Sample records for ute indian tribe

  1. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Knight, Tawnie [Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  2. Ute Tribe Energy Conference & Expo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    An international gathering of energy producing Tribes, governments and companies envisioning a path forward towards a more sustainable future.

  3. State Government Websites With Indian Tribe Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This list was compiled by the federal government's Interagency Working Group on Indian Affairs (IWGIA) as an aid to federal agency consultation with federally recognized Indian tribes. It is not...

  4. Renewable Energy Opportunities Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Planning Department; Smiley, Steve; Bennett, Keith, DOE Project Officer

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe has a vision to become self-sufficient in its energy needs and to maintain its culture and protect Mother Earth with respect and honor for the next seven generations. To achieve this vision, green energy sources such as solar, wind and biomass energy are the best energy paths to travel. In this feasibility study the Tribe has analyzed and provided data on the nature of the renewable resources available to the Tribe and the costs of implementing these technologies.

  5. SEC. 203. TRIBAL PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM. (a) DEFINITION OF INDIAN TRIBE.--In this section, the term ``Indian tribe'' has the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ``Indian tribe'' has the meaning given the term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and Education and the heads of other Federal agencies, the Secretary may study and determine the feasibility of carrying out) are located primarily within Indian country (as defined in section 1151 of title 18, United States Code

  6. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  7. Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sponsored by the Association on American Indian Affairs, this one-day conference is for federal, state, and local government officials and business leaders who have a need to develop working relationships with tribes and organizations.

  8. Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Energy Optimization Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troge, Michael [Project Manager

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oneida Nation is located in Northeast Wisconsin. The reservation is approximately 96 square miles (8 miles x 12 miles), or 65,000 acres. The greater Green Bay area is east and adjacent to the reservation. A county line roughly splits the reservation in half; the west half is in Outagamie County and the east half is in Brown County. Land use is predominantly agriculture on the west 2/3 and suburban on the east 1/3 of the reservation. Nearly 5,000 tribally enrolled members live in the reservation with a total population of about 21,000. Tribal ownership is scattered across the reservation and is about 23,000 acres. Currently, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) community members and facilities receive the vast majority of electrical and natural gas services from two of the largest investor-owned utilities in the state, WE Energies and Wisconsin Public Service. All urban and suburban buildings have access to natural gas. About 15% of the population and five Tribal facilities are in rural locations and therefore use propane as a primary heating fuel. Wood and oil are also used as primary or supplemental heat sources for a small percent of the population. Very few renewable energy systems, used to generate electricity and heat, have been installed on the Oneida Reservation. This project was an effort to develop a reasonable renewable energy portfolio that will help Oneida to provide a leadership role in developing a clean energy economy. The Energy Optimization Model (EOM) is an exploration of energy opportunities available to the Tribe and it is intended to provide a decision framework to allow the Tribe to make the wisest choices in energy investment with an organizational desire to establish a renewable portfolio standard (RPS).

  9. Correlation of producing Fruitland Formation coals within the western outcrop and coalbed methane leakage on the Southern Ute Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Christopher J.; Mathews, Stephanie; Wickman, Barbara

    2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado Geological Survey and Southern Ute Indian Tribe proposed to determine the cause of several gas seeps which are occurring on the western outcrop of the coalbed methane producing Fruitland Formation on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation. Correlation between outcrop coals and subsurface coals was necessary to determine seep source in the northern part of the study area. Subsurface studies include structure and net coal isopach maps, stratigraphy was cross-sections, production maps, and a production database. Detailed coal stratigraphy was correlated through production wells near the outcrop region. These maps and cross-sections were correlated to new surface outcrop maps generated by the Colorado, Geological Survey and the Southern Ute Division of Energy Resources. Methane gas seepage has been noted historically within the study area. The total investigation may help determine if gas seepage is natural, a result of coalbed methane development, or some combination of the above.

  10. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, D. [Morse, Richard, and Weisenmiller, and Associates Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Busch, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Starrs, T. [Kelso, Starrs, and Associates LLC, Vashon, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  11. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for the Makah Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RobertLynette; John Wade; Larry Coupe

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to determine the technical feasibility, economic viability, and potential impacts of installing and operating a wind power station and/or small hydroelectric generation plants on the Makah reservation. The long-term objective is to supply all or a portion of Tribe's electricity from local, renewable energy sources in order to reduce costs, provide local employment, and reduce power outages. An additional objective was for the Tribe to gain an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating such plants on the reservation. The Makah Indian Reservation, with a total land area of forty-seven square miles, is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Four major watersheds drain the main Reservation areas and the average rainfall is over one hundred inches per year. The reservation's west side borders the Pacific Ocean, but mostly consists of rugged mountainous terrain between 500 and 1,900 feet in elevation. Approximately 1,200 tribal members live on the Reservation and there is an additional non-Indian residential population of about 300. Electric power is provided by the Clallam County PUD. The annual usage on the reservation is approximately 16,700 mWh. Project Work Wind Energy--Two anemometer suites of equipment were installed on the reservation and operated for a more than a year. An off-site reference station was identified and used to project long-term wind resource characteristics at the two stations. Transmission resources were identified and analyzed. A preliminary financial analysis of a hypothetical wind power station was prepared and used to gauge the economic viability of installation of a multi-megawatt wind power station. Small Hydroelectric--Two potential sites for micro/small-hydro were identified by analysis of previous water resource studies, topographical maps, and conversations with knowledgeable Makah personnel. Field trips were conducted to collect preliminary site data. A report was prepared by Alaska Power & Telephone (Larry Coupe) including preliminary layouts, capacities, potential environmental issues, and projected costs. Findings and Conclusions Wind Energy The average wind resources measured at both sites were marginal, with annual average wind speeds of 13.6-14.0 mph at a 65-meter hub height, and wind shears of 0.08-0.13. Using GE 1.5 MW wind turbines with a hub height of 65 meters, yields a net capacity factor of approximately 0.19. The cost-of-energy for a commercial project is estimated at approximately 9.6 cents per kWh using current costs for capital and equipment prices. Economic viability for a commercial wind power station would require a subsidy of 40-50% of the project capital cost, loans provided at approximately 2% rate of interest, or a combination of grants and loans at substantially below market rates. Recommendations: Because the cost-of-energy from wind power is decreasing, and because there may be small pockets of higher winds on the reservation, our recommendation is to: (1) Leave one of the two anemometer towers, preferably the 50-meter southern unit MCC, in place and continue to collect data from this site. This site would serve as an excellent reference anemometer for the Olympic Peninsula, and, (2) If funds permit, relocate the northern tower (MCB) to a promising small site closer to the transmission line with the hope of finding a more energetic site that is easier to develop. Small Hydroelectric There are a very limited number of sites on the reservation that have potential for economical hydroelectric development, even in conjunction with water supply development. Two sites emerged as the most promising and were evaluated: (1) One utilizing four creeks draining the north side of the Cape Flattery peninsula (Cape Creeks), and (2) One on the Waatch River to the south of Neah Bay. The Cape Creeks site would be a combination water supply and 512 kW power generation facility and would cost a approximately $11,100,000. Annual power generation would be approximately 1,300,0

  12. Renewable Energy Development in Indian Country: A Handbook for Tribes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCourt, D. C.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is designed to be an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. It builds upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's tribal energy training sessions to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process as well as detailed guidance on the following: how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, including the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects.

  13. MHK Projects/Colorado River Indian Tribes IRR DI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump34.3719°,Convent,Tribes IRR DI

  14. Strategic Energy Planning (Area 1) Consultants Reports to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Federally Recognized Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Marvin; Bose, James; Beier, Richard; Chang, Young Bae

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assets that Citizen Potawatomi Nation holds were evaluated to help define the strengths and weaknesses to be used in pursuing economic prosperity. With this baseline assessment, a Planning Team will create a vision for the tribe to integrate into long-term energy and business strategies. Identification of energy efficiency devices, systems and technologies was made, and an estimation of cost benefits of the more promising ideas is submitted for possible inclusion into the final energy plan. Multiple energy resources and sources were identified and their attributes were assessed to determine the appropriateness of each. Methods of saving energy were evaluated and reported on and potential revenue-generating sources that specifically fit the tribe were identified and reported. A primary goal is to create long-term energy strategies to explore development of tribal utility options and analyze renewable energy and energy efficiency options. Associated goals are to consider exploring energy efficiency and renewable economic development projects involving the following topics: (1) Home-scale projects may include construction of a home with energy efficiency or renewable energy features and retrofitting an existing home to add energy efficiency or renewable energy features. (2) Community-scale projects may include medium to large scale energy efficiency building construction, retrofit project, or installation of community renewable energy systems. (3) Small business development may include the creation of a tribal enterprise that would manufacture and distribute solar and wind powered equipment for ranches and farms or create a contracting business to include energy efficiency and renewable retrofits such as geothermal heat pumps. (4) Commercial-scale energy projects may include at a larger scale, the formation of a tribal utility formed to sell power to the commercial grid, or to transmit and distribute power throughout the tribal community, or hydrogen production, and propane and natural-gas distribution systems.

  15. BIA Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the Bureau of Indian Affairs Request for Proposals for Climate Adaptation Grants for Tribes, due November 29.

  16. District Date(s) Tribe(s) State(s) Program/Project Tribal Issues/Concerns Status Lakes & Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) Seneca Nation of Indians (NY) Louisville Jun-12 Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa KY Paducah

  17. DOE Office of Indian Energy Provides Tribes with Hands-On Support to Advance Tribal Energy Projects, Fall 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Fall 2012.

  18. Federally-Recognized Tribes of the Columbia-Snake Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an omnibus publication about the federally-recognized Indian tribes of the Columbia-Snake river basin, as presented by themselves. It showcases several figurative and literal snapshots of each tribe, bits and pieces of each tribe`s story. Each individual tribe or tribal confederation either submitted its own section to this publication, or developed its own section with the assistance of the writer-editor. A federally-recognized tribe is an individual Indian group, or confederation of Indian groups, officially acknowledged by the US government for purposes of legislation, consultation and benefits. This publication is designed to be used both as a resource and as an introduction to the tribes. Taken together, the sections present a rich picture of regional indian culture and history, as told by the tribes.

  19. Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships with American Indian Tribes Workshop Working in Indian Country: Building Successful Business Relationships...

  20. Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnd, Natchee Blu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1986. Renegade Tribe: The Palouse Indians and the Invasionthe Spokane, Yakima, Palouse, and Coeur d’Alene peoples.

  1. Oneida Tribe Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Ray [Energy Controls Manager; Schubert, Eugene [Policy Analyst

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

  2. WA-TRIBE-STILLAGUAMISH TRIBE OF INDIANS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to and from the tribal medical, dental, behavioral health and massage clinics. Often the demand-response requests that come to STTS are for one to three passengers at a time;...

  3. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  4. MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul La Pointe; Claudia Rebne; Steve Dobbs

    2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado''. Optimizing development of highly heterogeneous reservoirs where porosity and permeability vary in unpredictable ways due to facies variations can be challenging. An important example of this is in the algal mounds of the Lower and Upper Ismay reservoirs of the Paradox Basin in Utah and Colorado. It is nearly impossible to develop a forward predictive model to delineate regions of better reservoir development, and so enhanced recovery processes must be selected and designed based upon data that can quantitatively or qualitatively distinguish regions of good or bad reservoir permeability and porosity between existing well control. Recent advances in seismic acquisition and processing offer new ways to see smaller features with more confidence, and to characterize the internal structure of reservoirs such as algal mounds. However, these methods have not been tested. This project will acquire cutting edge, three-dimensional, nine-component (3D9C) seismic data and utilize recently-developed processing algorithms, including the mapping of azimuthal velocity changes in amplitude variation with offset, to extract attributes that relate to variations in reservoir permeability and porosity. In order to apply advanced seismic methods a detailed reservoir study is needed to calibrate the seismic data to reservoir permeability, porosity and lithofacies. This will be done by developing a petrological and geological characterization of the mounds from well data; acquiring and processing the 3D9C data; and comparing the two using advanced pattern recognition tools such as neural nets. In addition, should the correlation prove successful, the resulting data will be evaluated from the perspective of selecting alternative enhanced recovery processes, and their possible implementation. The work is being carried out on the Roadrunner/Towaoc Fields of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, located in the southwestern corner of Colorado. Although this project is focused on development of existing resources, the calibration established between the reservoir properties and the 3D9C seismic data can also enhance exploration success. During the time period covered by this report, the majority of the project effort has gone into the permitting, planning and design of the 3D seismic survey, and to select a well for the VSP acquisition. The business decision in October, 2002 by WesternGeco, the projects' seismic acquisition contractor, to leave North America, has delayed the acquisition until late summer, 2003. The project has contracted Solid State, a division of Grant Geophysical, to carry out the acquisition. Moreover, the survey has been upgraded to a 3D9C from the originally planned 3D3C survey, which should provide even greater resolution of mounds and internal mound structure.

  5. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  6. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

  7. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  8. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will conduct energy audits of nine Tribally-owned governmental buildings in three counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to provide a basis for evaluating and selecting the technical and economic viability of energy efficiency improvement options. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians will follow established Tribal procurement policies and procedures to secure the services of a qualified provider to conduct energy audits of nine designated buildings. The contracted provider will be required to provide a progress schedule to the Tribe prior to commencing the project and submit an updated schedule with their monthly billings. Findings and analysis reports will be required for buildings as completed, and a complete Energy Audit Summary Report will be required to be submitted with the provider?s final billing. Conducting energy audits of the nine governmental buildings will disclose building inefficiencies to prioritize and address, resulting in reduced energy consumption and expense. These savings will allow Tribal resources to be reallocated to direct services, which will benefit Tribal members and families.

  9. 2015 National Indian Timber Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Intertribal Timber Council is hosting the Annual National Indian Timber Symposium to facilitate communication from the perspective of Tribes, the BIA, private industry, legislative bodies, and academia on issues and concerns of current forestry management practices.

  10. Approved Members of the Indian Country Energy And Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG APPROVED MEMBERS Blue Lake Rancheria Jana Ganion, BLR Energy Director Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs...

  11. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe's comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  12. College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), was founded in 1971 and is located on 164 acres in northwest Albuquerque, New Mexico in the center of New Mexico`s agricultural and high-tech corridors. SIPI became accredited as a community college in 1993, serves Native Americans nationwide, and is governed by a nationally-tribally appointed Board of Regents (Jicarilla Apache, Joint Oklahoma Tribes, Mescalero Apache, Navajo Nation-Arizona, Navajo Nation-New Mexico, Ten Southern Pueblos, and Eight Northern Pueblos, Southern Ute, Inter-tribal Council of Arizona, and Oglala Sioux). In 1993, The US Department of Education, TRIO Programs no longer funded the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) Summer Math and Science Enrichment Program. However, with US Department of Energy funding SIPI was able to continue service to the Native American community under the new title of College Bound American Indian Math and Science (AIMS) Enrichment Program. This new program continued the goals and objectives of the TRIO program with an expanded focus that included students from more Native American communities nationwide. The program also interfaced with a teacher enrichment program (Rural American Indian Science Education-RAISE) sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Sandia National Labs (SNL). SIPI in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) Laboratory established a mathematics and science enrichment program at SIPI for students attending rural high schools serving predominantly Native American populations. The primary goal of the program was to provide 9th--12th grade students, mostly Native American, the skills and knowledge, interest and motivation, and strategies to remain in high school and pursue a college education in a math, science, or technology based field. Each year, the program included a six-week intensive residential summer program located at SIPI as well as academic year support activities at the student`s high school. A summary of the program activities during the grant period is given.

  13. BUILDING TRIBAL CAPABILITIES IN ENERGY RESOURCE TRIBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Lopez

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERT Tribal Internship Program is part of the education and training opportunities provided by CERT to accelerate the development of American Indian technical professionals available to serve Tribes and expand the pool of these professionals. Tribes are severely impacted by the inadequate number of Indian professionals available to serve and facilitate Tribal participation and support of the energy future of Tribes,and subsequently the energy future of the nation. By providing interns with hands-on work experience in their field of study two goals are accomplished: (1) the intern is provided opportunities for professional enhancement; and (2) The pool of Indian professionals available to meet the needs of Tribal government and Tribal communities in general is increased. As of January 17, 2003, Lance M Wyatt successfully completed his internship with the Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice on the Task Force that specifically focuses their work on Tribal nations. While working as an intern with the National Transportation Program, Albuquerque operations, Jacqueline Agnew received an offer to work for the Alaska Native Health Board in Anchorage, Alaska. This was an opportunity that Ms. Agnew did not feel she could afford to forego and she left her internship position in February 2003. At present, CERT is in the process of finding another qualified individual to replace the internship position vacated by Ms. Agnew. Mr. Wyatt's and Ms. Agnew's final comments are given.

  14. Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Hachey

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wel

  15. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, this webinar will cover details on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) established in the 2014 Farm Bill. It will specifically discuss the implications of ACEP for Tribes and tribal owners.

  16. Southern Ute Alternative Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,Southeast Colorado Power Assn JumpPines, NorthUte Alternative

  17. Union Temporal de Empresas UTE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle AirshipsUnalakleet4888°,Empresas UTE Jump to:

  18. CA-TRIBE-SUSANVILLE INDIAN RANCHERIA, CALIFORNIA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting fixtures and lighting upgrades; conversion of exit signs to light- emitting diode; replacement of T-12 lamps and ballasts; heating, ventilating, and air...

  19. Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center is excited to present its first Grant Researching and Proposal Writing in Indian Country Workshop. Whether you are a beginner, an expert, or...

  20. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  1. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  2. Ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging using gradient pre-equalization and compressed sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabich, Hilary T.; Benning, Martin; Sederman, Andrew J.; Holland, Daniel J.

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    image was approximately 4 min with a TE of 3 ms. The UTE reconstruction in of approximately 2 min with a TE of 10 ls. The reconstruction in (d) used only 32 in with the TE remaining at 10 ls. All images are shown with a field of view of ess. sequence...

  3. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information on Tribes in the lower 48 states selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  7. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS). Phase 1 feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation`s nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe`s comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  9. Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

  10. DOI Bureau of Indian Affairs Mineral Development Grants to Help with Development of Tribal Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) is offering grants to federally-recognized Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that help the development of a tribal energy and mineral resource inventory, a tribal energy and mineral resource on Indian land, or for the development of a report necessary to the development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands.

  11. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Summer 2012. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) has selected 11 Tribes - five in Alaska and six in the contiguous United States - to receive on-the-ground technical support for community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects as part of DOE-IE's Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. START finalists were selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with their projects or community. Technical experts from DOE and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and assist the Tribes in moving their projects forward. In Alaska, the effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide additional assistance and expertise, as well as funding to fuel the Alaska START initiative.

  12. Improved UTE-based attenuation correction for cranial PET-MR using dynamic magnetic field monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitken, A. P.; Giese, D.; Tsoumpas, C.; Schleyer, P.; Kozerke, S.; Prieto, C.; Schaeffter, T., E-mail: Tobias.Schaeffter@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, King's Health Partners, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI has been proposed as a way to produce segmented attenuation maps for PET, as it provides contrast between bone, air, and soft tissue. However, UTE sequences require samples to be acquired during rapidly changing gradient fields, which makes the resulting images prone to eddy current artifacts. In this work it is demonstrated that this can lead to misclassification of tissues in segmented attenuation maps (AC maps) and that these effects can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories using a magnetic field camera. Methods: The k-space trajectories during a dual echo UTE sequence were measured using a dynamic magnetic field camera. UTE images were reconstructed using nominal trajectories and again using the measured trajectories. A numerical phantom was used to demonstrate the effect of reconstructing with incorrect trajectories. Images of an ovine leg phantom were reconstructed and segmented and the resulting attenuation maps were compared to a segmented map derived from a CT scan of the same phantom, using the Dice similarity measure. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated inin vivo cranial imaging in five healthy volunteers. Simulated PET data were generated for one volunteer to show the impact of misclassifications on the PET reconstruction. Results: Images of the numerical phantom exhibited blurring and edge artifacts on the bone–tissue and air–tissue interfaces when nominal k-space trajectories were used, leading to misclassification of soft tissue as bone and misclassification of bone as air. Images of the tissue phantom and thein vivo cranial images exhibited the same artifacts. The artifacts were greatly reduced when the measured trajectories were used. For the tissue phantom, the Dice coefficient for bone in MR relative to CT was 0.616 using the nominal trajectories and 0.814 using the measured trajectories. The Dice coefficients for soft tissue were 0.933 and 0.934 for the nominal and measured cases, respectively. For air the corresponding figures were 0.991 and 0.993. Compared to an unattenuated reference image, the mean error in simulated PET uptake in the brain was 9.16% when AC maps derived from nominal trajectories was used, with errors in the SUV{sub max} for simulated lesions in the range of 7.17%–12.19%. Corresponding figures when AC maps derived from measured trajectories were used were 0.34% (mean error) and ?0.21% to +1.81% (lesions). Conclusions: Eddy current artifacts in UTE imaging can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories during a calibration scan and using them in subsequent image reconstructions. This improves the accuracy of segmented PET attenuation maps derived from UTE sequences and subsequent PET reconstruction.

  13. Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Wind-Pump Storage Feasibility Study Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shawn A. LaRoche; Tracey LeBeau; Innovation Investments, LLC

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe is a federally recognized Indian tribe organized pursuant to the 1934 Wheeler-Howard Act (“Indian Reorganization Act”). The Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation lies along the west bank of Lake Francis Case and Lake Sharpe, which were created by the Fort Randall and Big Bend dams of the Missouri River pursuant to the Pick Sloan Act. The grid accessible at the Big Bend Dam facility operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is less than one mile of the wind farm contemplated by the Tribe in this response. The low-head hydroelectric turbines further being studied would be placed below the dam and would be turned by the water released from the dam itself. The riverbed at this place is within the exterior boundaries of the reservation. The low-head turbines in the tailrace would be evaluated to determine if enough renewable energy could be developed to pump water to a reservoir 500 feet above the river.

  14. Yerington Paiute Tribe Energy Plan Version 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Consulting, BB9 [BB9 Consulting; Director, Environmental

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yerington Paiute Tribe has made energy management and planning a priority. The Tribal Council has recognized that energy is an important component of their goal of self-sufficiency. Recognizing energy development as a component of the Tribe’s natural resources provides for needed economic development.A number of priorities have been identified for energy development. These range from immediate housing needs such as weatherization and solar to interest in energy as economic development.

  15. President Theodore Roosevelt and the American Indian, 1901-1909

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, David Harris

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This legislation was to have a 19 profound impact on Indian affairs for many years. The act defined Indian country as areas outside any state boundaries; the overwhelming 20 bulk of such land lay to the west of the Mississippi River. The practice of issuing... lands that had been secured by the United States through treaties with the several Indian tribes. It was now decreed that annuities should be paid to the chiefs or other designated representatives rather than to individual Indians. The previous policy...

  16. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  17. Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency...

  18. ant tribe camponotini: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including government tourism units, travel agencies, bus operators, local culture and tourism industry associations, as well as tribe B & B industry. 5. The tourists for tribe...

  19. Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions Workshop Helps Empower Tribes to Make Renewable Energy Project Development Decisions July 16, 2013 -...

  20. Clean Energy Projects Helping Wisconsin Tribe Achieve Sustainability...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    which ultimately aims to eliminate the tribe's carbon footprint and provide carbon-free energy to others in the region. With Energy Department funds, the tribe recently...

  1. american indian tribes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KEYWORDS: High-Performance Computing, Computer Software, Defense Applications, Government Policy on Science and Technology COUNTRY: India REPORT CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION EXECUTIVE...

  2. Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in an unprecedented set of agreements designed to improve habitat and strengthen fish stocks in the upper Columbia River Basin over the next 10 years. The new agreement...

  3. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment.Attachment FY2011-40(10 CFR PartsOil,Energy

  4. DOI - Policy on Consultation with Indian Tribes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data and Resources DOE Facility849 Jump to:Energywith

  5. Modern Realities of the 'Jurisdictional Maze' in Indian Country: Case Studies on Methamphetamines Use and the Pressures to Ensure Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronk, Elizabeth Ann; Thompson, Heather Dawn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because legal jurisdction in Indian country can involve three separate actors -- the tribe, the federal government, and potentially the state government -- the laws governing which entity has authority in various situations ...

  6. Renewable energy in Indian country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 25--27, 1995, at Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado, the Center for Resource Management (CRM), organized and sponsored a conference in conjunction with the Navajo Nation, EPA, and Bechtel Group, Inc., to deal with issues associated with developing renewable energy resources on Indian lands. Due to the remoteness of many reservation homes and the cost of traditional power line extensions, a large percentage of the Indian population is today without electricity or other energy services. In addition, while they continue to develop energy resources for export, seeing only minimal gain in their own economies, Indian people are also subject to the health and environmental consequences associated with proximity to traditional energy resource development. Renewable energy technologies, on the other hand, are often ideally suited to decentralized, low-density demand. These technologies--especially solar and wind power--have no adverse health impacts associated with generation, are relatively low cost, and can be used in applications as small as a single home, meeting power needs right at a site. Their minimal impact on the environment make them particularly compatible with American Indian philosophies and lifestyles. Unfortunately, the match between renewable energy and Indian tribes has been hampered by the lack of a comprehensive, coordinated effort to identify renewable energy resources located on Indian lands, to develop practical links between Indian people`s needs and energy producers, and to provide the necessary training for tribal leaders and members to plan, implement, and maintain renewable energy systems. Summaries of the presentations are presented.

  7. Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians Energy Conservation and Options Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Turner

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians was awarded a grant through the Department of Energy First Steps program in June of 2006. The primary purpose of the grant was to enable the Tribe to develop energy conservation policies and a strategy for alternative energy resource development. All of the work contemplated by the grant agreement has been completed and the Tribe has begun implementing the resource development strategy through the construction of a 1.0 MW grid-connected photovoltaic system designed to offset a portion of the energy demand generated by current and projected land uses on the Tribe’s Reservation. Implementation of proposed energy conservation policies will proceed more deliberately as the Tribe acquires economic development experience sufficient to evaluate more systematically the interrelationships between conservation and its economic development goals.

  8. Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade Idaho: Nez Perce Tribe Energy-Efficient Facilities Upgrade November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing 67,000 of EERE's...

  9. Karuk Tribe Strategic Energy Plan and Energy Options Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramona Taylor, Karuk Tribe; David Carter, Winzler and Kelly

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy planning document to assist the Karuk Tribe in making educated decisions about future energy priorities and implementation.

  10. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  11. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  12. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  13. Comparative cytotaxonomy in the tribe Bovini studied by banding techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Donna Carol

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. James E. Womack Chromosomes of eight species of the tribe Bovini were studied by G ? banding, C ? banding and silver staining techniques. The results of this comparative cytogenetic study support the theory that Robertsonian fusion... in the tribe Bovini whose species appear to differ by a series of centromeric fusions. The phylogenetic tree derived from the cytogenetic data of this study is not consistent with morphological and behavioral trees previously described for the tribe Bovini...

  14. Council of Energy Resources Tribes 1993 summer internship report: Nez Perce Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, J.S.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is designed to be a working part of a larger project which would deal with the topic of Tribal interests affected by the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program and the approaches by which those Tribal interests can be advanced. Topics discussed in this paper include: background history of the Nez Perce Tribe`s relations with the US government; a Nez Perce view of tribal interests affected by DOE activities at Hanford; and a Nez Perce framework for private/governmental/tribal interest.

  15. What is an Indian Family? The Indian Child Welfare Act and the Renascence of Tribal Sovereignty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Pauline Turner

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The case arose soon after Richard Adams and Cindy Ruiz gave up their twin daughters for adoption. Adams was the son of a Porno Indian, although at the time of the adoption he was not an enrolled member. Three months after the adoption, Adams and Ruiz... attempted to withdraw their consent to the adoption on the grounds that the adoption had not followed the ICWA's procedures and placement preferences. The Porno tribe, at the request of Adams's mother, inter vened in the case. The California courts were...

  16. Robinson Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan; Middletown Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Scotts Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Elem Indian Colony Strategic Energy Plan, Upperlake Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan, Big Valley Rancheria Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGinnis and Associates LLC

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians is located in Lake County in Northern California. Similar to the other five federally recognized Indian Tribes in Lake County participating in this project, Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians members are challenged by generally increasing energy costs and undeveloped local energy resources. Currently, Tribal decision makers lack sufficient information to make informed decisions about potential renewable energy resources. To meet this challenge efficiently, the Tribes have committed to the Lake County Tribal Energy Program, a multi Tribal program to be based at the Robinson Rancheria and including The Elem Indian Colony, Big Valley Rancheria, Middletown Rancheria, Habematolel Pomo of Upper Lake and the Scotts Valley Pomo Tribe. The mission of this program is to promote Tribal energy efficiency and create employment opportunities and economic opportunities on Tribal Lands through energy resource and energy efficiency development. This program will establish a comprehensive energy strategic plan for the Tribes based on Tribal specific plans that capture economic and environmental benefits while continuing to respect Tribal cultural practices and traditions. The goal is to understand current and future energy consumption and develop both regional and Tribe specific strategic energy plans, including action plans, to clearly identify the energy options for each Tribe.

  17. ICEIWG Participating Tribes | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmit ait's LEDParticipating Tribes

  18. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transfer toSensor Technologies for aShoshone-Bannock Tribes

  19. FACEBOOK GAMES: THE POINT WHERE TRIBES AND CASUAL GAMES MEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FACEBOOK GAMES: THE POINT WHERE TRIBES AND CASUAL GAMES MEET Di Loreto Ines Università degli Studi in Facebook. Our assumption is that the success of games in the Facebook context is linked to the blending and will then describe some practical examples from the Facebook context. KEYWORDS Social games, casual games, tribes

  20. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded: ? The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA"). ? Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization. ? An intern program. ? Staff training. ? Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  1. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  2. Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and CA

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate “the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values” (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

  3. Microsoft Word - ProvisionsFundsColvilleConfederatedTribesPurchaseLoup...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Confederated Tribes for purchase of the Loup Loup Creek and Aeneas Creek properties. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-104-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10...

  4. Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (Indian Council of Agricultural Research)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    #12;Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), Library Avenue, Pusa, New Delhi-110012 : July 2011 All Rights Reserved 2011, Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute (ICAR), New Delhi

  5. A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Carlo

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

  6. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phoenix, Arizona, Roundtable on Tribal Energy Policy convened at 8:30 a.m., Tuesday, April 5th, at the downtown Phoenix Hyatt. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by the Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Approximately thirty?eight people attended the meeting, including representatives of ten different tribes, as well as representatives of the Colorado Indian Tribes, the All Indian Pueblo Council and the Inter?Tribal Council of Arizona. Interested state, federal, university, NGO and industry representatives also were present. A full list of attendees is at the end of this summary. DOE representatives were Tracey LeBeau, Directory of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, and David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs.

  7. Nez Perce Tribe Energy Efficient Facilities Installation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Kinder

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Although Idaho's electrical rates are among the lowest in the country, the Nez Perce Tribe's electrical bills take a large bite out of the operating budget every year. Tribal programs are located in forty some buildings, in six counties, in two states. Ninety-five percent, or more, are heated electrically. The age of the Tribal office buildings located in Lapwai, Idaho vary from forty to over a hundred years old. Only sporadic updates, in the buildings themselves, have been made over the years. Working with the Tribe's electrical provider (Avista Corporation), it was determine that a minimum financial commitment could reap large rewards in the form of lower operating costs.

  8. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix] [Parametrix; Duncan, Ken [San Carlos Apache Tribe] [San Carlos Apache Tribe; Albert, Steve [Parametrix] [Parametrix

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  9. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Nez Perce Tribe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Jay Hesse Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries salmon abundance and productivity have been and continue to be influenced by construction and operation related to productivity; (1) adult abundance, (2) hatchery programs, (3) management actions, and (4

  10. Fossil Energy Oil and Natural Gas Capabilities for Tribes Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attend this webinar to hear from U.S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy Program staff about the Program’s oil and gas portfolio, technologies, and research capabilities that may be of interest to Tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations.

  11. The tribe Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of America north of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Lawrence S.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , p. 6,9; Syst. Ceramb., l861j., p. 3!?!?. Lacordaire, Gen. Col., IX, 1872, p. 7!?9, 762. Leng and Hamilton, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., XXIII, 1896, p. ll?. Lagochirus Erichson. LeConte, Smiths. Misc. Coll., XI (265) 1873, p. 337. Horn, Trans. Amer..., ....................... ....... .......................It Characteristics of the Tribe................ .............. .....? Morphological Features.......... ........................... . . . . 6 Phraseology.................................................... 9 Summary...

  12. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY INVITATION Description of work Estimated cost (1) (2) (3) 1 Construction of Institutional/Residential buildings, external development, HVAC, Elevators etc. for Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, at the campus

  13. Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Indian Housing Training Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To register for the conference and see a preliminary agenda, visit the Native Learning Center website.

  14. Nez Perce Tribe Formaldehyde Study 2011 Kayla Warden and Etta Axtell-Northwest Indian College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR Acknowledgements: This research was funded by EPA/FaST DOE and NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU). I

  15. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 Chairs Meeting - AprilEvents Clean

  16. Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull trout and other species

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just PlainKaitlyn Faries Kaitlyn

  17. 25 U.S.C. 477: Incorporation of Indian Tribes, Charter, Ratification by

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformationColorado School of|

  18. 25 U.S.C. 81: Contracts and Agreements with Indian Tribes | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformationColorado School

  19. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate as aAAB AsiaABEEolica

  20. Title 25 USC 324 Consent of Certain Tribes; Consent of Individual Indians |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson,Open EnergyTitle 18CFROpen EnergyOpen

  1. INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, N.

    INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY Science academies play a crucial role in promoting, recognizing and bring out proceedings and monographs. The academies promote public awareness and understanding the country. In this section the growth of the Indian National Science Academy and its functions

  2. Interior Department Awards $3.7 Million to 13 Tribes for Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Economic Development (IEED) has awarded 3.7 million to 13 tribes that are developing renewable energy resources for their communities. IEED selected six geothermal, four...

  3. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Energy Program, and State Energy Program to help Tribes tap into their abundant renewable energy resources. Webinar attendees will also hear about Montana's Confederated...

  4. Indian Water 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indian Water is a call to help plan a national water summit. This strategic session consist of a facilitated dialog with tribal leaders on important opportunities, challenges and tactics, which...

  5. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  6. Tribes and the New Energy Economy Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest forTechnologiesTribal Utility Formation ForumRegion |Tribes

  7. HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

  8. Indian Gaming 2013 Tradeshow & Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Indian Gaming Association will host its annual tradeshow and convention on March 24-27 in Phoenix, Arizona. Be sure to visit the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth at the event.

  9. Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Be sure to visit booths 2751 and 2752 to learn about resources for Tribes offered by the U.S. Department of Energy:

  10. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  11. Full-Fledged Indian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Josh Benjamin

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee Stafford is in his seventh summer as a counselor at Camp Arrowdance. While Lee enjoys his status as one of the most popular staff members at camp, he begins to wonder if he's in danger of going "Full-Fledged Indian", ...

  12. A Phylogenetic Analysis of the Bee Tribe Epeolini, with a Review of the Genus Triepeolus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rightmyer, Molly Greer

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generic-level cladistic analysis of the cleptoparasitic bee tribe Epeolini (Apinae: Nomadinae) is presented. One hundred and two characters of adult external morphology are identified and coded for 32 species representing ...

  13. Leading the Charge: Native Leaders Give Tribes a Voice on White...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Vision of the Future? That each Tribe can move toward energy reduction andor energy production that respects its own traditions. -Chwmn. Karen Diver, Fond du Lac Band of Lake...

  14. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  15. DOE Office of Indian Energy Announces New Indian Country Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Indian Community: Barney Enos, Jr., District 4 Community Council Ho-Chunk Nation: Susan Weber, Representative "The Working Group is honored to welcome these new members and would...

  16. Colonial Social Formations: The Indian Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Hamza

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to my view that Indian feudalism was dissolved under theis the widely held one that feudalism and imperialism haveto dissolve Indian 'feudalism' and imperialist domination.

  17. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

  18. 40th Indian Law Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Bar Association is hosting the 40th Annual Indian Law Conference. This two-day conference focuses on the significant changes that have occurred in the relationship between Tribal Nations and the United States in the last four decades. The conference will cover several topics, including climate change, Indian Law, tribal courts, and more.

  19. Tevatron University - UTeV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat About Usof theAtmosphericTevatron

  20. Arizona Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project, Spring / Summer 2014 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Spring / Summer 2014.

  1. Indian Energy Blog Archive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment and Department ofIndian Energy

  2. Indian/Alaska.pmd

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approved on 24Independent OversightFederalAmerican Indian

  3. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book), DOE Office of Indian Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 CleanFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April

  4. Quality site seasonal report: Cherokee Indian Hospital, SFBP 4058, December 1984 through April 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, M.G.

    1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and space heating system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The hospital serves the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokee Indian Tribe in Cherokee, North Carolina, near the eastern entrance to the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Solar energy is used to preheat domestic hot water (the cafeteria is the principal load) and for space heating. The hospital is expected to have a normal year-round occupancy of 200 people (patients, medical and maintenance personnel) with some 2775 expected visitors per year. The drainback solar system has 320 Owens-Illinois evacuated-tube collectors with a gross area of 5517 square feet. Solar energy is stored in a 6335-gallon storage tank. Solar energy from storage is supplied to a 700-gallon DHW preheat tank through a heat exchanger in the storage tank, and directly to heat exchangers in the heating ducts. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two large oil-fired boilers. Performance of the system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital during the period December 1984 through April 1985 are reported.

  5. Arizona Apache Tribe Set to Break Ground on New Solar Project, Spring / Summer 2014 (Newsletter), Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Tarasa U.S.LLC |Aquion EnergyEnergyDepartmentON THE

  6. Eleven Tribes Jump START Clean Energy Projects, Summer 2012 (Newsletter), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 in theGroupJuneThis primerDepartment

  7. ancient indian wisdom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Indian Ocean Zhang, Yi 180 FACT SHEET: INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: FACT SHEET: - INDIAN...

  8. Human Capacity Building in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy System Maintenance for the Yurok Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, R. A.' Zoellick, J J.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From July 2005 to July 2007, the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in the implementation of a program designed to build the Tribe’s own capacity to improve energy efficiency and maintain and repair renewable energy systems in Tribal homes on the Yurok Reservation. Funding for this effort was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Program under First Steps grant award #DE-FG36-05GO15166. The program’s centerpiece was a house-by-house needs assessment, in which Tribal staff visited and conducted energy audits at over fifty homes. The visits included assessment of household energy efficiency and condition of existing renewable energy systems. Staff also provided energy education to residents, evaluated potential sites for new household renewable energy systems, and performed minor repairs as needed on renewable energy systems.

  9. HANDBOOK FOR CONDUCTING ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWS RELATED TO TRIBAL AND INDIAN PARTICIPATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND CLEANUP OF THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cristann Gibson; Mervyn L. Tano; Albert Wing

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There were three major projects undertaken at the outset of the DOE/EM 22 Cooperative Agreement back in September 1995. There was a project relating to Tribal oral histories. Another project of the Cooperative Agreement related to technology and Tribal values and needs. This project by analogy could apply to issues of technology, environmental cleanup and other indigenous peoples internationally. How can Indian Tribes participate in defining the need for technology development rather than merely learning to adapt themselves and their situations and values to technology developed by others with differing needs, values and economic resources? And the third project was the placement of a Tribal intern in EM-22.

  10. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  11. Uranium in prehistoric Indian pottery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filberth, Ernest William

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    URANIUM IN PREHISTORIC INDIAN POTTERY A Thesis by ERNEST WILLIAM FILBERTH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject...: Chemistry URANIUM IN PREHISTORIC INDIAN POTTERY A Thesis by ERNEST WILLIAM FILBERTH Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Membe (Member) (Member) December 1976 ABSTRACT Uranium in Prehistoric...

  12. Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  13. Video Highlights How Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is Cutting Energy Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of a U.S. Department of Energy grant and in partnership with the Clallam County Public Utility District, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is saving money on their utility bills after installing ductless heat pumps in 42 tribal members’ homes.

  14. FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D.R.

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

  15. Assessment of Biomass Energy Opportunities for the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Haase (McNeil Technologies, Inc)

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of biomass energy and biobased product manufacturing opportunities for the Red Lake Tribe.

  16. 2015 State of Indian Nations Address

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The President of the National Congress of American Indians will deliver his annual State of the Indian Nations address to Member of Congress, government officials, tribal leaders and citizens, and...

  17. Welcome Indian Gaming Phoenix 2013 Attendees!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for visiting the DOE Office of Indian Energy booth. Below are links to our booth materials and resources.

  18. Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnd, Natchee Blu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colorado: Westview Press. Bixler, Margaret T. 1995. Winds ofIndian code talkers, see Bixler (1995) ad Meadows (2003).

  19. ATNI Mid-year Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Mid-year Convention will be hosted by the Chehalis Tribe.

  20. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE 560080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080 NOTICE INVITING TENDER SEALED ITEM RATE TENDERS are invited for the execution of the following work, 1. Proposed renovation for guest room at Indian Academy ­ 560042 Phone: 09916381210 5. Last date of receipt of tender 02.09.2011 before 3.00 pm at Indian Academy

  1. INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ronald Suppah, Vice-Chairman, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation Susan Weber, Representative, Ho-Chunk Nation Other Tribal Participants William Anderson, Chairman,...

  2. EUCI Tribal and Indian Country Energy Development: Collaborating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provide practical tips for mutually beneficial collaboration between tribes and utility companies. The conference will focus on the fundamental concepts on how to network and...

  3. change in the indian mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    climate change awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and policy support in India. The results make very Change Communication in collaboration with GlobeScan Incorporated. Fieldwork in India was conducted by C and should inform stakeholders across India. Dr. Leiserowitz has asked the Indian public a series

  4. Former Tribal Energy Program Intern Guides Tribes Toward a More Sustainable Path

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Suzanne Singer is working at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as an Energy and Thermal Fluids Analyst where she has an ongoing project to produce Sankey diagrams to analyze energy data and life cycle flows on tribal lands. Applying the knowledge and insights she gained from her work at LLNL, her internship, and her science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, Singer is educating Tribes on how to use their own resources and land to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

  5. Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushman, Chris

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Energy Program. This grant aimed to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce each building’s energy consumption by 30%. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use were selected for this study and included the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration Building, Bay Mills Community College main campus, Bay Mills Charter School and the Waishkey Community Center buildings. These five sites are the largest energy consuming Community buildings and comprised the study area of this project titled “Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community”. The end objective of this study, plan and the Tribe is to reduce the energy consumption at the Community’s most energy intensive buildings that will, in turn, reduce emissions at the source of energy production, reduce energy expenditures, create long lasting energy conscious practices and positively affect the quality of the natural environment. This project’s feasibility study and resulting plan is intended to act as a guide to the Community’s first step towards planned energy management within its buildings/facilities. It aims to reduce energy consumption by 30% or greater within the subject facilities with an emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency. The energy audits and related power consumption analyses conducted for this study revealed numerous significant energy conservation and efficiency opportunities for all of the subject sites/buildings. In addition, many of the energy conservation measures require no cost and serve to help balance other measures requiring capital investment. Reoccurring deficiencies relating to heating, cooling, thermostat setting inefficiencies, powering computers, lighting, items linked to weatherization and numerous other items were encountered that can be mitigated with the energy conservation measures developed and specified during the course of this project.

  6. FTA Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) announces the availability of approximately $5 million in funding is to support planning, capital, and, in limited circumstances, operating assistance for tribal public transit services. Eligible applicants include federally recognized Tribes or Alaska Native villages, groups, or communities.

  7. "Indian Rancherie on Dry Creek": An Early 1850s Indian Village on the Sacramento and San Joaquin County Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farris, Glenn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I "Indian Rancherie on Dry Creek": An Early 185Ds IndianIndian Rancherie on Dry Creek." Cahfomia Pictorial Letterimage of the rancheria on Dry Creek with a commentary relat-

  8. American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Communication & Engagement Tribal Programs American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive Orders American Indian Policy and Relevant DOE and Executive...

  9. Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27 Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27...

  10. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

  11. EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training...

  12. Society of American Indian Government Employees Annual National Training Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Event includes plenary session, American Indian law classes, Native American youth workshops, cultural presentations, and a veterans program. Sponsored by the Society of American Indian Government...

  13. DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country by Addressing Barriers to Renewable Energy Development DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country...

  14. american indian youth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been used for Indian script characters. Terminal In Partial; Jyotirmoy Saikia; To The 1999-01-01 279 Indian Railways Backbone of Information Transport in India Computer...

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Summit with American Indian...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    12:00 - 12:30 Special Closing Remarks Salons V & VI Secretary Vilsack, Department of Agriculture 12:30 - 4:00 Tribe-to-Tribe Dialogue (No Planned DOE Events) 6:00 - 9:00 Reception...

  16. Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter AccidentSeptemberDepartmentUmatilla Tribes to Grow

  17. SBT 2012 Response to ISRP 2012-5 Page 1 Detailed responses to the latest ISRP review comments are provided in the Tribes Response to ISRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SBT 2012 Response to ISRP 2012-5 Page 1 Detailed responses to the latest ISRP review comments are provided in the Tribes Response to ISRP 2012-5 Review Memorandum (00). The response and referenced-059-00 be subject to the Three-Step Review Process. The 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accord Agreement with the Tribes

  18. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Sanjiva

    MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND BHEL REGARDING THE `THERMAL POWER PLANT ENGINEERING CHAIR' This Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) made on 25th day of august 1986 between Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (IITD) and M/s Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, 18

  19. Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation is hosting the Special Institute on Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country. This two-day conference will cover laws, policies, and practices regarding natural resources development in Indian Country and how they've evolved in the recent years.

  20. Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

  1. Indian Policy and Westward Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malin, James Claude

    1921-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the in vestigation of his activity on that committee led to a study of Indian policy in the Trans-Mississippi Valley and its relation to the westward movement. This latter problem, begun as a phase of Atchison's career in the Senate, de veloped into one... policy and its relation to westward expansion now furnish a frame-work upon which the history of the Trans-Mississippi Valley before the Civil War may be written. The period is given a unity otherwise impossible and a foundation is laid upon which...

  2. Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasley, Larry C. [Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the tower�s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribe�s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribe�s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north by Highway 30 and on the south by 305th Street, a street which runs along a meandering west-south-west heading from this intersection with Highway 30. In relation to Settlement landmarks, it is 300 meters west of the Meskwaki water tower found in front of the Meskwaki Public Works Department, and is due north of the athletic playing fields of the Meskwaki Settlement School. The accompanying maps (in the Site Resource Maps File) use a red pushpin marker to indicate the exact location, both in the overview frames and in the close-up frame. 1.2.4 Long Term Energy Vision The Meskwaki Tribe is committed to becoming energy self-sufficient, improving the economic condition of the tribe, and maintaining Tribal Values of closeness with Grandmother Earth. The details of the Tribe�s long-term vision continues to evolve. A long term vision exists of: 1) a successful assessment program; 2) a successful first wind turbine project reducing the Tribe�s cost of electricity; 3) creation of a Meskwaki Tribal Power Utility/Coop under the auspices of the new tribal Corporation, as we implement a master plan for economic and business development; 4), and opening the doors for additional wind turbines/renewable energy sources on the community. The additional turbines could lead directly to energy self-sufficiency, or might be the one leg of a multi-leg approach using multiple forms of renewable energy to achieve self-sufficiency. We envision current and future assessment projects providing the data needed to qualify enough renewable energy projects to provide complete coverage for the entire Meskwaki Settlement, including meeting future economic development projects� energy needs. While choosing not to engage in excessive optimism, we can imagine that in the future the Iowa rate-setting bodies will mandate that grid operators pay fair rates (tariffs) to renewable suppliers. We will be ready to expand renewable production of electricity for export, when that time comes. The final report includes the Wind

  3. Peru: Illegal Mahogany Logging Continues in Reserve for Uncontacted Tribes Widespread illegal mahogany logging continues inside Peru's Muruanahua Territorial Reserve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peru: Illegal Mahogany Logging Continues in Reserve for Uncontacted Tribes Widespread illegal, indicating the settlement continues to be used as a transport center for mahogany illegally removed from and Park, loggers cut the trees into large boards with chainsaws. Because chainsawing mahogany is illegal

  4. DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Strategic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    her undergraduate degree from Stanford and a master's in non-profit management from Regis University. Miss Kabotie brings 20 years of experience working with tribes and has her own...

  5. "American Indian Freedom Controversy:" Political and Social Activism by Southern California Mission Indians, 1934-1958

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Heather Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indian Congress—Vyola Olinger, President, Max Mazzetti,representatives Viola Olinger, Virgil Lawson, Jane Penn (First Vice President- Viola Olinger; Second Vice President-

  6. A pillar in our Indian work: Daniel Gookin, the praying Indians, and King Philip's War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bane, Steven Kirk

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Submitted to the Off1ce of Graduate Stud1es of Texas ASM University 1n partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1989 Major Subject: H1story "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Approved as to style and content by: John Canup (Chair...

  7. Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association Annual Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join more than 2,500 industry professionals from all over the country at the 2012 Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association (OIGA) Conference and Trade Show specifically devoted to all aspects of the...

  8. Entomosporium Leafspot of Photinia and Indian Hawthorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Kevin

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Entomosporium Leaf Spot Photinia and Indian Hawthorn Kevin Ong, Assistant Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist Symptoms The first signs of Entomosporium leaf spot disease are tiny, circular, often bright red spots on both surfaces...

  9. SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SCHOOL INFORMATION Santa Fe Indian School 1501 Cerrillos Road Santa Fe, NM 87505 P.O. Box 5340 Santa Fe, NM 87502 Main: (505) 989-6300 www.sfindianschool.org Main and only Entrance...

  10. Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities...

  11. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  12. Improving Communications with Tribes along U.S. Department of Energy Shipping Routes: Preparing for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Office of National Transportation, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Portner, W. E. [Science Applications International Corporation, 2109 Air Park Drive, SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 (United States); Patric, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, SW, Washington, DC 20024 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes efforts by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to initiate, coordinate, and improve communications with Native American Tribes along potential shipping routes to the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The Office of National Transportation (ONT) within OCRWM is taking a collaborative approach that builds upon past working relationships between DOE and Tribal Nations. This paper focuses on those relationships, vehicles such as the Tribal Topic Group of the DOE Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC), and other recent interactions that ONT has been pursuing to strengthen existing partnerships and build new ones. It also offers lessons learned and goals for the future as ONT looks ahead to ensure appropriate coordination with Tribes on future shipments to Yucca Mountain. (authors)

  13. Green Business Development in Indian Country Training | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development in Indian Country Training Green Business Development in Indian Country Training May 31, 2015 8:00AM MDT to June 5, 2015 5:00PM MDT Pine Ridge, South Dakota Red Cloud...

  14. Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and Acquisition Letter 2013-02 Policy Flash 2013-28 Implementation of Indian Energy Preference Provision in EP Act 2005 and...

  15. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar June 24, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM...

  16. ani edenes indian: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you use. 3. If F is a field, show that the ring of n Hagen, Thomas 303 INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai...

  17. ani nitab indian: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you use. 3. If F is a field, show that the ring of n Hagen, Thomas 271 INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai...

  18. Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the major programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs.

  19. Translating Indian miniature paintings into a time-based medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidya, Aradhana

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    : Visualization Sciences iii ABSTRACT Translating Indian Miniature Paintings into a Time-based Medium. (May 2008) Aradhana Vaidya, B.Arch., Nagpur University, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Prof. Carol LaFayette The purpose of this research... ................................ 4 II VISUAL ANALYSIS OF MINIATURE PAINTINGS....................... 8 II.1 Characteristics of Indian miniature paintings..................... 8 II.2 Themes of Indian miniature paintings................................ 23 III...

  20. CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    1 CLIENT : Indian Academy of Sciences C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER FOR : PROPOSED HOSTEL BLOCK AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, FELLOWS RESIDENCY NEXT TO ISRO QUARTERS, JALAHALLI AND PLUMBING WORKS : 136-138 #12;3 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080 NOTICE INVITING TENDER SEALED

  1. CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    CLIENT : INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C. V. RAMAN AVENUE, SADASHIVNAGAR, BANGALORE ­ 560080 TENDER : PROPOSED INTERIORS FOR CABIN CUM MEETING ROOM AT INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, C V RAMAN AVENUE, BANGALORE COMPLEX, KAMARAJ ROAD, II CROSS, BANGALORE - 560042 #12;INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES BANGALORE ­ 560080

  2. INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus, Chennai 600036 (INDIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhashyam, Srikrishna

    INDIAN SOCIETY FOR HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER (REGD.) Indian Institute of Technology Madras Campus for Heat and Mass Transfer Department of Mechanical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Madras Society for Heat and Mass Transfer (Regd.) I/We agree that I/We will be governed by Rules and Regulations

  3. Indian Gasohol Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian BureauIndian

  4. EUCI Tribal and Indian Country Energy Development: Collaborating for Successful Transactions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hosted by the Electric Utility Consultants, Inc. (EUCI), this conference will provide practical tips for mutually beneficial collaboration between tribes and utility companies. The conference will...

  5. Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan Hoover

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan discusses the current energy use on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation, the current status of the Tribe's energy program, as well as the issues and concerns with energy on the reservation. This plan also identifies and outlines energy opportunities, goals, and objectives for the Tribe to accomplish. The overall goal of this plan is to address the energy situation of the reservation in a holistic manner for the maximum benefit to the Tribe. This plan is an evolving document that will be re-evaluated as the Tribe's energy situation changes.

  6. Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

    1980-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater aquifer. While beneficial uses may be found for these geothermal fluids, even higher temperatures (in excess of 260 F) may be found directly beneath the town of Poplar and the new residential development which is being planned in the area. This project is primarily concerned with the use of geothermal energy for space heating and domestic hot water for the town of Poplar (Figure 2 and Photograph 1) and a new residential development of 250 homes which is planned for an area approximately 4 miles east of Poplar along U.S. Route 2 (Figure 2 and Photograph 2). A number of alternative engineering design approaches have been evaluated, and the cost of these systems has been compared to existing and expected heating costs.

  7. Indian Monsoon Depression: Climatology and Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Huang, Wan-Ru (Judy) [Judy

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The monsoon climate is traditionally characterized by large seasonal rainfall and reversal of wind direction (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Most importantly this rainfall is the major source of fresh water to various human activities such as agriculture. The Indian subcontinent resides at the core of the Southeast Asian summer monsoon system, with the monsoon trough extended from northern India across Indochina to the Western Tropical Pacific (WTP). Large fraction of annual rainfall occurs during the summer monsoon season, i.e., June - August with two distinct maxima. One is located over the Bay of Bengal with rainfall extending northwestward into eastern and central India, and the other along the west coast of India where the lower level moist wind meets the Western Ghat Mountains (Saha and Bavardeckar 1976). The rest of the Indian subcontinent receives relatively less rainfall. Various weather systems such as tropical cyclones and weak disturbances contribute to monsoon rainfall (Ramage 1971). Among these systems, the most efficient rain-producing system is known as the Indian monsoon depression (hereafter MD). This MD is critical for monsoon rainfall because: (i) it occurs about six times during each summer monsoon season, (ii) it propagates deeply into the continent and produces large amounts of rainfall along its track, and (iii) about half of the monsoon rainfall is contributed to by the MDs (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Therefore, understanding various properties of the MD is a key towards comprehending the veracity of the Indian summer monsoon and especially its hydrological process.

  8. INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit Bangalore Announces Certification Program for SIX SIGMA.isi@gmail.com, sanjitisi@yahoo.co.in 6th - 8th, 12th ­ 14th September; 2014 Bangalore #12;EXPECTATION! Six Sigma is like, Dean Witter, Discover & Co. (Report on Business Magazine, October 1997) Six Sigma initiative has

  9. INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    INDIAN STATISTICAL INSTITUTE SQC & OR Unit Bangalore Announces Certification Program for SIX SIGMA.isi@gmail.com, sanjitisi@yahoo.co.in #12;EXPECTATION! Six Sigma is like that old Wella Balsam shampoo commercial: `She Magazine, October 1997) Six Sigma initiative has become a rage. Every organization wants to implement Six

  10. Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080 QUOTATIONS FROM entry fees will be paid by the Academy against production of coupons. 5. Rates for outstation trips. 8. The Academy will pay 10 paise hike for every extra rupee rise in fuel charges and vice versa

  11. Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore 560 080 QUOTATIONS FROM TRAVEL AGENTS FOR PROVIDING TRANSPORT. Parking charges and other entry fees will be borne by the Academy on production of coupons. 5. Rates. The Academy will pay 10 paise hike for every extra rupee rise in fuel charges and vice versa during the year

  12. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MADRAS CHENNAI600036

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Anurag

    Engg. Trade Apprentices ITI Certificate Holders Fitter, Sheet Metal Worker, Electrician the Principals of Polytechnic Tamil Nadu/Puducherry Sir/Madam, Sub: Engagement of Trade Apprentices/Technician ApprenticesReg. Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai600 036 is looking to engage

  13. Fact Sheet - Federal agencies announce agreements to benefit...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission 2) MOA with Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation and...

  14. DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Partnerships with States, Tribes and Other Federal Programs Help Responders Prepare for Challenges Involving Transport of Radioactive Materials Implementing adequate institutional programs and validating preparedness for emergency response to radiological transportation incidents along or near U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shipping corridors poses unique challenges to transportation operations management. Delayed or insufficient attention to State and Tribal preparedness needs may significantly impact the transportation operations schedule and budget. The DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) has successfully used a cooperative planning process to develop strong partnerships with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs to support responder preparedness across the United States. DOE TEPP has found that building solid partnerships with key emergency response agencies ensures responders have access to the planning, training, technical expertise and assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to a radiological transportation accident. Through the efforts of TEPP over the past fifteen years, partnerships have resulted in States and Tribal Nations either using significant portions of the TEPP planning resources in their programs and/or adopting the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program into their hazardous material training curriculums to prepare their fire departments, law enforcement, hazardous materials response teams, emergency management officials, public information officers and emergency medical technicians for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. In addition, through strong partnerships with Federal Agencies and other national programs TEPP provided technical expertise to support a variety of radiological response initiatives and assisted several programs with integration of the nationally recognized MERRTT program into other training venues, thus ensuring consistency of radiological response curriculums delivered to responders. This presentation will provide an overview of the steps to achieve coordination, to avoid redundancy, and to highlight several of the successful partnerships TEPP has formed with States, Tribes, Federal agencies and other national programs. Events, accident scenarios, and training where TEPP was proven to be integral in building the radiological response capabilities for first responders to actual radiological incidents are also highlighted. Participants will gain an appreciation for the collaborative efforts States and Tribes are engaging in with the DOE to ensure that responders all along the DOE transportation corridors are adequately prepared to respond to shipments of radioactive materials through their communities.

  15. RoUTe'14+ strategy memorandum -Enhancement of the RoUTe'14 vision document -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    + .....................................................................10 5. Strategic choices for Research .................................................................................................................26 8. Vision on the development of support services..................................................................................................................36 11.1 Consequences of government spending cuts

  16. Dual Use of Veterans Health Administration and Indian Health Service: Healthcare Provider and Patient Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, B. Josea; Vivrette, Rebecca L.; Satter, Delight E.; Jouldjian, Stella; McDonald, Leander Russell

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to care in the Indian health service. Health Affairs. 1993;VHA) and Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities, and thankAffairs or the Indian Health Service. Conflict of Interest:

  17. President Theodore Roosevelt and the American Indian, 1901-1909 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, David Harris

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , this relatively un- ?39 coordinated program never achieved widespread success. By 1848, despite some setbacks, the general outlook for Indian education was rather promising. "There were . . . 16 manual training ?40 schools, 87 boarding schools and other..., American Indian Education, 59. "Territorial Affairs, " The Outlook, 60 (December 3, 1898), p. 799. 53 1 d 9. WEt, 1'6 ~R* 61' E, 1B69-ABBR: 6 ~dd 1 Administrative ~Histor , 188. 20 CHAPTER I I THE FORMULATION OF INDIAN POLICY DURING THE ROOSEVELT...

  18. New York Nuclear Profile - Indian Point

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (Million CubicYearNonhydrocarbonIndian

  19. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovemberInvestigationsCommitteeBlog Archive Indian Energy Blog Archive RSS July

  20. Indian Energy News Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY ANDAlaska

  1. american indians living: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    positive correlations with the Indian Chang, Chih-Pei 262 Developing solutions for sustainable living-the Urban Living Laboratory: The world's largest 'living laboratory'...

  2. apache indian reservation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    survival or death 1. However, these statistical methods are constrained Sudarshan, S. 2 Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Environmental...

  3. DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Renewable Energy Project Developmen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing Essentials Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs is responsible for...

  4. DOE Office of Indian Energy Professional Course: Tribal Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Professional Courses: Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing Essentials (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "DOE Office of Indian...

  5. Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Names Director for Office of Indian Energy Policy and Makes Available 2 Million for Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands Department of Energy Names Director...

  6. DOE Announces Webinars on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 24: Live Webinar on Climate Change Impacts and Indian Country: Natural Resources and Agriculture Webinar Webinar Sponsors: White House Office of Public Engagement, White...

  7. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

  8. Empowering Indian Country to Energize Future Generations (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, including background, goals, mission, activities, and initiatives.

  9. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Progress Report 1996-1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Bailey, Dee; Peters, Ron

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an ongoing project to restore fisheries resources in tributaries located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, this report details the activities of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries Program for FY 1997 and 1998. This report (1) analyses the effect introduced species and water quality have on the abundance of native trout in Coeur d'Alene Lake and selected target tributaries; (2) details results from an ongoing mark-recapture study on predatory game fish; (3) characterizes spawning habitats in target tributaries and evaluates the effects of fine sediment on substrate composition and estimated emergence success; and (4) provides population estimates for westslope cutthroat trout in target tributaries. Low dissolved oxygen values in the hypolimnion of Coeur d'Alene Lake continue to be a cause for concern with regard to available fisheries habitat. Four sample sites in 1997 and eight sample sites in 1998 had measured levels of dissolved oxygen below what is considered optimum (6.0 mg/L) for cutthroat trout. As well, two sample points located north of the Coeur d'Alene River showed hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen deficits. This could lead to a more serious problem associated with the high concentration of heavy metals bound up in the sediment north of the Coeur d'Alene River. Most likely these oxygen deficits are a result of allochthonous input of organic matter and subsequent decomposition. Sediment loading from tributaries continues to be a problem in the lake. The build up of sediments at the mouths of all incoming tributaries results in the modification of existing wetlands and provides ideal habitat for predators of cutthroat trout, such as northern pike and largemouth bass. Furthermore, increased sediment deposition provides additional substrate for colonization by aquatic macrophytes, which serve as forage and habitat for other non-native species. There was no significant difference in the relative abundance of fishes in Coeur d'Alene Lake from 1997 to 1998. Four out of the six most commonly sampled species are non-native. Northern pikeminnow and largescale suckers are the only native species among the six most commonly sampled. Northern pikeminnow comprise 8-9% of the electroshocking catch and 18-20% of the gillnet catch. Largescale suckers comprise 24-28% of the electroshocking catch and 9-21% of the gillnet catch. Cutthroat trout and mountain whitefish, on the other hand, comprise less than 1% of the catch when using electroshocking methods and about 1.4% of the gillnet catch. Since 1994, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water and Wildlife Program has conducted an extensive mark-recapture study (Peters et al. 1999). To date, 636 fish have been tagged and 23 fish have been recaptured. We are finding that northern pike have a tendency to migrate from the original sampling site, while largemouth bass appear very territorial, rarely moving from the site where they were tagged. Both species are most commonly associated with shallow, near-shore habitats, where the potential for encountering seasonal migrations of cutthroat trout is maximized. Low-order tributaries provide the most important spawning habitat for cutthroat trout on the Reservation. The mapped distribution of potentially suitable spawning gravel was patchy and did not vary considerably within reaches or between watersheds. Furthermore, the quantity of spawning gravel was low, averaging just 4.1% of measured stream area. The lack of a strong association between spawning gravel abundance and several reach characteristics (gradient, proportion of gravel and pea gravel) corroborates the findings of other authors who suggest that local hydrologic features influence spawning gravel availability. Although the distribution of spawning substrate was patchy within the target watersheds, there is probably adequate habitat to support resident and adfluvial spawners because of currently depressed numbers. Spawning gravels in target tributaries of the Reservation contained proportions of fine sediments comparable to those in egg pockets of salmonid redds in th

  10. Cultural colonizers : persistence and empire in the Indian antiremoval movement, 1815-1859

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzales, Christian Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New York: Harper & Row, 1988. Gallay, Alan. The Indian slavelabor force. Historian Alan Gallay has explained that in therose sharply. See Alan Gallay, The Indian Slave Trade: The

  11. SAOT signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Indian CSIR-Institute ,,Indian Institute of Petroleum"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiebig, Peter

    of Petroleum" The Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) of the University Erlangen of Understanding - MoU) with the Indian Institute of Petroleum (IIP) which is one of 37 constituent institutes of Petroleum, Dr. M O Garg (left), and Prof. Dr. A. Leipertz (right), accompanied on the left-hand side by Dr

  12. Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Cancels DOE O 1230.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-6-09, cancels DOE O 144.1.

  13. Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Cancels DOE O 1230.2.

  14. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  15. Advancing Next-Generation Energy in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native governments selected to receive assistance from the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  16. Advancing Energy Development in Indian Country (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  17. Hierarchical Beta Processes and the Indian Buffet Romain Thibaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Hierarchical Beta Processes and the Indian Buffet Process Romain Thibaux Computer Science Division Department of Statistics November 5, 2006 Abstract We show that the beta process is the de Finetti mixing distribution underlying the Indian buffet process of [2]. This result shows that the beta process plays

  18. Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program at Argonne

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program for Renewable Energy at Argonne National Laboratory. Principal Contacts; Harold Myron (ANL), Anthony Dvorak (ANL), Freddie Cardenas (BIA). Supported by; United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Education, and Argonne National Laboratory

  19. Department of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh Yatindra Nath

    of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 3Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing Institute of Technology Kanpur 4Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing Networks · Whenever you of Electrical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 6Copyright © Telematics group Mobile Computing

  20. Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations from housekeeping agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations from housekeeping agencies Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore (Academy), invites quotations for Housekeeping services at its office will be provided by the Academy. Please Note: The Academy reserves the right to reject/not to accept any quotation

  1. Indian Academy of Sciences NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore NOTICE INVITING QUOTATIONS FROM CATERING SERVICES 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for catering services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

  2. Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations for catering services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    1 Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations for catering services 1. Indian Academy of Sciences (Academy), invites quotations for Catering Services for its guest house (Fellows Residency) at Jalahalli campus and at hired service apartments. 2. The Academy will provide the kitchen

  3. Bureau of Indian Affairs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to:Brunei:HillBureau of Indian Affairs

  4. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment and Department ofIndian

  5. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment and Department ofIndianJanuary

  6. Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar2014 || DepartmentMarchINDIAN COUNTRY

  7. Indian Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian Bureau

  8. Indian Energy Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovementINDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY ANDAlaska EnergyDOE-IEBlog

  9. Using Polysyllabic units for Text to Speech Synthesis in Indian languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivalingam, Krishna M.

    of Computer Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology - Madras Chennai 600 036 Email: {vinodh

  10. CX-007073: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nooksack Indian TribeCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 09/15/2011Location(s): Nooksack Indian Tribe, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  11. Rudyard Kipling's search for an integrated Anglo-Indian personality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Don Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the Raj. I should explain at this point that I apply these considerations only to Kipling's male Anglo-Indian characters. Though he does write of Indians male and female, as well as of the Englishwomen of the Raj, they are not, as a rule, his primary... of the Anglo-Indian Kipling was trying to create via Duncan Parrenness. As pointed out earlier, this is the only short story in Haining's collection in which the narrator and the protagonist are the same, Writing of himself under the influence of alcohol...

  12. Handwritten Character Recognition of South Indian Scripts: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jomy, John; Kannan, Balakrishnan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handwritten character recognition is always a frontier area of research in the field of pattern recognition and image processing and there is a large demand for OCR on hand written documents. Even though, sufficient studies have performed in foreign scripts like Chinese, Japanese and Arabic characters, only a very few work can be traced for handwritten character recognition of Indian scripts especially for the South Indian scripts. This paper provides an overview of offline handwritten character recognition in South Indian Scripts, namely Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada and Telungu.

  13. Indian National Institute of Ocean Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |IndianIndianIndian

  14. Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Sherman Indian School

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs has found a good way to reduce energy costs, replace inefficient lighting and aging building equipment, and install renewable energy systems without huge increases in the BIA budget. The agency is doing all this by making use of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) at BIA schools and facilities throughout the country.

  15. Indian Energy & Energy Infrastructure to be Showcased at RES...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to discuss economic development. Indian energy and energy infrastructure are at the heart of our conversations that will be happening at RES. Tracey LeBeau, the Director of our...

  16. american indian community: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cherokee were also the first American Indian nation to create and finance its own police, fire, and sanitary departments... Swafford, Tamrala Greer 2004-03-01 128 Logging the...

  17. american indian communities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cherokee were also the first American Indian nation to create and finance its own police, fire, and sanitary departments... Swafford, Tamrala Greer 2004-03-01 128 Logging the...

  18. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 Table 6. Sales of fossil fuel production from federal and Indian lands by statearea, FY 2003-13 trillion Btu State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Alabama...

  19. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    on Indian lands. Offshore federal only includes areas in federal waters. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Natural...

  20. The Origin of Indian Corn and its Relatives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph); Reeves, R. G. (Robert Gatlin)

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    if it were not that when it hybridizes with Zea, some of the segregates are indistinguishable from Mexican varieties. Zea L. Maize, Indian Corn The genus Zea usually is distinguished from its near relatives by having separate staminate and pistillate...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 574 (Monograph) MAY 1939 THE ORIGIN OF INDIAN CORN AND ITS RELATIVES P. C. MANGELSDORF AND R. G. REEVES Division of Agronomy (In cooperation...

  1. American Indian Complex to Cool Off Using Ice Storage System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Oklahoma City, summer temperatures can get above 100 degrees, making cooling more of a necessity than a luxury. But the designers of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum (AICCM) wanted to make cooling choices that reflect American Indian cultures' respect for the land. So, rather than using conventional air-conditioning, the museum's main complex will use an ice storage system estimated to save 644,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a year.

  2. DETERMINANTS OF INTERNATIONAL NEWS COVERAGE BY INDIAN ENGLISH- LANGUAGE NEWSPAPERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Alok

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    significant. Table 4. Infrastructure News Contribution Frequency Percent API/AFP/Reuters 123 42.7 Indian News Agency 96 33.3 Indian Correspondents 40 13.9 Foreign News Org. 22 7.6 Collaboration 7 2.4 Total 288 100.0 Researchers identified... 4 World of Determinants 5 Religion and Science & Technology 7 National Threat and National Traits 8 Relatedness and Cultural Affinity 9 Deviance, Involvement, and Prominence...

  3. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  4. Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase III Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program and Training #12;Acknowledgments The Indian Forest Service Officer Training program coordinators at Colorado University Center for Protected Area Management and Training · Colorado State University Warner College

  5. Intermediate-depth circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans measured by autonomous floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Russ E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,runs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans using the EstimatingIndian and (right) Pacific Oceans from the JPL–ECCO data-

  6. Alternative Energy Development in Indian Country: Lighting the Way for the Seventh Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies increasingly show that Indian country may be uniquely positioned to develop alternative energy. Indian country in general constitutes a significant portion of land in the United States. In recognition of the increasing interest...

  7. British Troops, Colonists, Indians, and Slaves in Southeastern North America, 1756-1763

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Wu

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work recasts the world of the North American Southeast during the Seven Years’ War by examining the intersecting stories of British soldiers, colonists, Indians, and enslaved and free Africans. Populated with diverse Indians, Europeans...

  8. Modelling the influence of North Atlantic multidecadal warmth on the Indian summer rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mean meridional streamflow as well as widespread low surface pressure over North Africa, the Middle East and the western Indian Ocean contributing to a strengthened Indian monsoon trough and increased

  9. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  10. Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the Indian Solar City Programme, provides an overview of one city's Master Plan and implementation progress, describes NREL's support of the Indian Solar City Programme, and outlines synergies and differences between the Indian and American programs including unique challenges and opportunities India is facing.

  11. Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 No. : IASc/ /13 System' The Indian Academy of Sciences is in need of `Multi-point Video Conference System: The Purchase In-charge, Indian Academy of Sciences latest by 30th December 2013 by 15:00 PM. Technical

  12. NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    NORTHEASTERN NATURALIST2009 16(2):307­313 Variation in Ozone Sensitivity Within Indian Hemp , and Dennis R. Decoteau1 Abstract - Sixteen selections of Apocynum cannabinum (Indian Hemp) and nine, adaxial stipple, similar to symptoms ascribed to ambient ozone in the field. Indian Hemp was more

  13. Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |IndianIndian

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/3-UT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <cac <de

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/14-UT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:

  16. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: American Indian Religious Freedom Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Book contains a copy of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act and guidance for DOE compliance with the statute. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically.

  17. Foreign direct investment in the electricity sector: the Indian perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A.K.; Vohra, Ekta

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    So far, India is losing out in the competition against other emerging economies to attract more foreign direct investment to its electricity sector. This is in large part because the Indian approach towards power sector reforms is more haphazard than the more orderly and sensitive growth model of Singapore and Latin American economies. (author)

  18. Effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the Indian Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the Indian Economy Sourangsu Banerji Visiting study the effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) with respect to India and its economy. We try interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than

  19. ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACRONYMS ARS Agricultural Research Service (USDA) BIA Bureau of Indian Affairs BLM Bureau of Land Wetlands Inventory ODA Oregon Department of Agriculture ODEQ Oregon Department of Environmental Quality ODF Department of Agriculture USDI United States Department of the Interior USFS United States Forest Service

  20. Research Investments in Large Indian Software Companies Pankaj Jalote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalote, Pankaj

    of the company can use to improve the business. Research is typically not a business or a profit center to bring out newer products in the market place. But why does a service company need investment in researchResearch Investments in Large Indian Software Companies Pankaj Jalote Professor, Department

  1. Quinault Indian Nation Renewable Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Hopps, Institute for Washington's Future; Jesse Nelson, Institute for Washington's Future

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Quinault Indian Nation (Nation) initiated this study on conservation and production of renewable energy because this approach created the opportunity: • To become self-sufficient and gain greater control over the energy the Nation uses; • To generate jobs and businesses for its members; • To better manage, sustain, and protect its resources; • To express the cultural values of the Nation in an important new arena. The Nation has relatively small energy needs. These needs are concentrated at two separate points: the Quinault Beach Resort and Casino (QBRC) and Taholah on the Quinault Indian Reservation (QIR). Except for the town of Queets, energy needs are small and scattered. The needs vary greatly over the season. The small scale, widely dispersed, and variable nature of these needs presents a unique challenge to the Nation. Meeting these needs requires a resource and technology that is flexible, effective, and portable. Conservation is the most cost-effective way to meet any need. It is especially effective in a situation like this where production would leave a high per unit cost. This plan is based on first gaining energy savings through conservation. Major savings are possible through: 1. Upgrading home appliances on the QIR. 2. Weatherizing homes and facilities. 3. Changes in lighting/ventilation in the QBRC pool room. These elements of the plan are already being implemented and promise to save the Nation around a quarter of its present costs. Wood biomass is the best resource available to the QIN for energy production either on-site or for commercial development. It is abundant, flexible and portable. Its harvesting has high job potential and these jobs are a good fit for the present “skill set” of the QIN. This plan focuses on using wood biomass to produce energy and other value-added products. Our study considered various technologies and approaches to using wood for energy. We considered production for both on-site and commercial production. This plan calls for commercial-scale production only, with the QIN being the first “customer” for the product. This plan favors employing the pyrolysis technology to produce bio-oil, heat, and char. We favor this approach and technology because it is the most cost effective way to use the available resource. Its main product, bio-oil, has proven utility for the production of heat and electricity. It has promise for use as an alternative fuel, which is a much higher value than present uses of wood and it meets the QIN need for flexibility, scalability, and portability. Char, the secondary product from the pyrolysis process, has proven value-added uses. In addition to these direct benefits, the use of biomass in pyrolysis technology has significant indirect benefits. These benefits include the fact that the technology is a good fit with the Nation’s cultural values, i.e., environmental protection and the holistic use of a resource. It fits well with current QIN enterprises. For example, char could be processed into a charcoal co-product for QIN fish. Finally, the QIN can become a leader in developing and demonstrating this innovative approach to the use of wood. This plan proposes key organization steps to insure both excellent implementation of the plan and taking the best advantage of the processes and facilities put in place. This plan calls for two new QIN organizations: an energy production/distribution corporation and a community development corporation. The production/distribution corporation can be either a utility or a business enterprise that develops and markets renewable energy. The community development corporation can be a not-for-profit to support the QIN in taking best advantage of its energy opportunities. The production and distribution corporation is the subject of a further business planning effort now underway. This plan envisions a community development corporation that works directly with the Business Committee on research, education, and project development. Specifically, this corporation can seek grant funding to research energy m

  2. Department of Mechanical EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology KanpurIndian Institute of Technology Kanpur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    i t l V lid tiSt k P t l E i d it E i t l V lid tifor Small Twofor Small Two--Stroke Petrol Engines and its Experimental ValidationStroke Petrol Engines and its Experimental Validation Sponsored by Indian

  3. Tribal Renewable Energy Development under the Hearth Act: An Independently Rational, but Collectively Deficient Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    to Indian country for potential energy development opportunities. Such attention on potential energy development opportunities in Indian country is warranted, as abundant alternative and renewable energy sources exist within Indian country. Many tribes...

  4. FINAL REPORT WIND POWER WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION TRIBAL LANDS DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FG36-07GO17077 SUBMITTED BY WARM SPRINGS POWER & WATER ENTERPRISES A CORPORATE ENTITY OF THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF WARM SPRINGS WARM SPRINGS, OREGON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Manion; Michael Lofting; Wil Sando; Emily Leslie; Randy Goff

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation Feasibility Warm Springs Power and Water Enterprises (WSPWE) is a corporate entity owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, located in central Oregon. The organization is responsible for managing electrical power generation facilities on tribal lands and, as part of its charter, has the responsibility to evaluate and develop renewable energy resources for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. WSPWE recently completed a multi-year-year wind resource assessment of tribal lands, beginning with the installation of wind monitoring towers on the Mutton Mountains site in 2003, and collection of on-site wind data is ongoing. The study identified the Mutton Mountain site on the northeastern edge of the reservation as a site with sufficient wind resources to support a commercial power project estimated to generate over 226,000 MWh per year. Initial estimates indicate that the first phase of the project would be approximately 79.5 MW of installed capacity. This Phase 2 study expands and builds on the previously conducted Phase 1 Wind Resource Assessment, dated June 30, 2007. In order to fully assess the economic benefits that may accrue to the Tribes through wind energy development at Mutton Mountain, a planning-level opinion of probable cost was performed to define the costs associated with key design and construction aspects of the proposed project. This report defines the Mutton Mountain project costs and economics in sufficient detail to allow the Tribes to either build the project themselves or contract with a developer under the most favorable terms possible for the Tribes.

  5. The Indians in the works of William Faulkner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigliazzo, Marc Anthony

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IASTER OF ARTS August 1967 hlajor Subject Engti sh THE INDIANS IN THE 1'/ORKS OF lVILL 1AM FAuLKNER A Thesis by htARC ANTHONY NIGL IAZZO Chairman of Committees (H. nH of . partn nt hlember August 1967 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chap ter I ~ I NTRODUCT! ON.... . . , ~ I I ~ A SHOR T H I 3 TORY OF THF CHOC TA'iY AND CHICKASA&d INDIANS I I I. CONTRAD!CTIONS IN FAULl!NER'S Pli'F SENTAi!ONS OF INDI AiN CHARAC TERS I V A COURTSHIP AND A JUSTICE ~ V. "RED LEAVES" AND "LOI" 37 VI . SAll FATHERS IN ' THE OLD Pr...

  6. Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A. C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

  7. Market-Based Indian Grid Integration Study Options: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoltenberg, B.; Clark, K.; Negi, S. K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian state of Gujarat is forecasting solar and wind generation expansion from 16% to 32% of installed generation capacity by 2015. Some states in India are already experiencing heavy wind power curtailment. Understanding how to integrate variable generation (VG) into the grid is of great interest to local transmission companies and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. This paper describes the nature of a market-based integration study and how this approach, while new to Indian grid operation and planning, is necessary to understand how to operate and expand the grid to best accommodate the expansion of VG. Second, it discusses options in defining a study's scope, such as data granularity, generation modeling, and geographic scope. The paper also explores how Gujarat's method of grid operation and current system reliability will affect how an integration study can be performed.

  8. Tools from the French and Indian War sloop Boscawen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, David Mitchell

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996 Major Subject: Anthropology TOOLS FROM THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR SLOOP 80SCA 8XW A Thesis by DAVID MITCHELL GRANT Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulgllment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS Approved.... . . . , Tools and Blacksmithing Equipment Sent to Crown Point . . . . 67 68 69 70 Tools Sent from Fort George to Crown Point. 72 British Axe Suppliers from the Mid-Eighteenth Century . . . . . 125 Tools Recovered &om the Boscawen. 139 CHAPTER I...

  9. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  10. American Indian Women of the Plains and Northern Woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlmann, Annette

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a short paragraph of quantitative data documenting American Indian poverty, health problems, high rates of alcoholism, and high birth rates. Only two, Kammeyer et, ale (1990) and Vander Zanden (1990) explore the continued exploitation of natural... and harvesting, dominated by women, as on hunting and warfare. They lived in 3 Mid-American Review ofSociology predominantly sedentary, economically autonomous, villages where women producedample food surplus. They not only owned the products of their labor...

  11. National Coexistence is Our Bull Durham: Revisiting "The Indian Today"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valandra, Edward C.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ); and the development of the St. Lawrence Seaway Project (Mohawk Nation), and their activism has been well documented.5 The Haudenosaunee Confederacy's proactive opposition to these colonial assaults caught the attention of Native Country, indicating that other... social movement to characterize the Indian movement is a deliberate choice. In their study of four different social or protest movements—unemployed workers, industrial workers, civil rights, and welfare rights—Frances F. Piven and Richard A. Cloward...

  12. Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushe, S.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Indian Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Policy Database (IREEED) developed in collaboration by the United States Department of Energy and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. IREEED provides succinct summaries of India's central and state government policies and incentives related to renewable energy and energy efficiency. The online, public database was developed under the U.S.- India Energy Dialogue and the Clean Energy Solution Center.

  13. EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications to provide training, and technical and outreach support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program.

  14. A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares Introduction Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares

  15. Aditya Soni, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, adityasoni1@gmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanathan, M.

    1 ________________ Aditya Soni, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, adityasoni1@gmail.com Ramanathan Muthuganapathy, Department of Engineering Design, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036, India, ssndipan

  16. Impacts of Pacific and Indian Ocean Coupling on Wintertime Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation: A Basin-Coupling CGCM Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Shu-Ping; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the central Indian and Pacific oceans. We notice from FigureIP) Run, (c) the Pacific Ocean (PO) Run, and (d) the Indiantropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. Journal of Climate 10:

  17. Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Awards $345,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council Community Reuse Organization

  18. CX-006111: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington-Tribe-Stillaguamish Tribe of IndiansCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B2.5, B5.1Date: 07/07/2011Location(s): WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  19. Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation by Andrew D. Mills: ___________________________________________ Jane Stahlhut Date #12;Wind Energy in Indian Country A.D. Mills Abstract - ii - Abstract Utility-scale wind projects are increasingly being developed in rural areas of the United States. In the West

  20. Acculturation and Its Effects on Help-Seeking Attitudes among Asian Indians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Sarita

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lack of research in the mental health field and on help-seeking regarding the Asian Indian population. Asian Indians are the third largest Asian subgroup in the United States; thus, it is important to understand their culture...

  1. Closure of the global overturning circulation through the Indian, Pacific and Southern Oceans: schematics and transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    internal diapycnal transformation in the deep Indian and Pacific Oceans. All three northern-source Deep and Pacific Oceans; only 0.1 PW is gained at the surface in the Southern Ocean. Thus, while an adiabatic model full participation of the diffusive Indian and Pacific Oceans, with a basin-averaged diffusivity

  2. Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be? Harbor Branch launches new study of humans who eat fish and live around the estuary By Scott Wyland Tuesday, May 22, 2012 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A 20-year-old man fishes local waters every day for his meals and scoffs

  3. Indian Solar Cities Programme: An Overview of Major Activities and Accomplishments (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indian Solar Cities Programme supports 60 Indian cities in the development of EE and RE projects. Aims to reduce conventional energy demand by 10% by 2013, compared to a baseline year of 2008, and support is provided to municipal corporations for preparing and implementing a master plan.

  4. Indian Academy of Sciences Notice inviting quotations from house keeping agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences Bangalore Notice inviting quotations from house keeping agencies Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore (Academy), invites quotations for House Keeping Services at its office into a formal agreement on a stamp paper of Rs 200/- the format of which will be provided by the Academy. Please

  5. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES C.V.RamanAvenue,Sadashivanagar,Bangalore560080. Indian Academy of the Academy consist of publication of scientific journals, election of Fellows, organizing scientific meetings, initiatives such as promoting science education,etc. The Academy is looking for a suitable person to fill

  6. Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 The Academy or email before 20 December 2013 to: The Executive Secretary Indian Academy of Sciences C V Raman Avenue: 1. The Academy reserves the right to restrict the number of candidates for interview to a reasonable

  7. Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

  8. Is the deep Indian Ocean MOC sustained by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    % of the world ocean. [3] Here, the energy budget of the deep Indian Ocean MOC is assessed using a range of the Indian Ocean overturning circulation with estimates of energy sources (winds, tides, and geostrophic are capable of carrying energy from ocean boundaries into the interior, and are generally considered

  9. Location, Reprocessing, and Analysis of Two Dimensional Seismic Reflection Data on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico, Final Report, September 1, 1997-February 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, Jennie; Taylor, David J.; Huffman, Jr., A. Curtis

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Multichannel surface seismic reflection data recording is a standard industry tool used to examine various aspects of geology, especially the stratigraphic characteristics and structural style of sedimentary formations in the subsurface. With the help of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe and the Bureau of Indian Affairs we were able to locate over 800 kilometers (500 miles) of multichannel seismic reflection data located on the Jicarilla Apache Indian reservation. Most of the data was received in hardcopy form, but there were data sets where either the demultiplexed digital field data or the processed data accompanied the hardcopy sections. The seismic data was acquired from the mid 1960's to the early 1990's. The most extensive seismic coverage is in the southern part of the reservation, although there are two good surveys located on the northeastern and northwestern parts of the reservation. Most of the data show that subsurface formations are generally flat-lying in the southern and western portion of the reservation. There is, however, a significant amount of structure imaged on seismic data located over the San Juan Basin margin along the east-central and northern part of the reservation. Several west to east trending lines in these areas show a highly faulted monoclinal structure from the deep basin in the west up onto the basin margin to the east. Hydrocarbon exploration in flat lying formations is mostly stratigraphic in nature. Where there is structure in the subsurface and indications are that rocks have been folded, faulted, and fractured, exploration has concentrated on structural traps and porosity/permeability "sweet spots" caused by fracturing. Therefore, an understanding of the tectonics influencing the entire section is critical in understanding mechanisms for generating faults and fractures in the Cretaceous. It is apparent that much of the hydrocarbon production on the reservation is from fracture porosity in either source or reservoir sequences. Therefore it is important to understand the mechanism that controls the location and intensity of the fractures. A possible mechanism may be deep seated basement faulting that has been active through time. Examining the basement fault patterns in this part of the basin and their relation to fracture production may provide a model for new plays on the Jicarilla Indian Reservation. There are still parts of the reservation where the subsurface has not been imaged geophysically with either conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional reflection seismic techniques. These methods, especially 3-D seismic, would provide the best data for mapping deep basement faulting. The authors would recommend that 3-D seismic be acquired along the Basin margin located along the eastern edge of the reservation and the results be used to construct detailed fault maps which may help to locate areas with the potential to contain highly fractured zones in the subsurface.

  10. Indian Reservations in Kansas and the Extinguishment of Their Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Annie Heloise

    1900-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1802.*f Her construction of that document was not consistent with the facts in the case; for the federal government had not promised to expel the In­ dians from Georgia, but only to extinguish their title within the reserved limits of the state " a...^ C i^J j ) INDIAN RESERVATIONS IN KANSAS ANI^EHE EXTINGUISHMENT OF THEIR TITLE. Thesis prepared in partial fulfilment of the requirement of the University of Kanowwfey ^ w degree of master of arts, by A N N A H B L O I S B A B E L , * of Salina...

  11. Office of Indian Energy Announces New Staff | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, July 29, 2009Office of Indian

  12. Office of Indian Energy START Team | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, July 29,Office of Indian Energy

  13. Before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteriesEnergy Committee on Energy andIndian Affairs

  14. Before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteriesEnergy Committee on Energy andIndian

  15. Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for #SpaceWeekOMB Policies OMBOffice ofOffice of Indian

  16. Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofC T OEnergyOffice of Indian Energy

  17. 2015 Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Flier | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, soFuel Cell24Industrial201516-17, 2015 |2015Indian

  18. Indian Creek Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP WindSatelliteInSAR JumpRenewableChange | OpenIndian

  19. Indian Mesa Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP WindSatelliteInSAR JumpRenewableChange | OpenIndianI

  20. Indian Wells, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty,Jump7 Varnish cacheTransport(Redirected from Indian Wells,

  1. Indian Wells, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty,Jump7 Varnish cacheTransport(Redirected from Indian

  2. Indian Country Solar Energy Potential Estimates & DOE IE Updates

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar2014 || DepartmentMarchINDIAN

  3. Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian Bureau of

  4. Indian Institute of Petroleum Dehradrun | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES) |Indian

  5. IndianOil CREDA Biofuels Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua NewSmallholder Systems (SAMPLES)IndianOil CREDA

  6. Minto Upgrades Community Lodge with START Support, Fall/Winter 2014 (Newsletter), Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLE OF CONTENTSTogether withEnergy Most CatalystINDIAN

  7. Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization - Human Capacity Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irenia Quitiquit

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to create jobs and to provide tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance for energy efficiency. The project will establish a Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program to provide training, outreach and education on energy assistance and conservation to low-income families. The Tribes' mission, under its Strategic Energy Plan of 2008, is to promote tribal efficiency, reduce energy costs, create jobs, economic opportunities, and incorporate energy planning in construction and economic development.

  8. Back-end of the fuel cycle - Indian scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wattal, P.K. [Nuclear Recycle Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-4000 85 (India)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has a key role in meeting the energy demands of India. This can be sustained by ensuring robust technology for the back end of the fuel cycle. Considering the modest indigenous resources of U and a huge Th reserve, India has adopted a three stage Nuclear Power Programme (NPP) based on 'closed fuel cycle' approach. This option on 'Recovery and Recycle' serves twin objectives of ensuring adequate supply of nuclear fuel and also reducing the long term radio-toxicity of the wastes. Reprocessing of the spent fuel by Purex process is currently employed. High Level Liquid Waste (HLW) generated during reprocessing is vitrified and undergoes interim storage. Back-end technologies are constantly modified to address waste volume minimization and radio-toxicity reduction. Long-term management of HLW in Indian context would involve partitioning of long lived minor actinides and recovery of valuable fission products specifically cesium. Recovery of minor actinides from HLW and its recycle is highly desirable for the sustained growth of India's NPPs. In this context, programme for developing and deploying partitioning technologies on industrial scale is pursued. The partitioned elements could be either transmuted in Fast Reactors (FRs)/Accelerated Driven Systems (ADS) as an integral part of sustainable Indian NPP. (authors)

  9. Development of energy-efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, P.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of advanced techniques in engineering simulation and economic analysis for the development of efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators is illustrated in this paper. A key feature of this methodology is refrigerator simulation to generate energy savings for a set of energy-efficient design options and life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis with these design options. The LCC of a refrigerator is analyzed as a function of five variables: nominal discount rate, fuel price, appliance lifetime, incremental price, and incremental energy savings. The frequency of occurrence of the LCC minimum at any design option indicates the optimum efficiency level or range. Studies carried out in the US and European Economic Community show that the location of the LCC minimum under different scenarios (e.g., variable fuel price, life-time, discount rate, and incremental price) is quite stable. Thus, an efficiency standard can be developed based on the efficiency value at the LCC minimum. This paper examines and uses this methodology in developing efficiency standards for Indian refrigerators. The potential efficiency standard value is indicated to be 0.65 kWh/day for a 165-liter, CFC-based, manual defrost, single-door refrigerator-freezer.

  10. Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 10-26-06

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Richard is the DOE representative on the White House Indian Affairs Executive Working Group. OCRWM Activities Update (Jay Jones) * Thirty nine Tribes have been identified along...

  11. Appendix B -1 Appendix B: Acronym Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries NPDES National Pollution Discharge Elimination System Tribe of Indians SWAPAH Soil, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Humans TAT Technical Advisory Team TDG

  12. CX-005086: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants. Round Valley Indian Tribe would conduct pre-solar panel installation weatherization efforts that would consist of replacing windows...

  13. CX-000115: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Conservation Block Grant Program. Round Valley Indian Tribe would conduct pre-solar panel installation weatherization efforts that would consist of replacing windows...

  14. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    replacementupgrade of facility components Round Valley Indian Tribe would conduct pre-solar panel installation weatherization efforts that would consist of replacing windows...

  15. Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    REMARKS Susan Masten, Vice Chairperson, Yurok Tribe Jana Ganion, Energy Director, Blue Lake Rancheria David Conrad, Acting Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy and...

  16. Tribal Communities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Indian tribes. Read about realated Executive Orders here. Stay in Touch Get email updates from our office. Subscribe Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Blog Funding...

  17. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Indian tribes . The Mille Lacs Band would hire a professional energy auditing finn (Sustainable Engineering Group LLC) to conduct energy audits of the main tribal government...

  18. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  19. Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indians Ronald Suppah, Vice-Chairman, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Susan Weber, Council Representative, Ho-Chunk Nation Richard J. Peterson, 4 th Vice President,...

  20. Helping STEM Education Take Root: Breaking Ground on a Field...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Director of the Department of Science and Engineering, Dave Huizenga, Senior Advisor for the Office of Environmental Management, and...

  1. Intellectual Property Provisions (GNP-115) Grant and Cooperative...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Intellectual Property Provisions (GNP-115) Grant and Cooperative Agreement Research, Development, or Demonstration Non-Federal Entity (State, Local government, Indian tribe,...

  2. Microsoft Word - CX_Priest_River_Acquistiont.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Kalispell) for purchase of Priest River (Flesher) property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1992-061-00, Contract BPA-004991 Categorical Exclusion...

  3. Tribal Strategic Energy Planning Provides a Step in the Right...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribes as part of the DOE Office of Indian Energy's 2012 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program. The strategic energy planning workshops guide tribal...

  4. CAIED Tribal Economic Development Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Center for American Indian Economic Development (CAIED) is hosting a conference on the impact that business and the economy will have on the next year for Tribes.

  5. The role of private participation in enhancing the Indian transport sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Nand, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian transport sector, one of the largest transport networks in the world, faces some serious issues. These may be identified as follows: * Unmet demand for service and infrastructure * Conflicting responsibilities ...

  6. American Indian nations comprise a sig-nificant portion of the lands in the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    their wariness: Well-remem- bered episodes such as the Cold War pursuit of uranium on the Colorado Plateau, a recent form of geophysical exploration on Ameri- can Indian homelands, led to resource exploitation

  7. Does "InDIan BlooD" stIll Matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    18, 2011 ­ January 8, 2012. Quantum Leap: phOTO CApTION: Installation shot of "The Faces of Native Indians are defined not solely by self-designation but by federal, state, and tribal laws. Blood quantum

  8. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY ADVERTISEMENT NO. F 34 / 10 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY ADVERTISEMENT NO. F 34 / 10 11 Applications are invited) Secondary School (Class ten) certificate or its equivalent; and (b) Diploma/certificate in preschool

  9. Two sixteenth century chroniclers and the Indian policy of the Spanish state 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huffman, Sarah Phillips

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Castro, De la edad conf lictiva (Madrid: Taurus Ediciones, 1972), and La realidad histdrica de ~Es aPra (Mexico: Editorial Porrua, 1973+ 19 Liss, p. 34. 21 CHAPTER III SPANISH INDIAN POLICY: THEORIES AND PHILOSOPHIES Lewis Hanke, an eminent...

  10. 21F.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Arundhati

    This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through ...

  11. The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    Indian Ocean towards the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone at about 6o S. We show that especially biofuel air quality (3-5). In rural residential areas, notably in India, the burning of biofuels, such as wood

  12. Reformers Revealed: American Indian Progressives at Haskell Institute, Lawrence, Kansas, 1884-1909

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Eric P.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Haskell Institute opened in1884, an early example of federal off-reservation boarding schools for American Indian youth. The goal was assimilation: strip away traditional languages, spiritual beliefs, tribal customs, even ...

  13. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph. 2332 7311).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    YEAR BOOK 2014 INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES #12;Text formatted by Wintecs Typesetters, Bangalore (Ph Academy of Sciences C.V. Raman Avenue Post Box No. 8005 Sadashivanagar Post Bangalore 560 080 India . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Role of the Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Statutes

  14. Prevalences of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hindu Indian subcommunities in Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaiya, K L; Swai, A B; McLarty, D G; Bhopal, Raj; Alberti, K G

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBJECTIVES--To seek differences in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and other coronary heart disease risk factors, and to identify factors associated with these differences within a Hindu Indian community. DESIGN--Population ...

  15. Technological learning and the evolution of the Indian pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivas, Smita

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical sectors have been characterised by three features considered analogous to technological stagnation: low R&D investments, "copying" on-patent drugs (legal in India if a novel ...

  16. Life-Cycle Assessment of the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel in Indian Locomotives (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With India's transportation sector relying heavily on imported petroleum-based fuels, the Planning Commission of India and the Indian government recommended the increased use of blended biodiesel in transportation fleets, identifying Jatropha as a potentially important biomass feedstock. The Indian Oil Corporation and Indian Railways are collaborating to increase the use of biodiesel blends in Indian locomotives with blends of up to B20, aiming to reduce GHG emissions and decrease petroleum consumption. To help evaluate the potential for Jatropha-based biodiesel in achieving sustainability and energy security goals, this study examines the life cycle, net GHG emission, net energy ratio, and petroleum displacement impacts of integrating Jatropha-based biodiesel into locomotive operations in India. In addition, this study identifies the parameters that have the greatest impact on the sustainability of the system.

  17. Depositional and diagenetic history of some Jurassic carbonates, Indian Rock-Gilmer Field, Upshur County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fall, Steven Anthony

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the origin of the paleostructure which pro- duced the shallow marine environments during Cotton Valley/Haynesvi lie deposition was a Paleozoic high. The Indian Rock-Gilmer Field was a shallow area in the Jurassic Cotton Valley/Haynesville sea situated...~ ~ ~ 0 '''j DEPOSITIONAL AND DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF SOME JURASSIC CARBONATES, INDIAN ROCK-GILMER FIELD, UPSHUR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY FALL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment...

  18. "Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeBeau, Patrick Russell

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Realizing the Dreams" In Four Directions: The American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University Patrick Russell LeBeau Motto Realizing the dreams of generations past, through preserving those of the future. Undergraduates... logo depicting the circle of life and situating the colors as we have, the American Indian Studies Program (AISP) at Michigan State University honors the Three Fires People of Michigan, the Chippewa (Ojibwe), Ottawa (Odawa), Pottawatomie (Potawatomie...

  19. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a unique clade in South Asia.

  20. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  1. For details kindly visit the official website of Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur: www.iitk.ac.in A quarterly newsletter of Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur for Institute's alumni and friends 2005-06/I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    .iitk.ac.in A quarterly newsletter of Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur for Institute's alumni and friends 2005-06/I

  2. From Activism to Academics: The Evolution of American Indian Studies at San Fransisco State University, 1968-2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De La Torre, Joely

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the department of American Indian Studies. Students at SFSU such as Wilma Mankiller (Hall of Fame, SFSU), former Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, to current adjunct faculty Joesph Myers (Porno) Director of the National Indian Justice Center, offer a... University Self Study for Reaccredidation, WASC Report, Chapter 10, Enhancing Human Relations, Spring 2001. 13. Ibid. 14. Adjunct faculty Joseph Myers (Porno) is the founder and director of the National Indian Justice Center. Nicole Myers-Urn (Porno...

  3. Haskell Indian Nations University Roundtable: Increased Productions of Traditional and Other Foods in an Era of Abrupt Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hosted by the Haskell Indian University International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management and Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Working Group, this roundtable discussion will identify and...

  4. DOE Office of Indian Energy: Leveraging Tribal Resources to Support Department of Defense Strategic Energy Goals (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs fact sheet identifies tribal technology generation potential and Native American tribal lands located near military bases.

  5. Correlation and climate sensitivity of human health and environmental indicators in the Salish Sea- Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project focused on the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, whose traditional territories are particularly vulnerable to threats like sea-level rise and increased storms. These sensitivities of...

  6. U.S. DOE and the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on biofuels between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)

  7. Study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves, NOSR-2, Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant and authorized a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The US owns 100% of the mineral rights and about 60% of the surface rights in NOSR-2. The Ute Indian Tribe owns the other 40% of the surface. This 88,890-acre tract was set aside as an oil shale reserve for the US Navy by an Executive Order of President Wilson in 1916. Management of NOSR-2 is the responsibility of DOE. No drilling for oil and gas has occurred on the property and no production has been established. No reserves are present, although the area is hypothesized to overlay gas resources. Mapping by the US Geological Survey and others has resulted in speculative seismic leads for structures that may or may not hold conventional oil and gas. All of the mineral rights (including oil shale) must be considered exploratory and the mineral rights must be valued accordingly. The opinion recommended to maximize value to the US is Option 4, sale of the interest of the US of all or part of NOSR-2. Evaluation of this option results in an estimated value which is more than three times greater than the next highest estimated value, for Option 2, transfer to the Department of the Interior for leasing.

  8. Alonso de León's 1690 expedition diary into Texas: an edition and study of the Spanish texts with semi-paleographic transcriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLain, Jana Dale

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ?n had learned by visiting with other Indian tribes that these children were living among coastal Karankawa Indians. The children's names were Roberto, Magdalena, and Lucien Talon. They were all siblings of Pierre Talon, who had already been...

  9. Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" ­ Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

  10. Cost to the Indian economy of mining coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, N.K.; Bhave, A. [Indian Inst. of Technology, New Delhi (India). Centre of Energy Studies

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Like steel production, energy production is one of the significant parameters of stage of advancement of a developing economy. Availability of energy at the right price is vital for development. Coal is a primary resource of energy. The price of coal has been a very important parameter in the Indian economy. In the past 20 years coal has been marketed at administered prices. There has been a very complex mechanism at work for this purpose. There have been a lot of incentives given to thin industry. These, in fact, are tantamount to subsidies. The role of subsidies is well acknowledged and is considered quite useful to the economy. A detailed analysis by carefully studying the methodology of mining and delineating various stages in mining has been conducted, and the subsidies, which have traditionally not been quantified, have been calculated The impact of each parameter on the total subsidy has been studied to facilitate continuance or change in the subsidy by adopting a suitable strategy for coal pricing, as presently the considerations show unaccounted-for subsidies to be more than 70% of the price charged.

  11. Fear of fatness, eating attitudes, and anti-fat perspectives: a cross-cultural exploration of Euro-American and Indian university students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambwani, Suman

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Although recent data suggest the existence of anti-fat attitudes, fear of fatness, and maladaptive eating attitudes among Indian women, few researchers have examined the cross-cultural validity of their instruments before assessing Indian samples...

  12. National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal Submission to Museum Stores National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Our Museum Stores your craft for sale in our Museum Stores, vendor shall be responsible for complying with all applicable

  13. National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/ Jewelry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/ Jewelry Submission to Museum Stores National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Our Museum Institution your craft for sale in our Museum Stores, vendor shall be responsible for complying with all

  14. National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/Books & Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    National Museum of the American Indian Museum Stores Washington, D.C. & New York Vendor Product Proposal/Books & Media Submission to Museum Stores National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) Our Museum Institution your craft for sale in our Museum Stores, vendor shall be responsible for complying with all

  15. The impact of agricultural intensification and irrigation on landatmosphere interactions and Indian monsoon precipitation --A mesoscale modeling perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    and Indian monsoon precipitation -- A mesoscale modeling perspective E.M. Douglas a, , A. Beltrán-Przekurat b convergence, mesoscale convection, and precipitation patterns over the Indian monsoon region. Four experiments pattern and changes in mesoscale precipitation. These agricultural changes, including irrigation modify

  16. Indian Journal of Marine Sciences VoL 35(2), June 2006, pp. 139-152

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    around 120 to Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) was conducted 150 km while the inland penetration breeze circulation along the west COllst of India during the Indian Ocean Experiment (1999 showed the extent of the sea breeze over the ocean to be 200 km. A mesoscale numerical model was used 10

  17. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Is the Indian Ocean MOC driven by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    of the ocean and that internal wave energy levels in the interior Indian Ocean are too weak to sustain, covering less than 20% of the world ocean. We assess the energy budget of the Indian Ocean MOC based circulation with published estimates of the energy put into the deep Indian Ocean by winds and tides. The main

  18. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K. [ITER- India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujrat (India); Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1x10{sup 18}/m{sup 3}, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  19. Sustainable solar thermal power generation (STPG) technologies in Indian context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.S. [Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, New Delhi (India). Solar Energy Centre

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    India is a fast developing country. Some of the factors like population growth, industrialization, liberalization in economic policies, green revolution and awareness toward the environment, are increasing the electricity demand rapidly. As per the 14th Power Survey Report, an energy deficit of (+) 9% and peak demand deficit of (+) 18% have been estimated. Keeping in view the liberalization in economic policies, this deficit may be higher by the year 2000 AD. An estimation indicates that India is blessed with solar energy to the tune of 5 x 10{sup 15} kWh/yr. Being clean and inexhaustible source of energy, it can be used for large-scale power generation in the country. Keeping in view the present state-of-art technologies for STPG in MW range, best possible efforts are required to be made by all the concerned, to develop sustainable STPG technology of the future, specially for tropical regions. Standardization of vital equipment is an important aspect. There are a few required criteria like simple and robust technology, its transfer and adaptation in tropical climate conditions; high plant load factor without fossil-fired backup; availability of plant during evening peak and night hours; least use of fragile components, and capacity optimization for MW plants as per solar irradiance and environmental factors. In this paper, efforts have been made to compare the different STPG technologies. On the basis, of literature surveyed and studies carried out by the author, it may be stated that Central Receiver System technologies using molten salt and volumetric air receiver, along with molten salt and ceramic thermal storage respectively seems to be suitable and comparable in Indian context. Performance of SOLAR-TWO and PHOEBUS plants may be decisive.

  20. The distribution of dissolved and particulate organic carbon in the southeastern Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abd El-Reheim, Hussein Anwar

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . rbe rloSxee of NASTI. R OP SCIENCE Decerabex 1976 Na)or Subject: OueanoStaPby THE DISTRIBUTION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN THE SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN OCEAN A Thesis by HUSSEIN ANWAR ABD EL-REHEIM (Co-Chairman of ommittee) (Co...-C irman of Commit e) (Head of Department) (Member) r (Member) December 1976 ABSTtlACT The Distribution of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Carbon In the Southeastern Indian Ocean. (December 1976) Hussein Anwan Abd El-Reheim B. Sc. , Alexandria...

  1. HUD Tribal Government to Government Consultation Policy Request for Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) request for comments is to enhance communication and coordination between HUD and federally recognized Indian Tribes, and to outline guiding principles and procedures under which all HUD employees are to operate with regard to federally recognized Indian or Alaska Native Tribes. Comments are due June 8, 2015.

  2. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a “regional” science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school — grades 6 through 8 — students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach — although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair (NAISEF) and EXPO at the Albuquerque, NM Convention Center. Albuquerque is also the home of the AISES national office. The AISES staff also recruits volunteers to assist with implementation of the science and math bowl event. In 2011, there were 7 volunteers; in 2012, 15 volunteers, and in 2013, 19 volunteers. Volunteers are recruited from a variety of local sources, including Sandia Laboratories, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute students, Department of Defense, as well as family members of AISES staff. For AISES, the goals of the Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl project are to have more Native students learn science, for them to gain confidence in competing, and to reward their effort in order to motivate them to pursue studies in the sciences and engineering. For DOE, the goals of the project are to get more Native students to compete at the National Science Bowl, held in Washington, DC.

  3. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration UTE (1999). UTE Uruguay Consumo de Energía387. McNeil, M. (2003). Uruguay Energy Efficiency Project -Administration UTE (1999). UTE Uruguay Consumo de Energía

  4. 94-A13 Native American Initiative Short Course Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A training program conducted in Bartlesville by BDM-Oklahoma technical staff, which included geologists, geophysicists, exploration and drilling specialists, and environmental policy experts. The proposed training schedule offered four courses per year and included those coursed identified by the tribes in the survey. The training program was outlined for members of Native American Tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The proposed program contributed to meeting the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Domestic Oil and Gas Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing their resources through training in cost-effective, improved technologies for hydrocarbon production that will meet environmental regulations. The training program outlined was for adult tribal representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings or setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry. The course content is in response to a survey that was developed by BDM-Oklahoma and sent in the Spring of 1995 to 26 tribal agencies identified through previous contact with DOE. Tribes were asked to indicate course content needs, levels, preferred time of year, and location. Six tribes responded with specific recommendations and needs. These tribes, were the Creek, Pueblo, Cherokee, St. Regis Mohawk, Northern Arapho, and Ute Mountain Ute.

  5. 3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

    2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was greatly extended by calibrating wireline logs from 113 wells with incomplete or older-vintage logging suites to wells with a full suite of modern logs. The model for the fault block architecture was derived by 3D palinspastic reconstruction. This involved field work to construct three new cross-sections at key areas in the Field; creation of horizon and fault surface maps from well penetrations and tops; and numerical modeling to derive the geometry, chronology, fault movement and folding history of the Field through a 3D restoration of the reservoir units to their original undeformed state. The methodology for predicting fracture intensity and orientation variations throughout the Field was accomplished by gathering outcrop and subsurface image log fracture data, and comparing it to the strain field produced by the various folding and faulting events determined through the 3D palinspastic reconstruction. It was found that the strains produced during the initial folding of the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations corresponded well without both the orientations and relative fracture intensity measured in outcrop and in the subsurface. The results have led to a 15% to 20% increase in estimated matrix pore volume, and to the plan to drill two horizontal drain holes located and oriented based on the modeling results. Marathon Oil is also evaluating alternative tertiary recovery processes based on the quantitative 3D integrated reservoir model.

  6. The social construction of difference in the Asian Indian community at Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Susan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on a qualitative analysis of the social construction of difference between two groups in the Asian Indian community at Texas A&M University. one group is comprised of students who have come from India for graduate study at A...

  7. Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase III Mid Career Training of Indian Forest Service Officers: International Training Program Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department & Center for Protected Area Management and Training #12;Report Authors This training program summary report was produced by Andrew W. Don Carlos, Tara L. Teel

  8. Interannual Rainfall Extremes over Southwest Western Australia Linked to Indian Ocean Climate Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Interannual Rainfall Extremes over Southwest Western Australia Linked to Indian Ocean Climate and Prediction, School of Mathematics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (Manuscript received 15 December 2004, in final form 24 August 2005) ABSTRACT Interannual rainfall extremes over southwest Western

  9. This article was downloaded by:[Indian Institute of Technology] On: 10 December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    of the complex valued non-linear regression model Debasis Kundu a a Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute, Debasis (1991) 'Asymptotic properties of the complex valued non-linear regression model', Communications of Technology, Kanpur Kanpur, PIN 208016, India Key Words and Phrases: Non-linear regression, Consistent Estima

  10. United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Testimony for the September 18, 2009 Roundtable on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    a study, which concluded that: The costs of continuing on our current energy path are steep. American and environment. If America continues along a business-as-usual energy path, U.S. fossil fuel spending is likely on Indian Energy and Energy Efficiency Opportunities by Daniel M. Kammen Professor in the Energy

  11. Indian agricultural development in the context of economic reforms. Causes of change and issues for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Indian agricultural development in the context of economic reforms. Causes of change and issues the influence of reforms in the 1990s regarding the agricultural development in India. Many studies have sector rather than on the agricultural sector. After India gained independence, the government

  12. Interactions between the Indonesian Throughflow and circulations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Tommy

    Interactions between the Indonesian Throughflow and circulations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans with the Indonesian Throughflow (IT), particularly concerning subsurface currents in the Pacific Ocean, are studied model (LOM), both confined to the Indo-Pacific basin; and a global, ocean general circulation model

  13. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY P.O. IIT Powai, Mumbai 400 076

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BOMBAY P.O. IIT Powai, Mumbai ­ 400 076 Advertisement No. D-45 /08 ten) certificate or its equivalent ; and (ii) Diploma / certificate in pre-school teacher education/Electronics/ Printing Technology of three years duration. Knowledge of computer applications. * Scales are likely

  14. www.cleanenergysolutions.org INDIAN RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY POLICY DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.cleanenergysolutions.org INDIAN RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY POLICY DATABASE India efficiency and renewable energy technologies throughout the country. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and India's Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) have partnered to develop an online database

  15. LLL reducing with the most significant bits Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villard, Gilles

    at a lower cost than using the entire initial basis. An approach for LLL-reducing a basis B may then be: 1LLL reducing with the most significant bits Saruchi Indian Institute of Technology New Delhi analyse an efficient reduction algorithm when B is itself a small deformation of an LLL-reduced basis

  16. Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper Quy-Toan Do (The World ABSTRACT Water pollution levels in many developing countries remain significantly higher than in the developed world. While such pollution is often a byproduct of economic activity, it also imparts a health

  17. Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Composition of Municipal Solid Waste- Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context of an eternally inherent low heating value on the other. Current status of Solid Waste Management The MSW Rules front in India17 . None of the major metros have any projects of significant scale of Solid Waste

  18. The Power (Law) of Indian Markets: Analysing NSE and BSE Trading Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Sitabhra

    The Power (Law) of Indian Markets: Analysing NSE and BSE Trading Statistics Sitabhra Sinha and Raj-tailed cumulative distribution, consistent with a power law having ex- ponent 3, similar to that observed in developed markets. However, the distributions of trading volume and the number of trades have a different na

  19. Newsletter of the Indian Academy of Sciences 2005 Annual Meeting ........................ 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    Newsletter of the Indian Academy of Sciences Inside... 2005 Annual Meeting. 43 March 2006 The seventy-first Annual Meeting of the Academy was held at Bharathidasan University in bridging physics and chemistry in selected areas. The opening lecture by the President of the Academy, TV

  20. Journal of Indian Society of Remote Sensing V. 32, No. 4 (December, 2004 Issue)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Journal of Indian Society of Remote Sensing V. 32, No. 4 (December, 2004 Issue) http in the Ganga basin. Aerosols are responsible for lowering of land surface temperature i.e. cooling effect which on radiative forcing that cause negative forcing (cooling) at surface and positive effect (warming) at top

  1. Seasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    energy and exert profound impacts on large-scale ocean circulations. Satellite altimeter ob- servations- sociations with the large-scale oceanic circulations and the climate. The global eddy kinetic energy (EKESeasonal Modulation of Eddy Kinetic Energy and Its Formation Mechanism in the Southeast Indian

  2. An inverse analytical technique applied to a chloride contamination of groundwater at Indian School and Levering sites, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, Helen

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the Indian River Site. were used to store road salt. Seepage from precipitation on these road salt piles has resulted in chloride contamination of the groundwater down gradient of the storage areas. The resulting chloride plumes were examined using two... Descriptions. 3. 1. 1. Indian River Site, 3. 1. 2. Levering Site 3. 2. Modeling Results for the Michigan Sites . . . . . . . . 3. 2. 1. Modeling Results for the Indian River Site, 3. 2. 2, MOdeling Results for the Levering Site. . 20 20 22 23 34 4...

  3. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Anchorage, Alaska, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Anchorage, Alaska Roundtable on Tribal Energy Policy convened at 10:00 a.m., Thursday April 15th, at the downtown Anchorage Hilton. The meeting was held by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the Office of Indian Energy, and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the Office of Indian Energy, represented DOE. Approximately twenty?seven people attended the meeting, including representatives of three native Alaskan villages, four Alaskan tribal corporations representing more than 40 tribal governments, as well as representatives from tribal associations and conferences. Interested state, federal, and non?profit representatives also were present. A full list of attendees is at the end of this summary. The meeting was facilitated by the Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute).  

  4. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Pala, California, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    PALA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Pala, California, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Pala Resort. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, attended. Tribal leaders and representatives from five tribal communities also attended. There were thirteen participants. The meeting was facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). She was assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.   

  5. Crisis in cultural adjustment: a comparative study of Indian and Korean graduate students at Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, Lynda Jay

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to determine factors influencing acculturation to a host society. It also examined the coping strategies utilized for success in a new academic environment. International Indian and Korean graduate student groups were...

  6. The Importance of Historical Trauma & Stress as a Factor in Diabetes and Obesity Prevention among American Indian Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Jason William

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the last forty years, the federal government and tribal governments have developed and administered programs to lower the obesity and diabetes rates among American Indian populations. Despite these joint efforts, a ...

  7. Geographic variations in access and utilization of cancer screening services: examining disparities among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towne, Samuel D; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite recommendations for cancer screening for breast and colorectal cancer among the Medicare population, preventive screenings rates are often lower among vulnerable populations such as the small but rapidly growing older American Indian...

  8. Webinar: DOE Funding Opportunity for the Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands (DE-FOA-0001021)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The intent of this webinar is to provide information for potential applicants to the Energy Departments Funding Opportunity for the Deployment of Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency on Indian Lands ...

  9. Statistics of the French purse seine fleet targeting tropical tunas in the Indian Ocean (1991-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    tropical tunas, i.e. Thunnus albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Thunnus obesus in the Indian Ocean during albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus obesus, fishing aggregating device 1. Introduction The French purse

  10. Heterogeneity of coronary heart disease risk factors in Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and European origin populations: cross sectional study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhopal, Raj; Unwin, Nigel; White, M; Yallop, J; Walker, L; Alberti, K G; Harland, J; Patel, S; Ahmad, N; Turner, C; Watson, B; Kaur, D; Kulkarni, A; Laker, M; Tavridou, A

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: To compare coronary risk factors and disease prevalence among Indians, Pakistanis, and Bangladeshis, and in all South Asians (these three groups together) with Europeans. Design: Cross sectional survey. ...

  11. Aridification of the Indian subcontinent during the Holocene : implications for landscape evolution, sedimentation, carbon cycle, and human civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponton, Camilo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian monsoon affects the livelihood of over one billion people. Despite the importance of climate to society, knowledge of long-term monsoon variability is limited. This thesis provides Holocene records of monsoon ...

  12. DOE's Energy Savings Performance Contracts Stretch Budgets in the Bureau of Indian Affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs has found a good way to reduce energy costs, replace inefficient lighting and aging building equipment, and install renewable energy systems-all without huge increases in the BIA budget. The agency is doing this by making use of the U.S. Department of Energy's Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) at BIA schools and other facilities throughout the country. This two-page case study describes how one BIA facility-the Sherman Indian School in Riverside, California-is cutting its energy costs with badly needed new lighting and heating and cooling equipment, and installing a new photovoltaic energy system, under a DOE Super ESPC, in which the energy services provider pays up-front costs and is repaid out of the facility's resulting energy cost savings.

  13. EA-2004: Seneca Nation of Indians Wind Turbine Project, Cattaraugus Territory, Chautauqua County, Irving, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to the Seneca Nation of Indians, to design, permit, and construct a 1.7-megawatt wind turbine on Tribal common lands in the Cattaraugus Territory, New York. The turbine would be located near Lucky Lane and Gil Lay Arena. An Environmental Assessment (EA) will be prepared by DOE pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  14. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancil, J. [ed.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  15. Short-term modulation of Indian summer monsoon rainfall by West Asian dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinoj, V.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Landu, Kiranmayi; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian summer monsoon is the result of a complex interplay between radiative heating, dynamics and cloud and aerosol interactions. Despite increased scientific attention, the effect of aerosols on monsoons still remains uncertain. Here we present both observational evidence and numerical modeling results demonstrating a remote aerosol link to Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Rainfall over central India is positively correlated to natural aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia. Simulations using a state-of-the-art global climate model support this remote aerosol link and indicate that dust aerosols induce additional moisture transport and convergence over Central India, producing increased monsoon rainfall. The convergence is driven through solar heating and latent heating within clouds over West Asia that increases surface winds over the Arabian Sea. On the other hand, sea-salt aerosol tends to counteract the effect of dust and reduces rainfall. Our findings highlight the importance of natural aerosols in modulating the strength of the Indian summer monsoon, and motivate additional research in how changes in background aerosols of natural origin may be influencing long-term trends in monsoon precipitation.

  16. Use Of The Evidence Base In Substance Abuse Treatment Programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives: Pursuing Quality in the Crucible Of Practice And Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2003. 41.drug, and mental health services for American IndianAbuse and Mental Health Services Administration: Tribal

  17. virginia pOLyteCHniC institUte anD state Universit y COMMENCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    , vice president for Finance and Chief Financial Officer earving L. Blythe, vice president Commencement gary L. Long, associate professor, Department of Chemistry, Commencement Marshal, University

  18. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W WBOE

  19. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W WBOEGas

  20. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S.5AreOil andMarketW W W

  1. Effects of the diurnal cycle in solar radiation on the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer variability during wintertime Madden-Julian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of the diurnal cycle in solar radiation on the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer September 2013; accepted 6 September 2013; published 3 October 2013. [1] The effects of solar radiation in the main run. The results show that the diurnal cycle of solar radiation generally warms the Indian Ocean

  2. Indian Ocean radiocarbon: Data from the INDIGO 1, 2, and 3 cruises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents {sup 14}C activities (expressed in the internationally adopted {Delta}{sup 14}C scale) from water samples taken at various locations and depths in the Indian and Southern oceans through the Indien Gaz Ocean (INDIGO) project. These data were collected as part of the INDIGO 1, INDIGO 2, and INDIGO 3 cruises, which took place during the years 1985, 1986, and 1987, respectively. These data have been used to estimate the penetration of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the Indian and Southern oceans. The document also presents supporting data for potential temperature, salinity, density (sigma-theta), {delta}{sup 13}C, and total CO{sub 2}. All radiocarbon measurements have been examined statistically for quality of sample counts and stability of counting efficiency and background. In addition, all data have been reviewed by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and assessed for gross accuracy and consistency (absence of obvious outliers and other anomalous values). These data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of this document and a magnetic tape containing machine-readable files. This document provides sample listing of the Indian Ocean radiocarbon data as they appear on the magnetic tape, as well as a complete listing of these data in tabular form. This document also offers retrieval program listings, furnishes information on sampling methods and data selection, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, and provides reprints of pertinent literature. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

  4. The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empricial Analysis of Indian States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, A; Jamasb, Tooraj

    www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empirical Analysis of Indian States EPRG Working Paper 1001 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 1005 Anupama Sen... and Tooraj Jamasb As developing countries seek to improve their economic prospects, electricity reform has been widely viewed as a central part of this effort. While the focus of most research to date has been at economy or utility level; there has...

  5. Crystallization temperatures and oxygen fugacities of magmas from the Southeast Indian Ocean Ridge system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ongley, Lois Kathe

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 52 Eugster, H. P. , and Wones, D. R. 1962, Stability rela+ions of the ferrugenous biotite, annite, Jour. Petrol. , v. 3, p. 82-125. Frey, G. A. , Bryan, W. B. , and Thompson, G. , 1974, Atlantic Ocean Floor: Geochemistry and petrology of basalts.... , and Weissel, J . K, , 1974, Depth anomalies in the South- east Indian Ocean (abs. ), Abstracts with Programs, Geol. Soc. Amer. , v. 6, n. 7, p. 784. Kudo, A. M. and Weill, D. F. , 1970. An igneous plagioclase thermometer, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol, , v. Z5...

  6. Geothermal Direct Use Feasibility Study on the Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Merrick

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation (FBIR) is rich in renewable energy resources. Development of its geothermal resources has the potential to profoundly affect the energy and economic future of the FBIC. Geothermal energy can contribute to making the reservation energy self-sufficient and, potentially, an energy exporter. The feasibility study assessed the feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating system to provide low-cost, efficient heating of existing and planned residences, community buildings and water, using an existing geothermal well, FB-3.

  7. Office of Indian Energy Sponsors Two Sandia Student Interns | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, July 29,Office of Indian

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Quinault Indian Nation Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies [Read-Only]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312),Microgrid Set-Top Box ProceedingMode]HowRQuinault Indian

  9. A review of "Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company" by Miles Ogborn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nechtman, Tillman W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2007. xiii + 318 pp. + 22 illus. $40.00. Review by TILLMAN W. NECHTMAN, SKIDMORE COLLEGE. The India Office Records... Company (EIC) and the English/British empire in South Asia. Miles Ogborn?s impressive new book, Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company, approaches this same archive from an important new direction. Rather than reading...

  10. Forecasting of Indian Rupee (INR) / US Dollar (USD) Currency Exchange Rate Using Artificial Neural Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perwej, Yusuf; 10.5121/ijcsea.2012.2204

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large part of the workforce, and growing every day, is originally from India. India one of the second largest populations in the world, they have a lot to offer in terms of jobs. The sheer number of IT workers makes them a formidable travelling force as well, easily picking up employment in English speaking countries. The beginning of the economic crises since 2008 September, many Indians have return homeland, and this has had a substantial impression on the Indian Rupee (INR) as liken to the US Dollar (USD). We are using numerational knowledge based techniques for forecasting has been proved highly successful in present time. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of several important neural network factors on model fitting and forecasting the behaviours. In this paper, Artificial Neural Network has successfully been used for exchange rate forecasting. This paper examines the effects of the number of inputs and hidden nodes and the size of the training sample on the in-sample and out-of-sample...

  11. Lack of uniform trends but increasing spatial variability in observed Indian rainfall extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Subimal [ORNL; Das, Debasish [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies disagree on how rainfall extremes over India have changed in space and time over the past half century, as well as on whether the changes observed are due to global warming or regional urbanization. Although a uniform and consistent decrease in moderate rainfall has been reported, a lack of agreement about trends in heavy rainfall may be due in part to differences in the characterization and spatial averaging of extremes. Here we use extreme value theory to examine trends in Indian rainfall over the past half century in the context of long-term, low-frequency variability.We show that when generalized extreme value theory is applied to annual maximum rainfall over India, no statistically significant spatially uniform trends are observed, in agreement with previous studies using different approaches. Furthermore, our space time regression analysis of the return levels points to increasing spatial variability of rainfall extremes over India. Our findings highlight the need for systematic examination of global versus regional drivers of trends in Indian rainfall extremes, and may help to inform flood hazard preparedness and water resource management in the region.

  12. These professional development opportunities were made possible by the 2008 OPI Indian Education for All Montana University System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    These professional development opportunities were made possible by the 2008 OPI Indian Education grants from the Office of Public Instruction (OPI), and support from the Office of the Commissioner Conference Eighty guests from OPI, OCHE, the Council of Elders, Bozeman Public Schools, and students, staff

  13. Writing the life of the self: constructions of identity in autobiographical discourse by six eighteenth-century American Indians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruett, David Alan

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    is gone home about three weeks a goe because we hear enemies is coming: but their was nothing in it. for all our Mohoaks are Pice with us yet: and hear I meet mr Gunn He come from Onohoguagee: He sead their is nodenger a mong the Indians at Onohoguagee...

  14. RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD IN GUJARAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD for complementarities between the present system of water supply and the alternative system of rainwater harvesting IN GUJARAT (Akil AMIRALY1 , Nathalie PRIME2 , Joginder P. SINGH3 ) ABSTRACT Water scarcity

  15. RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD IN GUJARAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RAINWATER HARVESTING, ALTERNATIVE TO THE WATER SUPPLY IN INDIAN URBAN AREAS: THE CASE OF AHMEDABAD their water requirements. Rainwater harvesting is one of them. It was functioning in the Old city of Ahmedabad and the alternative system of rainwater harvesting, in a context of water scarcity. The objective of the research

  16. Asymmetry of the Indian Ocean Basinwide SST Anomalies: Roles of ENSO and IOD* CHI-CHERNG HONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    2009, in final form 31 December 2009) ABSTRACT A basinwide warming (cooling) in the Indian Ocean significantly larger than the cooling. A composite analysis reveals that the amplitude asymmetry (positive to the ENSO remote forcing. The asymmetry of the mixed layer depth (MLD) between warm and cold events

  17. Speciation of ambient fine organic carbon particles and source apportionment of PM2.5 in Indian cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Mei

    Speciation of ambient fine organic carbon particles and source apportionment of PM2.5 in Indian, and Chandigarh is speciated to quantify sources contributing to fine particle pollution. Gas chromatography patterns of the impact of these five sources are observed. On average, primary emissions from fossil fuel

  18. Dynamic and Thermodynamic AirSea Coupling Associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Diagnosed from 23 WCRP CMIP3 Models*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Dynamic and Thermodynamic Air­Sea Coupling Associated with the Indian Ocean Dipole Diagnosed from and the thermodynamic air­sea coupling in shaping the different model behaviors. The Bjerknes feedback processes include of the dynamic and ther- modynamic feedback processes. The distinctive features in the dynamic and thermodynamic

  19. Role of AirSea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~oInduced North Indian Ocean Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Walker circulation adjustments, causing a sustained SST warming in the tropical southwest IO (SWIO) where in the equatorial Pacific with pro- found influences on the global climate. For example, El Nin~o causes sea surfaceRole of Air­Sea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~o­Induced North Indian Ocean Warming

  20. Observed Synoptic-Scale Variability during the Developing Phase of an ISO over the Indian Ocean during MISMO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    Observed Synoptic-Scale Variability during the Developing Phase of an ISO over the Indian Ocean A case study of an intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) is investigated in the period leading up to its for a convectively active phase of the ISO. The prominent shallow heating during this period may explain the rather

  1. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Las Vegas, Nevada, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    LAS VEGAS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Las Vegas, Nevada DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on March 16th, at the Las Vegas Hilton. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by JR Bluehouse, Program Manager, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Mr. Bluehouse was assisted by Tamara, Underwood, Program Assistant, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal governments and communities attended the roundtable. Tracey LeBeau, newly appointed Director of the Office of Indian Energy attended.    LaMont Jackson from DOE’s Office of Electricity attended. Also attending from the administration and federal agencies were Kim Teehee, Senior Policy Advisor for Native American Affairs, The White House; Charlie Galbraith, Associate Director of the Office of Public Engagement and Deputy Associate Director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, The White House; Jodi Gillette, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Economic Development, the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  2. Planning Brings Vision Into Focus (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study/fact sheet highlights the strategic energy planning process for Tribes that was developed by the DOE Office of Indian Energy. This nine-step process, which is outlined in one of the foundational education courses offered by the Office, enables Tribes to pursue energy projects in a well-planned and strategic manner.

  3. CX-007017: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peoria Tribe of Indians of OklahomaCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 09/23/2011Location(s): Peoria Tribe, OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  4. FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RICH, LAUREN

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe?s Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

  5. CX-006355: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon - Tribe - Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of OregonCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 03/26/2010Location(s): OregonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  6. Kusunda: An Indo-Pacific language in Nepal Paul Whitehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruhlen, Merritt

    Kusunda: An Indo-Pacific language in Nepal Paul Whitehouse , Timothy Usher , Merritt Ruhlen people of central Nepal have long been regarded as a relic tribe of South Asia. They are, or were until people of central Nepal are one of the few ``relic'' tribes found on the Indian subcontinent (the Nahali

  7. Respiratory survey of North American Indian children living in proximity to an aluminum smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, P.; Thomas, D.; Becklake, M.R.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explored the relationship of respiratory symptoms and lung function to exposure to ambient air pollution consisting of particulate and gaseous fluorides. The subjects were 253 North American Indian children 11 to 17 yr of age living on the Akwasasne reserve, which is adjacent to an aluminum smelter. Among boys, closing volume (CV/VC%) was increased in those raised closest to the smelter as opposed to those having lived most of their lives farthest from this source of air pollution. In both sexes, there was a significant linear relationship between increasing CV/VC% and the amount of fluoride contained in a spot urine sample. We conclude that exposure to fluoride air pollution in the community may be associated with abnormalities in small airways. The implication of these abnormalities for future respiratory health is unknown.

  8. CX-004619: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington - Traffic Signals and Street LightingCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/30/2009Location(s): WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. CX-002322: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-Tribe-Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Lone Pine CommunityCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 05/13/2010Location(s): Lone Pine, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  10. Acknowledgment This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    & Regional Agencies Regional Water Providers Private Water Providers Electricity Providers Agricultural Users for this survey. Federal Entities Indian Tribes State Entities Elected Officials Local Water Departments the institutional capacity of your agency Political impacts & governance Identifying and meeting stakeholder

  11. CX-002914: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-Tribe-Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk IndiansCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 06/30/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. CX-001757: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-Tribe-Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria Energy AuditCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 04/16/2010Location(s): Graton Rancheria, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  13. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . At the January Council meeting Gary James (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation) and Kevin Blakely (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife) will discuss how the managers plan to address the fall

  14. CX-004555: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California-Tribe-Robinson Rancheria of Pomo IndiansCX(s) Applied: B1.32, B5.1Date: 11/29/2010Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. Secretary Chu Announces Funding for Clean Energy Projects on...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Feasibility: Renewables Geothermal Electrical MT 233,170 0 233,170 Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Feasibility: Renewables Wind OK 242,586 15,751 258,337 Keweenaw Bay Indian...

  16. FOA 148 Amendment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the list of required documents on page 31. v. Clarify that consortia must designate a prime applicant. vi. Clarify the terms "Unit of local government (or Indian tribe) that is...

  17. CX-003247: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alaska-Tribe-Hoonah Indian AssociationCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 07/27/2010Location(s): AlaskaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal needs, funding opportunities, and more.

  19. LANDSTREAMER/GIMBALED GEOPHONE ACQUISITION OF HIGH RESOLUTION SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA NORTH OF THE 200 AREAS HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REPASKY TE; HYDE ER; LINK CA; SPEECE MA

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Landstreamer Seismic Reflection Vender Report by Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Montana Tech of the University of Montana, collected in FY2009 under CHPRC Contract 35789.

  20. NAIHC 2015 Legislative Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the National American Indian Housing Council (NAIHC), the 20th Annual Legislative Conference offers Tribes a chance to take part in the decisions made by Congress and the Administration in Washington, D.C.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    by or used for U.S. government, state government, or Indian nation, tribe, or pueblo purposes is exempt from the state excise tax. (Reference New Mexico Statutes 7-16B-5...

  2. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  3. The Impacts of Indirect Soil Moisture Assimilation and Direct Surface Temperature and Humidity Assimilation on a Mesoscale Model Simulation of an Indian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Assimilation on a Mesoscale Model Simulation of an Indian Monsoon Depression VINODKUMAR AND A. CHANDRASEKAR-generation Pennsylvania State University­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) simulation utilized the humidity and temperature

  4. The influence of ridge geometry at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (9?-25?E) : basalt composition sensitivity to variations in source and process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standish, Jared Jeffrey

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 90-25° E on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge lie two sharply contrasting supersegments. One 630 km long supersegment erupts N-MORB that is progressively enriched in incompatible element concentrations ...

  5. Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT in water and sediment of the Indian River Lagoon, Florida - 1977 to 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, T.C.; Johnson, R.S.; Bricker, J.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water and sediment samples collected during 1977 to 1978 from the Indian River lagoon between Vero Beach, Indian River County, and Fort Pierce, Saint Lucie County, Florida were analyzed for PCBs and DDT. Sample locations were chosen on the basis of proximity to major tributaries, sewage outfalls, or municipal area. Concentrations in water samples were below 0.01 ppB sigma DDT and 0.5 ppB PCBs. Small amounts of PCBs and DDT were found in most sediment samples, ranging from less than 1.0 ppB to 0.63 ppM Aroclor 1254 and from less than 0.1 ppB to 0.081 ppM sigma DDT. Samples from the Taylor Creek tributary and from the Fort Pierce power plant and municipal docking area contained higher PCB concentrations than did samples from other locations. DDT and PCB levels in most samples indicate little contamination by these compounds of the Indian River Waterway between Vero Beach and Fort Pierce.

  6. Northern Cheyenne Tribe Wind Energy Development Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belvin Pete; Distributed Generation Systems Inc; WEST, Inc; Michael S. Burney; Chris Bergen; Electrical Consultants, Inc; Terracon

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific development objectives focused on the completion of all actions required to qualify a specfic project for financing and construction of a 30MW wind facility.

  7. The Tribe of Jen-Wae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Meg

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -ky. There is still time. With the next birthing the:L'G may be one to stretch your powers to the full." Har-lGJ shook his head, his eyes bitter. "It is many birthings since I hoped 10 for such a thing?" he said sadly. ilSl eGr noVl') old? man. I1hero is much...

  8. Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and greatly appreciate their input regarding this proposed project. We would like to take this chance of decreased internal nutrient loading, may take a number of years to realize. But a single season is enough is annually stocked into Twin Lakes and it is the pri

  9. To Customers, Constituents, Tribes and Stakeholders:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prices, the cost of maintaining aging federal assets, and significant ongoing energy industry changes, BPA continues to increase its total outstanding debt and related...

  10. To Customers, Constituents, Tribes and Stakeholders:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study91Title:8To Customers,

  11. Key Renewable Energy Opportunities for Oklahoma Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3WASTE-TO-ENERGY:KenKeriKey IssuesKEY

  12. ICEIWG Participating Tribes | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen5October 30, 2011,21,List

  13. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Officials Visit WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSettingUncertainties in the3Arie Shoshani!

  14. NREL: Technology Deployment - Technical Assistance for Tribes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NRELCostBuildingModelsTechnical Assistance for

  15. Life assessment and emissions monitoring of Indian coal-fired power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the traveler, along with Dr. R. P. Krishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee spent three weeks in India planning and performing emissions monitoring at the coal-fired Vijayawada Thermal Power Station (VTPS). The coordination for the Indian participants was provided by BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore. The trip was sponsored by the PETC under the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Government of India (GOI)P Alternate Energy Resources Development (AERD) Project. The AERD Project is managed by PETC, and ORNL is providing the technical coordination and support for four coal projects that are being implemented with BHEL, Trichy. The traveler, after briefing the USAID mission in New Delhi visited BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore to coordinate and plan the emissions test program. The site selection was made by BHEL, CPRI, TVA, and PETC. Monitoring was performed for 4 days on one of the 4 existing 210 MW coal-fired boilers at the VTPS, 400 km north of Madras, India.

  16. Life assessment and emissions monitoring of Indian coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the traveler, along with Dr. R. P. Krishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee spent three weeks in India planning and performing emissions monitoring at the coal-fired Vijayawada Thermal Power Station (VTPS). The coordination for the Indian participants was provided by BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore. The trip was sponsored by the PETC under the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Government of India (GOI)P Alternate Energy Resources Development (AERD) Project. The AERD Project is managed by PETC, and ORNL is providing the technical coordination and support for four coal projects that are being implemented with BHEL, Trichy. The traveler, after briefing the USAID mission in New Delhi visited BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore to coordinate and plan the emissions test program. The site selection was made by BHEL, CPRI, TVA, and PETC. Monitoring was performed for 4 days on one of the 4 existing 210 MW coal-fired boilers at the VTPS, 400 km north of Madras, India.

  17. Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption in each sc

  18. Future projection of mean and variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean Climate systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annamalai, H [IPRC, University of Hawaii

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the ability of the CMIP3/5 models to simulate the Indian-Ocean monsoon systems. The PI along with post-docs investigated research issues ranging from synoptic systems to long-term trends over the Asian monsoon region. The PI applied diagnostic tools such as moist static energy (MSE) to isolate: the moist and radiative processes responsible for extended monsoon breaks over South Asia, precursors in the ENSO-monsoon association, reasons for the drying tendency over South Asia and the possible effect on tropical Indian Ocean climate anomalies influencing certain aspects of ENSO characteristics. By diagnosing various observations and coupled model simulations, we developed working hypothesis and tested them by carrying out sensitivity experiments with both linear and nonlinear models. Possible physical and dynamical reasons for model sensitivities were deduced. On the teleconnection front, the ability of CMIP5 models in representing the monsoon-desert mechanism was examined recently. Further more, we have applied a suite of diagnostics and have performed an in depth analysis on CMIP5 integrations to isolate the possible reasons for the ENSO-monsoon linkage or lack thereof. The PI has collaborated with Dr. K.R. Sperber of PCMDI and other CLIVAR Asian-Australian monsoon panel members in understanding the ability of CMIP3/5 models in capturing monsoon and its spectrum of variability. The objective and process-based diagnostics aided in selecting models that best represent the present-day monsoon and its variability that are then employed for future projections. Two major highlights were an invitation to write a review on present understanding monsoons in a changing climate in Nature Climate Change, and identification of an east-west shift in observed monsoon rainfall (more rainfall over tropical western Pacific and drying tendency over South Asia) in the last six decades and attributing that shift to SST rise over the tropical western Pacific. On the training of post-doctoral scientists: the PI spent considerable amount of time and efforts in introducing the post-docs into climate modeling and designing the numerical experiments. With training provided and knowledge gained, post-docs worked in the project obtained long term positions elsewhere. The PI also enjoyed the experience in managing the works and educating work ethics to the younger generation. Based on the research achievements and publications, the PI gave invited talks in major international monsoon conferences/workshops, and gave lectures in various research organizations in the last six years. Finally, during the project period, the PI attended all the DOE organized PIs meeting and presented the major results. Some of the major implications of the project include: (i) Sustained observational efforts are necessary to monitor the three-dimensional moisture distribution over the Asian monsoon region that would aid in better understanding, modeling and predicting severe monsoons well in advance and (ii) process-based diagnostics lead pathways for model improvements.

  19. Uncertainty in Resilience to Climate Change in India and Indian States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.; Brenkert, Antoinette L.

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This study builds on an earlier analysis of resilience of India and Indian states to climate change. The previous study (Brenkert and Malone 2005) assessed current resilience; this research uses the Vulnerability-Resilience Indicators Model (VRIM) to project resilience to 2095 and to perform an uncertainty analysis on the deterministic results. Projections utilized two SRES-based scenarios, one with fast-and-high growth, one with delayed growth. A detailed comparison of two states, the Punjab and Orissa, points to the kinds of insights that can be obtained using the VRIM. The scenarios differ most significantly in the timing of the uncertainty in economic prosperity (represented by GDP per capita) as a major factor in explaining the uncertainty in the resilience index. In the fast-and-high growth scenario the states differ most markedly regarding the role of ecosystem sensitivity, land use and water availability. The uncertainty analysis shows, for example, that resilience in the Punjab might be enhanced, especially in the delayed growth scenario, if early attention is paid to the impact of ecosystems sensitivity on environmental well-being of the state. By the same token, later in the century land-use pressures might be avoided if land is managed through intensification rather than extensification of agricultural land. Thus, this methodology illustrates how a policy maker can be informed about where to focus attention on specific issues, by understanding the potential changes at a specific location and time – and, thus, what might yield desired outcomes. Model results can point to further analyses of the potential for resilience-building.

  20. The Role of Moist Processes in the Intrinsic Predictability of Indian Ocean Cyclones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taraphdar, Sourav; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Zhang, Fuqing; Abhilash, S.; Goswami, B. N.

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of moist processes and the possibility of error cascade from cloud scale processes affecting the intrinsic predictable time scale of a high resolution convection permitting model within the environment of tropical cyclones (TCs) over the Indian region are investigated. Consistent with past studies of extra-tropical cyclones, it is demonstrated that moist processes play a major role in forecast error growth which may ultimately limit the intrinsic predictability of the TCs. Small errors in the initial conditions may grow rapidly and cascades from smaller scales to the larger scales through strong diabatic heating and nonlinearities associated with moist convection. Results from a suite of twin perturbation experiments for four tropical cyclones suggest that the error growth is significantly higher in cloud permitting simulation at 3.3 km resolutions compared to simulations at 3.3 km and 10 km resolution with parameterized convection. Convective parameterizations with prescribed convective time scales typically longer than the model time step allows the effects of microphysical tendencies to average out so convection responds to a smoother dynamical forcing. Without convective parameterizations, the finer-scale instabilities resolved at 3.3 km resolution and stronger vertical motion that results from the cloud microphysical parameterizations removing super-saturation at each model time step can ultimately feed the error growth in convection permitting simulations. This implies that careful considerations and/or improvements in cloud parameterizations are needed if numerical predictions are to be improved through increased model resolution. Rapid upscale error growth from convective scales may ultimately limit the intrinsic mesoscale predictability of the TCs, which further supports the needs for probabilistic forecasts of these events, even at the mesoscales.

  1. Enter Climate Change : Of beastly encounters, cervine disappearances, and categories of the state in the Indian Himalaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Nayanika

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or denialists. On the contrary, I very much believe that the Indian Himalaya is a precarious, ecological zone that is, to use the language of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), extremely “vulnerable” to the impact of climate change... like the bears – gone mad (pagal ho gaye hai) with their sorry plights. The bears are like humans in the sense that they don’t like seeing their natural environment being destroyed by things like ugly dams or mining or commercial deforestation. But...

  2. Physical Mechanisms for the Maintenance of GCM-Simulated Madden-Julian Oscillation over the Indian Ocean and Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Liping; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetic energy budget is conducted to analyze the physical processes responsible for the improved Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) simulated by the Iowa State University general circulation models (ISUGCM). The modified deep convection scheme that includes the revised convection closure, convection trigger condition and convective momentum transport (CMT) enhances the equatorial (10oS-10oN) MJO-related perturbation kinetic energy (PKE) in the upper troposphere and leads to more robust and coherent eastward propagating MJO signal. In the MJO source region-the Indian Ocean (45oE-120oE), the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is maintained by the vertical convergence of wave energy flux and the barotropic conversion through the horizontal shear of mean flow. In the convectively active region-the western Pacific (120oE-180o), the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is supported by the convergence of horizontal and vertical wave energy fluxes. Over the central-eastern Pacific (180o-120oW), where convection is suppressed, the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is mainly due to the horizontal convergence of wave energy flux. The deep convection trigger condition produces stronger convective heating which enhances the perturbation available potential energy (PAPE) production and the upward wave energy fluxes, and leads to the increased MJO PKE over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. The trigger condition also enhances the MJO PKE over the central-eastern Pacific through the increased convergence of meridional wave energy flux from the subtropical latitudes of both hemispheres. The revised convection closure affects the response of mean zonal wind shear to the convective heating over the Indian Ocean and leads to the enhanced upper-tropospheric MJO PKE through the barotropic conversion. The stronger eastward wave energy flux due to the increase of convective heating over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific by the revised closure is favorable to the eastward propagation of MJO and the convergence of horizontal wave energy flux over the central-eastern Pacific. The convection-induced momentum tendency tends to decelerate the upper-tropospheric wind which results in a negative work to the PKE budget in the upper troposphere. However, the convection momentum tendency accelerates the westerly wind below 800 hPa over the western Pacific, which is partially responsible for the improved MJO simulation.

  3. lara skinner, Ph.D anD sean sweeney, Ph.D Cornell University Global labor institUte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Canada's keystone Xl Pipeline 6 the Potential impact of tar sands spills on Jobs and the economy 6 transCanada inflates keystone Xl Job numbers 11 agriculture in the Pipeline states 12 when a spill Happens: social such as the transcanada corporation's Keystone Xl, little attention has been given to the potentially negative impacts

  4. Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Joanne

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the agreements.39 Concurrently, the state negotiated four compacts with tribes that did not have 1999 compacts: the Lyrton Band of Porno Indians (which would have meant an off-reservation casino in the San Francisco Bay area), the Buena Vista Rancheria of Me... with Proposition 70, which was immediately co-sponsored by the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians and endorsed by the California Indian Nations Gaming Association (rep resenting 64 tribes). Proposition 70 would have cancelled 68 if both had passed, allowed slot...

  5. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  6. Systemic inflammatory changes and increased oxidative stress in rural Indian women cooking with biomass fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Anindita, E-mail: anidu14@gmail.com [College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China) [College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Department of Experimental Hematology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata-700 026 (India); Ray, Manas Ranjan; Banerjee, Anirban [Department of Experimental Hematology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata-700 026 (India)] [Department of Experimental Hematology, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, 37, S.P. Mukherjee Road, Kolkata-700 026 (India)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was undertaken to investigate whether regular cooking with biomass aggravates systemic inflammation and oxidative stress that might result in increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rural Indian women compared to cooking with a cleaner fuel like liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). A total of 635 women (median age 36 years) who cooked with biomass and 452 age-matched control women who cooked with LPG were enrolled. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by ELISA. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by leukocytes was measured by flow cytometry, and erythrocytic superoxide dismutase (SOD) was measured by spectrophotometry. Hypertension was diagnosed following the Seventh Report of the Joint Committee. Tachycardia was determined as pulse rate > 100 beats per minute. Particulate matter of diameter less than 10 and 2.5 ?m (PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}, respectively) in cooking areas was measured using real-time aerosol monitor. Compared with control, biomass users had more particulate pollution in indoor air, their serum contained significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-? and CRP, and ROS generation was increased by 37% while SOD was depleted by 41.5%, greater prevalence of hypertension and tachycardia compared to their LPG-using neighbors. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} levels were positively associated with markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and hypertension. Inflammatory markers correlated with raised blood pressure. Cooking with biomass exacerbates systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, hypertension and tachycardia in poor women cooking with biomass fuel and hence, predisposes them to increased risk of CVD development compared to the controls. Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress may be the mechanistic factors involved in the development of CVD. -- Highlights: ? Effect of chronic biomass smoke exposure on cardiovascular health was investigated. ? Serum markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress were studied. ? Biomass using women had increased systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. ? Indoor air pollution and observed changes were positively associated.

  7. Impacts of the Indian Ocean on the ENSO cycle Jin-Yi Yu, Carlos R. Mechoso, James C. McWilliams, and Akio Arakawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jin-Yi

    , the ocean model domain includes only the tropical Pacific Ocean (the Pacific Run). In the other experiment, the ocean model domain includes both the Indian and tropical Pacific Oceans (the Indo-Pacific Run Oceans tends to be more realistic than that including the tropical Pacific Ocean only. In particular

  8. INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY E.O.I Notice No IIT(B)/CACI/Dean(IPS)/EOI/EMPNL/ 2011/1/ dt. 18-7-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    and facilities for Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai Architects / Firms who will fulfill be for Government/Semi Government/Government Undertaking/Government Autonomous Bodies etc. in India c) Have done & designing of Architectural, Civil Engineering, Public Health, Electrical, Air-Conditioning, fire fighting

  9. The Resilience of the Indian Economy to Rising Oil Prices as a Validation Test for a Global Energy-Environment-Economy CGE Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    as on how short-term mechanisms ­ and policy action ­ can smooth the negative impacts of energy price shocks1 The Resilience of the Indian Economy to Rising Oil Prices as a Validation Test for a Global Energy-Environment-Economy CGE Model Céline Guivarcha, * , Stéphane Hallegattea,b , Renaud Crassousa

  10. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  11. Final base case community analysis: Indian Springs, Nevada for the Clark County socioeconomic impact assessment of the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a base case description of the rural Clark County community of Indian Springs in anticipation of change associated with the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As the community closest to the proposed site, Indian Springs may be seen by site characterization workers, as well as workers associated with later repository phases, as a logical place to live. This report develops and updates information relating to a broad spectrum of socioeconomic variables, thereby providing a `snapshot` or `base case` look at Indian Springs in early 1992. With this as a background, future repository-related developments may be analytically separated from changes brought about by other factors, thus allowing for the assessment of the magnitude of local changes associated with the proposed repository. Given the size of the community, changes that may be considered small in an absolute sense may have relatively large impacts at the local level. Indian Springs is, in many respects, a unique community and a community of contrasts. An unincorporated town, it is a small yet important enclave of workers on large federal projects and home to employees of small- scale businesses and services. It is a rural community, but it is also close to the urbanized Las Vega Valley. It is a desert community, but has good water resources. It is on flat terrain, but it is located within 20 miles of the tallest mountains in Nevada. It is a town in which various interest groups diverge on issues of local importance, but in a sense of community remains an important feature of life. Finally, it has a sociodemographic history of both surface transience and underlying stability. If local land becomes available, Indian Springs has some room for growth but must first consider the historical effects of growth on the town and its desired direction for the future.

  12. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume III of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1993-94 annual report; (2) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Supplementation Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 technical report; and (3) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 annual report.

  13. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    TULSA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Tulsa, Oklahoma DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on April 14th, at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs and facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute) and Brian Manwaring, Program Manager, U.S. Institute. They were assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal communities attended the roundtable. David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs represented DOE at the meeting.  

  14. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  15. Personal possessions from the H.M.S. Boscawen: life on board a mid eighteenth-century warship during the French and Indian War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erwin, Gail

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . 15. Components of a Barrel or Cask 16. Parts of an English Wine Bottle. . . 17. The Parts of a Tobacco Pipe. . . . . . . 45 . 73 . . 78 . . . . . . 92 . . . . . . . 97 . . . . . 103 . . . . 114 . . . . . 133 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE 1... ~pt Lawrence NOVA SCOTfA~ M ~Ft. Edward oc. ~Grand Pre' paj ~ alit ax nnapoBsy~~ Royal ACADIASr' '1 FIGURE 2. British and French Fortifications in the French and Indian War. After Anderson's "Map of French and British Fortifications During...

  16. Parenting and child development in multi-ethnic Britain: a study of British Indian, British Pakistani and non-immigrant White families living in the UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iqbal, Humera

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    ) 155 Religio-cultural Socialisation 155 British Indian Religio-cultural Socialisation 157 British Pakistani Religio-cultural Socialisation 158 Non-immigrant White Religio-cultural Socialisation 159... identity (EI) is a complex phenomenon that changes over time. The study of EI has been based around the work of a number of important theories. Two of these are Tajfel and Turner's social identity theory (1986) and Erikson’s developmental theory of ego...

  17. Wind Power on Native American Lands: Opportunities, Challenges, and Status (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A.; Johnson, P. B.; Gough, R.; Robichaud, R.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 describes the opportunities, challenges, and status of wind energy projects on Native American lands in the United States.

  18. Wind Power on Native American Lands: Process and Progress (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A.; Flowers, L.; Gough, R.; Taylor, R.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development. This poster describes the process and progress of Wind Powering America's involvement with Native American wind energy projects.

  19. A Study of Osage History Prior to 1876

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christianson, James R.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : the •Journal of Isaac McCoyf 1828-1838," many of the papers of the St. Louis Superlntendency, an excellent collection of nineteenth century Kansas newspapers, a great many government documents concerning the Osage tribe, and the highly valuable "Governor... and to the history of the tribe since its arrival in Oklahoma. The Osage File and the A. M. G. D. Woodstock Letters at St. Louis University contain numerous choice references concerning the character of the Osage Indians, missionary activities among them...

  20. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  1. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS--Tapteal Bend Riparian Corridor Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the restoration of approximately 500 feet of streambank along the Yakima River at river mile 8, upstream of the Van Giesen Bridge on SR 224, in and between Richland and West Richland, Washington. This project will also result in the acquisition of Fox Island, a 12-acre island directly across the river from the restoration area. There is no development planned for the island. The proposed project includes: The installation of a bio-engineered streambank that incorporates barbs to capture silt and deflect flow, roughened rock or log toes, a riparian buffer, soil reinforcement, and bank grading. Long-term photo-point and plot sampling will also be implemented to evaluate the effectiveness and success of the restoration project. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Darrel Sunday, a contractor with Sunday and Associates, Inc. (April 4, 2004), and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are the pygmy rabbit, bald eagle, bull trout, Ute ladies'-tresses, and mid-Columbia Steelhead. The pygmy rabbit, bald eagle, and Ute ladies'Tresses are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity, and it was determined that the proposed restoration project would have no effect on these species. It is difficult to determine if bull trout occur within the Tapteal project area and Dave Carl of the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife was contacted and concurred with this assumption. It was determined that the project may affect, but is not likely to adversely affect bull trout, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has concurred with that determination (July 28, 2004). For the mid-Columbia Steelhead, an anadromous fish species, BPA has determined that if conducted in accordance with the applicable terms and conditions identified in the ESA Consultation Biological Opinion (BO) and Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Essential Fish Habitat Consultation, for BPA's Habitat Improvement Program (HIP), the Tapteal Bend Restoration Project meets the requirements of consistency and no further consultation is required. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. In complying with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, BPA contracted with the Cultural Resources Protection Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) for cultural resource survey work. Shawn Steinmetz prepared a report (December 15, 2002) concluding that there were only two isolated finds in the project area. BPA and the Washington Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation have concurred with the conclusions and recommendations set out in the report and the determination that no historic properties will be affected by the current project as proposed (January 31, 2003). It was recommended that a cultural resource monitor be present during ground disturbing activities. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is discovered during project implementation, an archaeologist should be notified immediately and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Standard water quality protection procedures and Best Management Practices should be followed during the implementation of the Tapteal Bend Restoration project. No construction is authorized to begin until the proponent has obtained all applicable local, state, and federal permits and approvals.

  3. Synthesis of Black and Red Mercury Sulfide Nano-Powder by Traditional Indian Method for Biomedical Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padhi, Payodhar [Orissa Engineering College, Bhubaneswar (India); Sahoo, G. [Tapaswini Ayurvedic clinic and Research center, Balasore (India); Das, K. [Gopobandhu Ayurvedic Medical College, Puri (India); Ghosh, Sudipto; Panigrahi, S. C. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT, Kharagpur (India)

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of metals and minerals in the traditional Indian system of medicine known as aired is very common and is practiced since seventh century B.C. Metals were reduced to calcined powder form for medicinal purpose. For detoxification, a further step of purification of the metals and minerals with different vegetable extracts was practiced. The people of East India were using mercury and its sulfide as medicine. Gradually this secret was leaked to Arabic physicians who used mercury in skin ointment. Subsequently Italian Physicians adopted Arabic prescriptions of mercurial ointments for skin diseases. In the olden days, metals and minerals were impregnated with decoction and juice of vegetables and animal products like milk and fat for purification. These were then reduced to fine particles by milling with a pestle and mortar. It was known by then that the fineness of the powder had a significant influence on the color, texture, and medicinal properties as is cited by Charak. Nagarjun studied in detail the processing of metals and minerals, particularly mercury and the influence of the processing parameters on the medicinal values. Mercury is unique in many aspects. Indian alchemy developed a wide variety a chemical processes for the ostensible transmutation of metals and preparation of elixir of life, in which mercury occupied a prime position .The present investigation attempts to use the traditional methods as prescribed in the ancient texts to prepare mercury sulfide in both red and black form for medicinal use. XRD, SEM and HRTEM investigations of the sulfides obtained shows that the ancient Indians were able to produce nano-sized powders. Possibly this may be taken as the earliest application of the production and use of nano powder. The study proves that even in ancient time the knowledge of nano particle synthesis was prevalent and used to enhance effectiveness of medicines. Further mercury in the free form is not acceptable in medicines. The ancient physicians could get rid of free mercury by milling and proper choice of the ratio of ingredients as is shown in the investigation by X-ray diffraction studies. In the traditional method for synthesis of mercury sulfide, mercury and pure sulfur were taken and milled in a mortar and pastel. During milling process, the white mercury and yellow sulfur yielded to a gray black colored sulfide. Synthesis of red sulfide of mercury required additional steps of heating and subsequent milling. For therapeutically application, the sulfide thus obtained needed detoxification, which was done using organic extracts. In the present investigation, the same method was followed to synthesize the sapphires and the product was characterized using modern methods like XRD, SEM and HRTEM. With increase in milling time the fineness of the powder increases, which increases the efficacy of the medicine, and free mercury, which is not desirable for medicinal application is found to decrease. The powder obtained at the end of 48 hours of milling is found to be of a size finer than l0nm.

  4. Comparison of Moist Static Energy and Budget between the GCM-Simulated Madden–Julian Oscillation and Observations over the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Liping

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moist static energy (MSE) anomalies and MSE budget associated with the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) simulated in the Iowa State University General Circulation Model (ISUGCM) over the Indian and Pacific Oceans are compared with observations. Different phase relationships between MJO 850-hPa zonal wind, precipitation, and surface latent heat flux are simulated over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, which are greatly influenced by the convection closure, trigger conditions, and convective momentum transport (CMT). The moist static energy builds up from the lower troposphere 15–20 days before the peak of MJO precipitation, and reaches the maximum in the middle troposphere (500–600 hPa) near the peak of MJO precipitation. The gradual lower-tropospheric heating and moistening and the upward transport of moist static energy are important aspects of MJO events, which are documented in observational studies but poorly simulated in most GCMs. The trigger conditions for deep convection, obtained from the year-long cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, contribute to the striking difference between ISUGCM simulations with the original and modified convection schemes and play the major role in the improved MJO simulation in ISUGCM. Additionally, the budget analysis with the ISUGCM simulations shows the increase in MJO MSE is in phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over the western Pacific, while out of phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over the Indian Ocean. However, the NCEP analysis shows that the tendency of MJO MSE is in phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over both oceans.

  5. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai, PIN-400094 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  6. Low temperature alteration of the ocean crust: a study of hydrothermal alteration of basalts from near the Australia Antarctic Discordance of the Southeast Indian Spreading Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Jill Lynn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reported values 44 5 Sample runs and duplicate runs 45 6 Major element analyses of glass, Leg 187 46 7 Major element and LOI analyses for fresh basalt samples, Leg 187 47 8 Major element analyses of altered basalts from Leg 187 49 9 Major oxides... and LOI analyses of altered dredge basalts 51 10 Computed mass change terms after Gresens and Grant 55 11 Correlation coefficients for Leg 187 altered basalts 59 ix LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page I Southeast Indian Ocean regional map showing...

  7. Hormonal adaptation to the stresses imposed upon sodium balance by pregnancy and lactation in the Yanomama Indians: a culture without salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, W.J.; Neel, J.V.; Grekin, R.J.; Cohen, E.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yanomama Indians of northern Brazil and southern Venezuela have been identified as a no salt culture. In this study, data were obtained to determine in this population the adjustments of sodium-related hormones to the stresses imposed upon sodium balance by pregnancy and prolonged lactation. Controls against the possibility that findings in the Yanomama were ethnic rather than dietary were provided by similar observations in the Guaymi Indians of Panama, who have free access to salt. Urinary concentrations of sodium were approximately 1 mEq/l in male and female Yanomama, with 24-h excretion rates in the males averaging 1 mEq, similar to our prior observations. The pregnant Yanomama had exceeding high urinary concentrations of aldosterone. These were associated with higher plasma renin activities and serum aldosterone concentrations than in all other subjects. Although pregnant Guaymi had elevations of serum and urinary aldosterone, these were significantly lower (p < 0.001) than those of the Yanomama. Prolonged lactation in the Yanomama was associated with elevation of plasma renin activity and serum and urinary aldosterone concentration compared with the Guaymi, but were not higher than those in nonlactating Yanomama females. The findings suggest that pregnancy in a salt-poor environment is associated with an exaggerated augmentation of hormonal responses that enhance positive sodium balance.

  8. biogas to indian buses come home, dad biosensor lab in singapore sexy statistics world university No reason to rush homeLiU alumna Klara Tiitso enjoys her life in London | page 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    biogas to indian buses come home, dad biosensor lab in singapore sexy statistics world university | page 30 Hearing is about communication Excellence centre focus on cognitive aspects | page 19 Biofuel, but the experience in Malaysia taught us a few lessons: It showed how vulnerable global communication is, but

  9. 9/4/12 Tigers in Nepal take the night shift to coexist with people -Indian Express 1/2www.indianexpress.com/news/tigers-in-nepal-take-the-night-shift-to-coexist-with-people/997714/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9/4/12 Tigers in Nepal take the night shift to coexist with people - Indian Express 1/2www.indianexpress.com/news/tigers-in-nepal-take-the-night-shift-to-coexist-with-people/997714/ Key Words | Unfashion | Talk Updated: Tue, 4 Sep 2012 14:24 IST Share | Tigers in Nepal take the night shift

  10. The Racial Paradox of Tribal Citizenship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Steve

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , blood quantum as a determinant of citizenship was not a great leap. Blood quantum as a determinant of citizenship might have been new to most Indians, but exogamy was not. As the Cherokee demographer Russell Thornton has pointed out, during early... been common outside of Indian tribes and is now unfortunately also becoming common within them. Citizenship by Blood Quantum Citizenship by blood quantum alone is a guarantee of physical extinction. Know the tribal population, the required blood...

  11. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-37)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund the purchase of four parcels of land within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation, totaling approximately 860 acres. Title to the land will pass to the Spokane Tribe of Indians. The goal of the property acquisition is to dedicate the land to the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife affected by the construction and operation of portions of the Federal Columbia River Power System.

  12. IEED Energy and Mineral Development Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the Interior, through the Office of lndian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), is soliciting grant proposals from federally recognized Indian tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that assess, evaluate, or otherwise promote the processing, use, or development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands. Grant awards are subject to the availability of funds as appropriated by Congress and allotted to IEED.

  13. More Weatherized Homes for Minnesota Tribe | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    been busy replacing old furnaces, sealing air leaks, and weathering stripped doors for people who are at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty line, with priority given to...

  14. The tribe Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of America north of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Lawrence S.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , "May 22, 193U and September 10, 1933 (S.E. Jones) pPg-a t Remarks: From the other species with biannulated basal antennal segments, this form is distinguished by the following combinations of characters: Pubescence above generally light brownish... as they are found to be entirely extraterritorial. 10 Key to Genera 1. Prosternal process one-half or more than half as wide as a pro- coxal cavity............................................. 2 Prosternal process less than half as wide as a procoxal cavity...10...

  15. EECBG Success Story: Tribe's Headquarters Gets Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Success Story: North Lauderdale Gets 'Smart' on Cars Before and after shots of a new boiler system | courtesy of the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs EECBG...

  16. DOE Announces Consultation Sessions with Alaska Native Tribes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to provide input on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region 10-year plan to develop renewable energy resources in the Arctic region. DOE supports the goals and activities of...

  17. Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the laws applicable to rivers or river systems, including electric power facilities related thereto, other of the state and federal governments, which identifies specific actions the Parties agreed to take during government-to- government negotiations. The Yakama Nation believes the Accords are a long overdue step toward

  18. AK-TRIBE-ASSOCIATION OF VILLAGE COUNCIL PRESIDENTS, INC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title...

  19. United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) Annual Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mark your calendars for the the upcoming USET 2014 Annual Meeting!  The USET Conference will begin with general assembly December 2, 2014 at 8:30 AM. Presentations for the Board of Directors will...

  20. ND-TRIBE-TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    if several sizeable public buildings have the potential to be sites for either district heating or a combined heat and power project, develop initial plans for installation of...