R.; Passey, Q.R. (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (USA)); Snavely, P.D. III; Webster, R.L. (Exxon Co., U.S.A., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ancestral Nesson anticline and associated geothermal anomalies: Enhanced hydrocarbon generation controlled by crustal structure  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon generation in the Williston basin is influenced by crustal motions and geothermal gradient anomalies associated with the ancestral Nesson anticline, a long-lived crustal structure located along 103{degree} longitude. This structure and its effects are particularly important in Canada where most petroleum source rocks were not sufficiently buried to have generated hydrocarbons in a normal geothermal gradient environment. High geothermal gradients associated with this structure raise the oil window and expand the region of source rock thermal maturity. Ancestral Nesson structure subsided differentially throughout the Phanerozoic, controlling paleobathymetry and facies over its crest. During the Upper Ordovician the structure was positive; rich potential petroleum source rocks were deposited on the western flank of the structure, generally excluding them from the zone of elevated heat flows. The total petroleum potential of this oil-source system exceeds 5.5 billion bbl of oil equivalent in Canada alone. Unfortunately, its exclusion from the maturation anomaly results in no more than 200 million bbl of oil being expelled from these sources. During the Middle Devonian, the structure was a negative feature that formed a starved subbasin separating the Winnipegosis and Elm Point carbonate shelves. Rich potential petroleum source rocks that accumulated on the crest of the structure at that time now overlie the region of elevated heat that flows and enhanced hydrocarbon maturation. Two billion barrels of oil are estimated to have been expelled from this source rock. Understanding the history and tectonics of the ancestral Nesson anticline is fundamental to a correct appraisal of hydrocarbon resources in the Williston basin.

Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R. (Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Completion Report for Well ER-12-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

GEOCARBSULF: A combined model for Phanerozoic atmospheric O2 and CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model for the combined long-term cycles of carbon and sulfur has been constructed which combines all the factors modifying weathering and degassing of the GEOCARB III model [Berner R.A., Kothavala Z., 2001. GEOCARB III: a revised model of atmospheric CO2 over Phanerozoic time. Am. J. Sci. 301, 182204] for CO2 with rapid recycling and oxygen dependent carbon and sulfur isotope fractionation of an isotope mass balance model for O2 [Berner R.A., 2001. Modeling atmospheric O2 over Phanerozoic time. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 65, 685694]. New isotopic data for both carbon and sulfur are used and new feedbacks are created by combining the models. Sensitivity analysis is done by determining (1) the effect on weathering rates of using rapid recycling (rapid recycling treats carbon and sulfur weathering in terms of young rapidly weathering rocks and older more slowly weathering rocks); (2) the effect on O2 of using different initial starting conditions; (3) the effect on O2 of using different data for carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis and alternative values of oceanic ?13C for the past 200 million years; (4) the effect on sulfur isotope fractionation and on O2 of varying the size of O2 feedback during sedimentary pyrite formation; (5) the effect on O2 of varying the dependence of organic matter and pyrite weathering on tectonic uplift plus erosion, and the degree of exposure of coastal lands by sea level change; (6) the effect on CO2 of adding the variability of volcanic rock weathering over time [Berner, R.A., 2006. Inclusion of the weathering of volcanic rocks in the GEOCARBSULF model. Am. J. Sci. 306 (in press)]. Results show a similar trend of atmospheric CO2 over the Phanerozoic to the results of GEOCARB III, but with some differences during the early Paleozoic and, for variable volcanic rock weathering, lower CO2 values during the Mesozoic. Atmospheric oxygen shows a major broad late Paleozoic peak with a maximum value of about 30% O2 in the Permian, a secondary less-broad peak centered near the Silurian/Devonian boundary, variation between 15% and 20% O2 during the Cambrian and Ordovician, a very sharp drop from 30% to 15% O2 at the Permo-Triassic boundary, and a more-or less continuous rise in O2 from the late Triassic to the present.

Robert A. Berner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Microbial degradation of sedimentary organic matter associated with shale gas and coalbed methane in eastern Illinois Basin (Indiana), USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular biodegradation indices for extracts from five Pennsylvanian coals and six New Albany Shale (Devonian Mississippian) samples from the eastern part of the Illinois Basin help constrain relationships between the degradation of biomarkers and the generation of coalbed methane and shale gas. Investigation of these gas source rocks of varying thermal maturity from different depths facilitates evaluation of the association of microbial degradation with biogenic gas formation distinct from thermogenic processes. Extensive biodegradation of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons is observed in the coal extracts, whereas in shale extracts only short-chain (C15C19) n-alkanes from the shallowest depth appear to be microbially altered with minimal evidence for losses of acyclic isoprenoid alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons. By contrast, biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, specifically alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes, occurs in coal extracts in concert with losses of n-alkanes attributable to microbial activity. Thus, the progress of hydrocarbon biodegradation in coals differs from the sequence recognized in petroleum where the effects of microbial alteration of aromatic constituents only appear after extensive losses of aliphatic compounds. The extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation in these coals also decreases with depth, as recorded by the ?(nC25nC30) index (i.e. abundance relative to 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopane) among the aliphatic constituents and several aromatic compounds (methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, and trimethyl- and tetramethylphananthrenes). However, the depth variations in the distributions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in the shale extracts primarily reflect the effects of thermal maturity rather than biodegradation. Overall, variations in the extent and patterns of biomarker biodegradation among coals and shales likely reflect their distinct microbial consortia that can be attributed to differences in (i) surviving microorganisms and inoculations from meteoric water, (ii) the characteristics of the sedimentary organic matter, especially the preponderance of aromatic constituents in coals, and (iii) the accessibility to that substrate through pores and cleats. These results help constrain the processes involved in biodegradation and controls on its extent, which, in turn, assist in recognizing sites favorable for methanogenesis and improved estimates of biogenic gas resources in the Illinois Basin.

Ling Gao; Simon C. Brassell; Maria Mastalerz; Arndt Schimmelmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Paleozoic oil/gas shale reservoirs in southern Tunisia: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During these last years, considerable attention has been given to unconventional oil and gas shale in northern Africa where the most productive Paleozoic basins are located (e.g. Berkine, Illizi, Kufra, Murzuk, Tindouf, Ahnet, Oued Mya, Mouydir, etc.). In most petroleum systems, which characterize these basins, the Silurian played the main role in hydrocarbon generation with two main hot shale levels distributed in different locations (basins) and their deposition was restricted to the Rhuddanian (Lllandovery: early Silurian) and the LudlowPridoli (late Silurian). A third major hot shale level had been identified in the Frasnian (Upper Devonian). Southern Tunisia is characterized by three main Paleozoic sedimentary basins, which are from North to South, the southern Chotts, Jeffara and Berkine Basin. They are separated by a major roughly EW trending lower Paleozoic structural high, which encompass the Mehrez-Oued Hamous uplift to the West (Algeria) and the Nefusa uplift to the East (Libya), passing by the Touggourt-Talemzane-PGA-Bou Namcha (TTPB) structure close to southern Tunisia. The forementioned major source rocks in southern Tunisia are defined by hot shales with elevated Gamma ray values often exceeding 1400 API (in Hayatt-1 well), deposited in deep water environments during short lived (c. 2Ma) periods of anoxia. In the course of this review, thickness, distribution and maturity maps have been established for each hot shale level using data for more than 70 wells located in both Tunisia and Algeria. Mineralogical modeling was achieved using Spectral Gamma Ray data (U, Th, K), SopectroLith logs (to acquire data for Fe, Si and Ti) and Elemental Capture Spectroscopy (ECS). The latter technique provided data for quartz, pyrite, carbonate, clay and Sulfur. In addition to this, the Gamma Ray (GR), Neutron Porosity (?N), deep Resistivity (Rt) and Bulk Density (?b) logs were used to model bulk mineralogy and lithology. Biostratigraphic and complete geochemical review has been undertaken from published papers and unpublished internal reports to better assess these important source intervals.

Mohamed Soua

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Comparison of the Wymark CO2 Reservoir with the Midale Beds at the Weyburn CO2 Injection Project  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian carbonates of the Duperow Formation on the western flank of the Williston Basin in southwest Saskatchewan contain natural accumulations of CO{sub 2}, and may have done so for as long as 50 m.y. in the views of some investigations. These carbonate sediments are characterized by a succession of carbonate cycles capped by anhydrite-rich evaporites that are thought to act as seals to fluid migration. The Weyburn CO{sub 2} injection site lies 400 km to the east in a series of Mississippian carbonates that were deposited in a similar depositional environment. That natural CO{sub 2} can be stored long-term within carbonate strata has motivated the investigation of the Duperow rocks as a potential natural analogue to storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} that may ultimately provide additional confidence for CO{sub 2} sequestration in carbonate lithologies. For the Duperow strata to represent a legitimate analog for Midale injection and storage, the similarity in lithofacies, whole rock compositions, mineral compositions and porosity with the Midale Beds must be established. Previous workers have demonstrated the similarity of the lithofacies at both sites. Here we compare the whole rock compositions, mineralogy and mineral compositions. The major mineral phases at both locales are calcite, dolomite and anhydrite. In addition, accessory pyrite, fluorite and celestine are also observed. The distribution of porosity in the Midale Vuggy units is virtually identical to that of the Duperow Formation, but the Marly units of the Midale have significantly higher porosity. The Duperow Formation is topped by the Dinesmore evaporite that is particularly rich in anhydrite, and often contains authigenic K-feldspar. The chemistry of dolomite and calcite from the two localities also overlaps. Silicate minerals are in low abundance within the analyzed Duperow samples, < 3 wt% on a normative basis, with quartz the only phase identifiable in x-ray diffraction patterns. The Midale Beds contain significantly higher silica/silicate concentrations, but the silicate minerals observed, K-feldspar and quartz, are unlikely to participate in carbonate mineral precipitation due to the absence of alkaline earths. Hence, physical and solution trapping are likely to be the primary trapping mechanisms at both sites. Given the similarity of mineral constituents, whole rock and mineral chemistry, reactive transport models developed for the Weyburn site should also be applicable to the Duperow lithologies.

Ryerson, F; Johnson, J

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

422

Naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements in the geothermal microcosm of the Los Azufres (Mexico) volcanic complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Los Azufres geothermal complex of central Mexico is characterized by fumaroles and boiling hot-springs. The fumaroles form habitats for extremophilic mosses and ferns. Physico-chemical measurements of two relatively pristine fumarolic microcosms point to their resemblance with the paleo-environment of earth during the Ordovician and Devonian periods. These geothermal habitats were analysed for the distribution of elemental mass fractions in the rhizospheric soil (RS), the native volcanic substrate (VS) and the sediments (S), using the new high-sensitivity technique of polarized x-ray energy dispersive fluorescence spectrometry (PEDXRF) as well as instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for selected elements. This work presents the results for the naturally occurring heavy radioactive elements (NOHRE) Bi, Th and U but principally the latter two. For the RS, the density was found to be the least and the total organic matter content the most. Bi was found to be negligibly present in all substrate types. The average Th and U mass fractions in the RS were higher than in the VS and about equal to their average mass fractions in the S. The VS mass fraction of Th was higher, and of U lower, than the mass fractions in the earth's crust. In fact for the fumaroles of one site, the average RS mass fractions of these elements were higher than the averaged values for S (without considering the statistical dispersion). The immobilization of the NOHRE in the RS is brought about by the bio-geochemical processes specific to these extremophiles. Its effectiveness is such that despite the small masses of these plants, it compares with, or may sometimes exceed, the immobilization of the NOHRE in the S by the abiotic and aggressive chemical action of the hot-springs. These results indicate that the fumarolic plants are able to transform the volcanic substrate to soil and to affect the NOHRE mass fractions even though these elements are not plant nutrients. Mirrored back to the paleo times when such plant types were ubiquitous, it would mean that the first plants contributed significantly to pedogenesis and the biogeochemical recycling of even the heaviest and radioactive elements. Such plants may potentially be useful for the phytostabilisation of soil moderately contaminated by the NOHRE. Furthermore where applicable, geochronology may require taking into account the influence of the early plants on the NOHRE distributions.

W.A. Abuhani; N. Dasgupta-Schubert; L.M. Villaseor; D. Garca Avila; L. Surez; C. Johnston; S.E. Borjas; S.A. Alexander; S. Landsberger; M.C. Surez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Section 4 - Wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exploitation of wind power for useful energy is both a practice dating back to ancient times and a key component of todays effort to substitute renewable energy sources for fossil fuels. Use of wind energy has progressed historically through three stages. First came the use of wind for propulsion of water craft via sails. Then the windmill came into use in agriculture, originally to grind grain and then later to drain water from fields or raise it from a well. Finally (much later) came the use of wind to power turbines to generate electricity. The two historic uses of wind power, sailing ships and windmills, are both still in existence today, though on a lesser scale than in the past. The earliest use of the sail is thought to have occurred more than 5,000 years ago on the Nile River and in the Mediterranean Sea. A major advance in sailing came in the era of the Roman Empire, as early as the 2nd century A.D., with the appearance on the Mediterranean of the lateen (triangular) sail, which was capable of taking the wind on either side and thus could sail into the wind, as opposed to the earlier square sail which could only sail with the wind. This technology is believed to have originated with Arab sailors on the Red Sea about 200 years earlier. The use of multiple triangular sails, in combination with square sails, led to the Age of Sail, during which sailing vessels were employed for global exploration, international trade, and naval warfare. The ultimate in wind-powered ships were the clipper ships of the mid 19th century, famous for their high speed, elegant design, and graceful appearance. Ironically, the finest clipper ships appeared just as the Age of Sail was in its twilight years, having been overtaken by the development of the steam-powered ship. The classic European windmill first appeared in the Middle Ages, probably in the 12th century. A written record of one in England dates from the 1180s. The common type was the tower mill, which was developed shortly afterward. It became known as the Dutch windmill because it was ubiquitous in that country, and even today it is a popular symbol of the Dutch nation. The windmill influenced the topography of the Netherlands in that it was widely used to provide the power to reclaim submerged land. The windmill also was reported in China at about the same time it emerged in Europe, though it may have developed even earlier. In the United States the so-called American farm or American-style windmill became a familiar sight from the middle of the 19th century onward, especially in the developing Western region. It was used to provide power to raise well water and to run farm machinery. New technology enabled it to turn its wheel to adjust to changing wind direction, and also to restrict the wheel speed so that the blades would not be destroyed during storms. The use of steel rather than wood as the blade material was a later refinement. This type of windmill eventually spread far beyond the U.S. borders to be used globally. The beginnings of the use of wind power to generate electricity came in the late 1880s and early 1890s, through the work of Charles Brush in the U.S. and Poul la Cour in Denmark. Brush modified a windmill to operate a DC generator, creating what is considered to be the first wind power plant. The experiments of la Cour with wind turbines laid the foundation for modern wind energy technology. In the 1920s the U.S. wind pioneer Marcellus Jacobs developed the first commercial propeller-type rotor for a wind turbine. Companies such as his Jacobs Wind continued on the path established by Brush of modifying existing windmills to provide power to drive DC generators, especially for use by farms that were not on the electrical grid prior to the coming of widespread rural electrification. Another major development of the 1920s was the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), which was patented by the French engineer Georges J. M. Darrieus. This new type of wind turbine had a distinctive eggbeateror skipping rope design, in contrast with the horizontal a

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect

One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now interpreted as a large negative anomaly associated with the entire field. The results of the State Smock horizontal well and the Bowers 4-25 well confirmed the lack of additional recoverable hydrocarbons in the Vernon Field. (4) The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach, Burke County, North Dakota area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the geological and geophysical data; the microbial values here were the highest we have observed. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling, however, a pipeline has not yet been completed that would allow the wells to be placed into production. We also present in this annual report the results of recent efforts to map carbonate facies tracts in the middle Devonian Dundee and Rogers City Limestones using gamma ray, bulk density, and photoelectric effect geophysical well log amplitudes. This work was undertaken to identify fairways for exploration in the Dundee and Rogers City where surface geochemical techniques could then be used to screen potential leads.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ore mineralization related to geological evolution of the KarkonoszeIzera Massif (the Sudetes, Poland) Towards a model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The KarkonoszeIzera Massif is a large tectonic unit located in the northern periphery of the Bohemian Massif. It includes the Variscan Karkonosze Granite (about 328304Ma) surrounded by the following four older units:- IzeraKowary (the Early Paleozoic continental crust of the Saxothuringian Basin), - Jet?d (the Middle Devonian to Lower Visan sedimentary succession deposited on the NE passive margin of the Saxothuringian Terrane), out of the present study area, - Southern Karkonosze (metamorphosed sediments and volcanics filling the Saxothuringian Basin), out of the present study area, - Leszczyniec (Early Ordovician, obducted fragment of Saxothuringian Basin sea floor). The authors present a genetic model of ore mineralization in the KarkonoszeIzera Massif, in which ore deposits and ore minerals occurrences are related to the successive episodes of the geological history of the KarkonoszeIzera Massif:- formation of the Saxothuringian Basin and its passive continental margin (about 500490Ma) - Variscan thermal events:- regional metamorphism (360340Ma) - Karkonosze Granite intrusion (328304Ma) - Late Cretaceous and Neogene-to-Recent hypergenic processes. The oldest ore deposits and ore minerals occurrences of the KarkonoszeIzera Massif are represented by pyrite and magnetite deposits hosted in the Leszczyniec Unit as well as by magnetite deposit and, presumably, by a small part of tin mineralization hosted in the IzeraKowary Unit. All these deposits and occurrences were subjected to the pre-Variscan regional metamorphism. Most of the KarkonoszeIzera Massif ore deposits and occurrences are related to the Karkonosze Granite intrusion. This group includes a spatially diversified assemblage of small ore deposits and ore mineral occurrences of: Fe, Cu, Sn, As, U, Co, Au, Ag, Pb, Ni, Bi, Zn, Sb, Se, S, Th, REE, Mo, W and Hg located within the granite and in granite-related pegmatites, in the close contact aureole of the granite and within the metamorphic envelope, at various distances from the granite. Assuming world standards, all these deposits are now uneconomic. Various age determinations indicated that ore formation connected with the Karkonosze Granite might have taken place mostly between about 326 and 270Ma. The last ore-forming episode in the KarkonoszeIzera Massif is related to hypergenic processes, particularly important in the northern part of the massif, in the IzeraKowary Unit where some uranium deposits and occurrences resulted from the infiltration of ore solutions that originated from the weathering of pre-existing accumulations of uranium minerals. A separate problem is the presence of oxidation zones of ore deposits and occurrences, both the fossil and the recent. A full list of ore minerals identified in described deposits and occurrences of the KarkonoszeIzera Massif together with relevant, key references is presented in the form of an appendix.

Ksenia Mochnacka; Teresa Oberc-Dziedzic; Wojciech Mayer; Adam Pieczka

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z